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SELECTED WORKS

01

The Workspace

Shophouse in Hoan Kiem District, Hanoi 02

Rochor Canal Community Hub Community hub with sporting facilities 03

Sinuation

Mixed-use recreational building in Hongdae Area on an infill site 04

Woodblock Museum

Museum at Sturdee Road for Lim Mu Hue woodblock works 05

Landscape Architecture Internship

Resort in Ubud, Bali. Jia Residential Development in Malaysia 06

The Room and a “Street”

Adapting Frank Lloyd Wright’s Architectural language into a room as a temporary dwelling for one person


01

THE WORKSPACE

Retaining residents, modernising the Ancient Quarters Year 4 Semester 1, 2017

The need for preservation of the Hanoi Ancient Quaters arises from issues of gentrification, the risk of being overty touristified, compounded by the mass migration of local residents in recent years.

To maintain the cultural richness of the Hanoi Ancient Quarters, the local residents and the younger generation has to remain and feel a sense of belonging to the place. Attention has been paid to preserving the physical buildings of the Ancient Quarters, but current conservation efforts lack the social aspect, of getting the local residents involved, giving them a say as to how they would like to preserve the place.

For the continued survival of the Ancient Quarters, modernisation is required. Promoting traditional trades artificially would be both costly to operate, with potentially no profits to be made. Instead of trying to recreate a medieval market place, a programmatic shift from the goods and service industries to a knowledge-based industry has to be made.

To provide residents with the choice of continuing to remain in the Ancient Quarters, tubehouses need to be able to accomodate multiple generations, while intensifying the space for commercial purposes, to gain more income from rental to cope with the rising cost of living.


THE (CONNECTED) SHOPHOUSE:

17 Bat Dan Street is home to an architect, his sister and nephew, his aged parents, and aunt and uncle. A cafe and co-working office space for freelance-workers occupy the front portion of the tubehouse.

Angle screens allow for directed views to the greenery in the courtyard, a shared space, while providing both visual privacy and maximum ventilation as opposed to other spatial solutions such as the walling off of residential spaces from the commercial spaces.

private; formal

public; formal

WORKSPACE MORPHOLOGY

PROGRAM DIAGRAM

semi-private; informal

semi-public; formal

public; semi-formal

public; informal


regular sized voids

two main voids, subsidiary ventilation shafts and light wells

VOID HIERARCHY

differentiated voids, with inclines according to daylight studies

RESIDENTIAL-COMMERCIAL CONFIGURATION

ELEVATION


PLANS

SECTION


DAYLIGHT STUDIES

Well lit spaces, without too large a difference in illuminance level to avoid visual strain from glare discomfort.

Min: 300 lux Max: 1500 lux Bright Pink: over 1500 lux Black: under 300 lux

Vertical incline of screens helped to double as a self-shading device for better light distribution.

NORTHEAST WINDS

SOUTHEAST WINDS

COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS STUDIES To assess the natural ventilation in the tube house, done in two stages. The larger domain includes the surrounding street blocks, to obtain the pressure values on the walls of the tubehouse in question. Those values are used as inputs for the second stage of CFD simulations. Higher middle block, to catch wind from both the Northeast and Southeast. Residential spaces all shifted to the back to obtain self-sustaining ventilation through stack effect. Final Design, with glass canopy over the back courtyard


VISUAL PRIVACY

A number of parameters were used to explore to achieve visual privacy between the public and private spaces of the tube house. They include the dimensions of the apertures, thickness of screens, angle of rotation, and vertical incline. Their performance were assessed based on illuminance levels and daylight autonomy.


Left: Back airwell in residential block. Right: Residential courtyard, as seen from porch in front of parent’s bedroom.

Left: Co-working space on second level. Right: Co-working space on third level looking towards mezzanine and open courtyard.


Residential courtyard, looking towards dining area on ground floor.


02

ROCHOR CANAL COMMUNITY HUB Community hub with sporting facilities Year 3 Semester 2, 2017

Masterplanning of the Rochor Canal area involved the coalescing of the apportioned and disconnected communal space in the neighbourhood give rise to a larger usable common space usable by the residents and the public.

