Page 1

CHIRAAG PUNJABI

ARCHITECTURAL PORTFOLIO chiraagpunjabi@gmail.com +91 9920310010


CHIRAAG PUNJABI

MUMBAI, INDIA

Date of Birth - 22nd October, 1991 Age - 25 Yrs | Civil Status - Single

English | Hindi Marathi | Sindhi

OBJECTIVE To evolve a Practice that negotiates design and spatial solutions for the populace

of India through Collaboration, Experimentation, Research and Critical Thinking

STATUS Student, Stadelschule Architecture Class EDUCATION Bachelors of Architecture

Oct 2017 - Present Aug 2009 - Oct 2014

Kamla Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute for Architecture and Environmental Studies (K.R.V.I.A.), Mumbai, India

“Same-Same” Exchange Program (Selected)

Nov 2011

In collaboration with Tongji University, Shanghai, China

WORK Assistant Professor EXPERIENCE Aditya College of Architecture, Borivali (W), Mumbai

Jun 2015 - Sep 2017

Year Master 1. Sem 4, Academic Year 2016-17 2. Sem 4, Academic Year 2015-16 Course Instructor 1. Vertical Electives (Philosophy), Academic Year 2017-18 2. Sem 5, Humanities, Academic Year 2016-17 & 2017-18 3. Sem 2, Arch. Design Studio, Academic Year 2015-16 4. Sem 1, Arch. Design Studio, Academic Year 2015-16 Research & Website Development 1. ACA’s 5th International Design Competition 2017 2. ACA’s 4th International Design Competition 2016 3. ACA’s 3rd International Design Competition 2015-16 Fund Raising Team Arghya Borivali Design Fair 2016 Records Committee Academic Year 2015-16 Study Trip Co-ordinator Ahmedabad, Academic Year 2015-16

Associate Architect

A & A Design Associates, Mumbai

Make A Difference (M.A.D.), Mumbai Chapter

(A non-profit organisation that mobilises young leaders to provide equitable outcomes to kids in shelter homes) Shelter Support Fellow, Academic Year 2016-17 1. Handling authority relations with all 4 shelter homes 2. Established Operations at 2 new shelter homes Center Head, Academic Year 2015-16 Handled operations at St. Catherines Home, Mumbai Teacher, Academic Year 2014-15 10 children, Class 5 Math

+91 9920310010 +91 222 6403828

WORK Course Co-ordinator/ Instructor EXPERIENCE Artistic Impressions, Santacruz (W), Mumbai

Jun 2016 - Sep 2017

Taught Technical Drawing Elective to ICSE Board Students

Junior Architect

D.I.G. Architects, Mumbai

Jun 2014 -May 2015

Karma Consultancy, Front and Back Office, Mumbai Design Development/ 3D Modelling/ Resolution/ Working Drawing/ Execution/ Correspondence Phoenix Market City, Bangalore Interior Concepts Presentation/ 3D Modelling/ 3D Views Post Production/ Illustrations/ Research Sunil Sahu’s Villa, Raipur Design Development/ Working Drawing/ Model making Apollo Hospital, Belapur Presentation Drawings/ 3D Rendering/ Illustrations Atlani House, Raipur Presentation Drawings/ Design Development/ Working Drawings/ Correspondence/ Model making Chirag Patel Residence, Mumbai Site Supervision/ Execution

Teaching Assistant K.R.V.I.A., Mumbai

Third Year Bachelor of Architecture Architectural Design Studio, Academic Year 2014-15 First Year Bachelor of Architecture Introdcutory Workshop, Academic Year 2013-14

Intern

Vanwari Architects, Mumbai

Jun 2014 -Apr 2015 Aug 2013 May 2012

Worked on HOf Horizontal Farms Ideas Competition

Jan 2017 - Sep 2017

Archivist

K.R.V.I.A. Library, Mumbai

May 2011

Worked on creating archival system for Library Inventory

Mumbai Metropolitan Region - Heritage Conservation Society Project Grant for Signages & Street Furniture Project Proposal/ Research Readings/ Site Visits/ Design Methodology Development

Fellow

chiraagpunjabi@gmail.com chiraagpunjabi@outlook.com

302, Sunrise Society, 247, Waterfield Road, Bandra (West), Mumbai - 400050

Freelance

Observatory Houses, Young Architects Competition Design Development/ 3D Modelling/ Panel Making

