Page 1

Economic development In The News


COMMUNITY

March 11, 2014

Current in Noblesville

March 11, 2014

www.currentnoblesville.com

DISPATCHES

Contact the Editor

Have a news tip? Want to submit a calendar event? Have a photograph to share? Call Robert Herrington at 489.4444 ext. 206 or e-mail him at robert@ youarecurrent.com. You may also submit information on our website, currentnoblesville.com. You can find the Contact Us form under About Us in the upper-left corner. Remember our news deadline is typically eight days prior to publication.

Join our community

www.facebook.com/currentinnoblesville www.twitter.com/CI_Noblesville

Want to advertise?

Current in Noblesville reaches 100 percent of the households in 46060 and 46062 by U.S. Postal Service every Tuesday. For more information about how to reach that audience, call Cathy Pimley at 840.6550 or e-mail her at cathy@youarecurrent.com.

On the Cover

The Façade Grant Improvement Program was created in late 2007. There have been 38 projects including the Noblesville Visitor’s Center at 839 Conner St. (Submitted photos) Founded Sept. 15, 2009, at Noblesville, IN Vol. V, No. 22 Copyright 2013. Current Publishing, LLC All Rights Reserved. 30 South Range Line Road Carmel, IN 46032 317.489.4444 info@youarecurrent.com The views of the columnists in Current in Noblesville are their own and do not necessarily reflect the positions of this newspaper.

3

Dinner & auction - Noblesville First United Methodist Church, 2051 E. Monument St., will hold its annual Chicken N’ Noodle Dinner and auction from 5 to 7 p.m. March 21. Adult tickets are $10 and children’s tickets are $5 for ages 10 and under. Children ages 2 and under are not charged. All proceeds will support mission projects of the United Methodist Women. Chaucie’s Place – Come to a breakfast seminar with former Miss America, Marilyn Van Derbur, from 7 to 9 a.m. April 23 at the Ritz Charles, 12156 N. Meridian St., Carmel. Van Derbur will share her journey of healing, hope and empowerment. To reserve a seat visit www.chauciesplace.org.

A bird’seye view, which has not been released to the public before now, shows the layout of the proposed West Gateway Park with downtown Noblesville in the top right corner. The complete layout will be unveiled at a public meeting March 12. (Rendering submitted)

West Gateway Park to be unveiled

By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com

met with different groups giving input,” Hendricks said. “The architects came up with the layout. We’re trying to get as many enhancements in the park.” In August the City of Noblesville announced its Hendricks said the city now has to look at potenplans to purchase 6.4 acres between Ind. 19 and Lotial costs of the various aspects of the park, gan and Conner streets. Diversion At 7 p.m. March 12, the which include an amphitheater, splash park, trails, public event space, shelters, a parkcity will host a public ing area and storyboard walls. The project meeting to unveil the design and master includes a pedestrian friendly walkway from plan for West Gateway Park. the park to downtown and Ind. 19 enhanceThe public meeting will be held at Noblesments with landscaping. ville City Hall, 16 S. 10th St., on the second “The focal points are all in your perspecfloor in conference rooms A213 and A214. The Hendricks tive,” Hendricks said of the amenities. format will consist of a presentation startThe city plans to break ground next year and will ing at 7 p.m. given by city personnel and the project be completed in phases. consultant and will then be followed by a question“We were hoping back in November to get a and-answer session. ground breaking in 2014, but with timing and per“It is a well rounded community park for the size mits it just wasn’t going to happen in 2014. There’s of the space it is. There’s something for everyone always a possibility to an earth-moving later this and can be utilized year-round,” said Deputy Mayor year,” Hendricks said. Mike Hendricks, who is overseeing the project. West Gateway Park will be just west of the White Ideas for the park were first unveiled on Nov. 1 at River in the area bordered by Ind. 19 to the west; the First Friday Soup Cook-off event. “The layout was developed after we sat down and Nixon Street to the east, Conner Street/Ind. 32 to the south; and Logan Street to the north.

ON THE WEB

DVD review Set in New York City in the early 1960s, when the folk music scene that produced Bob Dylan was germinating, “Inside Llewyn Davis” is the story of somebody who never makes it. Llewyn (Oscar Isaac) is a sad sack and a lout who sponges off his friends for everything, even a place to sleep. But he’s a genuinely gifted singer – and so is Isaac, who skillfully and wistfully performs all his songs himself. Read more at currentnightandday.com.

Dress sale – The Cinderella Story of Hamilton County will host its annual dress sale from noon to 3 p.m. March 15 at Noblesville High School, 18111 Cumberland Rd. This special dress event is for eligible high school girls attending prom. Dresses are appropriate for evening or prom attire and range from $20 to $50. Dresses are limited to one per “Cinderella” and school ID may be required upon purchase. For more information e-mail cinderellastory46060@ gmail.com or visit www.facebook.com/ CinderellaStoryofHamiltonCounty. Coming soon – Living up to its motto “If you’ve seen one Chuy’s, you’ve seen one Chuy’s!”, Chuy’s newest location in Hamilton Town Center will feature eclectic Mexican décor inspired by the same Texas and Mexico border towns that originated many of Chuy’s recipes. The 9,028 square foot restaurant at 14150 Town Center Blvd. is scheduled to open April 8. For exclusive updates and giveaways visit www.facebook. com/ChuysHamiltonTownCenter. On sale – Single game tickets for the Indy Eleven professional soccer team are on sale now. The North American Soccer League expansion team’s 2014 regular season home schedule at IUPUI’s Michael A. Carroll Stadium begins April 12. Single-game seats are available from $10 to $30 in general seating sections and $40 to $100 in premium seating areas, plus fees. For more information or to purchase tickets visit www. IndyEleven.com.

Honoring veterans

Financial workshops

Indy Honor flight is offering the opportunity to see behind the scenes at one of Indy Car’s most successful teams is 2 to 7 p.m. March 15 at Ganassi Race Shop, 7777 Woodland Dr., Indianapolis. The event includes tours from 2 to 5 p.m., a silent auction from 4 to 5 p.m. and a live auction from 5 to 6 p.m. All proceeds will be used to send World War II veterans to Washington, D.C. to see their memorial. Read more at currentinwestfield.com

Joel Harris, an independent investment and insurance professional, will be conducting retirement-planning workshops at the Monon Center in Carmel in the coming days. Harris said he puts Harris these workshops together to provide information for people thinking about their retirement. Topics include: unlocking Social Security, financial planning, and risk management. Read more at currentinwestfield.com


March 11, 2014

COMMUNITY

Current in Noblesville

March 11, 2014

www.currentnoblesville.com

5

The Wild, 884 Logan St., will remain a children’s bookstore after finding a new owner. (file photo)

The Wild gets new owner By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com Debbie Marinaro has found a new owner to take over The Wild bookstore in downtown Noblesville, business so Hamilton County will not lose its only independent bookstore. “I’m more happy than anything. I look at it as a chapter closing and another opening for Marinaro me,” she said. “I don’t know what that will be. I owned The Wild, so I can do anything. It’s not something I thought I’d do. It was a big leap of faith. I’m proud of myself for doing that.” “It will stay The Wild, stay a bookstore,” new owner Peggy Clark said. “It’s been the craziest two weeks ever.” Clark, a Noblesville resident for 17 years, has taught 2- through 4-year-olds how to swim at Stony Creek Swim Center in Noblesville for the past 10 years. “I love being around kids,” she said. “I always wanted to start my own business. It really worked out perfectly because I was ready to make a change. I wanted to do something on my own.” Clark said she has “a million ideas” about possible changes to the business, including in how long and when the store is open. She said she wants the store to have more hands-on opportunities, a book center where kids can hang out while parents shop and possibly add a hot chocolate maker or snack area. “I also want to be a bigger part of what’s going

on in the square,” she said. “It’s in a great location.” Marinaro, 58, announced in February that The Wild, 884 Logan St., would be sold or have its doors closed on March 27. “I didn’t know what to expect,” she said. “I was talking to five serious people and finally got to the point that I was talking to people I was comfortable in selling the store to. They had the same vision for it – it was all about the importance of the store in the Clark community and love of children.” Marinaro said she and her husband, Michael, have become first-time grandparents and need a little more flexibility in their lives than the store would allow. “I need to be at the store full time or not any more. At this age and stage, it’s time for us to let someone else take the reins,” she said. Marinaro purchased The Wild four years ago from Jane Mills, who had operated it for four and a half years. Marinaro said her love for children, books and literacy were the main reasons she bought the store. “I did it for the community. It’s just a vital part of downtown. I’m so happy I didn’t have to lock the door and leave,” she said. “I’m so thankful someone did step forward and take the next leap of faith … it’s going to be in good hands with Peggy. I’m happy to be able to shop in there with my granddaughters.” The plan is to hopefully keep the store open continuously through the transition as each party hopes to close on the deal next week.

OBITUARY Tom Burton, 70, of Noblesville died March 1, 2014. He was born Dec. 18, 1943 to the late George and Kathryn Burton. His love for the Lord led him away from being lead mechanic at Trans World Airlines for 21 years to attend Southern Baptist Seminary. His passion to serve and spread The Gospel to others sent him to preach in Noblesville. Besides pastoring his church home, he volunteered at the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office, where he served from 2000 until his passing. As the agency’s senior chaplain he was instrumental in the development and organization of the support teams and services. He found absolute joy in every opportunity to serve others: family (including 17 foster children), chaplains, inmates and any passing stranger. His favorite passage was 1 Thess 5:16-18, which reads “Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, and in everything give thanks, for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you.” Survivors include his wife of 48 years, Joyce; children, Tommy Burton (Paula) Burton, Shanoah (Jeff) Bruner, Jim Hunt, David (Vivian) Burton and Angela Burton; grandchildren, Nicole, Mitchell, Leah, Kayleigh, Mia and Hannah; brother, Jack (Shirley) Burton; and sister, Alice (Jack) Ruppel. Funeral service was held March 6 at Christ Community Church of Hamilton County, 772 N. 10th St., Noblesville with the Rev. Mark Fidler and his son, Tommy Burton, officiating. Burial followed at Crownland Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to Hamilton County Chaplaincy Fund, 18100 Cumberland Rd., Noblesville 46060 or www.hamiltoncountychaplains.com.

Dad and I have always been close. Wellbrooke helps us stay that way. From learning to ride a bike to navigating life’s big decisions, he’s always been there for you. Lately, you’ve noticed he needs support with daily activities, and you’re wondering how to be there for him. You can, with Wellbrooke. • Service-rich environment that provides help with tasks like dressing, bathing and medication reminders • Fresh, resort-style design and spacious private apartments • Resident-centered care assuring comfort and dignity—our LifeSTYLE Promise™ to you and your family

(317) 804-8044

937 E. 186th Street • Westfield, Indiana 46074

www.WellbrookeOfWestfield.com

From SR 32/W. Main Street, turn onto Wheeler Road going north into Grand Park. Turn left at 186th Street. Wellbrooke will be on your left.

Upcoming Events at Wellbrooke of Westfield: Thursday, March 20 •

VA Aid & Attendance Seminar 2:00 PM at Wellbrooke Refreshments provided

Call (317) 804-8044 to register or for more information. NP/CURRENT/3-14 WST-93 CURRENT.indd 1

2/26/2014 2:12:00 PM


Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Façade grant program restores, improves city’s historic downtown / P15

Residential Customer Local

©2013 IU Health 12/13 HY21213_0701 IU Health North Physician Ad Strip Ad 10” x 1.5”

West Gateway Park plans to be unveiled / P3

ECRWSS

Carmel, IN Permit No. 713

U.S. Postage Paid Presorted Standard

Primary care expertise to help you and your family stay strong.

The Wild to remain downtown / P5

New Italian restaurant opens / P24

Find a primary care physician near you at iuhealth.org/primarycare

©2013 IU Health 12/13 HY21213_0701

21213_0701_IUHNORTH_10x1.5_4c_StripAd_Physician.indd 1

12/20/13 9:51 AM


15

March 11, 2014

COMMUNITY

Current in Noblesville

www.currentnoblesville.com

Façade grant program restores, improves city’s historic downtown By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com The City of Noblesville began its matching façade grant program in 2008. Since then, 38 projects have revitalized the downtown square for a total capital investment of $1,159,333.57 – with cover story the city paying just $489,219.36. “It is the most successful program we’ve had in downtown for a catalyst in reinvestment,” said economic development specialist Alaina Shonkwiler, who oversees the program for the city. “It’s visual … you can see the impact they have.” Shonkwiler said the program has a Shonkwiler maximum matching grant of $25,000, which has been approved five times; otherwise it is a 50 percent match of the total project’s costs. Fifteen projects were approved in the first year, but since then the number has dropped each year. In 2012 and 2013 only four projects were applied for and approved. “We’ve hit a plateau of four a year,” Shonkwiler said. While the city has not received any applications for 2014, Shonkwiler expects two – Nova 29 in the former Eddie’s Corner Café and Kiln Creations. The city provides funding but the approval of projects comes from a review committee consisting of Renee Oldham, John Adams, Andrew Habel, Mike Marinaro and Heather MacInnis. Shonkwiler said the program district boundaries are Wayne, Division, 10th and Fifth streets. “There are projects that still can be done, but we are considering expanding the district,” she said. As the façade grant program evolves it faces two potential major changes. Shonkwiler has asked the Noblesville Common Council to amend the façade grant ordinance by waiving permit fees of approved projects. Of the 38 projects, 13 (four building and nine encroachment) have needed additional permits from the city. Shonkwiler said these fees total $3,600 or $450 a year over the eight years of the program. “They still apply and fulfill all the regulations for them,” she said. “It’s one more thing we can use as an incentive for façade grant projects. It’s a small impact on the city but a big one for businesses.” Funding for the program comes from the Logan Street TIF, whose funds expire in the next 10 years. Shonkwiler said the last appropriation was $75,000 in June. “There’s $80,000 in the kitty for 2014. The council is willing to appropriate more funds as needed,” she said. Funds from the TIF district may be used for the West Gateway Park the city is looking to build directly across White River from downtown. If that decision happens, Shonkwiler will turn to federal and state grants to continue the program. “I’m looking at more creative ways to supplement the funding structure,” she said. “Right now we are in good shape. I’m looking four or five years down the road.”