The site is located at the Queen Street Bus terminal. To serve the residents of the neighbourhood, and two schools, and park goers of the canal, a community hub with sporting facilities is proposed. The centre includes a multipurpose plaza, climbing walls, a skate park, a gymnasium, a dance studio, a basketball court, classrooms, reading room and an auditorium. Anchoring the ancillaries are the two main spaces that occupy the centre of building: the multipurpose sunken plaza, and the basketball court.

This community hub promotes leisure through sports and fitness, allowing residents to engage in sports and leisure activities at their convenience. It is a breakaway from the strong commercial nature of the shop houses and malls in the surrounding areas.


AXES

CANAL CONNECTIV-

PROGRAM SUSTAINING CANAL

POROSITY OF RESIDENCE

LATERAL TIES


MASTERPLAN

COMMONSPACE

The coalescing of the apportioned and disconnected communal space in the neighbourhood give rise to a larger usable common space usable by the residents and the public. Porosity in the footprint of the residential buildings ensure that the canal is accessible by all. Two clear axis – a community–centric axis and a transportation thoroughfare allows for intuitive wayfinding, while also leading people to the canal. The open area by the canal serves as the confluence for the heart of this neighbourhood, where residential and civic and educational areas converge.


TRANSPORTATION THOROUGH-

CANAL


COMMUNITY AXIS

TRANSPORTATION THOROUGHFARE The Transportation Thoroughfare in this pedestrianized community connects Jalan besar MRT station, through a transport hub and bicycle rental, to Victoria Street where pedestrians can reach the bus stop or Bugis MRT. COMMUNITY AXIS An experiential journey from a community space with lush bio-swales and an open expanse that frames the waterfront, to the community centre and shared sporting field across the canal on one side, and the park and heritage cemetery on the other. CANAL The area along the canal has been extended to form a sunken plaza-like promenade, shaded by trees, that supports cycling and other activities. Retail as a program along the canal supports the interest and vitality of the canal, inviting people down from the main axes and neighbourhood.


The open ground floor invites visitors into the building from any corner. Retail stores flank the pedestrianised Arab Street of the transport thoroughfare, while the skate park is tucked next to the back of the church. The outdoor climbing wall forms the faรงade of one side of the building, making use of the area in front of the canal, capitalising views of the canal and the city. The hawker centre with seats spill over to the outside allow diners the choice of engaging with the internal plaza or dining by the canal and watching climbers scale the high wall.

On the second floor, a dance studio and auditorium faces the back of the church while the gym faces the canal. The civic functions (reading room and classrooms that double as workshop spaces) open to a corridor that doubles as a gallery, overlooking the sunken plaza below. The spectator stand allows people to watch the ongoing game or sit and socialise. The skylights around the basketball court allow a generous amount of light into the building. Physiotherapy rooms to provide for the needs of rehabilitating athletes and residents.


03

SINUATION

Mixed-use recreational building in Hongdae Area Year 3 Semester 1, 2016

Busking makes the cultural essense of the street. The SINUATION is a mixed used recreational building that acts as an extension of the busking street. It acomodates performance areas and audience seating, together with skateboarding as a program.

Where walls are required for structural support of the building, an undulating curve that melds walls to floors create an expansive feel intended in this open building, while still incorporates a sense of enclosure in the more formal spaces such as the auditorium and the rehearsal rooms.

On a street where the only places people pause at are smoking alleys, this building also provides a place both for lively activities, and for respite.


BASKERS’ STAGE APPROPRIATION The varying street levels provide stage opportunities for buskers in Hongdae, who appropriate ground space, steps or even planters to reach their audience. It is up to the performers’ personal preference whether they perform on a level higher than the audience, or in a reverse stage setting where the audience stands on higher ground to watch performances. Depending on spatial environment, such as the spill-over of a nearby store’s commodities onto the pedestrian path, or the presence of steps or planters behind, buskers may be surrounded by an audience, or perform to an audience in front as in a traditional setting. The planters along the path provide a sense of enclosure, as well as a demarcation of space that determines the proximity of the next busker.