Aug 2014 - Jun 2017

May 2017 - Jul 2017

Low Cost Housing, Mahabaleshwar, India

Dec 2016

Waterenvirons, Water Habitat Revival Project

Jan 2016

Godrej Design Lab, India

Jan 2016

Design Development/ Working Drawing/ Site Visits Website Design and Site Model Laser Cutting

Exhibition Stall Design with A & A Design Associates

Lighthouse Hotel, Young Architects Competition

Nov 2015 - Feb 2016

woodengineer.in

Aug 2015 - Oct 2015

Design Development/ 3D Modelling/ Panel Making Content/ Article Writing for the Website

Nothin Fishy About it, Carter Road, Bandra, Mumbai Interior Design for a Quick Service Restaurant (QSR)

Apr 2014


AWARDS/ Commendation - Commercial Workplace (Small) - IIID Awards 2016 HONOURS/ Karma Consultancy Offices, Mumbai (under D.I.G. Architects) COMPETITIONS ‘Light Design 2015’ Award, Trendz Excellence Awards 2015

Light Fixture at Karma Consultancy Offices, Mumbai (under D.I.G. Architects)

Public Display of “Waterworks”, Kala Ghoda Design Festival 2016

ACADEMIC Study of Pol Typology Housing - 2015 TRAVEL India - Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Critical Study of Buildings in cities of India - 2012

India - Ahmedabad, Chandigarh, Delhi, Bhopal and Mandu

Analysis of Architect Sudeshna Chatterjee’s Practice - 2012

4th Year Urban Design Studio Manifesto Publication

India - Gurgaon, Delhi

2nd Rank Overall Academics Fourth Year Bachelor of Architecture

Study of the Sikumen typology of housing in China - 2011

Academic Year 2012- 2013, K.R.V.I.A., Mumbai

3rd Place, Annual Design Competition for Futuristic Designs, 2012 Late Bhausaheb Hiray College of Architecture Annual Festival “Tarash”

Selected for the SAME-SAME Exchange Program, Nov 2011

China - Same-Same Exchange Program at the Tongji University, Shanghai

Documentation of Architect Geoffrey Bawa’s Work - 2011

Sri Lanka

Study and Measure Drawn Documentation - 2010

In Collaboration with Tongji University, China and K.R.V.I.A., Mumbai

India - Neo-Vaishnavite Monastries on the River Island of Majuli, Assam

2nd Rank Architectural Design Second Year Bachelor of Architecture

Rural Study and Documentation - 2009

Academic Year 2010-2011, K.R.V.I.A., Mumbai

PUBLICATIONS The Architecture of Boundaries - Co-Author

ACA’s 4th International Design Competition 2016 Brief

Sacred Spaces - Co-Author

ACA’s 3rd International Design Competition 2015-16 Brief

Once Upon a Pol.. - Author

Semester 2 Arch. Design Studio Brief, Academic Year 2015-2016

Space. Body. Experience. - Author

Semester 1 Arch. Design Studio Brief, Academic Year 2015-2016

Architecture of an Object - Author

Thesis Volume, Academic Year 2013-2014

Analysis of Ar. Sudeshna Chhaterjee’s Practice - Co-Author

Theory of Design Studio, Academic Year 2012-2013

Waterworks - Co- Author

4th Year Urban Design Studio Manifesto, Academic Year 2012-13

Cinema City Publication - Transcriber K.R.V.I.A. Design Cell, October 2009 Reflections - Academic Work featured across editions

Annual Publication of the K.R.V.I.A., Juhu, Academic Years 2009 to 2014

WEB DESIGN www.adityacampus.org/idc (Sep 2016)| www.waterenvirons.org (Jan 2016) ACADEMIC Cultural Secretary of the Student Council GOVERNANCE Academic Year 2012-2013, K.R.V.I.A., Mumbai

Head of the Study Trip Committee for following places: 1. Wai, Maharashtra, India 2. Sri Lanka Academic Year 2011-12, K.R.V.I.A., Mumbai

In-charge of the following Campus Exhibitions at K.R.V.I.A., Mumbai 1. C.O.A. Exhibition (2013) 3. Sri Lanka Exhibition (2012)

2. Annual Exhibition (2012-2013) 4. Majuli Exhibition (2011)

India - Asaniye Village, Sawantwadi, Maharashtra

WORKSHOPS Space. Body. Experience, May 2015

In Collaboration with the Bhav:nikshetra Academy for Speech and Drama Devised and Conducted