The cause of reinvestment

A new coat of paint and working neon sign were two changes Syd’s Grill and Bar used with its 2009 façade grant at 808 Logan St. (submitted photos) Darren Peterson was on the façade review committee for two years and his architecture firm has done a handful of grant projects including the visitor’s center, Kiln Creations and Matteo’s Ristorante Italiano. “The 1970s were Peterson rough on the architecture of downtown Noblesville, with rising energy cost and spiraling interest rates, instead of fixing energy problems with long term solutions they were simply covered up and energy savings alone could not pay for the construction in any reasonable period. High windows were covered with wood mansards so rising heat did not escape single pane retail windows, ornate cast iron columns were wrapped with wood for “out”sulation and exterior solid brick facades were Syd’s Grill and Bar prior painted and sealed to prevent moisture and thermal penetration. Naturally everything was to its facade grant. sealed up very tight to conserve energy but alas it created the perfect environment for mold and ultimately deterioration. At varying speeds we have witnessed a slow and steady deterioration of several downtown building, culminating in an entire ’70s façade breaking free on the building and landing on the sidewalk. I am not sure if this was the impetus for the façade grant program, but certainly made many building owners start to wonder about the facades and also importantly, what was under them structurally and aesthetically. Over and over again we heard ‘I never knew that was under there’ and ‘we are looking forward to the demolition portion of this project more than the rebuild.’” “It’s more friendly, a new perspective. It makes the whole thing feel less sleepy. The impact seems cleaner, safer and people care about their business,” he said.

In their words “The façade grant was a significant factor in upgrading our original plans for the rehabilitation of the Ninth Street façade of our two buildings, 2 and 11 N. Ninth St. While the façade is common to both structures, they are actually two separate buildings and the cost of the inside renovation was significant. We were determined to preserve the historic character to the greatest extent possible and the grant made the difference for us. The whole square has shown wonderful improvement largely because of this incentive.” – Doug Church of Church, Church, Hittle & Antrim “Obviously it’s a good program and for a small building owner it absolutely helps out. It defers a lot of the cost … I’m looking at applying for a grant this week. I’d have to wait 12 to 18 months if the grant was not available. I cannot see any disadvantages to the program from my point of view or the city’s. It helps small businesses and business owners,” – Shannon Loomis, owner of Kiln Creations and its building

Church, Church, Hittle & Antrim made a capital investment of $125,000 in its remodeling of 12 N. Ninth St. It is the largest amount spent for a façade grant project.

Facade grants

Church

Loomis

To view all the recipiants and project amounts visit currentnoblesville.com

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

TOTAL

Project Investment

415179.39

126328.27

129536.48

Grant Amount

194364.81

62235.32

56026.44

243231.28

86247.21

158810.94

$1,159,333.57

74585.15

42842.14

59165.5

$489,219.36

Total Projects

15

6

5

4

4

4

38


March 11, 2014

COMMUNITY

Current in Noblesville

March 11, 2014

www.currentnoblesville.com

7

Reed to help retain, expand business By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com

architect. In my second year at University of Cincinnati I discovered planning. Being from a small town I had never heard of planning before,” she The City of Noblesville has hired a new ecosaid. “I looked into it and made the switch.” nomic development specialist, Sarah Reed, 34. Reed entered the urban planning proShe replaces Courtney Zaugg, gram and was hired fulltime by Jacobs city who left earlier this year. Engineering, where she worked with its “I feel like I’m already part co-op program during school. She was of a good team. They’re great people to transferred to the Indianapolis office work with,” Reed said. after working out of Cincinnati. After Reed said she came to Noblesville six years with Jacobs, Reed worked because of its history and opportunities. for a consulting firm that wrote zoning “It has a different history than the Reed ordinances. other communities in Hamilton County,” Prior to starting for the City of Noblesville on she said. “Everything isn’t being new or created Feb. 18, Reed spent the past two and a half years from scratch. It’s a good advantage and selling in the Westfield economic and community develpoint.” opment. While working in Westfield, Reed said Reed said her duties include business visits, she spent 95 percent of her time planning and 5 workforce development and promoting science, percent on economic development. technology, engineering and mathematics in the “Here, it’s completely (the reverse),” she said. school district. Reed is learning about the community, pro“I am really excited to have Sarah on the cesses and ordinances. economic development team. She will focus on “Insight will help me give better locations and existing business retention and expansion along solutions for economic development,” she said. with business attraction project submissions. Sarah’s skill set is strong and balanced with both “People with a planning background tend to look at things more regionally – come to the table a planning and economic development backwith a different perspective on land use.” ground,” Economic Development Director Judi She also is working to achieve her certified Johnson said. economic developer title through the University A native of Freemont, Ohio, Reed graduated of Oklahoma. She has completed the two of the from a high school and a technical high school four years in the program. before attending the University of Cincinnati. “Continued training is a goal of mine,” she said. “I thought I was going to be an engineer or

C A REASON TO SMILE!

C armel Dental Group FAMILY & COSMETIC DENTISTRY

Cami L. Hovda DDS, PC

IN TOP D DY’S 2011, 2 ENTIST IN 012 & 2 013!

• Cosmetic, Restorative and Implant dentistry • Smile Designs/Cosmetic Veneers/Tooth Whitening • Dentistry for the entire family • Children's program • Sleep apnea/Snore appliances • Implant supported dentures • Laser dentistry • Sedation dentistry • Clear braces • Relaxed and friendly environment

Sleep Disorders Seminar

Join Dr. Michael Levine, medical director of the Riverview Hospital Sleep/Wake Center, to learn about how sleep disorders such as sleep apnea can have a serious impact on your health—including heart disease, stroke, depression, diabetes and other chronic diseases. Dr. Levine will also discuss the latest in diagnosis and treatment of sleep issues. A light dinner will be served. The program is free, but registration is required. Register at riverview.org or call (317) 776-7999. When:

Thursday, March 27, 2014 Time:

6-7 pm Location:

Riverview Hospital Krieg DeVault Conference Room Lower Level of the Women’s Pavilion (entrance 11)

TOOTH WHITENING SPECIAL!

NEW PATIENT DENTAL EXAM REQUIRED.

1 FREE EXAM

NEW PATIENTS ONLY. DOES NOT INCLUDE RADIOGRAPHS.

Most insurances accepted & financing available.

riverview.org

715 West Carmel Drive, Suite 103, Carmel, IN 317.844.0022 | www.carmeldentalgroup.com RVH-166-Current-4.9167x10.5-03.11.14-FNL.indd 1

3/4/14 9:13 AM


COMMUNITY Contact the Editor

Have a news tip? Want to submit a calendar event? Have a photograph to share? Call Robert Herrington at 489.4444 ext. 206 or e-mail him at robert@ youarecurrent.com. You may also submit information on our website, currentnoblesville.com. You can find the Contact Us form under About Us in the upper-left corner. Remember our news deadline is typically eight days prior to publication.

Join our community

www.facebook.com/currentinnoblesville www.twitter.com/CI_Noblesville

Want to advertise?

Current in Noblesville reaches 100 percent of the households in 46060 and 46062 by U.S. Postal Service every Tuesday. For more information about how to reach that audience, call Cathy Pimley at 840.6550 or e-mail her at cathy@youarecurrent.com.

February 18, 2014

Current in Noblesville

February 18, 2014

www.currentnoblesville.com

City to save $808k by refinancing

By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com

those savings are: Little Chicago Road, $533,230; Noblesville Fire Station No. 5 and 6, $578,372; and City Hall, an estimated $808,000. Noblesville officials are refunding bonds in order “We could wait but the analysis shows if interest to reduce the annual lease rental payments by havrates go up 6 percent we would be at a ing a lower interest government rate. City attorney push. Their recommendation is that we go now,” Howard said. “The best advice from Michael Howard said advisors is this is the time to go forward.” the 2005 bonds are from the building of City Councilman Greg O’Connor, a vice presiHall. dent at M&I Bank, echoed the sentiments of “Presuming interest rates stay at their City Securities and said it would be prudent present level, City Securities anticipates a to refinance sooner rather than later. total gross savings over the next 11½ years Howard “I think we can lock these short-term of approximately $800,000,” he said. “The experts are anticipating that interest rates will be up rates now,” he said. “If we want to make a move, now is the time to do it.” substantially between now and the call date of the With the approval of the resolution, Howard said 2005 bonds, which is July 15, 2015.” the City Securities plans to enter into a bond purHoward said with the estimated savings on these chase agreement through a private placement by bonds, Noblesville will have saved $1.2 million in this week. interest payments over the next 12 years. He said Other items of business at the Feb. 11 meeting:

Parks director Brandon Bennett has been working for Noblesville Parks since 1995. He said overseeing the department was a dream of his he didn’t know he had. (Photos by Robert Herrington) Founded Sept. 15, 2009, at Noblesville, IN Vol. V, No. 19 Copyright 2013. Current Publishing, LLC All Rights Reserved. 30 South Range Line Road Carmel, IN 46032 317.489.4444 info@youarecurrent.com The views of the columnists in Current in Noblesville are their own and do not necessarily reflect the positions of this newspaper.

DISPATCHES Deadline nears – March 1 is the last day for Hamilton County youth in grades 3 through 12 to enroll in the 4-H program for 2014. 4-H is an informal educational program in which youth “Learn by Doing.” Youth can learn life skills such as cooperation, leadership, decision-making, responsibility and more through hands-on projects in more than 60 different subject areas. For more information and an enrollment card, visit the Purdue Extension Hamilton County office on the 4-H Fairgrounds at 2003 Pleasant St., Noblesville, or call 776-0854. Online enrollment is available at www.ag.purdue. edu/counties/hamilton. Kids sale – The Kids Helping Kids indoor garage sale is 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 22 at the Forest Park Inn, 701 Cicero Rd. Children run their tables with adult assistance and keep their profits. All items for sale must be fun stuff: toys, games, dress-up attire, books, bikes and DVDs. Admission is $1 and go toward Noblesville Parks kids’ program scholarships. For more information, call 770-5750.

What happened: Ordinance amendment concerning benefits What it means: Deputy Mayor Mike Hendricks said this ordinance was only brought before council to clean up areas that have already been approved by council in other ordinances, agreements, and meet and confer contracts. Nothing new was added or taken away from the police or fire agreements.

What’s next? The amendment was unanimously approved by the council.

What happened: Ordinance concerning health benefits What it means: Human resources director Holly Ramon said certain retired and appointed employees and elected officials can evaluate various Medicare Prescription Plans that cost the same or less than its current carrier, Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield. Ramon said one example of the change was a retired employee’s payment dropped from $90 a month to $12 with the change. “It’s a savings for the individual and the city,” she said.

What’s next? The ordinance was unanimously approved by the council.

What happened: Ordinance amendment to employee personnel policy handbook What it means: Ramon said sections of the handbooks have been changed to comply with state and federal laws. The handbook also has added information on the city previously not included. “It’s just wording changes and updates,” Ramon said.

On the Cover

3

What’s next? The ordinance may be voted on at the Feb. 25 meeting.

Third writing contest guideline announced – The Noblesville Cultural Arts Commission and The Polk Street Review have created the inaugural Armchair Detective Story Contest. The grand prize winner will receive $1,000. As one of its rules, the contest mandates that the story must incorporate four required elements, one of which will be released every week in February in “Current in Noblesville.” The Polk Street Grasshopper says the third requirement in the NCAC Armchair Detective Contest pays homage to the written word. The Polk Street Review, Noblesville’s Literary Magazine, celebrates our city and its poets and writers. Therefore, one clue your armchair detective comes across while attempting to solve the crime you’ve manufactured out of the recesses of your imagination must be a piece of written language. (Notice – The Grasshopper doesn’t say the written language must be English, handwritten, on paper or in complete sentences; only that it be written language.) For more details and former guidelines, visit www.currentnoblesville.com.

ON THE WEB

DVD Review - Game of Thrones: Season 3 Say what you will about author George R.R. Martin and HBO’s adaptation of his epic fantasy series, but they’re willing to take big storytelling chances. That narrative brashness continues in season three, which sees the entire continent of Westeros split into different warring factions. It’s full of surprises and unexpected character development, with fan favorites brought low and the hissable Lannister clan seemingly triumphant. Read more at currentnightandday.com

Fit for the ball – For the past eight years, Cinderella Story of Hamilton County has collected donations of new and like-new formal gowns and accessories and provided them to specially selected junior and senior girls from Hamilton County Schools for prom. Drop-off locations are Twisted Sister, 546 N. Union St., Westfield; American Family Insurance, 15200 Cumberland Rd., Noblesville; and Health Source of Carmel, 12413 Old Meridian St. For more information, e-mail cinderellastory46060@gmail.com. Concert series – The Noblesville Parks Dept. has announced the lineup for the 2014 summer concert series. Concerts start at 7 p.m. and will be held at Dillon Park, 6001 Edenshall Lane, and Forest Park, 701 Cicero Rd. Shows at Dillon Park include Living Proof, May 29; The Bishops, June 5; Seth Bradley, June 12; Dave & Rae, June 19; and My Yellow Rickshaw, June 26. Forest Park shows are Zanna-Doo, July 10; Jordan Carter, July 17; 8 Miles High, July 24; and Paul Butler as “Elvis,” July 31.

Decorating

Smart students

Columnist Vicky Earley writes that most people understand the basic concept of a focal point, but don’t understand how to use this critical design tool to create a fabulous room. Technically, a focal point is defined as the point at which all elements or aspects converge; the center of activity or attention. This leads to the question, just what should be the center of attention in a space?. Read more at currentnoblesville.com

Noblesville High School has released the First Semester Honor Roll for freshmen through senior students that made either the All “A” or A/B honor rolls. To see the complete list of students honored, visit currentnoblesville.com.

Spring Break programs Noblesville Schools is offering special programs for students in grades 1-8 during Spring Break. Sessions will be offered from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Monday through Thursday each week of Spring Break (March 31 through April 3 and April 7 through 10). Sessions are offered for elementary and middle school students. All programs will be led by certified teachers and all are offered free of charge. Read more at currentnoblesville.com


February 11, 2014

COMMUNITY

Current in Noblesville

www.currentnoblesville.com

State of transition By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com

As 2013 came to an end, several downtown Noblesville business owners faced a tough decision on the fate of their stores. Some are closing for personal reasons, and others Cover Story are starting because of opportunities presented. Regardless of the reason, the look of the town square may soon change.