ACCESS POINTS -- CARVING OUT REST SPACES The site is located in close proximity to several subway exits. The busy street is accessed mainly via pedestrian crossings from the main road, but also smaller lanes which link it to the next street, which experience varying degrees of traffic. Some of these smaller lanes provide temporary respite for smokers, thus becoming nodes of stillness amidst the bustling crowds.


OPACITY AND TRANSPARENCY To the pedestrian, the street appears as a spectrum of varying opacities, where differing levels of connection are established between the pedestrian and what he can see.

Elevation

Process Design Sections


During the day, accessible apertures at street level and signage directly in the pedestrian’s path are the most eye-catching and engaging, while apertures and signage above the field of vision allows the pedestrian to gain a sense of what is within the building, but only from the other side of the street. The second level windows are interpreted as less transparent than doors and windows on the ground floor. At night, the darkness of the street and the surroundings cause the pedestrian’s eye to be naturally drawn to brightly lit signs and windowvs instead of the path directly in front of him. The contrast between the bright lights indoors and the darkness is more obvious than obstacles such as signage on the pavement.

Elevation


Process Design Exploded Axonometric

Stage Typologies


SITE CONDITION There is a disconnect such as level difference of the ground, raised planters, soft edge provided by trees result in an experience of a vast chasm between adjacent street face Intervention: Protrusion of the building is visible from the other side of the main road, to meld the inside and the ouside seemlessly with continuation of performance spaces in a semi-formal setting that provides more sense of enclosure.

Audience’ Viewing Space Buskers’ Performance Space Practice Space

Skaters’ Area Buskers’ Performance Space


Design Concept: Synthesis of Structure

Response to Street

Exploded Axonometric Plan


South-East Elevation

North-West Elevation


Interior Spaces

Sectional Perspective


04

WOODBLOCK MUSEUM

Museum at Sturdee Road for Lim Mu Hue woodblock works Year 2 Semester 2, 2016

Envisioned as a extension of the back alley, a seamless continuation of the back lane into the compounds of the museum is created by internal spaces on the ground floor opening out to a generous courtyard. Seating on the wooden decking allows visitors and residents to pause and rest, generating a community space.

The second floor continues to facilitate the continuation of inside with the back lane through visual connectivity. The neighbourhood can be perceived from the inside through porous screens; movement and activities inside the workshop and the permanent gallery can be viewed from the outside.

Translucent screened portico affords an ambience of diffused lighting at parts of the building that is not shelter by the existing trees.


STURDEE ROAD

SITE PLAN


APPROACH

SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE

STREET ELEVATION


Loading/Unloading Meeting room Storage

Multi-purpose room Public workshop Courtyard Gift shop & cafe Entrance lobby

FIRST FLOOR PLAN


Temporary gallery

Private workshop Archive room Director's office

Lobby

Lobby Meeting room General office

Permanent gallery

Permanent gallery

Rooftop garden

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

SECTION A-A’

SECTION B-B’


COVER PLATE AT JOINTS IN ROOF EDGE METAL ROOF EDGE CURB BASE FLASHING, DAMP PROOF MEBRANE INSULATION INVERTED TEE CONCRETE BEAM SEALANT

600MM BY 600MM MARBLE TILING LATEX MODIFIED THINSET MORTAR PRESSURE-TREATED SLEEPER BASIC FLEX SPORT CUSHION DOUBLE TEE PRECAST CONCRETE (2440MM WIDE, 300MM DEEP) GYPSUM BOARD

STEEL HOLLOW SECTION GYPSUM BOARD STEEL STUD GYPSUM BOARD NANO CRYSTALISED WHITE GLASS STONE THREAD CLADDING VENTED RUBBER BASE 600MM BY 600MM MARBLE TILING LATEX MODIFIED THINSET MORTAR PRESSURE-TREATED SLEEPER BASIC FLEX SPORT CUSHION INVERTED TEE BEAM (300MM DEEP) GYPSUM BOARD 250MM BY 250MM REINFORCED CONCRETE COLUMN

ALUMINIUM FRAME 150MM WIDE TIMBER FINS 600MM BY 600MM MARBLE TILING LATEX MODIFIED THINSET MORTAR PRESSURE-TREATED SLEEPER BASIC FLEX SPORT CUSHION DAMP PROOF MEMBRANE 25MM BLINDING SLAB-ON-GRADE FOUNDATION CRUSHED STONE/GRAVEL

01| ISOMETRIC FACADE SECTION SCALE 1:25


DETAILED DESIGN Vertical panels enliven blank walls based on the pre-existing rhythms of the building’s apertures. The facade comprises two different finishes of wood that contribute to material richness and warmth. Inspired by how the shadows cast by the trees on site subtly informs viewers where the sun is in the sky, the facade design hangs slightly off the wall, allowing shadows to be projected onto the walls, a non-static nuance of the passing of time.