Street Play, Dec 2012

During the Annual Event at K.R.V.I.A., Mumbai Devised and Conducted

Re-Imagining the Behrampada Slums, Dec 2012 During the Annual Event at K.R.V.I.A., Mumbai In-Charge (Conducted by Architect Ipye Chacko)

AVOCATION Theatre - Acted in, Written and Directed several plays and won several awards and accolades for the same. Dance - Performed live at various professional shows across dance styles Stand-Up Comedy - Performed at open mic competitions Poetry, Films, Travel, Music, Puzzles, Treasure Hunts, Indoor Sports

SKILLS AutoCAD **********

Lumion

Adobe Suite

AutoCAD 3D

Sketchup

Microsoft Suite

Rhinoceros 4.0/5.0

Grasshopper

Model Making

V-Ray / Mental Ray

Hand-drafting

Hand Sketching

**********

**********

**********

********** ********** **********

**********

**********

********** **********

**********

REFERENCES Aneerudha Paul | Director | K.R.V.I.A.

director@krvia.ac.in | +91 9820891736 Advait Potnis | Principal Architect | D.I.G. Architects advait@digarch.net | +91 98 Aparna Surve | Principal | Aditya College of Architecture principal@aditya-arch.edu.in | +91 9757427801


UP ABOVE THE WORLD SO HIGH, View, SketchUp + Photoshop Observatory Houses Competition, Young Architects Competition, July 2017


INDEX 1. THE ARCHITECTURE OF AN OBJECT............................................................................02 LOCATION - Vile Parle, Mumbai, India TYPE - Individual Academic Work TIME - June 2014 - April 2014 LEVEL - Year 5, Semester 9 (Final Year Design Dissertation) MENTOR - Ar. George Jerry Jacob (george.jacob@krvia.ac.in)

2. AFFORDABLE HOUSING...................................................................................................07 LOCATION - Boisar, Maharashtra, India TYPE - Individual Academic Work TIME - Dec 2012 - March 2013 LEVEL - Year 4, Semester 8 MENTOR - Ar. Shantanu Poredi (studiomoof@gmail.com) Ar. Manisha Agrawal (studiomoof@gmail.com)

3. WATERWORKS......................................................................................................................12 LOCATION - Ulhasnagar, Maharashtra, India TYPE - Academic Team Work (Contribution- Site Study Drawings) + Individual Academic Work TIME - Jun 2012 - Oct 2012 LEVEL - Year 4, Semester 7 MENTOR - Ar. Sahil Latheef (sahil.latheef@gmail.com) Ar. Ekta Idnany (ekta.idnany@gmail.com)

4. HAMMAM - THE BATHING FACTORY.........................................................................16 LOCATION - Imamwada, Mumbai, India TYPE - Individual Academic Work TIME - Jun 2010 - Oct 2010 LEVEL - Year 2, Semester 3 MENTOR - Ar. Shilpa Gore Shah (shilpagoreshah@gmail.com)

7. ATLANI HOUSE....................................................................................................................24 LOCATION - Raipur, Chhatisgarh, India TYPE - Professional Work TIME - Jun 2014 - May 2015 CONTRIBUTION - Presentation/ Design Drawings, Working Drawings, Design Development, Model Making PROJECT HEAD - Ar. Advait Potnis (advait@digarch.net)

8. KARMA CONSULTANCY OFFICES................................................................................28

LOCATION - Mumbai, Maharashtra, India TYPE - Professional Work TIME - October 2014 - April 2015 CONTRIBUTION - Presentation/ Design Drawings, Working Drawings, Design Development/ Execution/ Correspondence PROJECT HEAD - Ar. Advait Potnis (advait@digarch.net)

9. ACA’s 4th INTERNATIONAL DESIGN COMPETITION..........................................32

LOCATION - Mumbai, Maharashtra, India TYPE - Academic Faculty Work TIME - Jun 2016 - Dec 2016 CONTRIBUTION - Co-Author of Brief, Design Problem, Competition Rules, Schedule Set Up of Website, Graphics, Jury Exhibition, Awards Ceremony, Media FACULTY TEAM - Aparna Surve (Principal), Pritam Mhadgut, Shishiir Saawant, Tanuj Jain Cover Image: CITY AND COMPLEXITY, Fold-Out Drawing, Free-Hand Sketch Same - Same Student Exchange Program, Shanghai, China. Nov 2011 Index Image: DABELIWAALA STALL, Axonometric View, Hand Drafted First Year, Architectural Design Studio, K.R.V.I.A., Mumbai, Mar 2010.

5. HOUSE NO.17, AUNIATI SATTRA....................................................................................20 LOCATION - Majuli, Assam, India TYPE - Individual Academic Work TIME - Dec 2011 - Mar 2011 LEVEL - Year 2, Semester 4 MENTOR - Ar. Rohan Shivkumar (deputy.director@krvia.ac.in)

6. ONCE UPON A POL.............................................................................................................23 LOCATION - Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India TYPE - Academic Faculty Work TIME - Jan 2016 - Mar 2016 FOR - Year 1, Semester 2 Architectural Design Studio CONTRIBUTON - Course Co-ordinator FACULTY TEAM - Anshul Sinha, Anjuri Agrawal, Pritam Mhadgut, Renuka Kale, Sonia D’Silva

1


THE ARCHITECTURE OF AN OBJECT

TYPOLOGY OF EVER MORPHING INCREMENTAL STRUCTURES LOCATION - Vile Parle, Mumbai, India TYPE - Individual Academic Work TIME - June 2014 - April 2014 LEVEL - Year 5, Semester 9 (Final Year Design Dissertation) MENTOR - Ar. George Jerry Jacob (george.jacob@krvia.ac.in)

THE OBJECT ACROSS THE STREET, View, Rhino + Lumion + Photoshop Chiraag Punjabi, Year 5, Semester 9

2


INTRODUCTION

In our ever growing, ever changing cities, the architect needs to cater to a wide range of coexistent stakeholders with different needs and tastes, accounting for environmental forces that influence the making of space. I started engaging with the relationships between Form, Function and Stakeholders through this project on the chosen site. The typology of an ever morphing incremental structure started evolving as a result of a simple game I played with all the stakeholders to account for their aspirations. This led to the creation of a system consisting of a super structure (the Gantry Cranes) and a building system that would help provide for the architecture of the object, rather than the creation of the architecture itself.

INTER-STAKEHOLDER RELATIONSHIPS ON

THE SITE

Originally a theatre, the 4000 sq.m. plot of land in the middle of the city is highly contested, owing to the number of stakeholders that have claimed ownership on to it over the years. There are many facts, stories and rumours that circle around how the number of stakeholders increased over the years. One of the many intriguing stories is that of the Temple. Originally an artefact inside the Theatre Foyer, it assumed the identity of a Temple once the structure around it was demolished. Some stakeholders have leases on the land they thereby hold development rights to the land. The cantilevered cinema balcony eerily hanging mid-ar is all that remains of the old theatre.

G+4 COMMERCIAL STRUCTURE THERE SINCE - 1995 SPACE REQUIRED - 1500 sq.m.

TEMPLE THERE SINCE - 1982* SPACE REQUIRED - 50 sq.m. *assumed identity as one in 2003

HAWKERS ENTERTAINMENT

THERE SINCE - 2005 SPACE REQUIRED - 500 sq.m.

OWNER’S OFFICE THERE SINCE - 1982 SPACE REQUIRED - 200 sq.m.

SUBSIDIARY BUSINESS

CAR SERVICING AREA THERE SINCE - 2010 SPACE REQUIRED - 750 sq.m.

GOODS - INTANGIBLE

GOODS - TANGIBLE

ON

GOODS STORE/SHOP THERE SINCE - 2008 SPACE REQUIRED - 800 sq.m.

THEATRE THERE SINCE - 1982* SPACE REQUIRED - 2000 sq.m. *partly demolished in 2003

DANCE BAR THERE SINCE - 2001 SPACE REQUIRED - 300 sq.m.



RESTAURANT THERE SINCE - 1999 SPACE REQUIRED - 750 sq.m.

MOTOR DRIVING SCHOOL THERE SINCE - 2007

SPACE REQUIRED - 200 sq.m.

MONEY

Chiraag Punjabi, Year 5, Semester 9

3


GAME OF STAKEHOLDER ASPIRATIONS

HAWKER CHOOSES FACADE

COMMERCIAL LESSOR CHOOSES TUCKED BACK

+

RESULTING BUILT FORM CONFIGURATIONS

HAND OF THE ARCHITECT

GOODS SHOPS/STORE CHOOSES FACADE CORNER

DRIVING SCHOOL CHOOSES FACADE CORNER

FRONT STREET VIEW

THE TOWER CRANES

AXONOMETRIC VIEW

BUILT FORM CONFIGURATION 1

DANCE BAR CHOOSES FACADE CORNER

BACK STREET VIEW

THEATRE MANAGEMENT CHOOSES MID-SECTION

FRONT STREET VIEW

CAR SERVICE CENTRE CHOOSES MID-SECTION

RESTAURANT CHOOSES FACADE

THE GANTRY CRANES

AXONOMETRIC VIEW

BUILT FORM CONFIGURATION 2 TEMPLE CHOOSES FACADE

LAND OWNER CHOOSES TUCKED BACK

BUILT FORM AT THE END OF GAME Chiraag Punjabi, Year 5, Semester 9

THE GAME was devised in a bid to bring about all stakeholders on a common platform. The Rules were1. Each Participant is allowed to choose a particular location on the site. 2. The location maybe anything from the categories of a.) Facade, b.) Facade Corner, c.) Mid-Section, d.)Tucked Back. 3. The position chosen by one Participant may overlap with the other in this Game and they need not care about getting the exact amount of space as required by them as the architect would negotiate that. The realisation that the game would be played constantly led to the idea of the Hand of Architect- A constant presence of a superstructure on site that would keep on building and dismantling the form as and when required

THE BUILDING BUILDING ITSELF

BACK STREET VIEW

4


BUILDING SYSTEMS - A KIT OF PARTS

NODES

TRI-PANEL INFILL

STEEL FRAME

+

+

MULTIPLE MODULE - HORIZONTAL

STANCTIONS/ BEAMS

STEEL FRAME

STEEL STAIRS

STRUCTURE

FLOORS

MEZZANINE FLOORS

+

INFILL PANELS

=

SINGLE MODULE

BISON BOARDS GLASS A.C.P. PANELS

OUTER FRAME

INNER TRI-FRAMING IN STEEL

P.U. PACKING

FACADE PANELS

WALLS The creation of a super structure such as the Gantry Cranes meant that a system of building, based upon a grid would be required to carry out the assembly and dismantling of built forms efficiently. Stakeholders can choose, based upon their requirements from the building systems kit of parts and derive unending interesting combinations of plans, facades and mezanines. The kit of parts was devised keeping in mind privacy requirements as well as economic constraints of certain stakeholders. For example - Bsion board Panels with P. U. Panel packing could provide sound and visual insulation to the Dance Bar whereas the A.C.P. Panels could provide inexpensive soultions to goods shop owners. Chiraag Punjabi, Year 5, Semester 9

MULTIPLE MODULE - HORIZONTAL + VERTICAL

VIEW FROM THE INTERIOR OF THE BUILDING

VIEW OF THE PUBLIC ATRIUM - THE CENTRAL SPACE

5


It’s time for Architecture to do things again, not just represent things.... - Joshua Prince Ramus, TEDx SMU, 2009 THE BUILT OBJECT SOMETIME IN THE FUTURE... , Section, AutoCAD + Photoshop Chiraag Punjabi, Year 5, Semester 9

6


AFFORDABLE HOUSING SOLUTIONS IN CONSTRAINTS

LOCATION - Boisar, Maharashtra, India TYPE - Individual Academic Work TIME - Dec 2012 - March 2013 LEVEL - Year 4, Semester 8 MENTOR - Ar. Shantanu Poredi (studiomoof@gmail.com) Ar. Manisha Agrawal (studiomoof@gmail.com)

BUILDINGS STAGGER AROUND THE CUL-DE SACS, View, Model Chiraag Punjabi, Year 4, Semester 8

7


INTRODUCTION

Affordable housing is of great relevance, especially in the context of a developing country like India. Architects have been constantly experimenting, trying to work their way through the constraints a highly valued piece of land brings when it is used for affordable housing. In the Indian urban sector however, such kind of housing is largely developer driven and the resulting designs barely produce livable conditions.. The project aims to find solutions to these problems working with two major constraints and provides housing to various income groups through 1 Room Kitchen (1 RK), 1 Bedroom Hall

CONSTRAINT 1 -SOLUTION 1 RK 18 sq.m. 1 BHK 24 sq.m.

1.5 BHK

=

Within the building, the units/modules are extremely tightly packed. Light barely enters the rooms which have only a mere 2m x 1m opening. These structures lack architecture that allows the buildings and its inhabitants to breathe.

1 RK 1 RK

1.5 BHK 30 sq.m. 2.5 BHK 2 BHK 48 sq.m.

1.5 BHK

=

Kitchen (BHK), 1.5 BHK, 2 BHK AND 2.5 BHK modules.

CONSTRAINT 1

CONSTRAINT 2 - SOLUTION

1 RK

1 RK 2.5 BHK 54 sq.m.

2.5 BHK

=

1 RK 1 RK

UNDERSTANDING ALL THE MODULES & COMBINATIONS

1. PLACING UNITS OF 30M X 6M ON SITE GRID OF 30M X 15M

2. FURTHER SUBDIVIDING AND ESTABLISHING UNITS OF 6M X 6M

3. ESTABLISHING 3 UNITS OF 6M, 12M AND 24M (MULTIPLES OF 6M) AND ARRANGING THEM AS SARDINES

4. CREATING A DISTRUBANCE IN THE GRID LINES TO CREATE A PATTERN OF ARRANGEMENT

5. CLEARING THE DISTURBANCE AND RESOLVING THE UNITS BASED ON SIMPLE SHAPES SUCH AS THE LETTERS L, T, Z AND I

6. INTRODUCING PLAZAS AND OPEN SPACES ACROSS THE SITE AND ESTABLISHING CONNECTS

CONSTRAINT 2

The need to house a huge number of people, forces a sardine like arrangment of the housing buildings. In some cases, two buildings are placed as close as 3 m from each other. A lack of community spaces berates the quality of living in such housing schemes.

BUILDING A TYPICAL 4 STOREY (F.S.I.) BUILDING IN A MULTIPLE OF 6M WITH MODULES TIGHTLY PACKED

THE DESIGN

The many permutations and combinations possible with such a kind of design approach, led to the generation of 10 distinct building types, each complete with open spaces for almost every house and shared open spaces between clusters of buildings. The minimum open space between any two buildings is atleast 6m. Cul de Sacs are provided for access.

THE STRUCTURAL SYSTEM

The entire scheme is proposed to be built using pre-cast technology in order to reduce cost of construction. The structural system consists of a vertical service core made up of pre cast shear walls housing pre-cast staircases and elevators. Pre cast slabs are designed based on the design of the unit and standardization is achieved due to modularity maintained across building types. Columns brace the structures primarily at the corners and are used to stiffen the structure wherever necessary as well. The understanding of precast technology as a building system proved to be a precursor study to the thesis topic of research and design. Chiraag Punjabi, Year 4, Semester 8

REMOVING MODULES AND PLACING THEM BACK ABOVE TO EASE TIGHTNESS

CREATING VARIOUS COMBINATIONS IN MODULES WITH 7 STOREY STRUCTURES WITH EACH HOUSE HAVING A TERRACE

RESTRUCTURING MODULES TO CREATE BUILDING TYPES

8


VERTICAL SERVICE CORE MADE OF PRE CAST SHEAR WALLS

EXTENDING SLABS OUT UPTO A MAX. OF 12 M ON EITHER SIDES

BRACING THE CORNERS WITH PRECAST COLUMNS ON ENDS

BASIC STRUCTURAL SYSTEM DIAGRAM

A

GROUND FLOOR WITH CUL-DE-SACS FOR ACCESS, PLAZAS AND BUILDING TYPES

THE LARGER MASTER PLAN

SECTION AA’

Chiraag Punjabi, Year 4, Semester 8

A’

N

BUILDING TYPE L1

BUILDING TYPE T1

BUILDING TYPE Z1

BUILDING TYPE L2

BUILDING TYPE T2

BUILDING TYPE Z2

BUILDING TYPE L3

BUILDING TYPE L4

BUILDING TYPE Z3

MASSING MODELS OF BUILDING TYPES

9


THE BUILDING CATALOGUE & PRECAST DETAILS

PRECAST R.C.C. SLAB TYPE S1 40 X 25 T.W. SHUTTER PRECAST R.C.C. BEAM TYPE B3.b PRECAST R.C.C. BEAM TYPE SB1 6 MM THK GLASS LOUVRES 100 X 75 ALUMINUM FRAME 6 MM THK GLAZED GLASS 100 X 20 X 3 MM M.S. HANDLE 40 X 50 ALUMINUM FRAME 100 MM LONG M.S. PEG/HOLDER 100 X 75 MM ALUMINUM FRAME 6 MM THK GLAZED GLASS 2 MM THK ALUMINIUM FLASHING OVER LAYER OF WATERPROOFING 150 MM THK P.C.C. SILL 15 MM THK INTERNAL PLASTER UPPER FLOOR PLANS

UPPER FLOOR PLANS

UPPER FLOOR PLANS

230 MM THK BRICK MASONRY WALL 110 MM HIGH STONE SKIRTING 20 MM THK KOTAH STONE FLOORING 50 MM THK STITCHING CONCRETE WITH REINFORCEMENT MESH

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

BUILDING TYPE L1

HAS 3 MORE PERMUTATIONS

Chiraag Punjabi, Year 4, Semester 8

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

BUILDING TYPE T1

HAS 2 MORE PERMUTATIONS

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

BUILDING TYPE Z1

HAS 1 MORE PERMUTATIONS

WALL SECTION

SHOWING PRECAST DETAILS

10


AFFORDABLE HOUSING, View, Rhino + Lumion + Photoshop Chiraag Punjabi, Year 4, Semester 8

11


THE GRAPHIC NOVEL

SMALL INTERVENTIONS. LARGE IMPACTS LOCATION - Ulhasnagar, Maharashtra, India TYPE - Academic Team Work (Contribution- Site Study+ Graphic Novel) + Individual Academic Work TIME - Jun 2012 - Oct 2012 LEVEL - Year 4, Semester 7 MENTOR - Ar. Sahil Latheef (sahil.latheef@gmail.com) Ar. Ekta Idnany (ekta.idnany@gmail.com) WATERWORKS - THE GRAPHIC NOVEL, Publication, Illustrator + Photoshop + InDesign TEAM - Chiraag Punjabi, Nidhi Kacholia, Vatsal Upadhyay, Jayesh Jain, Dhaval Kevadia, Nishit Patel, Shibani Raney, Jyotiraditya Shah, Sahil Shah, Mihir Vasani, Priyank Vaghasia Chiraag Punjabi, Year 4, Semester 7

12


INTRODUCTION

The studio intent was to study modern day water systems. Ulhasnagar was chosen as a site due it peri urban location and the prominence of the Ulhas River, that runs along the settlement, as a port since ancient times.

PRESENCE OF WATER ON SITE

Apart from the Ulhas River, there are many other types of water bodies that exist in the Ulhasnagar area such as the Pokhran Talao, Kaala Talao, Devaje Lake, etc. Being under the Peshwa rule, many Wadas (courtyard houses) were built on site, each having a well in the courtyard to draw water from for everyday use.

WATERWORKS - THE GRAPHIC NOVEL

Our interest in studying everyday urban complexities led to an alternate way of expressing narratives, the Urban Manifesto “Waterworks” - a graphic novel depicting the story of fictional character Ar. Sanjay Udamale on a quest to understand the water system in Ulhasnagar. We found out that originally all the Talaos, Lakes and Wells were connected either directly (underground channels) or indirectly (ground water recharge) The old Wadas would also carry out rain water harvesting through surface water collection. With the advent of modern technology however, many borewells were dug in various places around the site and during the Kala Talao beautification project, underground channels were sealed, disturbing the water table completely and causing a great shortage of water on site.

THEN

WATER COLLECTED DURING 4 MONTHS OF RAINFALL SUFFICIENT TO PROVIDE FOR REQUIREMENTS OF OLD KALYAN TOWN FOR REMAINING 8 MONTHS

SMALL INTERVENTIONS. LARGE IMPACTS

The idea to therefore generate an awareness amongst the residents to carry out surface water collection and other related practices led to the proposed design of a Youth Recreation Center- A space where people would come together and water as a resource would be celebrated. Pokhran Talao was chosen as a site due to its scale and proximity to Wadas.

NOW

WATER COLLECTED DURING 4 MONTHS OF MONSOOM NOT SUFFICIENT DUE TO EXPLOITATION OF GROUNDWATER RESOUCES BY DIGGING OF BOREWELLS IMPERMEABLE ROOFS

CURRENT SITUATION

PERMEABLE LAYER HARD IMPERMEABLE LAYER

BUILDINGS IN THE VICINITY DO NOT CARRY OUT SURFACE WATER COLLECTION LIKE THE WADAS USED TO DO, HENCE ARE IMPERMEABLE PERMEABLE ROOFS

PERMEABLE LAYER HARD IMPERMEABLE LAYER

THE POKRAN TALAO IN THE CENTER AND THE NETWORK OF WELLS AROUND Chiraag Punjabi, Year 4, Semester 7

PROPOSED FUTURE

WATER COLLECTION VIA BUILDING TERRACES, HENCE MAKING THE BUILDINGS ALSO PERMEABLE LAYERS

13


THE YOUTH RECREATION CENTER, ULHASNAGAR, INDIA The building is an expression that Celebrates Water. Celebration of water as a resource in order to generate an awareness about the need to save water, prompted the design of the R.C.C. gutters at the entrance plaza of the Youth Recreation Center. Water is collected and harvested from the gutters and the multiple terraces across all floors of both the buildings. N

SECTION AA’ 150 MM DEEP P.C.C. PARAPET 230MM THICK BRICK WALL 15 MM THICK CHINA MOSAIC TILES 25MM THK CEMENT SCREED IN C.M. 1:2:5 600MM X 300MM R.C.C. BEAM 350 MM THK PORTAL FRAME 100 MM PRE-CAST WATER CHANNELS

A

A’

300 MM Ø PRE-CAST HOLES IN PORTAL FRAMES FOR WATER DRAINAGE 150 MM THK BRICK BAT COBA FILLING 15 MM THK I.P.S. SURFACE 70 X 85 MM ALUMINIUM WINDOW FRAME ANCHORED TO PRE-CAST CHANNELS 10 MM THK GLASS ALUMINIUM FLASHING 25MM THK CEMENT SCREED IN C.M. 1:2:5 15 MM THICK CHINA MOSAIC TILES 90 DIA. DRAINAGE PIPE WATER COLLECTION TROUGH 225 MM THK R.C.C. SLAB

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

WALL SECTION SHOWING R.C.C. GUTTER DETAILS

Chiraag Punjabi, Year 4, Semester 7 GROUND FLOOR PLAN (1:200)

14


RAINFALL IS CELEBRATED AS WATER CASCADES THROUGH THE GUTTERS AND IS COLLECTED AND HARVESTED, View, SketchUp + Lumion + Photoshop

Chiraag Punjabi, Year 4, Semester 7

15


THE BATHING SPACE, View, Charcoal Sketch

HAMMAM

THE BATHING FACTORY LOCATION - Imamwada, Mumbai, India TYPE - Individual Academic Work TIME - Jun 2010 - Oct 2010 LEVEL - Year 2, Semester 3 MENTOR - Ar. Shilpa Gore Shah (shilpagoreshah@gmail.com)

Chiraag Punjabi, Year 2, Semester 1

16


THE PROBLEM

Hammams have traditionally been spaces for bathing and resultant communal gathering. But technological and social progress RESIDENTIAL AREA

THE PROCESS

D ROA

ADJOINING MOSQUE COMPLEX

THE SITE

Imamwada predominantly houses the Muslim Community. The Mosque Complex adjoining the site is frequented by the community. The existing Hammam is almost defunct. Dark spaces with light percolating through minimal openings form the architecture of this Hammam. The site provided for intervention is a large plot of open land owned by the Mosque.

ADA MW IMA

RESIDENTIAL AREA

brought about a change in the everyday system of sanitation and has led to this ancient system of bathing becoming defunct.

The studio primarily focused on reviving the age old tradition of bathing in Hammams, employing air, water and light as the primary tools to create architecture for the Hammam relevant in todays context. Being a Semester 3 project, the core focus was on understanding how to conceptualise and create an experience.

THE EXISTING HAMMAM SITE FOR INTERVENTION

SITE PLAN

TRADITIONAL HAMMAM - A SPACE FOR BATHING AND COMMUNAL GATHERING

THE ASSEMBLY LINE OF EVERYDAY LIFE

WAKE UP

EXERCISE

SHOWER

SUIT UP

MEETINGS

LUNCH

WORK

DINNER

SHOWER

UNWIND

SLEEP

THE ARGUMENT

THE BATHING FACTORY

Everyday life is rigid and monotonous. Technology may have progressed to create modern homes and systems that have made our life easier., but truth is that with this progress comes alienation.

Close Door, Lock Bolt Pant Shirt, On the Floor, Switch Hot, Keep Cold, Temper Body, Scrub-Scrub Go, Made Pure, Wipe Off, