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C hloe M arce la C oe lho

Exper ience

Por t f olio 2 019


Chloe Marcela Coelho Bachelor of Industrial Design (Honours) Experience Portfolio This portfolio was created for the sole intention of showcasing personal projects completed in RMIT and outside of it. Š 2019 Chloe Coelho


Design creates culture. Culture shapes values. Values determine the future. — Robert L. Peters

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Prof essional Por tf olio

Product Design

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Connected Health Dirt Dreams Gilded Lillies Heavy Metal + Light Metal

Service Design

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Design for Dementia

Experience Design

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Uncomfortable Immersion

Graphic Design

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Grad Ex Exposure Marketing Co

Robert L. Peters Quote i

CAD

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10

Life Size FEA Ceramic Tiles Ceramic Cups

Visualisation Sketching Illustration

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PRODUCT DESIGN

CO N N E C T E D H E A LT H This medical based studio was conducted within an industry context where students designed a product to address the needs of a particular disease area. My project centred around SIDS. Semester 2, 2015

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PRODUCT DESIGN Connect ed Healt h

R ES EA RC H SIDS is the sudden and unexpected death of an infant between 1-12 months of age. It’s characterised as an instant traumatic event occuring in the brain stem. There is not much else known about its locality aside from the area in which it occurs. Prevention Methods: - Laying a baby on their back when sleeping - Keeping the baby’s crib clear of toys and pillows - Using a firm mattress - Keeping the baby at a comfortable temperature - Swaddling the baby safely - Not smoking around the baby or during pregnancy - Breastfeeding the baby My device aims to remotely and unobtrusively monitor using Doppler Radar technology with added features and benefits which make this product value for money.

CO R E A I M S

$ Ease of use

Safety

Affordability

US ER INS IG HTS

Parents or Carers

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Doctors + Nurses

SIDS + KIDS


PRODUCT DESIGN Connect ed Healt h

CON C E P T The developed concept centred around my gooseneck version, working out the clamping mechanism and the gooseneck swivel and ball bearing mechanism. The mobile contains doppler radar technology to remotely detect the baby’s vitals without physical contact. The ‘head’ would contain the technology required whilst the body clamps onto cots. The clamps themselves have a rolling joint, much like a ball and socket, to have a greater range of grip and universal sizing.

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PRODUCT DESIGN Connect ed Healt h

R EF INEM ENT

The refinement of the concept focused largely around working out the finer details of the product, such as the ball bearing mechanism and how the ratcheting system (or otherwise) will work.

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PRODUCT DESIGN Connect ed Healt h

446

With a swivel goose neck and a ratchet system based clamp, it appeals with its user friendliness. The soft, organic shapes are visually friendly for the sleepy infant.

220 528

116

141

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PRODUCT DESIGN Connect ed Healt h

S TORYBOA RD

Clamp the Dino Sense

Tucking in the baby,

mobile on the side of the cot

using Safe Sleeping

wherever is appropriate, use

practices, made easier

a simple pushing motion.

with the rotational neck. Power on the device.

Baby starts to fall asleep.

It is out of the parents hands now. Hopefully the baby will pull through.

“To give your baby CPR first you.....”

000 The baby gets taken to the

During the night the device remotely

hospital immediately.

registers the lack of heartbeat or dangerous levels and alerts the parent’s Dino Sense mobile and Parent Device.

When the heart stops, the device on (or around) the baby sends a signal to the monitor to automatically call 000. While this is happening the parent is being instructed via device on baby, on giving CPR.

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PRODUCT DESIGN Connect ed Healt h

Item

Qty

1

1

Neck Right

2

1

Neck Left

3

1

Body 1 of 1

4

1

Body 1 of 2

5

1

Body 2 of 1

the two doppler radar nodes, microphone, bluetooth and

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1

Body 2 of 2

infrared camera glued to the circuit board underneath and the

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1

Storage

LEDs, button parts and CPR chip on the top.

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1

Top

9

1

Bottom

10

2

Buttons

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1

Top Bearing

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1

Bottom Bearing

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11

14

4

Clamps

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1

Release Lever

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1

Ratchet

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1

USB Port

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1

Battery

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1

Pawl

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1

PCB

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11

LED Ring

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1

CPR Chip

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1

Speaker

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1

Bluetooth

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1

Infrared Camera

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1

Microphone

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2

Doppler Radar

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2

Button Spring/LED

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2

LED Diffuser

EX P LO D ED V IEW

The baby monitor has two separate assemblies; the body and the neck which are assembled in different directions/ axis. This component has the most detail in the product with

Top View

Bottom View

Description

Ball Bearings

1

7


PRODUCT DESIGN Connect ed Healt h

S UP P O RT IN G P ROD U C TS

The Dino Sense Monitor comes with a touchscreen parent device (optional) for a more advanced user system and video streaming capabilities. The app is free from purchase and has a more simplified layout for the user. You can calculate the heartbeat of your baby at the press of a button. It also features remote control of the device, temperature readings and helpful tips. With every model comes 3 plastic spine caps that can be stored in the device. With these you can attach various toys with any medium for the full baby mobile experience.


PRODUCT DESIGN Connect ed Healt h

TE S R

R OT

S

S H I N E S

A

T

TA T ES

H

O

LI G

E

RO TAT

C L A M P S D O W N

To create the night light effect the coin cell battery was placed inside the head along with an LED taped to it.

P ROTOT Y P E

The half scale model has a rotatable goose neck, compartment for placing an LED and a bolt & thread method of clamping. The rotatable gooseneck is a custom made method due to the difficulty of finding OEM parts to mimic the ball bearing mechanism. The compartment in the head is to show proof of concept of the night light idea by simply placing an LED and coin cell battery inside. To create the clamping mechanism I split the front into two halves and placed a nut inside.