CAST-IN STEEL CHANNEL CONCRETE BEAM STEEL U CHANNEL ANGLE PLATE ALUMINIUM FRAME WOODEN FACADE BOLTED TO ALUMINIUM PLATE WELDED CONNECTIONS

03| WOODEN LOUVER FACADE DETAIL SCALE 1:10

STEEL HOLLOW SECTIONS L BRACKETS FASTERNERS OUTER THREAD PAD INNER THREAD PAD STAIRS THREAD (NANO CRYSTALISED WHITE GLASS STONE)


600MM BY 600MM MARBLE TILING LATEX MODIFIED THINSET MORTAR PRESSURE-TREATED SLEEPER BASIC FLEX SPORT CUSHION INVERTED TEE BEAM (300MM DEEP) GYPSUM BOARD 250MM BY 250MM REINFORCED CONCRETE COLUMN

600MM BY 600MM MARBLE TILING LATEX MODIFIED THINSET MORTAR PRESSURE-TREATED SLEEPER BASIC FLEX SPORT CUSHION INVERTED TEE BEAM (300MM DEEP) GYPSUM BOARD 250MM BY 250MM REINFORCED CONCRETE COLUMN

03| WOODEN LOUVER FACADE DETAIL SCALE 1:10

03| WOODEN LOUVER FACADE DETAIL SCALE 1:10 STEEL HOLLOW SECTIONS L BRACKETS FASTERNERS OUTER THREAD PAD INNER THREAD PAD STAIRS THREAD (NANO CRYSTALISED WHITE GLASS STONE)

ALUMINIUM FRAME 150MM WIDE TIMBER FINS 600MM BY 600MM MARBLE TILING LATEX MODIFIED THINSET MORTAR PRESSURE-TREATED SLEEPER BASIC FLEX SPORT CUSHION DAMP PROOF MEMBRANE 25MM BLINDING SLAB-ON-GRADE FOUNDATION CRUSHED STONE/GRAVEL

ALUMINIUM FRAME 150MM WIDE TIMBER FINS 600MM BY 600MM MARBLE TILING LATEX MODIFIED THINSET MORTAR PRESSURE-TREATED SLEEPER BASIC FLEX SPORT CUSHION DAMP PROOF MEMBRANE 25MM BLINDING SLAB-ON-GRADE FOUNDATION CRUSHED STONE/GRAVEL

STEEL HOLLOW SECTIONS L BRACKETS FASTERNERS OUTER THREAD PAD INNER THREAD PAD STAIRS THREAD (NANO CRYSTALISED WHITE GLASS STONE)

01| ISOMETRIC FACADE SECTION SCALE 1:25

04| STAIRS DETAIL SCALE 1:10

C FACADE SECTION

STAIRS DETAIL

LIGHT GAUGE STEEL STUDS GYPSUM BOARD DAMP PROOF MEMBRANE

CORBEL COLUMN REINFORCING STEEL BARS INVERTED TEE BEAM

02| PRECAST CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SYSTEM

05| METAL STUD WALL SYSTEM

SCALE 1:10

SCALE 1:10

04| STAIRS DETAIL SCALE 1:10

LIGHT GAUGE STEEL STUDS GYPSUM BOARD DAMP PROOF MEMBRANE

TEEL BARS EAM

CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SYSTEM

METAL STUD WALL SYSTEM 05| METAL STUD WALL SYSTEM SCALE 1:10


01| ISOMETRIC FACADE SECTION SCALE 1:25

CORBEL COLUMN REINFORCING STEEL BARS INVERTED TEE BEAM

02| PRECAST CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SYSTEM

1:10 PRECASTSCALE CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SYSTEM

COVER PLATE AT JOINTS IN ROOF EDGE METAL ROOF EDGE CURB BASE FLASHING, DAMP PROOF MEBRANE INSULATION INVERTED TEE CONCRETE BEAM SEALANT

600MM BY 600MM MARBLE TILING LATEX MODIFIED THINSET MORTAR PRESSURE-TREATED SLEEPER BASIC FLEX SPORT CUSHION DOUBLE TEE PRECAST CONCRETE (2440MM WIDE, 300MM DEEP) GYPSUM BOARD

CAST-IN STEEL CHANNEL CONCRETE BEAM STEEL U CHANNEL ANGLE PLATE ALUMINIUM FRAME WOODEN FACADE BOLTED TO ALUMINIUM PLATE WELDED CONNECTIONS

600MM BY 600MM MARBLE TILING LATEX MODIFIED THINSET MORTAR PRESSURE-TREATED SLEEPER BASIC FLEX SPORT CUSHION INVERTED TEE BEAM (300MM DEEP) GYPSUM BOARD 250MM BY 250MM REINFORCED CONCRETE COLUMN

WOODEN LOUVER FACADE DETAIL 03| WOODEN LOUVER FACADE DETAIL SCALE 1:10


05

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE INTERNSHIP Resort in Ubud, Bali. Jia Residential Development, Malaysia Year 2 Summer break, 2016


JIA RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT, MALAYSIA [BELOW] Research on the preferences of generation Y buyers, specific to trends in Malaysia. The project includes themed function rooms that act as extension of the living room for the residents

RESORT IN UBUD, BALI [LEFT] Resort rooms to capitalise on the views offered byt the natural landscape. The bridge across the steep valley connects the reception area that encompasses the original village temple, to the rooms. The project includes facilities like pools, restaurants, gym, and spa, and meditation areas which form draws inspiration from traditional padi terraces.


06

THE ROOM AND A ‘STREET’

Adapting Frank Lloyd Wright’s Architectural language into a room as a temporary dwelling for one person. Year 1 Semester 2, 2015

The Architectural language is adapted to make a room for one person as a temporary dwelling. The dwelling unit encompasses an entrance that relates to the street, a space for a bed, a space for study table suitable for reading, wardrobe for clothes, a toilet, a space to prepare food, a space for a visitor to sit and converse, and fenestration that is appropriate for views and light.

Based on the precedent study of Jacob Herbert house, the plan of the dwelling is derived from a 15 cm square grid. Due to site constraints, the polliwog form that characterises Usonian houses is reinterpreted as the sequence of circulation through the house in the progression from a less intimate to the most intimate space.

Different ceiling and roof levels demarcate the degree of intimacy of the space. Full-length window walls of the front façade let in generous amounts of light, and blurs the boundaries between inside and outside through visual connectivity.


The design process starts of by locating the heart of the house, the hearth. This is followed by the adding of the living zone, and bedroom and study. Inflections of the exterior corners give rise to the nooks in the interior, or furniture that are flushed with walls. The masonry core and other masonry walls anchor the cantilevered roofs. The board and batten walls are modularized and help to organise different elements of the house in terms of height.

Different ceiling heights define the spaces. The taller ceilings of the living room and dining area makes the space feel expansive, while the lower ceilings of more private areas such as the gallery and the bedrooms provides a cosier atmosphere. The core which consists of utilities such as the kitchen and toilets have the highest ceilings. The public faรงade is shielded for privacy, with clerestory window to let in light. The private faรงade lined with window walls, bring the outside in, making a seamless transition between when the house ends and the garden begins.


Organization of furniture, apertures, and roof levels through modularized height system. Perspectives of bedroom, and study room from the gallery.


The thicker walls of textile block construction form the core and the gallery, while board and batten makes up the rest of the walls. The clerestory windows are recessed to let diffused light in deeper. Inflections on the external faรงade reflect the niches and spaces within the dwelling, and cantilevered roofs spreading out from the core emphasizes the horizontality of the dwelling.


The dwelling built as a 1:1 installation, out of cardboard. The site: concourse in front of NUS Museum.


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