The Wild Bookstore has had two owners in its eight-year history and is now looking for its third. If a buyer of the bookstore is not found, owner Debbie Marinaro will close the downtown shop.

For sale

Hamilton County may lose its only independent bookstore as The Wild, 884 Logan St., will be sold or have its doors closed by March. “March 27 is the date. My lease is up May 1,” owner Debbie Marinaro, 58, said. “I have a two-year lease and I wasn’t going to wait for another two years.” Marinaro said she and her husband, Michael, have become first-time grandparents. “We need a little more flexibility than the Marinaro store could provide for us,” she said. “I need to be at the store full time or not any more. At this age and stage, it’s time for us to let someone else take the reins.” Marinaro said she wants the store to remain open. “It’s an icon of downtown Noblesville,” she said. “I’m still passionate (about it) and still love it.” Marinaro purchased The Wild four years ago from Jane Mills, who had operated it for four-and-a-half years. Marinaro said her love for children, books and literacy were the main reasons she bought the store. “A lot of things came together. At the time I was losing my job in Title 1 in Noblesville Schools and my husband and I were becoming empty nesters,” she said. “Teaching kids to read, to love to read and to want to read were the underlying principals of why we did it.” In addition to hundreds of children’s books, The Wild has always welcomed and sold local authors and books. “It’s really important that there be a place because it’s a tough business to break into,” Marinaro said. Marinaro declined to publicly comment on the amount she wants for the business but anyone interested in The Wild may contact her at 773-0920. “As the for sale signs went into the window, the outcry from customers and the community over the possible closing of the store has been tremendous. I have had customers in denial, disappointment and tears,” Marinaro said.

13

Several downtown shops are changing owners or closing

Lynne Goodman co-owns At Home with Us with Kathy Blake and Jenna Rowe. The home decor shop, formerly known as At Home with Valerie, was scheduled to close on Dec. 27 before the three ladies purchased it.

Opening

A new home décor store was saved after Lynne Goodman, Kathy Blake and Jenna Rowe purchased At Home with Valerie and renamed the shop At Home with Us. The store opened on Aug. 15 but due to personal health reasons owner Valerie Nicholson had to sell or close the shop by Dec. 27. “We all had booths there,” Goodman said. “We just did not want to see the shop close. We were determined to keep it open. All of the vendors were right behind us to keep it open and make a go of it.” Goodman said the three ladies decided to purchase the store at 982 Logan St. 72 hours after hearing Nicholson tell vendors about the closing on Oct. 30.

Closing

Michael Delk, 43, opened The Faux Flower and Gift Shop, 84 S. Ninth St., in October 2006. After closely monitoring his bank books, Delk has decided to close his business after more than seven years. “I was using a lot of red pen. It just wasn’t working,” he said. “I never had any record sales in any year.” After deciding to close, Delk consolidated his two spaces into one in January. He plans to keep the store open until the end of the month. “If it all sells within one week I won’t be here anymore,” he said. “At what point do you just box it up and head to Goodwill?” What will he do next? Delk said his future is unknown. “I have no clue – absolutely none,” he said, “but I’m not retiring.” With the loss of Faux Flower, the city also loses a little nostalgia during the holiday season. Delk said it takes 60 hours of work to step back to yesteryear, when elaborate window decorations were more common, to attract shoppers better than Black Friday deals do. “It’s all in storage,” he said. “Maybe someday they’ll make an appearance.” What began with two windows expanded to 10 displays along

“We said, ‘If we are going to do it, let’s do it,’” she said. “We were three people who never knew each other.” Goodman said At Home with Us is not a flea market or antique shop, but a place to find home décor. “If it’s home décor related you’re going to find it here – from toothpick holders to original oil paintings. With three levels there’s a wide variety that appeals to anybody,” she said. “We liked the concept. We really don’t want to change it a lot.” At Home with Us is open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. The store can be contacted at 776-4100. “We may open on Sunday and Monday at some point, especially when the restaurant opens,” Goodman said, citing The ‘Ville, a restaurant next door in the former Eddie’s Corner Café spot.

Michael Delk isn’t sure what he will do next, but he certainly isn’t retiring he said. After almost seven and a half years, the Faux Flower is closing its door by the end of the month.

Ninth Street and all included animated David Hamberger designs – a throwback to Delk’s childhood. “The Muncie Mall had displays like this I remember as a kid in the early ’70s,” he said. “It’s a way of sending a Christmas card to the city. In the very beginning I did it as a way to say ‘thank you.’” Currently sitting empty at 50 N. Ninth St. is the former building of Martha Jane’s. Owner Anne Millikan, who was ready to retire after 25 years, opened the downtown Noblesville location six years ago and closed it prior to the New Year.


COMMUNITY Contact the Editor

Have a news tip? Want to submit a calendar event? Have a photograph to share? Call Robert Herrington at 489.4444 ext. 206 or e-mail him at robert@ youarecurrent.com. You may also submit information on our website, currentnoblesville.com. You can find the Contact Us form under About Us in the upper-left corner. Remember our news deadline is typically eight days prior to publication.

Join our community

www.facebook.com/currentinnoblesville www.twitter.com/CI_Noblesville

Want to advertise?

Current in Noblesville reaches 100 percent of the households in 46060 and 46062 by U.S. Postal Service every Tuesday. For more information about how to reach that audience, call Cathy Pimley at 840.6550 or e-mail her at cathy@youarecurrent.com.

February 4, 2014

Current in Noblesville

February 04, 2014

www.currentnoblesville.com

Council approves 500-home project

By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com

Boomerang to take advantage of the city’s new open space policy. Noblesville is allowing developers to pay a fee to reduce open space requirements in residential areas near public parks. According to the policy, the city must use the funds to begin building the park. Thompson said Boomerang will reclaim 11.37 acres, which reduces the development open space from 28 percent to just over 23 percent. He said that payment and other park impact fees for the project will total approximately $1 million. The development will have no impact on Noblesville Schools as the Wayne Township property falls in the Hamilton Southeastern Schools district.

Klipsch Music Center is about to get new neighbors. The Noblesville Common Council approved plans from Fishers-based Boomerang Development LLC to build Noble East, a $150 million community off Boden Road. Developer Corby Thompson said the development will include 497 lots in three neighborhoods north of 156th Street. It will be built in phases over the next eight years, Thompson estimated. “Sixty homes a year is a success,” he said. Most of the houses are expected to sell for $275,000 to $350,000 and homes along Lehr Creek are estimated to be $425,000 to $450,000. Ryland Homes and Pulte Homes will be builders on the property. Thompson said the development will raise the assessed value to $500,000 per acre for the 260acre project. Noble East is adjacent to 200 acres of city-owned land slated to become Eastside Park, which allows Other Items of business What happened: Resolution for tax phase-in

What it means: LeMaster Steel Erectors received a two-year tax phasein on the increase in assessed valuation resulting from the construction of a new 10,625 square foot at 17540 Kraft Ct. The company has outgrown its current space in the Stony Creek Business Park and has had a Noblesville branch for the past 30 years.

What’s next? LeMasters’ capital investment is approximately $830,000. The business retention will keep 48 employees in Noblesville with five new hirings expected by 2017.

What happened: Amending the salary ordinance What it means: Noblesville police K9 officers are paid one hour a day or 365 hours a year to care for their dogs, which live with the officers. In an effort to be more efficient, Deputy Mayor Mike Hendricks said the city will create a stipend for the extra care instead of manually inputting the time each pay period.

What’s next? The police department has three K9 units. Hendricks said the pay will be $10,500 a year, the average cost of the three officers.

What happened: Reimbursement of design and construction costs What it means:The city has entered into an agreement to purchase 50 acres of land in the northern part of the Stony Creek-Presley Drive development. City Attorney Mike Howard said plans are to construct road, sanitary sewer and drainage improvements. The total cost of the project is $5 million and the city will pay $1.5 million prior to June 1.

What’s next? Howard said the city can use TIF funds instead of issuing a bond and reimburse itself down the road.

What happened: Public comment from the Noblesville School Board

On the Cover

Brad and Nathalie Dahlager are restoring the former Dr. James Dillon office as its houses their new practice, Noblesville Family Chiropractic, at 953 Maple Ave. (Photo by Robert Herrington) Founded Sept. 15, 2009, at Noblesville, IN Vol. V, No. 17 Copyright 2013. Current Publishing, LLC All Rights Reserved. 30 South Range Line Road Carmel, IN 46032 317.489.4444 info@youarecurrent.com The views of the columnists in Current in Noblesville are their own and do not necessarily reflect the positions of this newspaper.

What it means: Speaking on behalf of the school board, president Pat Berghoff commented on the board’s opposition to the potential multi-family project at Chicago Road and Ind. 32. Berghoff said that high density housing in the south quadrant of Noblesville puts a strain on schools, which is currently redistricting at the elementary level to balance enrollment.

ON THE WEB

What’s next? The proposed project was indefinitely tabled by the developer prior to the meeting. The council was scheduled to vote on the project on Jan. 28.

Redmond

Mike Redmond is one of those goofs who actually likes winter. He likes the cold air, snow, winter sunrises and being home on a winter’s night with the house all cozy and warm and a pot of soup simmering on DVD Review the stove or a mug of hot cocoa on Has any actor ever squandered his career with better efficiency than Matthe table beside his reading chair. thew McConaughey, then reclaimed it with such a superior run of movies? But this winter isn’t romantic; it’s a The former star of “Failure to Launch” has played one terrific role after anoth- giant pain in the butt and we’re just er lately, capped off by his Oscar-nominated performance in “Dallas Buyers a third of the way through it. Read Club.” Read more at currentnightandday.com more at currentnoblesville.com

3

DISPATCHES Public hearing – The Noblesville School Board held a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. Feb. 4 to discuss and hear objections to and support for proposed amendments to the current contract of Supt. Dr. Libbie Conner. Proposed amendments include a 6 percent base salary increase to Conner $166,632 and a $25,000 payment if she provides 90 days advanced written retirement notice on or before Sept.15. For more on this topic, visit www.currentnoblesville.com. Teen social media – Hamilton County Sheriff Mark Bowen invites area residents and concerned citizens to a public education forum on Teen Social Media from 7 to 8 p.m. March 10 at the Hamilton County 4-H Fairgrounds, 2003 Pleasant St. Det. Alex Petty will be the main facilitator in bringing this topic to a clearer view and presenting ideas on protecting area families. Petty is a lead investigator of many of these types of crimes for the Sheriff’s Office. Student honored – Arianna Yeary of Noblesville has earned regular honors on the Aurora University dean’s list during the fall 2013 semester. Yeary joins more than 900 other AU students who were honored for their academic success by earning a 3.6 GPA or higher. Assisting Hoosiers – Gov. Mike Pence has implemented a number of measures to help Indiana families and businesses cope with the propane shortage caused in part by recent extreme winter weather. To assist propane suppliers, Pence has again extended an emergency proclamation to waive propane transport statutes until March 1. To read more, visit www.currentnoblesville.com. New hire – Beth Stroh has been hired by United Way of Central Indiana to lead its education priority that focuses on early childhood and school-age programs and policies. UWCI has committed nearly $13 million to ensure that children have opportunities to acquire the academic and social skills to succeed in school and life. Stroh fills the vacancy created with the departure of Ted Maple in July.

Tax reform

New scam

Gov. Mike Pence sent a letter to mayors across Indiana on improving the economic wellbeing of Hoosiers by eliminating the business personal property tax. The letter continues his efforts to speak with Indiana’s mayors about his ideas and create an open dialogue on how those ideas impact their communities.” Read more at currentnoblesville.com

Last year, con artists attempted to scam Hamilton County residents by calling and threatening arrest, claiming victims were delinquent in paying taxes. A new variation of this scam has popped up in Hamilton County with thieves now calling and threatening arrest because victims did not appear for jury duty. In an even more interesting twist, the callers may be using names of courthouse employees to lend credence to their calls. Read more at currentnoblesville.com


8 P.1

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Brad Dahlager opens new healthcare practice in Dr. James Dillon’s former office / P11 Residential Customer Local

©2013 IU Health 12/13 HY21213_0701 IU Health North Physician Ad Strip Ad 10” x 1.5”

Noble East development get approval / P3

ECRWSS

Carmel, IN Permit No. 713

U.S. Postage Paid Presorted Standard

Primary care expertise to help you and your family stay strong.

Inaugural armchair detective story contest / P5

Find a primary care physician near you at iuhealth.org/primarycare

©2013 IU Health 12/13 HY21213_0701

21213_0701_IUHNORTH_10x1.5_4c_StripAd_Physician.indd 1

12/20/13 9:51 AM


February 4, 2014

COMMUNITY

Current in Noblesville

www.currentnoblesville.com

Brad Dahlager opens new healthcare practice in Dr. James Dillon’s former office

The hand carved mantle which surrounds the fireplace which has been upgraded to natural gas. (Photos by Robert Herrington)

By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com Brad Dahlager has been in Noblesville only since October, but the new business owner and healthcare provider feels deeply connected cover story with the community. In addition to creating a chiropractic practice, Dahlager and wife, Nathalie, are “carrying the torch” of preserving the historic home of the late Dr. James A. Dillon at 953 Maple Ave. “I felt I had his ghost looking over my shoulder making sure I was doing things right,” Dahlager said. Dillon, who died in 1989, was a longtime physician in Noblesville and served on the Noblesville Parks and Recreation Board for almost 40 years. When the town needed a doctor, Dillon came from Iowa with $5 in his pocket. “He served the community faithfully for 50 years and had a major impact on healthcare,” Dahlager said. “We want to continue that kind of service he provided Noblesville.” After being a chiropractor for 23 years and owning a private practice in Chicago, Dahlager said he thought it made sense to scale things down. He decided to open up a new practice in a city where the pace was a little slower. “It was doing very, very well. It was almost too much to see the volume of patients,” he said. Dahlager sold his practice and put his family’s home on the market; it ended up selling in a weekend. “We didn’t have a practice or a home. We didn’t know where we would go,” he said, adding that his ideal location was a place like Mayberry. “When you look at Noblesville, you see it is a lot like Mayberry – lot of character, high ethics and morals. It’s a really good community.” Before Noblesville Family Chiropractic settled in downtown Noblesville, the Dahlagers looked at places in Fishers, Carmel and other Indianapolis-area cities. Close

The knob-and-tube fuse box

The practice Many people see a chiropractor for chronic pain, so the chiropractor can find the cause of the problem. Noblesville Family Chiropractic’s Brad Dahlager said chiropractors treat the cause of the problem instead of just providing a temporary fix and search for what patients can change in their lifestyle to Brad Dahlager help create overall health and wellness. Dahlager decided to pursue a chiropractic career when he realized that he loved to help people. “I still remember the moment when I decided to become a chiropractor. I was young and successful and making a great living as manager of a printing company, but I felt that my life had little purpose or meaning. I simply wasn’t giving back,” he said. “One day I was grocery shopping and deep in thought about how I could make a contribution to the world when I noticed an older woman hobbling along pushing her cart. Her right foot was wrapped in bandages and plastic. I saw how much she hurt and I found myself wishing, ‘If only I could wrap my hands around her injured foot and help speed the healing of those tissues.’ At that moment, as I realized how much I cared about a total stranger, I suddenly found my purpose; I felt called to go into health care and, having grown up with chiropractic care, choosing to become a chiropractor was a natural decision.” Noblesville Family Chiropractic, 953 Maple Ave., is open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday and 8 to 10 a.m. Tuesday and Thursday. It is closed on the weekends. To schedule an appointment, call 214-7218.

Recessed wooden bookcases remains flush to the walls and accent points in a room

to giving up on finding a place, Dahlager lucked into finding the building, which had sat on the market for a year, while driving on 10th Street. “I believe God was holding it for us,” he said. “I knew immediately this was the right spot for us.” Although he is still trying to find out more about the building, Dahlager said one of the carpenters for the Conner family built the home in 1905. When Dillon first owned the house, he rented the two back rooms to sisters to bring in income. “I’ve always liked old buildings,” he said. “The insistence on quality, you can’t get today or get that easily. The craftsmanship and work it took to create that – the attention to detail to make sure everything was just right.” Dahlager said his parents were antique collectors and he hates “to see anything older tossed aside because it’s older. “Those are worth preserving and passing long. You can’t go and buy this anywhere,” he said. “I put a level on a window and it’s still level 109 years later.” The house has received a few upgrades such as converting to a working gas fireplace, but Dahlager’s intention and goal is to restore the building to its original state with antique salvage and period-correct furnishings. “We’re finding the right materials little by little,” he said, adding that one patient commented on his office bookcase and noted it looks like the one Dillon had in his office. Although disconnected, the old cast-iron radiators and knob-and-tub fuse box remain, along with all the original woodwork, cabinetry and flooring, which has an inlay of oak, maple and mahogany. Dahlager also is looking into getting a bronze plaque placed onto the building recognizing at as the old Dillon office. “I’m going to stay on that because he deserves that honor,” he said. (Anna Skinner assisted with writing this story.)

“The insistence on quality, you can’t get today or get that easily. The craftsmanship and work it took to create that – the attention to detail to make sure everything was just right.” - Brad Dahlager

11


Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Stake in the Ground Award winner / P2 ••• City retains expanding business / P5 ••• Schools to balance enrollment / P6

Sharon McMahon, longtime Noblesville Chamber of Commerce president, announces retirement / P7

Residential Customer Local

©2013 IU Health 12/13 HY21213_0701 IU Health North Physician Ad Strip Ad 10” x 1.5”

ECRWSS

Carmel, IN Permit No. 713

U.S. Postage Paid Presorted Standard

Primary care expertise to help you and your family stay strong.

Find a primary care physician near you at iuhealth.org/primarycare

©2013 IU Health 12/13 HY21213_0701

21213_0701_IUHNORTH_10x1.5_4c_StripAd_Physician.indd 1

12/20/13 9:51 AM


January 21, 2014

COMMUNITY

Current in Noblesville

Her business imprint

www.currentnoblesville.com

7

In their own words

Sharon McMahon, longtime Noblesville Chamber of Commerce president, announces retirement By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com

When Sharon McMahon took over as Noblesville Chamber of Commerce president in 2001, the office was at 54 S. cover story Ninth St. – the site of the former G.C. Murphy fiveand-dime store. McMahon, 64, remembers the store and its huge candy counter from when she was a little girl. “I used to beg for candy,” she said, adding that her favorites were the multicolored bonbons. “I walked in the door my first day (as president) and my office was only steps from the candy counter where I used to ogle the bonbons when I was 5 years old. It was a very warm and comforting feeling at the same time.” Since then, McMahon has overseen the city’s chamber through peaks and valleys in the economy, helped increase the business landscape in Noblesville and moved the offices to 601 E. Conner St. in August 2006. And now, she is leaving. On Jan. 13, McMahon announced her retirement effective Feb. 28. “The chamber profession is amazing. There are few other professions which give one such a rich and diverse experience of meeting and working with diverse personalities. At the same time, it’s a profession that requires a great deal of oneself. A lot is expected and it really encompasses a great deal of your life and time,” she said. While her job is “very rewarding and satisfying,” McMahon said her decision to retire allows her to pursue other interests. “My decision was to focus on other projects and activities and say goodbye to a position that’s meant a lot to me over the years. I’ve gained the respect of the community and business community. I feel comfortable going on to other things,” she said. McMahon began her chamber career as the Fishers president in 1994. Prior to that, she worked in nonprofit management for 30 years. “I was familiar with being a director of a nonprofit,” she said. “At that time there were only 8,000 people in Fishers and 100 members of the chamber. It was an exciting opportunity.” After seven years in Fishers, McMahon took over the Noblesville chamber in 2001. “Noblesville is my town,” she said. “I personally have such an affinity to how important

“Sharon has been a dedicated leader in Noblesville. Her leadership at the helm of the Noblesville Chamber of Commerce for the past 13 years has contributed to the growth of the Noblesville business landscape and she was a devoted advocate to and for the chamber members.” Judi Johnson, City of Noblesville economic development director

“Sharon has had a big impact on not only the Chamber of Commerce, but also the entire Noblesville community. I appreciate the partnership she has fostered with the city and wish her well in her retirement.” Noblesville Mayor John Ditslear For the past 13 years, Sharon McMahon has been in the middle of all Noblesville Chamber of Commerce activities, like presenting plaques to Kevin Buchheit with Krieg DeVault LLP (left) or hosting special events such as the annual golf outing (right). (Submitted photos)

the business community is to the health of a community.” When she began, McMahon said the city had just created its economic development department (most development was drawn through the Hamilton County Alliance) and the chamber was more involved in tourism. “We’re in a very rapidly changing economic environment. When I started, people were still faxing. People were just starting to use e-mail on a regular basis,” she said. “We didn’t have development at Corporate Campus, Ind. 37 or 146th Street. Our boundaries have changed and grown.”

Constant change

Change has been constant in business and the chamber’s history. During her time, the organization has launched its successful “Lunch and Learn” series, grown its young professionals group and created the annual Taste of Business. “Eighty businesses come together to meet each other and see what the other businesses do, make eye-to-eye connections and form business relationships,” McMahon said. “It’s also a place for the public in an hour-and-a-half to two hours to visit 80 businesses. It’s a win-win in so

many respects and it continues to grow.” McMahon said she won’t mind not having early morning meetings – although she is a selfdescribed morning person – but will miss “the interaction with chamber members on a regular basis.” During her tenure, the chamber’s 75th anniversary gala in 2010 stands out as one of McMahon’s favorite memories. “It was such a milestone,” she said. “I heard from so many chamber directors from across the country. It was something I will never forget. The event and the turnout of people were amazing, as was knowing how much the community appreciated the chamber.”

Search committee next

McMahon said her position will be posted on the Indiana Chamber Executives Association Website and Chamber Board Chairman John Paris will name a search committee. “The chamber’s board of directors and staff will continue to provide excellent leadership for our many chamber business members from Noblesville and throughout Hamilton County,” she said. “The Noblesville chamber has served our community since 1935 will continue to be the voice of business in Noblesville.”

“Obviously I’m sad she’s leaving, but I’m thrilled for her that she will have some well-deserved time for herself and her grandkids. I’ll miss her. She’s been a mentor and a friend. I’ve looked up to her over the years. She’s a part of the community.” Mary Noble, Chamber of Commerce director of business development

“We know Sharon has dedicated herself and her time to the chamber for many years. Not only has she been the face of the chamber; she has been its heart and soul. Because of her dedication and many accomplishments, we regret her leaving. Because we know her dedication to her family and the joy she derives from her many outside activities, we celebrate her opportunity to embark on this next leg of her journey and we thank Sharon for all she has done for us individually and corporately, and we wish her the best.” John Paris Noblesville Chamber board chairman

Meet Sharon McMahon

Age: 64 Hometown/residence: Noblesville Family: Husband, Bruce; three adult children and four grandsons Hobbies: McMahon is a certified fitness instructor and enjoys genealogy research and traveling. Her favorite thing about Noblesville is its people. “The people here are unique. They’re in a very fastpaced world, but the people I know, I encounter in Noblesville, are very caring and supportive of their community.” Quote: “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.” - Oscar Wilde

“Sharon McMahon has been the voice and face of the Noblesville Chamber ever since I’ve been involved with the chamber. Her contribution to the City of Noblesville during the past 13 years has been greatly appreciated, and she will be missed.” Sydney Loomis, The Farmers Bank assistant vice president


2

January 21, 2014

Current in Noblesville

www.currentnoblesville.com

COMMUNITY

January 21, 2014

DISPATCHES

Contact the Editor

Have a news tip? Want to submit a calendar event? Have a photograph to share? Call Robert Herrington at 489.4444 ext. 206 or e-mail him at robert@ youarecurrent.com. You may also submit information on our website, currentnoblesville.com. You can find the Contact Us form under About Us in the upper-left corner. Remember our news deadline is typically eight days prior to publication.

Join our community

www.facebook.com/currentinnoblesville www.twitter.com/CI_Noblesville

Want to advertise?

Current in Noblesville reaches 100 percent of the households in 46060 and 46062 by U.S. Postal Service every Tuesday. For more information about how to reach that audience, call Cathy Pimley at 840.6550 or e-mail her at cathy@youarecurrent.com.

On the Cover

Sharon McMahon has been the head of the Hamilton County Chamber of Commerce for the past 20 years - 13 in Noblesville and seven in Fishers. (Photo by Robert Herrington) Founded Sept. 15, 2009, at Noblesville, IN Vol. V, No. 15 Copyright 2013. Current Publishing, LLC All Rights Reserved. 30 South Range Line Road Carmel, IN 46032 317.489.4444 info@youarecurrent.com The views of the columnists in Current in Noblesville are their own and do not necessarily reflect the positions of this newspaper.

2013 Common Council President Roy Johnson, left, presents Ray Thompson, wastewater department director, with the annual Stake in the Ground Award on Jan. 14. (Photo by Robert Herrington)

Stinky job earns stake award

By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com

Ray Thompson has served as Noblesville’s wastewater director for the past four years and has worked for Noblesville for the achievement past 34 years. On Jan. 14, the Noblesville Common Council honored him for his work with the annual Stake in the Ground Award. “I’m humbled. I had no clue it was coming,” Thompson said. Thompson is overseeing the long-term implementation plan for the city’s sewer collection system. In basic terms, Thompson said the city and state have an agreement for Noblesville to make improvements. “We have to do ‘X’ amount of modifications in so many years,” he said, adding the city has 15 years to finish the project. “It started prior to my becoming director. We have until 2022 to complete it.” Thompson said part of the project was installing a new sewer on Maple Street along with a new roadway. “There is a total of five phases. We tackled the most expensive first,” he said. The current project is installing 1,100 feet of 60-

inch sewer line. Thompson said the top of the sewer line will be a city trail from Maple to Division Streets right along the bank of White River. The trail will attach to Riverwalk and connect the sewer treatment plant to Forest Park. “It’s almost a three-year project. It officially began in July,” he said. Like they have with other wastewater projects, Thompson said the departments try to make improvements within the city with sidewalks, streets or trails. “We’re going to go in and tear up an area, why not restore it or make it better than it was before?,” he said. 2013 Common Council President Roy Johnson described Thompson as an “unsung hero.” “He’s out there working his tail off,” Johnson said. “Nobody knows all the effort and time he puts into his job.” Johnson said the award was designed to recognize – at the director level – city employees “who obviously go way above and beyond their jobs.” “We had really good candidates this year,” he said, adding that each councilor makes a nomination and then all members vote on it.

ON THE WEB

DVD Review Director Paul Greengrass is not a man who deals in moral absolutes. In “Captain Phillips” he, along with screenwriter Billy Ray and star Tom Hanks, relate the true story of an American cargo ship captain who was kidnapped at sea by Somali pirates. But rather than making the bad guys faceless, soulless villains, he portrays them as real, thinking individuals who feel pressured to commit acts of piracy. Read more at currentnightandday.com

Lasting impact – Prior to the end of his 21-year career as Noblesville Parks director, Don Seal, right, was honored by President Mark Boice and the Noblesville Common Council on Jan. 15. Seal began his parks career in Anderson in January 1972. After 20-and-a-half years, he was recruited to come to Noblesville and transform the city’s amenities. Noblesville’s landscape and parks department were quite different when Seal started in August 1992. Since then he has affected every facet of Forest Park. Update – Former chairman of the Hamilton County Republican Party Charlie White won’t need to wear an ankle bracelet in the immediate future. On Jan. 3 Daniel Pfleging, Hamilton County Superior Court 2 judge, granted a stay of White’s previous home-detention sentence pending a possible appeal. Milestone win – Coach David McCollough earned his 300th win at Noblesville High School when the Millers defeated the McCutcheon Mavericks at home by a score of 47-44 on Jan. 11. The victory makes McCollough’s record 300-135 at Noblesville and 457-230 for his 31-year career.

McCollough

Safe sitter – The Noblesville Parks Dept. is offering a class to teach babysitters how to handle crises, keep their charges secure, and nurture and guide a young child. Safe Sitter will be held from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Jan. 25 at Forest Park Lodge. Cost is $35. Pre-registration is required and registration will close on Jan. 22 or when the class is filled. For more information or to sign up, call 770-5750.

Humor

United development

Columnist Mike Redmond recently went with his family down to Disney World. Every group has a Grumpy, but even Redmond must admit Dizzily World also made him, by turns, Happy, Sleepy and Sneezy – not to mention nauseous and footsore. Read more at currentnoblesville.com

With the sour tasteConceptual of unwanted development in Plans 2003 of the Conceptual Plan “A” northeast corner of Spring Mill Road and 161st Street, neighboring subdivisions have worked collaboratively to create a plan for those highly attractive pieces of land. To read more, visit www. currentinwestfield.com.

Decorating Interior design is about the big picture and the big picture works when it is the result of a carefully planned compilation of elements and principles. Good taste, on the other hand, is the sum of life experience and exposure. Columnist Vicky Earley explains the difference in this week’s column. Read more at currentnoblesville.com

SPRING MILL STATION

Countryside

Enclave at Maple Knoll

Mulberry Farms

Crosswind Commons

4.1


COMMUNITY

January 7, 2014

Current in Noblesville

January 07, 2014

www.currentnoblesville.com

DISPATCHES

Contact the Editor

Have a news tip? Want to submit a calendar event? Have a photograph to share? Call Robert Herrington at 489.4444 ext. 206 or e-mail him at robert@ youarecurrent.com. You may also submit information on our website, currentnoblesville.com. You can find the Contact Us form under About Us in the upper-left corner. Remember our news deadline is typically eight days prior to publication.

Join our community

www.facebook.com/currentinnoblesville www.twitter.com/CI_Noblesville

Want to advertise?

Current in Noblesville reaches 100 percent of the households in 46060 and 46062 by U.S. Postal Service every Tuesday. For more information about how to reach that audience, call Cathy Pimley at 840.6550 or e-mail her at cathy@youarecurrent.com.

On the Cover

Downtown Noblesville is one of the city’s major assets for tourism as events like the Old Mill festival fill the streets with patrons. (Photo illustration by Zach Ross) Founded Sept. 15, 2009, at Noblesville, IN Vol. V, No. 14 Copyright 2013. Current Publishing, LLC All Rights Reserved. 30 South Range Line Road Carmel, IN 46032 317.489.4444 info@youarecurrent.com The views of the columnists in Current in Noblesville are their own and do not necessarily reflect the positions of this newspaper.

3

Dance rescheduled – The Winter Snow Globe dance at Noblesville East Middle School has been rescheduled for 6 to 8 p.m. Jan. 24. Student council members will be re-issuing tickets to only those who have already purchased tickets during lunch periods starting Jan. 20.

From left, Assistant Planning Director Andy Wert, Planning Director Christy Langley and Zoning Administrator Denise Aschleman look over blueprints. New technology changes within the planning department will make files digital and easier to access. (File photo by Robert Herrington)

Free design seminars – Case Design/Remodeling Indy is holding two free kitchen and bath seminars in January. During these sessions, CaseIndy designers will provide homeowners with the basic building blocks, plus tried and true advice on what to expect from a remodeling experience. The first seminar will be held from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Jan. 16 at the Indiana Design Center, 200 S. Range Line Rd. Complimentary h’ors dourves will be served. The second opportunity is from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Jan. 18 at the Indiana Design Center. This event features a complimentary light breakfast. Register by Jan. 13 at www.CaseIndy.com or by calling 846-2600.

Web upgrades create efficiencies

By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com As technology changes and becomes a more vital role in the daily lives of residents, Planning Director Christy Langley is adapting her planning department to be cutting edge. Langley said a new permit management database is an overhaul to how people interact with the planning department. “People can apply and pay online and check on it,” she said. “We realize the world has changed on how they know use technology.” Langley said the database will go live at the end of June. “People can still come in. We’ll have work stations and staff will be happy to assist them,” she said. The overhaul will provide more efficiency for the planning staff and consumer. “It assists us in the field. Inspectors can access the system in the field. Now everything is going to be in real time,” Langley said. “No longer input by hand. With automatic field population takes out a lot of human error.” The planning department also is working on a

scanning initiative. Langley said 470 file boxes from 1974 to today are housed in the basement of City Hall. The files have been scanned and saved by permit number, subdivision and lot number. “They are all completely digital now,” Langley said. “When a person comes in asking about their house that was built in 1978, we don’t have to go to the basement and pull it.” Langley said the files will be available to other departments like engineering and economic development. “We’re excited about that because it adds a new efficiency component,” she said. “The city is more versatile.” Another file going online is the Unified Development Ordinance, where the public can access all PDFs. “There are 17 articles and it is very difficult to search. It’s kind of confusing. The city code is in there with intelligent search for words and phrases,” Langley said. “A static PDF is very difficult to navigate period. This is more friendly and searchable.” The planning department also intends to create info graphics with nuts and bolts of common procedures in March and April.

ON THE WEB

DVD Review “The Act of Killing” is one of the best documentary films columnist Christopher Lloyd has seen in a while, even though it diverges quite a bit from the standard format of journalistic exploration. By eschewing the modus operandi of the documentary film, “The Act of Killing” provides a unique and unforgettable lesson in the loss of humanity. Read more at currentnightandday.com

First baby of 2014 – Indiana University Health North Hospital welcomed its first baby of the new year, a baby girl born to Bobby and Becky Sutton of Indianapolis. Riley Sutton was born at 8:23 a.m. She weighed 6 lbs. 13 oz. and was 20 inches long at birth. Mother and baby are each doing well. (Submitted photo) Local play auditions – The Carmel Theatre Company will conduct auditions for “Next of Kin” from 5 to 7 p.m. Jan. 7. The theatre company would like to have as many relatives performing as possible: fathers and sons, mothers and daughters, sisters, etc. Auditions also will be held for “The Dining Room” from 7 to 9 p.m. Jan 7 at Studio 15, First Ave. N.E. in Carmel. For more information, call 688-8876 or visit www. carmeltheatrecompany.com.

Decorating

Pets

Interior design is about the big picture and the big picture works when it is the result of a carefully planned compilation of elements and principles. Good taste, on the other hand, is the sum of one’s life experience and one’s exposure. A person can be born with a sense of design, while the quality of good taste is gleaned, collected and polished. Read more at currentnoblesville.com

January is Train Your Dog Month. Much like fitness-based New Year’s resolutions, pet owners probably gave up on resolutions for training their dog in midJanuary. This week’s column reviews clicker training, a positive reinforcement-based training that owners can easily use with their dog. Read more at currentnoblesville. com

Travel King Ludwig’s fairy tale castle, built by an eccentric king deposed for claimed insanity, is the model for Walt Disney’s Sleeping Beauty castles. Every day in the summer, about 6,000 visitors to Neuschwanstein pour money into Bavaria’s economy, helping make it the richest state in Germany. Read more at currentnoblesville.com


Tuesday, January 7, 2014

Tourism is becoming big business and Noblesville is creating new opportunities to capitalize on it / P11

Residential Customer Local

©2013 IU Health 12/13 HY21213_0701 IU Health North Physician Ad Strip Ad 10” x 1.5”

Technology changes coming to planning dept. / P3

ECRWSS

Carmel, IN Permit No. 713

U.S. Postage Paid Presorted Standard

Primary care expertise to help you and your family stay strong.

Traffic stop leads to burglar’s arrest / P5

Ringing in the New Year at the fairgrounds / P10

Find a primary care physician near you at iuhealth.org/primarycare

©2013 IU Health 12/13 HY21213_0701

21213_0701_IUHNORTH_10x1.5_4c_StripAd_Physician.indd 1

12/20/13 9:51 AM


January 7, 2014

COMMUNITY

Current in Noblesville

www.currentnoblesville.com

11

The 92-room Courtyard Marriott will open later this year and increase the number of rooms available in Noblesville to 405. (Submitted photo)

Tourism is becoming big business and Noblesville is creating new opportunities to capitalize on it By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com If you are attending local attractions or special events, you may have noticed a lot of unfamiliar faces. Part of that can be contributed to the city’s population growth; the cover story other part is due to the county’s popularity and enhanced perception as a place to visit. Hamilton County Convention and Visitors Bureau Executive Director Brenda Myers said tourism is the third largest industry in Hamilton County with 11.4 percent of employment. It falls behind healthcare (15.4 percent) and retail/trade (11.8 percent). Finance and insurance was a close fourth with 11 percent. “It also has the second fastest growing rate of tourism spending among Indiana counties Myers with the highest tourism spending,” Myers said. “In 2013, hospitals dropped 7.2 percent, retail continues to grow at a 1.2 percent increase and tourism had a 7.1 percent increase. The three are so close, they could all change places.” The numbers come from a recent economic impact study that provides the HCCVB a benchmark before the opening of Grand Park, a 360-acre sports campus in Westfield that will feature a full range of championship-level outdoor facilities for baseball, softball and field sports including soccer, football, rugby, field hockey and lacrosse. “We’re already seeing full weekends on the calendar and navigating that is exciting,” Myers said. “We have weeks in 2014 where

Innkeepers tax collected in 2013 City Carmel Fishers Noblesville

Total $1,662,557 $911,294 $245,143 County Total:

Percent of county total 59% 32% 9% $2,818,994

Note: Westfield had no businesses that paid this tax in 2013 SOURCE: Hamilton County Treasurer

every hotel (in Hamilton County) is booked. We’re suggesting people look into Kokomo, Lafayette and Indianapolis.” Myers credits a portion of that to Grand Park’s scheduled events, which are set to begin in March. “The tournaments are so large with 40 to 80 teams – it’s just huge,” she said, adding Hamilton County has more than 3,000 hotel rooms with 65 percent occupancy already for 2014.

Opportunities

Myers said Hamilton County has a unique touring product with “wonderful downtowns in Noblesville and the Arts & Design District in Carmel, the Nickel Plate district in Fishers and Grand Junction in Westfield.” “One community has four cultural districts. All four are beautiful and unique and offer something different,” she said. “There also are anchor alternatives like the Indiana Transportation Museum, Klipsch Music Center, the Palladium and sports not just at the Grand Park Sports Complex.” Each also offers different experiences at different times of the year. “There are so many assets. They keep coming back because there is something to do,” Myers said, adding that communities are being proactive about tourism. “They are looking for opportunities and ways to make it better.”

Economic impact

Why is tourism such a lucrative business? Hamilton County is ranked third for attracting the largest amount of tourist dollars in the state and is ranked second for expected growth. Myers said for every travel dollar spent, 92 cents stays in the county. “Day and overnight visitors spend $375 million resulting in a total economic impact of $611 million and an overall savings of $888 in taxes annually for every Hamilton County household,” she said, adding a total of $159.6 million in taxes were generated by the county’s tourism industry in 2012. Johnson Noblesville Economic Director Judi Johnson said the city is economically impacted by tourism in many ways. “Wealth is dispersed locally due to the vast availability of food

and beverage establishments which consistently continue to appear throughout the Noblesville landscape, and through varied shopping choices. Noblesville offers three large retail nodes – Hamilton Town Center, the Ind. 37 corridor and the downtown locally owned and operated establishments,” she said.

A place to stay

Noblesville has 313 rooms available at its four hotels: Cambria Suites, 13500 Tegler Dr. (132 rooms); Fairfield Inn & Suites, 17960 Foundation Dr. (59 rooms); Quality Inn and Suites, 16025 Prosperity Dr. (64 rooms); and Super 8, 17070 Dragonfly Lane 58 rooms). All are located off Ind. 37 with the exception of Cambria Suites, which is across from Hamilton Towne Center and I-69. Currently under construction is a Courtyard Marriott at 17863 Foundation Dr. The 92-room hotel will feature deluxe guestrooms, underground parking, a bistro and much more. Courtyard also has the first meeting and banquet space on Ind. 37 in Noblesville. “The impact of wedding ceremony and reception tourism is abundant in Noblesville due to our unique and expressive venue choice,” Johnson said. “Couples choose Noblesville due to its true historic and cultural vibe.”

Future

With the increase in tourism opportunities, the HCCVB is talking with Ivy Tech about offering hospitality and art classes at the upcoming Noblesville campus, which opens in August. “There’s a lot that hotel services and culinary arts do for us in the county,” Myers said. Upcoming events and initiatives include a countywide gardens promotion in June, doing a better job of packaging outdoor recreational opportunities and tying music packages together. 2014 also is the “Year of Arts” at Conner Prairie. “We’re reshaping how we do tourism,” Myers said. Johnson said the city works in partnership with many cultural organizations and hopes to increase its ability to attract even more tourists through future cultural emergence initiatives. “Let’s not forget that tourism and quality of life draw the type of workforce talent every community wants to attract and sustain,” Johnson said. “Young talent lifestyle choice is dependent upon cultural amenities and their desired location to live is based on ‘Live first, Work second.’ Economic development sustainability within any community is dependent on where talent lives and the choice they make ultimately drives the location of business.”


2

December 31, 2013

Current in Noblesville

www.currentnoblesville.com

COMMUNITY

December 31, 2013

DISPATCHES

Contact the Editor

Have a news tip? Want to submit a calendar event? Have a photograph to share? Call Robert Herrington at 489.4444 ext. 206 or e-mail him at robert@ youarecurrent.com. You may also submit information on our website, currentnoblesville.com. You can find the Contact Us form under About Us in the upper-left corner. Remember our news deadline is typically eight days prior to publication.

Trash time – As a result of the holidays, there will be no trash pickup Jan. 1 and regular trash pickup schedule for Wednesday through Friday will be delayed one day. Beginning Jan. 6, Republic Services will then return to its normal pickup schedule. In addition, Republic Services will pick up Christmas trees now through Jan. 31. Trees will be collected on the same day and in the same location as residents’ trash/recycle collection. For questions, contact Republic Services at 917-7300.

Terry Lee Crossing site map. (Submitted)

Join our community

www.facebook.com/currentinnoblesville www.twitter.com/CI_Noblesville

Want to advertise?

Current in Noblesville reaches 100 percent of the households in 46060 and 46062 by U.S. Postal Service every Tuesday. For more information about how to reach that audience, call Cathy Pimley at 840.6550 or e-mail her at cathy@youarecurrent.com.

On the Cover

Noblesville City Hall stands behind Mayor John Ditslear while on the roof of HMC Screen Printing, 954 Conner St. (Photos by Robert Herrington) Founded Sept. 15, 2009, at Noblesville, IN Vol. V, No. 14 Copyright 2013. Current Publishing, LLC All Rights Reserved. 30 South Range Line Road Carmel, IN 46032 317.489.4444 info@youarecurrent.com The views of the columnists in Current in Noblesville are their own and do not necessarily reflect the positions of this newspaper.

Business climate heats up

By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com The opportunities and options available in Noblesville are continuing to attract businesses to the city, according Economic Development to Economic Development Director Judi Johnson. When asked what the top three new construction/renovations projects are in the city for 2014, Johnson provided the following information: RZ Automation: A company that specializes in automation for Johnson robotics in industrial companies, RZ Automation is a 10-year-old enterprise that has outgrown its current space at 15223 Herriman Blvd. in the Stony Creek Business Park. In 2014 it will build a building of approximately 15,000 square feet in the Noblesville Business Park (near 146th Street and Cumberland Road) with a capital investment of approximately $1,750,000 and purchase new personal property valued at approximately $125,000. When a business wants to expand and has outgrown its current business park location, multiple business park options to meet its growth needs are available in Noblesville. The average wage for new employees will be $65,000 with benefits. Pharmakon Pharmaceuticals, Inc.: The long-

ON THE WEB

DVD Review For those who aren’t put off by a story that’s all about sex, “Don Jon” is actually a rather charming movie. The directing debut of star Joseph GordonLevitt is about a guy who thinks he’s got it all figured out, hurts a lot of people carelessly and gets hurt himself. Read more at currentnightandday.com

New businesses • New openings in 2013 include: Hobby Lobby, LA Fitness, Home Goods, Rio Grande Mexican Grill, Nemo’s, YAT’s, Vitamin Shoppe, Noblesville Family Chiropractic, Vom Fass, Pizza Hut Hazel Dell Road, Jiana Gifts and Tea, The Joint and Harbour Market. • Planned openings in 2014 are the Courtyard by Marriott, Tucano’s Brazilian Grill, Chuy’s, Terry Lee Hyundai, City Cafeteria, Wings Etc. and Panda(ology).

term care pharmacy company took ownership and has begun renovation of a 40,000 square foot building at 14450 Getz Rd. in Saxony Business Park. Pharmakon anticipates relocating 65 current employees to the site and plans on hiring 70 new employees by 2018. The company also will invest nearly $1.5 million. Terry Lee Crossing: Ongoing work is being done by Terry Lee. This development will ultimately offer a new Terry Lee Hyundai dealership of Ind. 37 and Ind. 32. Terry Lee Crossing, when fully developed, will offer eight lots for sale on approximately 33 acres. The balance of the 52 acre site is needed for floodway reconstruction and mitigation, storm water detention, and public rights of way. The Hyundai dealership is expected to create 76 jobs with an estimated annual payroll of $3.7 million.

Living united – 35 percent of Noblesville Schools’ employees have made pledges and donations of more than $23,000 to this year’s United Way campaign to benefit central Indiana families. Each school and the Educational Services Center participated in a drive for United Way. White River Elementary School won the district’s traveling trophy for having the highest participation rate among employees with 93 percent making pledges or donations. A close second was North Elementary with 83 percent of its staff participating. Construction – City Engineer John Beery said the city has received a $250,000 grant to construct a half-mile trail along Carrigan Road to Clarendon Drive. “It will directly connect the entrance of North Harbour to the pedestrian bridge over the reservoir,” he said. The project will be completed by the fall. Holiday cheer – The holiday spirit was abundant at Riverview Hospital on Christmas Eve. Many patients enjoyed handmade cards – with thoughtfull notes inside – and angel ornaments. These items were given by a Riverview Hospital Foundation Philanthropy Council member’s family, as well as students from Casey Toomb’s fourth grade class at North Elementary School in Noblesville. Women’s health – Riverview Hospital will host a Women’s Health & Wellness Event from 8 a.m. to noon Jan. 18 at the hospital Women’s Pavilion (entrance 11). Enjoy a morning filled with health information, screenings and assessments designed to educate and inspire women. This event will include a variety of breakout sessions, health and wellness information booths, fitness demonstrations and a continental breakfast. To register, call 776-7247. For more information, visit www.riverview.org.

Grammar Guy “Gone” and “went” are both past tense forms of the verb “go.” While both “went” and “gone” are used in the past tense, you’ll notice that “gone” is paired with an auxiliary verb – “have” – while “went” is alone. Jordan Fischer explains the two reasons for this. Read more at currentnoblesville.com

Redmond

Travel Bethlehem’s Church of the Nativity is believed to be the oldest complete church in the world, owing its longevity to the power of the Biblical wise men from the east. Although Christmas has come and gone for most Christians, the Christmas Eve service in the church commemorating the birth of Jesus is still at least a week away. Read more at currentnoblesville.com

Instead of just one, how about 12 Days of Christmas? Mike Redmond writes it’s a chance to savor the best time of the year instead of wolfing it down in one huge chunk and then feeling a little let down, a little empty, the next day – and the day after that, and the day after that, and the day after that. Read more at currentnoblesville.com


Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Business growth coming / P2

High school buildings expanding / P4

Keep on keeping on City sets sights on new projects to continue momentum / P8 Residential Customer Local

©2013 IU Health 12/13 HY21213_0701 IU Health North Physician Ad Strip Ad 10” x 1.5”

ECRWSS

Carmel, IN Permit No. 713

U.S. Postage Paid Presorted Standard

Primary care expertise to help you and your family stay strong.

More opportunities offered at Nickel Plate / P11

Find a primary care physician near you at iuhealth.org/primarycare

©2013 IU Health 12/13 HY21213_0701

21213_0701_IUHNORTH_10x1.5_4c_StripAd_Physician.indd 1

12/20/13 9:51 AM


8

December 31, 2013

COMMUNITY

Current in Noblesville

www.currentnoblesville.com

City sets sights on new projects to continue momentum By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com Despite numerous awards as a best place to live, raise a family and recover story tire to, Mayor John Ditslear isn’t letting the city sit idle and rest on its recent accomplishments. “2013’s been great and we’re looking forward to 2014,” Ditslear said. Among the city’s developments and construction for the coming year, Ditslear highlighted the following projects:

Ivy Tech

When Ivy Tech Community College opens in August, Noblesville will be home to the 32nd Ivy Tech campus and will provide Hamilton County residents easier access to college credits, technical certificates and associate degrees. “One of my goals from when I became mayor in 2004 was to have an institute of higher learning come to the city,” Ditslear said. “Ivy Tech is a real, real plus for all of us – current students, upgrading skills, recertification and life-long learners.” Ivy Tech began offering classes in Hamilton County in 1980, and during the spring 2013 semester more than 3,000 students took advantage of this opportunity. School officials said Ivy Tech is busy determining what the site will look like and how to best serve the Hamilton County community. “We look forward to the renovation and opening of Noblesville Ivy Tech in the fall. The economic development department, in partnership with the Vision Noblesville Workforce Development Council and the Hamilton County Alliance, will continue to connect businesses from Noblesville and all other Hamilton County Communities with the Ivy Tech Corporate College Staff to align desired curriculum and certification needs,” Noblesville Economic Director Judi Johnson said.

Eastside Park

On the even larger scale of Noblesville Parks’ projects is Eastside Park, which will be the largest in Noblesville at 200 acres. By comparison, Forest Park is 150 acres. Officials said Eastside Park, at 166th Street and Boden Road, is the city’s commitment to provide accessible parks and recreation facilities for residents living east of Ind. 32, particularly those in Wayne Township. “It’s an ideal setting,” Ditslear said. The massive park’s plans include a YMCA, aquatic center, events lawn and stage, softball complex, three athletic fields, shelters, nature center, archery range, disc golf course, playgrounds, sledding hill and a dog park. The area also includes numerous trails and nature settings including grasslands, woodlands and wetlands/pond. To assist in funding the project, Noblesville Common Council members approved changes to the city’s land-use law in September. The change allows residential developers within a half-mile of Eastside Park to set aside less property as open space in exchange for a fee. The idea behind the change is that residents are more likely to use a municipal park near their home than a neighborhood playground. Less open space means

Citizen survey

Every three years the city conducts a Citizen Survey to provide insight as to what residents believe are the strengths and weaknesses of the community and local government. “This survey tells us a lot about our citizen’s preferences and allows us to help determine what we’re doing right and what needs to be changed,” Ditslear said, adding the results assist city leaders with long-term planning. From the last survey in 2010, Ditslear said there was a perception of lack of opportunities to volunteer. To address that, Vision Noblesville was created, and one of its responsibilities was creating a volunteer database for those interested and groups needing assistance. Results of the recent survey will be announced in January.

more homes can be built and the fees cause less of a financial burden on the city. “It’s an opportunity for us to use our parks as green space,” Ditslear said.

Comprehensive Master Plan

Noblesville will have a new Comprehensive Master Plan in 2014. Ditslear said the last one was revised 10 years ago. “With the new master plan we will do our best and follow what the public wants,” he said. Noblesville Planning Director Christy Langley said the Comprehensive Master Plan will be introduced to the Noblesville Plan Commission on Jan. 21 and the Langley Noblesville Common Council on Jan. 28. Once approved, Langley said the guidance document will take a “tour of sorts.” “We’ll go to the school board, chamber of commerce, Noblesville Main Street and Noblesville Preservation Alliance to say, ‘Here’s what the plan says and how you are specifically involved,’” she said. The plan will outline a vision and strategic framework for future development, redevelopment and community building projects. Langley said a community’s comprehensive plan sets public policy in terms of transportation, utilities, land use, recreation and housing over short and long-term periods. The previous plan was prepared in 1995 and updated by the city in 2003. Langley said a review of the plan will take place annually. “It’s a living plan and we’re talking about it constantly,” she said. “Each year will see minor revisions. We’ll spend three to four weeks working on it each year.”

Westside Park

The next Noblesville park will be on 6.4 acres of flood-prone land between Ind. 32 and Logan Street along White River. Plans call for an open-air amphitheater (which would be a permanent home for the Noblesville Cultural Arts Commission’s Shakespeare in the Park series and could relocate the city’s free summer concerts and farmers market) and a pedestrian bridge crossing the river into the downtown square. Officials also are looking at a splash pad, trails and shelters. “We want that to be the ‘wow’ factor when you’re coming to Noblesville from the west,” Ditslear said. While construction will begin in 2014, Ditslear said the city cannot financially complete the project next year.

“The desire is to extend downtown west for a long time to kick start other development,” Ditslear said. Officials hope the project unites the city’s core business district. “The future West Side Park will be a catalyst for community transformation. New park development adds to the portfolio of Noblesville’s quality of life attributes,” Johnson said. “We hope the West Side Park development creates a more vibrant economy through additional commercial and residential attraction. It is evident that citizens seek out community. The west side of the river is also a part of downtown Noblesville and will ultimately compliment and sustain our already thriving downtown and historic square.”


Tuesday, December 3, 2013

Enterprise Awards Chamber, city honor year’s best and brightest / P10

Residential Customer Local

Carmel, IN Permit No. 713

IUH_21113_0338 BRAND STRIP AD 10” x 1.5”

Students donate to memorial fund / P3

Survey shows calendar performance / P8

Food substitutes for the holidays / P19

U.S. Postage Paid

ECRWSS

Presorted Standard

LIVE HEALTHY. STAY STRONG. Find a doctor and the tools you need to succeed at iuhealth.org/stronger ©2013 IU Health 11/13 HY21113_0338

21113_0338_IUHNORTH_10x1.5_4c_StripAd_Brand.indd 1

11/21/13 4:59 PM


10

December 3, 2013

Current in Noblesville

www.currentnoblesville.com

Enterprise Awards

COMMUNITY

By Robert Herrington robert@youarecurrent.com

A leap of faith and one dedicated lunch break helped Darren Peterson, 46, start his architecture firm 17 years ago. “Somebody once told me if you don’t start your cover story company before you’re 30 you won’t start it until you’re 50. So four months before my 30th birthday – four months before my first daughter was born – I went out on my lunch hour. They were widening 116st Street and I went door to door with all those businesses that were affected, negotiated a contract (with one business) and went back to my company and quit my job,” Peterson said. Peterson said a secret of his success has been the company’s willingness to take on any project. The original focus was on outpatient medical facilities, which was hit and miss, so the firm expanded to design gas stations, factories, warehouses and restaurants. Peterson has buildings in 37 states, Guam and Puerto Rico. “I’m the author of the fourth largest building in Oregon, a 1.5 million square foot Lowe’s distribution center,” he said. “While we were working on that we were also getting a building permit for a dog house here in Hamilton County.” Among his clients are five Fortune 500 companies including Lowe’s, Frito Lay and Pepsi Co. “I try to make everyone feel unique. I’ve designed 50 Taco Bell restaurants and every one is a little different,” he said. Peterson Architecture is at 298 S. 10th St. – a place he is very familiar with. “Fifteen years ago we designed the area that used to be a spa,” Peterson said. Peterson graduated from Ball State University in 1991, when the economy “was pretty bad.” His first job out of school was as a graduate architect at Ernst Bliem Architect in Tirol, Austria. “I spent every penny I had traveling around Europe,” he said. When he returned stateside, Peterson landed in Noblesville as he stayed with friends. “I had no home or car. Noblesville got to be home pretty quick,” he said. “My first client was in Noblesville. “Fishers and Carmel didn’t have the same home feel.”

Peterson said it’s important for the success of your business to be active in the community. “You have to be a part of the community to better understand your clients better. I know why I moved to Noblesville and understand why they moved to Noblesville,” he said. “The goal is to work, play and live all in the same place.” Outside of work, Peterson is involved in the Noblesville Riverwalk Committee, Façade Grant program, Indianapolis Museum of Art, Noblesville First United Methodist Church and Nickel Plate Arts. He also is the vice president of Noblesville Main Street where he created the Thursday evening produce market this summer. “It was a nice intimate marketplace. There was a big variety this first year,” Peterson said. “We made use of a lost space on the square.” In his free time, Peterson enjoys spending time with his family. While helping his daughter, Emily, on her 4-H cake decorating project Peterson discovered a new hobby that utilized his skill background. “It’s a hobby that I could get paid for and do with my daughter,” he said. “I’m a Wilton Cake decorating teacher at the new Hobby Lobby in Noblesville.”

Young Professional of the Year Alaina Shonkwiler, Economic Development Department The inaugural Young Professional of the Year Award went to Noblesville native and city employee Alaina Shonkwiler. “I’m being rewarded for doing something I love,” she said. “I feel the pressure that I have to set that standard and keep on doing what I’m doing.” The 2001 Noblesville High School graduate earned a degree in public affairs management and a minor in nonprofit management from Indiana University. “Like many of my fellow (NHS) graduates I decided I needed to leave Noblesville and experience something else and with that I packed up and moved to Washington, D.C.,” Shonkwiler said, adding she worked as a budget analyst for the corporation of national and community service for three years after graduation. Shonkwiler, 30, returned home in 2009 after brief stays in Fort Bragg, N.C. and Columbus, Ohio. She worked part-time at the Noblesville Chamber of Commerce before becoming an economic development specialist for the city. “Before I started working for the city I had no idea the focus the mayor and city had on the quality of life aspect for our citizens,” Shonkwiler said. Shonwiler, whose focus is on community development in the down-

town and Old Town areas, is a stable at Nickel Plate Arts, Hamilton County Convention and Visitors Bureau, Noblesville Main Street and Kiwanis meetings and events. “What I love about going into work is building relationships and talking to people who have such a passion for downtown. We’re all trying to make it a better place,” she said. “Being from Noblesville I remember coming into downtown for different events. I like we are creating that sense of place for the community.” One of Shonkwiler’s favorite aspects of her job is her involvement in the future of Noblesville. “One of the most beautiful things about my job and my role in this community is I do get to have an impact on it. We’re talking about the Westside Park and having it be an 85 to 100 year park. We’re talking about the materials that might be here for someone else. We’re building a community for the future and someone did that for us so I want to be able to do that for them, my grandkids and the future generations.” Her wide range of topics makes each day at work unique and different. “I love that I can go from a very serious project submission to going to an arts council meeting. Some are serious, some are fun – it fits my personality well,” she said. “I’m so glad the mayor see’s that. It’s his vision I get to act it out.”

Jay, left, and John Merrell.

Business Person of the Year Darren Peterson, Peterson Architecture

Business of the year IDI Composites International IDI Composites International is the premier global formulator and manufacturer of thermoset industrial compounds for custom molders and original equipment manufacturers “Composites International started in Noblesville in 1966, known as Industrial Dielectrics, Inc. - IDI - which is what we all still call it,” said Executive Vice President Jay Merrell. “We make polyester modeling materials for electrical, automotive, appliance applications – many different things that you use in your household but don’t think about very much that would come from Noblesville.” The business, started by Merrell’s father, John, began as a stamping business. His first customer was RCA. “The business at the time was built for electrical insulating materials, mostly for TVs and radios. If you think back to the old days of the TV turners where you actually had to walk up to the TV and twist the knob, the switch on the inside we made the parts for those.” The company started to make the materials themselves for the same insulated parts and the chemistry of making materials transferred into the modeling materials that it makes today. “The business is going to continue to grow. It will continue to grow here in Noblesville and that’s one of the main reasons we did our remodeling project,” Merrell said. The company also has plants in Puerto Rico, England, France and China but the markets the company touches are as equally broad as its global business. From automotive to electrical applications for switch gears and circuit breakers, Composites International makes things that help distribute electricity. Merrell said the Noblesville plant makes bulk molding compounds and sheet molding compounds. “These are raw materials that are then molded into all these various products,” Merrell said. The annual Enterprise Awards are presented to local businesses and people for their exceptional work by the Noblesville Chamber of Commerce and the City of Noblesville.


COMMUNITY

December 3, 2013

Current in Noblesville

December 03, 2013

www.currentnoblesville.com

5

Mayor John Ditslear, Joy Petty of the Noblesville Youth Assistance Program, Noblesville firefighter Rick Russell and others from the Noblesville Charity Ball Committee count the thousands of coins at BMO Bank on Ind. 37. (Submitted photo)

Coin Harvest nets $6k for charity news@currentnoblesville.com

Noblesville Schools’ second Coin Harvest at the seven elementary buildings brought in a total of $6,514.41 – all of which will go education to three local organizations. The coin harvest took place in classrooms during the first week in November. The money will be combined with funds raised at the next Noblesville Charity Ball and then given to the Noblesville Youth Assistance Program, Friends of Central Pool and the Noblesville Firefighters Christmas Food and Toy Drive. The Noblesville YAP works directly with Noblesville’s

school counselors to assist students. Doni Fisk’s kindergarten class at Stony Creek Elementary School raised $215.45, the most of any class in the school district. That class, as well as the class at each of the other elementary schools that raised the most in their school, earned a pizza lunch with Mayor John Ditslear. The other winning classes include: • Hazel Dell – Justin Rausch, fourth grade • Hinkle Creek – Katelyn Schalburg, first grade • Noble Crossing – Tania Stultz, fifth grade • North – Lynnette Husted, first grade • Promise Road – Lisa Barthuly, third grade • White River – Jaime Miller, fifth grade

Rehab That Always Rehab That’s Never a Beat Better Misses Than Par

Wellbrooke helps strikeyour thehandicap. right chord. Wellbrooke helps youyou improve Even afterknee a stroke. Even after replacement. Choose our our private, resort-like resort-like Choose Choose our private, private, resort-like Wellbrooke Rehabilitative Rehabilitative Care Care Wellbrooke Wellbrooke rehabilitative care suites for Suites for continuation of your care, Suites for continuation of your care, continuation of your care, and you and and you and your family will have and you and your family will have your family will have unprecedented unprecedented flexibility to shape shape unprecedented flexibility to flexibility and control in your daily routine. your own rehab plan. plan. And thereceive? quality The Andown the quality of care you’ll your rehab And the quality ofabsolute care you’ll you’ll receive? The absolute absolute best.receive? It’s the Wellbrooke LifeSTYLE of care The best. It’s the theAnd Wellbrooke LifeSTYLE Promise™. it’s almostLifeSTYLE as rare as a hole best. It’s Wellbrooke in one. Recuperate yourperfect terms. Promise™. Consideron it the the perfect Promise™. Consider it The golf course is calling. progression of of chords chords and and care. care. progression Recuperate on your your terms. Recuperate on terms. 62 hotel-style private suites • Fabulous restaurants and pub The Outdoor piano’s calling. calling. The piano’s courtyard with green spaces • And so much more!

62 hotel-style hotel-style private private suites suites •• Fabulous Fabulous restaurants restaurants and and pub pub 62 Music room room and and movie movie theater theater •• And And so so much much more! more! Music

Now Open. Call or drop by for your personal tour!

Join us for an open every 2nd Tuesday (317)house 804-8044 937 E. 186th Street •274-0444 Westfield, INto 46074 at 2:00 pm. Call (260) learn more. www.WellbrookeOfWestfield.com 20 John John Kissinger Kissinger Drive Drive •• Wabash, Wabash, Indiana Indiana 46992 46992 20 From SR-32/W. Main Street, turn onto Wheeler Road heading north. www.WellbrookeOfWabash.com Turn leftwww.WellbrookeOfWabash.com at 186th St; Wellbrooke of Westfield will be on your left.

WST-71 Golf Current Version.indd 1

10/7/2013 1:35:53 PM


Tuesday, November 12, 2013

A global impact Helmer Scientific’s employees volunteer locally and internationally / P12

Residential Customer Local ECRWSS

©2013 IU Health 11/13 IUH19613_0658 BOLT for the Heart Strip Ad 10” x 1.5” V2

Master plan nears final draft / P5

One tasty First Friday cook-off / P10

‘Giving Tree’ remembers former mayor / P11

Carmel, IN Permit No. 713

U.S. Postage Paid Presorted Standard

Make Thanksgiving a heart-healthy holiday. Join us at the Bolt For The Heart Run/Walk and help care for hearts in Indiana.

For more details, see our ad on the back page. ©2013 IU Health 11/13 HY19613_0658

19613_0658_10x1.5_IUHNORTH_4c_FrontStrip.indd 1

11/1/13 12:12 PM


12

November 12, 2013

COMMUNITY

Current in Noblesville

www.currentnoblesville.com

In their own words

Helmer Scientific employees describe their volunteering and service trips:

A global impact

From left: Paul Copeland, Wendy Swanson, Wendy Gibson, David Coots, Allen Prince, Heather Knowles, Bonnie Tipton, Karyn Yates and Cara Fry explore downtown Kyiv, Ukraine, before a two-hour drive to Zhitomir region to serve 80 boys with severe disabilities at Romaniv orphanage. (Submitted photos)

Helmer Scientific’s employees volunteer locally and internationally By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com Helmer Scientific is about impact – the impact on the science industry to improve and save lives; the financial impact of becover story ing a growing business, leading manufacturer and global distributor of laboratory equipment; and the impact of service on others. In a ceremony at the Indiana Statehouse last month, Helmer Scientific, 144000 Bergen Blvd., Noblesville, was honored with the 2013 Governor’s Service Award for Corporate Service, the most prestigious award for volunteer service. Helmer Scientific was recognized for its demonstration of the very best practices in employee volunteer programs and impact for the local community. Programs of the organization include charitable giving, community service and corporate volunteer opportunities. “We’ve always been philanthropic. We’ve done it in such a way that’s quiet, humble. We’re going to do it if anyone cares or not,” said David Helmer, owner of the family business which has been operHelmer ating for 36 years. In 2003, Helmer said he believed he was missing out on ways to energize more people and started talking with employees. “I want to increase awareness of what generosity can do in a company and individual’s life,” he said. “My desire was to have it grow naturally. As a result I think it started to stir some people.” Helmer Global Initiatives, the corporate social responsibility program of Helmer Scientific, was

Helmer Scientific volunteers Leonce Jean-Baptist (first on the left, front row), Thomas Long (in the middle, front row) and Dustin Etchison (first on the right, back row) after installing donated by Helmer blood banking equipment and training staff at a newly built state-of-the-art hospital transfusion service in Mirabalais, Haiti.

After the Governor’s Service Awards program ended, Mayor John Ditslear, center, joins Noblesville winners Sue Treida, the honoree for the faithbased volunteer, and David Helmer of Helmer Scientific, winner of the corporate volunteer award.

initiated later that year. “The mission is to spread a culture of generosity by engaging individuals and organizations locally and globally at their highest level of capability to provide aid and justice for poor and vulnerable people,” Helmer said. “I don’t want to comfort the comfortable so we’re going to the hard places.” Helmer Global Initiatives Director of Development Nataliya Mazur said the goal is to “go into communities and be influential there.” “People do what is significant to them,” she said. “People are so open to help and to serve it is amazing.” Mazur now works to cultivate people for service trips three, five and 10 years down the road.

“It’s a big step for quite a few people,” she said. “People want to do this; we’re just providing the environment.” Through international service and expertisesharing trips to Ukraine, Rwanda, Guatemala and Haiti, employees get a better understanding of poverty. “Poverty in the United States is very different than in developing countries,” she said, adding when employees return they have a new appreciation for what they have. “This environment is completely different – see real need and struggle right before them. You can’t fix it or forget about it. That causes change to a person’s soul. When they come back to their own place it gives them a different perspective,” Helmer said. “It’s not a vacation. It’s uncomfortable.” Helmer said every employee is a part of the effort because since its inception, at least 10 percent of Helmer Scientific’s net profit has been used to make an impact on society through active philanthropy and volunteerism. “What they are doing is making a difference. Just by stepping up and doing a good job they are a part of it,” he said, adding the level of volunteerism is left up to each individual. “We provide opportunities for people to experience personal meaning in a different way. For some it awakens their sense of service.” Helmer said local efforts are important because “this is our community, this is where we live.” He added that it also provides an easier way for individuals to become engaged with the community and their peers outside of work. Helmer said the generosity philosophy is significant for morale and helps the company with recruiting and retention. “We’re interested in having our people engage in something that is greater than themselves,” he said. “It is not just about doing good. It is about effecting change.”

“Now that my fourth son is old enough to be actively involved in the writing process, we have volunteered to be pen pals for one of the children that Helmer sponsors through Compassion.”

Sandie Anselm, regional sales representative

“It is great to better know someone who you spend all day with at work through volunteering. Personal relationships improve business relationships.”

Kenny Wilson, mechanical engineering technician

“(Visiting Ukrainian families) was one of the most impressive experiences for me during the trip. We would go to a home and the host, having nothing, tried to give you at least something to make you feel welcome.”

Donna Stephens, master assembler

“I expected it to be bad, but not as bad as the reality of it was. The first day at the orphanage was truly shocking for me and it took a while to adjust to the environment… The impact was so heartfelt that their desire to be engaged and to interact with the team increased daily. The few hours spent in their presence each morning were impactful enough to evoke joy, profound introspection, sporadic discomfort and deep sorrow amongst team members. To my amazement we had all surrendered our egos, and instead traded our vulnerabilities for the success of our trip.”

Leonce Jean-Baptiste, regional sales representative

“Since returning home, seeking ways to support and influence business owners in Rwanda has now become a goal of mine. I continue to communicate with business owners who participated in the workshop and assist those whom I have developed a relationship with.”

Aaron Stout, global sales director

“We plan on making a big difference in a lot of people’s lives who are currently struggling with poverty. Our talents used here will be enabling them to provide there.”

Terry McCurry, manufacturing engineering technician


Tuesday August 20, 2013

Medical implants maker RMI moved to Noblesville for more space, now the growing company is expanding its products / P11

Food trucks’ fee increased / P3

Residential Customer Local ECRWSS

Carmel, IN Permit No. 713 U.S. Postage Paid Presorted Standard

Your miracle deserves unmatched maternity care.

Officer of the Year / P7

Where art thou, Romeo? / P9

iuhealth.org/northmaternity

Š2013 IU Health 04/13 HY05213_0186

05213_0186_IUHN_10x1.5_4c_CC_Maternity.indd 1

4/15/13 1:48 PM


August 20, 2013

COMMUNITY

Current in Noblesville

www.currentnoblesville.com

11

Medical implants maker RMI moved to Noblesville for more space, now the growing company is expanding its products Lines of manufacturing and milling machines line the walls as RMI President Jim Evans, left, and Vice President David E. Langenkamp pause in the workstation center during a tour of the company, 9650 E. 148th St. (Photos by Robert Herrington)

The work

By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com When former Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Manning had his neck surgery two years ago, a herniated disc in his cervical spine was removed and replaced by a bone graft held in place by steel plates attached to the vertebra Cover story above and below the disc space. Those steel plates comprised an orthopedic implant like the ones created by Noblesville contract manufacturer RMI. Like Manning, many residents locally and around the globe may be walking around with parts created by RMI to replace or provide fixation of a missing joint or bone or to support a damaged bone. “RMI supplies thousands of products, including titanium, stainless steel and PEEK (polyetheretherketone) plastic implants as well as the specialized tools used by surgeons to install them,” RMI President and General Manager Jim Evans said. “The spinal products help carry the load… and mechanically separate vertebra.”

The move

RMI began as a contract manufacturer of medical devices in 1995 in Rochester, Ind. It changed its name from Rochester Medical Implants to RMI after making the move to Noblesville in October 2011. Evans said the move to 9650 E. 148th St. significantly added to the company’s capacity and ability to quickly design and produce custom products. “The Noblesville move has worked out well for us as we now have a world-class facility offering greater access to customers and a skilled workforce,” he said. “It was hard to get talent and retain talent and get customers to visit because it was off the beaten trail. We chose Noblesville because of the location and (the building) being across from a major highway. Customers said this area had good talent and they were right.” About two thirds of the company’s employees and their families moved to the Noblesville area, including Lana Morrison, who has worked for RMI for six and a half years. “We were prepared to build a new home in Rochester when my husband and I heard the company decided to relocate. So, we put our plans on hold and relocated here,” she said. “We bought a house and were here before the company was.” Morrison said she loves her job and being able to work and live in Noblesville.

Besides complex assemblies (pictured) creates orthopedic implants such as bone screws, cervical plates, expandable interbody implants, fixation components, hooks, interbody cages, pedicle screws, rods and stackable cage systems.

“It’s great to see us growing the way we are,” she said. “I’m glad we’re in Noblesville and not Indy. You’re getting that small town feel but not as small as Rochester. I love the downtown and all the things they have.” Office Manager Tammy Ellet still commutes to work, but spends two days a week in the area visiting family and her grandchildren. “I live here partially,” she joked. “Noblesville is a great place. It still has that hometown feel but offers a lot of amenities that larger cities offer. It’s a great place. If it were up to me I’d live here.” By moving, RMI also increased its space from 9,000 to 33,000 square feet. “It was like going from a barn to a palace,” Ellet said. “We were very limited on office and manufacturing space and had outgrown the facility.” “We installed a Mazak Integrex i200S CNC machine that we just didn’t have space for in our old plant,” Evans said. “The Integrex multi-tasking automation technology gives us an incredible ability to machine small, highly complex parts meeting tight design and production schedules.”

Vice President David E. Langenkamp said the facility has 20 work centers that can produce 200 to 250 pieces a day. The average time per part is 30 minutes, but creation can take between 10 minutes to two and a half hours. “We keep running machines in 45-minute cycles,” Langenkamp said. “It’s sculpted from raw material.” Raw materials consist of titanium, stainless steel, aluminum, tantalum, special alloys and plastic resins. All unused chunks or filings are recycled. RMI creates orthopedic implants such as bone screws, cervical plates, expandable interbody implants, fixation components, hooks, interbody cages, pedicle screws, rods and stackable cage systems. The company also custom creates many products. “People who design the products, they’re in charge of all the distribution; we’re just the manufacturer,” Langenkamp said, adding the average lot size is 25 to 50. “We’re a job shop. We’re constantly the first to make it… The paper (documentation) weighs more than the job.” “Every product we manufacture starts as a 3-D mathematical model in our CAD/CAM system which is used to generate the programs for our CNC machines,” Evans said. “We have a great record of first-time success.” Noblesville has four medical-device manufacturers: RMI, Nexxt Spine, Helmer and King Systems. What separates RMI from others is it has passed formal certification audits to provide equipment to the aviation, defense and space industries such as engine components and braking and landing-gear systems. Evans said the move to aerospace manufacturing is a logical one for RMI because of the company’s experience in building precise medical instruments with critical tolerances, short cycle times and repeatable results. “We have always been in the failure-is-not-an-option business,” he said. “Having aerospace gets us in the door, where before you couldn’t get answers,” Langenkamp said. “We make highly precision products. That lends itself very much to avionics and the aerospace industries. We’ve engaged in discussions and are trying to make a splash… The sky is the limit.” Ellet said the company has 31 employees and is looking to fill another 10 positions in administration, quality control, manufacturing and engineering. Those interested can apply online at www. rmi.us.com.


8

July 9, 2013

Current in Noblesville

www.currentnoblesville.com

COMMUNITY

July 09, 2013

Water-treatment facility completed By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com Indiana American Water has completed construction of a new two million gallon per day water treatment facility in utilities Noblesville. The $3-million facility and related infrastructure is on the city’s north side along Allisonville Road. Officials said the improvements will increase capacity in the Noblesville system by almost a third for area customers. “This new facility puts us and the community in a great position as we head into the summer months when we typically see water usage significantly increase,” said IAW President Alan DeBoy. After drought conditions hit the Midwest last summer, IAW accelerated the Allisonville Road treatment facility project. Initially, a new well was placed in service temporarily and the company fast-tracked the project to build a new treatment facility and place new transmission water mains in service this spring. “Access to a reliable and adequate water supply and infrastructure is a key component of the success of our community,” said Noblesville Mayor John Ditslear. “We have worked closely with Indiana American Water over the last several years to upgrade our system here, and we appreciate the investments they have made to support our efforts to make Noblesville one of the best communities in the nation in which to

102 Wilshire Ct $599,900 BLC#21208700 Surround yourself with luxury in this fashionable 5BR/4+BA lakefront residence. 3 fireplaces. Office, sun room. Dock.

DALE MOORE 697-4321

Indiana American Water’s new $3-million facility is on the city’s north side along Allisonville Road. (Photo provided)

live and work.” Since 2007, IAW has completed several capacity related improvements in Noblesville worth more than $18 million. In addition to the Allisonville road project, the company also has added pumping and treatment capacity at the White River North Treatment Facility, constructed a one million gallon water tank near Promise Road and 186th Street, and installed a new booster station. DeBoy said these improvements increase the system pressure and production capacity of the Noblesville system. It will also enhance fire protection capabilities and the ability to move water when and where it is needed. IAW also invested $375,000 last year to retrofit almost all of the community’s fire hydrants with Storz quick-connect hydrant nozzles, which allow firefighters to connect to hydrants with a quick, quarter turn action. IAW’s Noblesville District has approximately 14,550 customer connections.

15976 Hargray Dr $286,900 BLC#21240408 Visualize the vibrant DALE charm of this exhilarating MOORE 4BR/3BA two-story. 3-car 697-4321 garage, gas fireplace. Office.

9536 Bay Vista E Dr $122,000 BLC#21237457 Home in on true contentDALE ment in this hospitable MOORE 2BR/2BA condo. Great 697-4321 room, vaulted ceilings, fine master suite. Deck.

We were Broad Ripple Heating and Air Conditioning.

WANTED: REWARD: Free Service Call with Repair. F o r m e r Cu s t o m e r s .

(4328)

A $79 value!

Learn more and get special savings at CO51300008

www.HowaldHeatingAndAir.com * Not valid for annual maintenance or Comfort FitTM Agreements.


potter's bridge fest / P7 • See inside for a special halloween Edition of Night & Day

LET US KE

YOU WARM AND ETP OASTY

THIS WINTER

SCHEDULE YOUR

Tuesday October 16, 2012

FURNACE TUNE

54

$

FURNACE

TUNE-UP

UP NOW!

Lic# CO5080

0234

www.SUMM

ERSPHC.com

Residential Customer Local ECRWSS

Carmel, IN Permit No. 713

©2012 IU Health 03/12 HY05812_4951 10.375” x 1.25” Front Strip Built at size (100%)

Nickel Plate Arts new executive director Aili McGill looks to expand organization, public participation / P12 Executive Director Aili McGill with pieces of the Salvage Art Exhibit, which were created from items found in the Judge Stone House during its renovation to the Nickel Plate Arts Campus in Noblesville. The exhibit is open noon to 5 p.m. Thursday and Friday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday.

U.S. Postage Paid Presorted Standard

Photo by Robert Herrington

When joint pain ends, an active life begins. ©2012 IU Health 03/12 HY05812_4951

05812_4951_IUHSAX_10.375x1.25_4c_SaxOrtho.indd 1

3/19/12 5:02 PM


COMMUNITY

Cover Story

Nickel Plate Arts new executive director Aili McGill looks to expand organization, public participation By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com Aili McGill’s love for the arts began at a young age. As a middle school student, she recalled how her quirky fun family had a “Von Trapp” vibe. “My mom would regularly write plays. We toured around doing plays at garden clubs throughout the state,” said the 30-year-old. Besides providing a foundation for her performing arts career, the garden club circuit is the root for her career in developing plays and programs. “I was always a successful student but informal learning is always when I was the most passionate and had the most fun,” she said. Two week ago, McGill began her new job as executive director of Nickel Plates Arts, which is headquartered in Noblesville’s Judge Stone House but has locations in Fishers, Cicero, Arcadia and Atlanta. “I hope my enthusiasm and professional experience give the organization a stable foundation to grow and blossom,” she said. “I hope in the next three to five years, Nickel Plates Arts is hooking people up with amazing art experiences that are inspiring. . . The slogan is ‘Unplug & Create’ and we want to get as many people as possible to do that.” McGill has lived in Noblesville for the past six years, but she knows the area well because her father has worked in the city for the past 15 years.

Alexis Reynolds draws a sunflower in the Acrylic Painting class. (Photo provided by Nickel Plate Arts)

“It’s incredibly exciting. We are finally embracing the fact that we are a cool place,” she said. “I was OK with the cultural opportunities here beforehand, but the fun stuff I did was in Marion County not Hamilton County. I’m so excited to be able to foster neat, quality fun things to do and stay in Hamilton County.” McGill, who does improv at ComedySportz Indianapolis, says she dabbles in art. Being a little modest, McGill has created two graphic

Meet Aili McGill Hometown: Fortville, Ind. Residence: Noblesville Education: Mt. Vernon High School, B.A.

in museum studies at Earlham College, M.A. in museum studies from IUPUI. Hobbies: Performs in ComedySportz Indianapolis. “Improv’s great because you don’t have to rehearse.” McGill also enjoys gardening, landscaping and her historic Noblesville home is an ongoing project. Awards: Conner Prairie Employee of the Year, 2006 Personal quote: “It’s not worth doing if it doesn’t have disastrous potential.” McGill explained that she’s not into crazy risk taking or change for change’s sake, but she looks for the greatest potential of every situation or project. “Taking risks and changing things up have never intimidated me.” 12 | October 16, 2012

novels – one for pleasure and one while working at Conner Prairie. “It’s very fair to call me a performing artist,” she jokingly stated. “I love being around artistic people. They inspire me to keep developing my skills. I dabble in arts and want to support them.” Prior to coming to Nickel Plate Arts, McGill was the director of operations at Conner Prairie. “I love Conner Prairie dearly; I’ll always be a big supporter,” she said. McGill worked for Conner Prairie for 12 years and started as the "carpenter’s daughter." “It was a summer job in college, but they kept promoting me,” she joked, adding that part of the reason for the change was to strengthen her administrative skills. “The potential here is limitless. I can walk to work and recognized I would be as creative in this job as I could be. I can develop and shepherd any crazy idea to its conclusion.” Drawing from her time at Conner Prairie, McGill said guest satisfaction and enjoyment are important to the organization’s schedule for programming and classes. “We can’t just do art for the artists’ sake or projects that make us happy,” she said. This year served as a pilot season for Nickel Plate Arts. As construction and renovation was taking place for the new headquarters, programming was concentrating on classes – which ones had interest and what price the public was comfortable in paying. “In 2013 we’re taking a broader approach,” said McGill. “We’re still figuring out what we are and look like.” That approach includes having a larger pres-

Current in Noblesville

ence within the Nickel Plate Arts Trail communities by providing opportunities for all age groups to be successful in all arts. Other potential programming could include cooking classes, progressive dinners, murder mysteries, improv comedy and artists doing work in front of the public. “It’s my goal to see a poetry slam happen in Hamilton County,” said McGill. “We are planning an art lab where people can wonder through and experiment with different art mediums.” The Nickel Plate Arts Campus in downtown Noblesville comprises the Judge Stone and Stephenson houses. Renovated space in the two buildings will provide classrooms, areas for exhibitions and seven artist studios. “We had far more interest in studios than space to give them,” said McGill, adding the organization’s long-term goal is to provide affordable studio space for artists. Campus space will be used flexibly to emphasize all arts – fine, sculpting, craft and performing arts “It’s a wonderful thing,” added artist John Reynolds. “I could tell you how important it (art) is. With the city and county to reopen it and be behind it like they are is just great.” Reynolds, a Noblesville resident who lives a few minutes away and has one of the seven studio spaces, spent the past 20 years driving to Indianapolis to work on his art. “The drive got worse every year,” he said. “All the (natural) light and old atmosphere is kind of fun.”

Know more

Upcoming events at the Nickle Plate Arts Campus in Noblesville include • Nov. 2 – Stories & Sweets. After enjoying soup from Noblesville’s finest restaurants during the First Friday event, come • Nov. 25 – Holiday crafts. Bring the whole family to the campus from noon to 4 p.m. to make a holiday craft before or after the 31st annual Noblesville Christmas Parade, which begins at 2 p.m. and will run through downtown. • Dec. 7 – Home for the Holidays. The exhibition room at the Judge Stone House will be filled with winter art and homemade holiday gifts from 5 to 9 p.m. Enjoy holiday music, light refreshments and buy local art for family and friends. For more information, visit www.nickelplatearts.org or call 848-3181. www.currentnoblesville.com

Economic