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PRODUCT DESIGN

DIRT DREAMS This studio explored the rigors of slip-cast production; basic mold-making, casting and glazing techniques to become familiar with batch produced lead times. This was accompanied by parametric modelling in Grasshopper and Rhino. Semester 2, 2016

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PRODUCT DESIGN Dir t Dreams

R ES EA RC H ­— CER A M I C C U P S

The brand for my cup design and packaging was Far North Spirits which is based in Minnesota, United States of America. Gustaf Navy strength gin contains 57% Alcohol Volume which perfectly suits the chilly Minnesotan winter. The extra strength helps to keep warm in winter, which is what gin was used for when British Troops fought during the Thirty Years’ War (1618 to 1648) to keep them warm during the damp temperature.

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PRODUCT DESIGN Dir t Dreams

CO N CEP T S K ETC HES

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PRODUCT DESIGN Dir t Dreams

M O LD M A K IN G

Once the CAD model of the cup was completed in Solidworks it was then converted to an .stl file which is standard for 3D printing. In order to check the quality of the object however, I imported it into Rhino and issued the command ‘check’ to search for any inconsistencies in the edges and if it is a ‘good’ mesh. This is a good way to check files that have been baked from grasshopper (ie. solidified in Rhino as a mesh) to ensure that it will succeed as a 3D print. Once printed it was packed with plastic (sculptural) clay and sanded.

S LIP C A S T IN G

One of the first steps was setting up the plaster moulds in a tray in case of any leakage. The 5L slips buckets needed to be given a rough stir while in the bucket. Here I’ve taken a small sample of the thicker slip and added some water to it, leaving it to dry out to test the new thickness. This was partially successful, I needed to keep adding some water and adding that mixture slowly to the large bucket. The slip was sieved through a very fine mesh that was originally meant for cultures in biology. After pouring, the plaster mould were left to drip dry upside down and on an angle.

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PRODUCT DESIGN Dir t Dreams

F IRIN G + G L A Z IN G

The whole glazing process took place at Northcote Pottery in a single day. It’s a mad dash to create as many interesting combinations as possible. To glaze simply dip the ceramics into the mixture for an average of 4 seconds and remove, it should dry off soon after.

F IN A L F IR E

This is the cup that I want to replicate because it best matches the branding and history of navy strength gin. It uses he correct colour palette, simplified form and takes texture cues from the moodboard: reminiscent of cold winter weather to emulate the navy history of this type of Gin. The diagonal dips relate to some of the simple geometry seen in the Alcohol bottle. Here are just some examples of the interesting glazing that came out of that session.

Final cup set + box for Gustaf Navy Strength Gin

2016

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PRODUCT DESIGN Dir t Dreams

R ES EA RC H — CER A M I C T I L E S

This tile project was done in conjunction with another group member: Anthony Dinh and we chose to explore the potential further use of ceramic tiles in hospitals. Our proposed tile design aims to purify the air inside patient rooms and corridors to bring a calming, aesthetic form to the hospital environment. Hence why we proceeded with an organic shape. Hospitals use ceramic tiles as an important part of their operating theatres because of a unique glazing that purifies the air and is sterile to clean. There is an example in Mexico of a hospital building that has ceramic tiles covering the exterior which purifies the polluted air around it utilising the special glazing formula. In addition to the obvious benefits of purifying the interior patient rooms and corridors of a hospital, the tiles can benefit people that are afflicted by Sick Building Syndrome (SBS). This describes a scenario in which occupants of a building experience adverse health effects ‘that seem to be linked directly to the time spent in the building. No specific illness or cause can be identified.’ Some of the listed factors that may be responsible for the syndrome as a chemical contaminant are outdoor pollutants and indoor volatile organic compounds such as ‘adhesives, upholstery, carpeting, copy machines, manufactured wood products, pesticides, cleaning agents, etc.’ Biological contaminants to the air can include ‘pollen, bacteria, viruses, fungus, molds, etc.’ Mold and damp walls can also contaminate the air.

Mexico City Hospital Tiles

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PRODUCT DESIGN Dir t Dreams

Grasshopper Packaged Script

CON CEP T In researching Sine waves, we came across a script that showed us how to create a wave. From then on we altered the Sine function in Maths to a Cosine function; this changed where the wave begins in the series. In addition we fixed the coordinates of where these profile are located to coincide with the base profile. Concept Design

Grasshopper Tile Render

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PRODUCT DESIGN Dir t Dreams

PA RA M ET RIC VA R IAT I O N S

For the Base Profile parameter you can alter the circle radius’ of the base profile for more variation when it’s tessellated by using the Circle Radius Sliders. In the Wave Profile Middle section, the central curve can be altered in height from two point and the degree of curvature is altered through the location of the two points on the x and y axis. While two halves of the tiles are similar, the profiles that created the Cosine waves were done separately to allow for a greater degree of parameters as we determines that the client would be focused on the finer details for the hospital environment. The amplitude multiplier determines the height of the wave from the baseline to the highest point while the wave frequencies is the number of waves. The sweeps width can likewise be altered up to a limited point so that there are no undercuts.

Here are the different circle radius.

This is the Middle curve with altering curvature.

These are the various amplitudes and frequenies.

Here is the Sweep widths.

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PRODUCT DESIGN Dir t Dreams

M O LD M A K IN G

In researching Sine waves, we came across a script that showed us how to create a wave. From then on we altered the Sine function in Maths to a Cosine function; this changed where the wave begins in the series. In addition we fixed the coordinates of where these profile are located to coincide with the base profile.

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PRODUCT DESIGN Dir t Dreams

F IR IN G Here are the tiles after being bisque fired. Due to not being able to glaze, we have elected to keep one tile each before they are high fired as we want to try glazing them after this studio. The rest of the 17 tiles were then put back in the kiln on their sides and high fired.

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PRODUCT DESIGN Dir t Dreams

R E S U LT High fired tiles. Colour palette from the top right clockwise is; white, light grey, medium grey and dark grey. There are many intriguing tessellations that can arise from arranging these tiles, more can be possible with the inclusion of other parameters.

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PRODUCT DESIGN

GILDED LILLIES This project focused solely on the prototyping and finishing aspects of lighting design and ceramic production; neither of which I had prior experience with when I commenced this project. Semester 1, 2016

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PRODUCT DESIGN Gilded Lillies

OBJ ECT IV E For the semester, in consultation with the lecturer my lighting concept sketches were far more interesting and challenging for me to undertake. For this I chose a simple looking pendant light form, however as I would come to realise, the simple form was a complex one to prototype. The concept behind the form was made with the intention of using an edison bulb styled filament. The cut side profile was an attempt to bare the bulb instead of hiding it away as well as highlighting the warmth in the interior walls.

363.1 O/A

26.8

TOP ELEVATION

12

ISOMETRIC VIEW SCALE 1:4 2

A

331.7 O/A

1

A 215.6 O/A

SIDE ELEVATION

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FRONT ELEVATION

SECTION A-A SCALE 1:4


PRODUCT DESIGN Gilded Lillies

M O LD M A K IN G

For my chosen concept, I decided to work with two primary materials. Originally it was a ceramic body of porcelain and a separate lip made from timber. In discussion with my lecturer and an expert ceramicist they all recommended that I do not use timber. Trying to line the joins up would be too much taxing work. Likewise for the top piece; 2mm wall thickness was too thin and was liable to snap. I had planned on using maple for these part and chose to use metal; specifically brass, instead. In consultation with Pie Bolton down at the ceramics department of RMIT, she recommended I use Walker’s number 10 slip. This is stoneware which she also advised that should be of a 7-10mm thickness. Both Pie Bolton and Judith Glover told me that stoneware once fired has less of a chance of warping when fired because Porcelain (especially Southern Ice) deforms the most despite the benefit of also being one of the strongest clays.

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PRODUCT DESIGN Gilded Lillies

S LIP C A S T IN G + M E TA L FA B R I C AT I ON

To cut the intensive labour of sanding after the work was fired, I would focus more on sanding it before firing in it’s bone dry state. I would also move the cord hole in the main body so that it’s easier to balance the piece. One of the most important things I would change would be to spray the lip and let it dry with more patience. I’ve have the most disasters happen in spraying and the paint dripping because there’s too much. In retrospect I would try to cut down the cost as much as possible so that it’s easier to manufacture and market despite the very hand crafted aspect of my lights. I am still quite happy with the end results for never having made a product before and I hope to put this level of detail and care into future prototypes I make.

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PRODUCT DESIGN Gilded Lillies

GILDED LILLIES

The pair of pendant lights were also exhibited at Melbourne Fringe Furniture Festival at Abbotsford Convent.

2016

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PRODUCT DESIGN

H E AV Y M E TA L + L I G H T M E TA L The focus of this studio was to explore the fabrication of ferrous and non-ferrous metals through metal smithing, casting and finishing techniques; in conjunction with studying the history of craftsmanship to inform the design of our final artefact. Semester 1, 2015

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PRODUCT DESIGN Hea vy Me t al + Light Me t al

R ES EA RC H Initial research began with broadening our understanding of craftsmanship to the recent design eras so that we may draw upon the styling for inspiration. One of the industry precedents that I researched was Thomas Feitchner who has many varied manufacturing processes he experiments with. I was intrigued with his traditional cutlery process and I was inspired by the style and ideology of Art Nouveau.

CON CEP T Ideation began with freeform sketches exploring the pure shapes that the final product could undertake. The goal was to create something more simplistic than the first version, however complex enough to utilise a wider array of manufacturing processes. From there translating the sketch to something tangible was the real challenge in producing the final sketch (image on the right).

1

2

30

3

Thomas Feitchner


PRODUCT DESIGN Hea vy Me t al + Light Me t al

FA BRIC AT ION T EC HN I QU E S

The Heavy metal component of the studio focused on the necessary skills for the cutting, grinding, blacksmithing, tap & die, twisting and bending of Mild Steel. The Light metal component of the studio focused on small scale casting, filing, jewellery making and finishing techniques such as sandblasting, powdercoating, polishing, brushed and hammered for textured effects.

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PRODUCT DESIGN Hea vy Me t al + Light Me t al

P ROTOT YP IN G The top half of the cutlery was made by using a water jet cutter on 3mm of mild steel to attain the flat shapes and then the pieces were rounded on metal jigs. The spoon was repeatedly heated using the Oxy-acetylene torch and hammered over a spoon dome while the curvature of the fork was cold hammered over a steel cylinder. The spoon detail where the handle and the head meet up was cut with a jewellers saw and held in place with pieces of foam because of its shape.

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PRODUCT DESIGN Hea vy Me t al + Light Me t al

F IN A L A RT E FAC TS

The handles were made by creating a jig with two 10mm pipes/rods and using the Oxy-acetylene torch to bend the 5mm rods around and twisting them using the length as hand holds. The cap on the end of the knife is a small casted sleeve.

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SERVICE DESIGN

DESIGN FOR DEMENTIA The design for dementia studio was a research context studio where students worked to create either a service or a product in response to some of the research that interested us regarding problem areas in dementia. Semester 1, 2016

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SERVICE DESIGN Design f or Dementia

AGED 65 + 1 in 10 have dementia

AGED 85 + 1 in 3 have dementia

2050

R ES EA RC H

135.5

Dementia is an epidemic worldwide. By the year 2050, millions of people will have it. Improving the awareness and understanding of dementia across all levels of society is needed to decrease discrimination and to improve the quality of life for people with dementia and their caregivers. (WHO | “10 facts on dementia”, 2016)

This means many people will become carers, either as family or personal care assistants (PCAs). The strain of caring includes “physical, emotional and economic pressures” (WHO | 10 facts on dementia”, 2016). According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), early diagnosis and treatment improves the quality of life for people with dementia and their families.

By 2050, it is predicted that 135.5 million people globally will have dementia.

EVERY

4

SECONDS

A new case of dementia is diagnosed every 4 seconds.

AT PRESENT

$

604

BILLION ANNUALLY

Currently the health care cost of dementia is $604 billion annually.

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SERVICE DESIGN Design f or Dementia

Psychologist visits Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Social Skills Training Psychotherapy

Psychiatrist visits

THERAPY

Antipsychotic agents

MEDICATION

MENTAL DISORDERS Social Cue Recognition

Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs)

Behaviours

Disinhibition

Aggression

Psychostimulant agents Cholinesterase inhibitors

Anger Management Concentration

M A P P IN G US ER NEE D S

Frontotemporal dementia is nerve cell damage that leads to a loss of brain functions and deterioration in their personality, language abilities, muscle/motor functions and behaviours. Typically it can occur as early as a persons 30s up to 60s. Behaviour Variant Frontotemporal Dementia BvFTD is one of the most common type/symptoms which result in personality, behavioural, judgement and empathy changes.

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SERVICE DESIGN Design f or Dementia

P ER S ON A Early Stages

Late Stages

Memory Orientation Vision Communication

She hopes to retain as much of her empathy as possible to be able to care for her family. She hopes this service will encourage and enable her to do this and also assist her in conversing with others. ILLNESSESS

A DVO C AT I ON + D E C I S I ON MAKING

MARGARET BROT AGE 76 SEX Female MARITAL Married LOCATION Melbourne, VIC OCCUPATION Was a Baker LANGUAGE German / English

Due to Margaret’s failing cognitive abilities, she has discussed (in the presence of a GP) that she would like her eldest daughter to advocate and make decisions on her behalf when the GP recognises that she is no longer able to do so on her own.

Margaret is showing the early stages of Behavioural Variant Frontotemporal Dementia (bvFTD). She has difficulties navigating through social situations and the finer nuances of senses other peoples emotions are lost on her, along with starting to lose some of her empathy.

“I don’t want to change, I love my family” — Margaret Brot

- Type 1 diabetes - Uses a cane

S TA K E H OL D E R 38

MAPPING


SERVICE DESIGN Design f or Dementia

CON CEP T The premise of my service is using google glass and microexpression technology to enable the wearer with dementia (who suffers from apathy) to recognise the emotions of others and keeps them in touch with their own. The technology that my service will implement is google glass, a form of augmented reality. The user interface is is simple and based on touch swiping the right side of the frame. It features an easily toggled standby mode so that it’s never in the way. A small landscape ‘card’ screen is in front of your eyes when the glass is activated and here you can swipe through different menus. In the functions of the glass, you can take a picture using the inbuilt camera. Through this, my services’ facial recognition software is implemented to recognise microexpressions and thus the emotions of the other person. My software however will automatically ‘recognise’ the other persons face in real time after 4 seconds when staring directly at them for this amount of time.

TOUC HP OINTS 1

2

consultation

In this pre-service stage, the user is in consultation with a psychologist or psychiatrist (after talking to their local GP and a neurologist consultation), in which they recommend ways to manage the behavioural symptoms of bvFTD. Social Savvy is recommended here.

3

app

The application’s primary function is to act as a supporting external software from the smart glasses. Its main features include learning, social tips, feedback, wayfinding, talk to a friend and information/support.

set up

A service employee comes by to first consult with the bvFTD sufferer with a family or carer present for support and later it is delivered to them by the service provider who can assist in setting up the device and explaining to a family or carer how to input familiar faces. 4

use

The user wears the glasses which recommends courses of action and relays what emotion the person facing them is feeling in order to assist the user in realising what they can do in a situation where someone is sad or angry. The smart glasses also have a wayfinding option.

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SERVICE DESIGN Design f or Dementia

US ER J OURNEY

I looked at the user’s journey through diagnosis to methods of coping with bvFrontotemporal Dementia (bvFTD) with the added assistance of my service. In this I have used my persona (Margaret Brot) in creating a character that we may empathise with. .

Two Weeks Later

Margaret is diagnosed with Frontotemporal Dementia after visits to her local GP and other specialists.

Her symptoms regarding social cues and behaviours are getting worse, sometimes being too open with strangers.

Medications such as antidepressants and forms of psychological therapies are available. This is where our service is recommended.

One Weekend Later Compulsive behaviours and disinhibition can be controlled with psychotic agents.

A service representative comes by to set up the glasses and app. Margaret is tech savvy.

Margaret is taught how to input familiar faces onto the app which connects to the google glass.

A Few Years Later

She is now able to recognise her grandson’s (Ben’s) unusual behaviour.

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When Ben looks at her, the glasses display the emotion that he is feeling to margaret through visual symbols.

She then moves to comfort him.

She managed to hold onto what makes her herself, for as long as she can. Easing the burden on her family.


SERVICE DESIGN Design f or Dementia

P ROTOT YP E This application is a part of my service that works in conjunction with the google glass to bring about an easier mode of practice and communication with a psychologist, psychiatrist, family or carer. This application is a part of my service that works in conjunction with the google glass to bring about an easier mode of practice and communication with a psychologist, psychiatrist, family or carer.

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EXPERIENCE DESIGN

UNCOMFORTABLE IMMERSION This project explores ways in which adolescents are able to experience grief at different times after a close death by proposing the use of storytelling and rituals through varying scenarios. In literature, both storytelling and rituals have been identified as a powerful resource for the personalisation of the grieving process. Semester 1 + 2, 2018

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EXPERIENCE DESIGN U ncomf or t able Immersion

.

P ROJ ECT A BS T RACT

The institutionalisation of death has resulted in a collective misconstruction of grief within our society. People are unprepared to let the grieving take place and instead, there is an expectation that those grieving hide their emotional depth and avoid showing their vulnerability. This is particularly true for grieving teenagers who are too often treated as either children or adults, when they are not. It alienates them and may discourage them from talking and dealing with their grief in the way that they choose, or need, to do. At a time of enormous physical and mental changes, when they are reevaluating their self-identity and relationship with their parents or carers, the death of someone they are close to is devastating. Initial support is crucial and it is received from family and community during and shortly after a funeral. However, it is in the initial six to twelve months after a death, that most support is unavailable when it is needed most. This project explores ways in which adolescents are able to experience grief at different times after a close death by proposing the use of storytelling and rituals through varying scenarios. In literature, both storytelling and rituals have been identified as a powerful resource for the personalisation of the grieving process. The scenarios proposed include three different grieving ritual experiences of; honouring the death, letting go and self-transformation. The scenarios would allow teenagers to experience and deal with feelings of sorrow and grief which can come crashing down with a frightening intensity. Using a humancentred design approach the project allows the uncovering of the emotional and complex within grief. It allows adolescents the creation of their own journey with the awareness and skills to survive. Design adds value through the use of tools and methods in order to humanise the grieving experience.

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EXPERIENCE DESIGN U ncomf or t able Immersion

G R IEF Grief is the feeling of intense sorrow and loss. It is not sequential or in defined ‘stages’. The Five Stages of Grief does more harm than good. There is a difference between Pain vs. Suffering and allowing people to feel that pain is important.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Denial Anger Bargaining Depression Acceptance

There are three deaths. The first is when the body ceases to function. The second is when the body is consigned to the grave. The third is that moment, sometime in the future, when your name is spoken for the last time.

­­— David Eagleman

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EXPERIENCE DESIGN U ncomf or t able Immersion

AC K NOW L E D G E T H E RE A L I T Y O F T H E D E AT H

M o vin g f ro m “H e a d Un d e r s t a n d in g ” t o “H e a r t Un d e r s t a n d in g ”

M OV E TOWA RD T H E PA I N O F T H E LO S S

RE CE IVE O N G OIN G SUPPORT F R OM OTHE R S

Fune r al s c rea t e a soci a l st a t em ent where t he be re avi ng i s op en a nd a ccep t i ng of su p p or t

E xpre s s in g pa in f ul t h o ug h t s a n d fe e lin g s

.

MOURNING NEEDS

SE A R C H FO R M E A N IN G

RE M E M B E R T H E P E RS O N W H O D I E D

Ask i n g t he “ why ” q u est i ons a nd t he re a l i sa t i on t ha t we wi l l di e t oo

T h e d e c e a s e d m o ve f ro m a ph y s ic a l pre s e n c e t o a m e mo r y D E V E LO P A NE W S E L F- I D E NT I T Y

S el f- i d e n t it y c h a n g e s , f un e r a ls a re a s o c ia l set t i n g fo r w h ic h t o d e f in e o ur n e w ro le s

LO S S O R I E N TAT I O N Conf ronting grie f he ad on De nial or avoidanc e of re storation Re minisc ing

R E S TO R AT I O N O R I E N TAT I O N Change s of role in f amily Distrac tion of grie f

E VE R Y D AY L I F E E X P E R I E N C E S

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G R I E F M OD E L S

Mourning Needs by Alan Wolfelt Illustrated by Chloe Marcela Coelho 2018 (above) and the Dual Process Model of Coping with Bereavement (left).


EXPERIENCE DESIGN U ncomf or t able Immersion

Denial

Cultural

Personal

Literature insights Interview insights

Problem-solving

DATA SYNT HES IS

Mind mapping multiple themes and issues that were repeated across multiple sources. This simple method of recording helped to organise my thoughts around the vast topic (right). In my perceptual mapping (or Literature and Interview Matrix), each dot represents a theme in which the qualitative data correlated with personal issues and problem-solving the most within this grief matrix.

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EXPERIENCE DESIGN U ncomf or t able Immersion

CON CEP TS Using Value Mapping and Affinity Diagramming, the tangible outcomes for this project became clearer and clearer. I decided to create something that was guided by my personal experience of grief, to use that experience to add value to the current grief literacy for adolescents. The outcomes of this project were a grief book for teenagers called ‘Without Expectation’, a mourning scarf and a signature pendant.

Value Mapping

180 Degree Thinking

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Ideation


EXPERIENCE DESIGN U ncomf or t able Immersion

P ROTOT YP ES Many textile experimentations were done to apply the thermochromic ink and transfering text onto textiles. Shown above are a small sample of the prototyping to meticulously uncover ways to maintain softness of fabric, even application and water resistance. Due to technological constraints however, wetting the final product can cause the ink to run. Despite this there is continual development on ways to make this scarf functional in wet weather.

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EXPERIENCE DESIGN U ncomf or t able Immersion

OUTCOMES

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EXPERIENCE DESIGN U ncomf or t able Immersion

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GRAPHIC DESIGN

GRAD EX The RMIT industrial design graduate exhibition required branding, signage and exhibition graphics. Inspiration was drawn from RMIT’s branding guidelines and the geometric influence of the bauhaus movement. Semester 2, 2017

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GRAPHIC DESIGN Grad Ex

BRIEF With Industrial Design’s departure from the School of Architecture + Design and move to a different building, it is fitting that the 2017 Graduate Exhibition branding was designed with bauhaus inspired geometry in mind with a bold and striking navy and white background. Industrial Design branding traditionally uses a long, thin poster (pictured right), however additional formats were required for digital poster displays and invites so the design was adapted for landscape viewing (pictured below).

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GRAPHIC DESIGN Grad Ex

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

16 bu .11. 33 ild 17i ca Lyg ng 27.1 rl on 45 1.1 to 7 n str ee t

DA TE +

LO

CA

TIO

N

GRAD e

P O S T ER D ES IG N

Point, line, shape, colour. The elements of design are the focus of this poster, indicative of industrial design returning to its basic forms, becoming separate to the School of Architecture + Design. It has become a part of the School of Design instead.

For more information, please contact Industrial Design

industrial.design@rmit.edu.au

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GRAPHIC DESIGN Grad Ex

Invitation for the Industry Opening (created as a GIF)

Invitation for the End of Exhibition

Invitation for the Extended Exhibition

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GRAPHIC DESIGN Grad Ex

P ROJ ECT P L AQ UES

Each student required a plaque to place their project abstracts onto. A simple method of displaying them was to use a single sheet, scored and propped on an angle (pictured above).

RMIT Industrial design

GRAD e

Thanks the students for their hard work and effort they have put into their last year with us.

Student Thank You Card2.indd 1

6/11/17 10:15 pm

RMIT Industrial design

GRAD e

Thanks the students for their hard work and effort they have put into their last year with us.

Student Thank You Card3.indd 1

6/11/17 10:16 pm

RMIT Industrial design

T HA NK YOU C A R D S

Thank you cards were created for every honours student, in recognition of the effort that they put into their last year.

GRAD e

Thanks the students for their hard work and effort they have put into their last year with us.

Student Thank You Card1.indd 1

6/11/17 10:14 pm

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GRAPHIC DESIGN Grad Ex

D OO R S I G N AG E

Do not enter or exit signs were displayed around the various entrances of the Grad Ex location. They follow RMIT’s branding guidelines.

I N T E R N A L S I G N AG E

The well-recognised international symbol for male and female was used for toilet signage, created from scratch in illustrator. It was then vinyl cut and placed inside the exhibition building with transfer paper.

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GRAPHIC DESIGN Grad Ex

WIND OW D EC A L

The front entrance to the exhibition building required some branding. I contacted several vinyl printers in Melbourne however, the cost for my intial design (mockup shown above) was too much. To reduce the cost, I adapted the design to reduce the materials used. To further learn new skills, I was also tasked with learning how to vinyl cut designs, prepare the transfer of the vinyl and apply the vinyl to the windows. The final result can be seen below.

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GRAPHIC DESIGN

EXPOSURE MARKETING CO As the lead graphic designer at a property marketing company, I was in charge of branding, logos, signage, brochures and photography. October, 2017 — August, 2018

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GRAPHIC DESIGN Exposure Mar ke ting Co.

T HE TA M P ER T R A P

One of the major logos that I had created at Exposure Marketing Co., was for a new cafe in Brighton. The clients requested the inclusion of a symbol for three T’s. The T’s I created were to look reminiscent of a coffee tamper held by a thumb and forefinger. .

THE TAMPER TRAP CAFE

Brighton Final Vector Logo 62


GRAPHIC DESIGN Exposure Mar ke ting Co.

M A R K ET IN G M AT ER I A L S

The Tamper Trap logo was then placed on signage, a menu, DL Flyer, their website and coffee cups. The DL Flyer was distributed a month prior to opening the cafe with the incentive of free coffee, valid for the month after opening. The menu was designed with the psychology of menu reading in mind. The first thing read is the middle column, followed by the left column, then the right. Higher prices were intentionally put at the top, as most people order the first few items.

THE TAMPER TRAP CAFÉ IS COMING SOON!

Present this coupon to redeem your FREE coffee*

Enjoy a sumptuous breakfast or lunch with one of our specialty coffees

ONE FREE COFFEE Breakfast • Lunch • Specialty Coffee FIND US: @thetampertrapbrighton

DL Flyer

+61 000 000 000

181 Bay Street, Brighton VIC 3186

info@thetampertrap.com *Valid only until 1/2/2018

OUR BR EA KFA ST

MENU

FRUITY C RUNC HY B IRC HER

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Praline house made almond caramel, vanilla

DRINKS

yoghurt, seasonal fruit, house soaked oats with

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BI G AL’S BR E AK Y

berries

HOT C OFFEE

Poached eggs, sour dough, chorizo, bacon,

B REAKY B RIOC HE

hollandaise sauce Trap it up with Smashed Avo

12

Fried Egg, Mushrooms, Rocket, Bacon, Chipotle

+ 4. 5

Mayo Trap it up with Croquettes

+3

HOUSE EGGS

Honeycomb, chocolate vanilla mascarpone, rainbow sugar, maple syrup, macerated

10. 5

Choice of scrambled, poached or fried on

strawberries & kiwi

20

Tumeric Latte

NOISETTE C HOIC E TOAST

7

Selection of spreads

Milkshake (caramel, chocolate, strawberry, vanilla) Frappe

+ 3 ea

S M AS H E D AVO

Freddo Chino, Fredo Espresso

L UNC H

Iced Latte Iced Coffee, Iced Chocolate, Iced Mocha

18

Purezza Sparkling Fresh Orange Juice

Multigrain toast, poached egg, dukkah mix, feta

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B EEF B URGER

cheese Trap it up with Bacon, Chorizo or Mushrooms

Beef Patty, Baby Cos, Rocket, Tasty Cheese,

+ 4 ea

Tomato, Bacon, Slaw, Mayo, Tomato Sauce W/

CH E E SY CR O Q UE TTE BE NNY

18

Poached egg, bacon, chorizo, hollandaise sauce Trap it up with Mushrooms or Smashed Avo

+4

Soul Cleanser (coconut water, lemon juice, kale,

Slaw, Mayo W/ Potato Or Sweet Potato Chips

18

SIDES Smoked Salmon

22

SUPER FOOD B OWL

Smashed / Sliced Avo

Smoked Salmon, Quinoa, Beetroot Yoghurt, Kale,

Potato Croquette

chilli

Cherry Tomato, Cabbage Slaw, Lemon Dressing,

Bacon / Chorizo

Hummus, Edemame Seeds, Carrot & Zucchini

Roasted Tomato

16

Mushrooms

Noodles

Spinach

House made toasted granola, nuts, strawberries,

18

Halloumi

kiwi, almond praline, oreo biscuit, chocolate

EL NINO SALAD

chips

Carrots, Cabbage, Quinoa, Kale, Rocket, Broccoli,

Hollandaise

Corn, House Dressing

Extra toast

M E NI N G O LA BO W L House made toasted granola, acai, yoghurt, peanut butter, seasonal fruits

9

cucumber, blueberries, mint)

Bacon, chorizo, cherry tomato, mint & coriander,

O R E O VANI LLA PAN ACO TTA

9

coconut, acai, chia seeds, mint)

21

C HIC KEN B URGER Marinated Crispy Chicken, Baby Cos, Rocket,

+ 4. 5

TR APPE D CH I LLI S CR AM BLE

4.2 6 5.5 6 3.9 6 5 6

SMoothies Banging Berries (orange juice, mango, mixed berries,

Potato Or Sweet Potato Chips

6

C OLD DRINKS Cold Drip

Tomato chutney, poached egg, smashed avo Trap it up with Mushrooms or Halloumi

Espresso, Double Espresso

chamomile, earl grey, english breakfast)

sourdough toast

S W E E T PO TATO & ZUCCH I NI F R I TTE R S

Long Black

Piccolo, Short Macchiato, Long Macchiato

20

H O NE Y H O TCAKE S

3.9 4.4 3.9/4.4 3.9/3.9/4.4 Warm Chocolate, Hot Chocolate 3.5/4.5 Magic 3.9 Matcha 4 Prana Chai Latte 5 Tea (lemongrass & ginger, green, peppermint, 4 Latte, Cappuccino, Flat White, Mocha

mushrooms, roasted tomato, spinach,

14

Trap it up with Crispy Chicken or Halloumi or Salmon

Feta / Goat cheese

6 6 5 5 4 5 4 4 3 4 3

+5

+4 +4

FOLLOW US @thetampertrapbrighton #thetampertrapbrighton thetampertrap.com.au

Menu Design 63


GRAPHIC DESIGN Exposure Mar ke ting Co.

.

S IG N AG E The logo was appropriately scaled for internal signs and external decals. In creating the signage files, the illustrator file size was 25% of its intended size as there is a limit to how large an artboard can be in the program and the vector image was easily scaled upwards by the printing company.

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GRAPHIC DESIGN Exposure Mar ke ting Co.

P HOTO G R A P HY As part of their new website and social media accounts, The Tamper Trap required photography of their premises and most importantly, their new menu.

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GRAPHIC DESIGN Exposure Mar ke ting Co.

.

ELLE ELWOO D

Elle Elwood was the name of a building project which required its own branding. The aesthetic aimed to appeal to the audience as a luxury brand and location for people to live. As part of designing this publication, a map of the suburb and surrounding points of interest was created in illustrator. The floor maps were also painstakingly curated for the project in illustrator.

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GRAPHIC DESIGN Exposure Mar ke ting Co.

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GRAPHIC DESIGN Exposure Mar ke ting Co.

OT HER LO G OS

In my time with Exposure Marketing Co., I was involved in quite a few logo creations, some not making it past the concept stage due to budgetary contraints on the client’s behalf. Nevertheless, here are some examples of logos done for smaller scale businesses.

.

QUAZER SOUTH OAKLEIGH

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GRAPHIC DESIGN Exposure Mar ke ting Co.

QU AZER SOUTH OAKLEIGH

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jasart


CAD

LIFE SIZE Lif Size was an exercise in reverse modelling a real life objects into a 3D model. Semester 2, 2014

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CAD Lif e Size

P ROG RA M S Solidworks is one of the first programs I’ve used for 3D modelling (aside from SketchUp). My learning in its use began with modelling from drawings sheets, creating said drawing sheets and reverse engineering an existing object into a 3D model.

.

In more advanced classes I covered DFMA (Design for Manufacture and Assembly) with models and FEA (Finite Element Analysis) in particular. One of the more interesting and challenging models to create are lofted and organic shapes in Solidworks and how you can run FEA for testing stress in the materials and strength of the product’s form.

Branching out from the very straightforward and additive method of modelling with Solidworks I learnt how to 3D model with Rhino and Grasshopper. While Grasshopper is a Rhino extension, I was taught how to build an object from the ground up with primarily using Grasshopper. It has taught me the value of parametric design and how I can combine Solidworks and other programs with Grasshopper to create more flexibility design-wise. In my ceramics studio Dirt Dreams, I have used Grasshopper for both my cup and tile design. In this section of the portfolio, it heavily delves into the scripting techniques used; then the use of Rhino for preparing a plaster mould with a CNC ready 3D model.

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CAD Lif e Size

LIF E S IZ E — EX P LO D E D V I E W

Life size is a reverse engineering project done as part of my CAD component at RMIT. Using Solidworks we were required to digitally replicate a small scale object and 3D print a component of that object for comparison. I chose to work with a Glue gun because the particular brand I looked at specifically required an organic surface. From this I learned a lot about lofting and shelling out a part as well as practicing surfacing and creating a part in a way that lets me go back through the ‘tree’ to alter some dimensions without consequences.

Nozzle Glue Housing

Right Shell Trigger part

Heating Element Trigger

Left Shell

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CAD

FEA I’ve created a number of three-dimensional models throughout my degree using computer aided design; solidworks, onshape, rhino and grasshopper. Some of which I have used Finite Element Analysis to quantify the efficacy of my models. March, 2014 — November, 2017

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CAD Fe a

D IN O S ENS E Due to the fact that my product had so much weight placed at the head, I decided to do an FEA (Finite Element Analysis) in order to pinpoint the amount of Displacement (left), to find out how much it would move when force was distributed on the head downward. I used PP material properties from the Solidworks library. The more important component was finding out which area would fail/ suffer from stress more (left). The Von Mises stress was highest at the apex of the neck curve, meaning that this area should require thicker and more frequent rib placement. The rib structure I put into the neck was the component where it needed it the most. The material properties required for the product is something that has slight flexibility (from the displacement results), suggesting a flexible and strong Nylon or hybrid ABS.

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CAD Fe a

C A D M O D EL

A mixer component was modeled into Solidworks using calipers and images. This was then stress tested using Solidworks’ FEA program.

OR I G I N A L According to hand calculations, there was a displacement of 2.9843e-18m, however when I ran the simulation there was a displacement of 3.693e-004m. This is because the added weight of the beater extension can’t be simplified to just a cantilever force there are more factors involve. The places that had the most stress was near the fixed pieces with a maximum of 904.6 psi, far from the yield strength of 7,998. A different material could be used to save cost and potentially be stronger to make thinner wall thickness for a lighter part.

R ED ES IG N The new displacement was spread out along the farthest edge, and less concentrated like the current part, making the stress distribution better for absorbing shock. Stress is spread out across the part more evenly than the original but had concentrate amounts of red at the fixtures. The maximum von mises is 513.7 in comparison to the yield strength.

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CAD

CERAMIC TILES These ceramic tiles were created in grasshopper so that the model was parametric. Every component of the tile model was done solely in grasshopper, with the exception of the mold positive which was done in rhino. Semester 2, 2016

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CAD Ceramic T iles

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4 2

3

T ES S ELL AT IO N S CR IPT

Here is the script for tessellation and using Box Morph and Cull to create varying heights / thicknesses for the tiles. Steps: 1. Sub Surface and Divide creates a base grid for the rectangle 2. Surface Box creates three dimensional boxes on a grid 3. Cull pattern defines where you place a brep in the grid 4. Bounding Box combines multiple objects, like the tile brep, into a single object 5. This is connected to Morph which places the tiles into the Boxed areas, allowing you to alter height etc Note: We weren’t able to process our tiles in this pattern due to the strain it causes. Therefore we have opted to show the steps with a simple cuboid brep.

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CAD Ceramic T iles

M A S T ER M OLD CN C

In order to create the tile plaster moulds, we decided to digitally create the halves with Rhino and grasshopper. Due to the timing for creating a complete grasshopper tile being off, we ended up teaching ourselves to use Rhino to create the tile surface. Luckily features in Grasshopper are easily translated to Rhino and we managed to prepare the file for cnc. Once the renshape was cnc’d, we decided to sand the surface as smooth as we could possibly get. Due to the fillets caused by the cnc bit around the registration keys, we needed to file it down so that the plaster moulds will sit flush together.

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CAD

CERAMIC CUPS Like the ceramic tiles, ceramic cups were modelled in grasshopper so that clients can adjust and customise the desired shape. Semester 2, 2016

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CAD Ceramic Cups

G R A S S HO P P ER OV E RV I E W

My script consists of parameters such as height, the polygon profile, polygon segments, pattern frequency, rotation, scale and thickness. In the Cluster shown left (bottom), you can identify what factors connect to each parameter, labelled for furthering my understanding of the various elements that interact with each other. The cup itself has an organic twist to it however it also has a truncated four point pyramid patterned into the surface. The particular challenge that came with using such a design as this was the fact that I needed to navigate around that script and document extremely carefully because of the sheer load it was putting on a computer far more powerful than my laptop. I applied the truncated pyramid because it created the sharp geometry I was looking for and it also had a flat top head which allowed for comfort when gripping the cup. The image to the left shows the cup design before a texture and height adjustment has been applied to it with the truncated pyramid displayed to the right of the rendered form.

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CAD Ceramic Cups

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9

1

5

2

6

10 7

8

3

CERA M IC CUP S CRIPT

1. Beginning the script by creating a line with ‘PerpFrames’ applied to create a ‘Polygon’ that appears on all lines. 2. The next step was to apply ‘Rotation’ with ‘Range’ controlling the Domain (top + bottom) profiles. 3. This was then connected to ‘Scale” which has its own range and domain sliders. 4. The resulting geometry of scale was lofted and the bottom profile of rotate was closed up. 5. Once joined the surface was connected to ‘DeBrep’ which split the surfaces. 6. ‘List Item’ (with added outputs) channeled the surfaces into separate components which were then joined into a surface. 7. The resulting surfaces were ‘Offset’ with ‘Negative’ so that it projected outwards. 8. Surface Domain Number established the surfaces as a grid. ‘Morph3D’ contained the resulting 3D pattern. 9. The pattern itself was a ‘Brep’ referencing a form in Rhino with a Toggle so that the hardware could process the script more easily. 10. The final mesh was thickened using weaverbird and everything was clustered and labelled.

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CAD Ceramic Cups

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2

3

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5

6

7

8

9

10

F ORM VA RIAT IONS

The very basic variations in form is height. It is adjusted through the ‘SDL Line’ command which moves the ‘PerpFrames’ (it came before in the script). Polygon Profile affects the Polygon radius ie. width. It also conttrols the segments of the Polygon with a range of 3-10. The lowest number is 3 because it would not exist as a two dimensional object in the program. This prevents clients from making this error. The radius of the fillet can also be altered however the range was created to be limited because at a certain high integer for the fillet, the more complications that arise in the form. The scale is based on the ‘ConstructDomain’ command which uses the top and bottom profiles to ascertain the scale angle of the shape based on the numerical relation in the two sliders.

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CAD Ceramic Cups

PAT T ER N VA RIAT IONS

This render shows the various types of patterns that have been applied to a consistent cup shape to explore the manufacturing feasibility and the type of texture that I was looking for. The texture I chose for the final cup design was the truncated pyramid because of its grip quality and the fact that I can make the pyramids very shallow and on an extreme draft angle.

Metallic copper finished cup

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VISUALISATION

SKETCHING This is a collection of sketches across many projects at various stages of conceptualisation. March, 2014 — November, 2017

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VISUALISATION Ske tc hing

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LINE S K ETC HES


VISUALISATION Ske tc hing

R END ER IN G

REFERENCE IMAGE

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VISUALISATION

ILLUS TRATION These are a sample of some of the personal illustrations that I’ve pursued in my spare time. March, 2014 — November, 2017

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VISUALISATION Illustration

Feather Chloe Marcela Coelho 2013

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Family Tree Chloe Marcela Coelho 2013


VISUALISATION Illustration

Andre Chloe Marcela Coelho 2013

Decay Chloe Marcela Coelho 2016

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VISUALISATION Illustration

Bleak Chloe Marcela Coelho 2012

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VISUALISATION Illustration

Detox Chloe Marcela Coelho 2018

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Profile for chloemcoelho

Experience Portfolio 2019  

Experience Portfolio 2019  

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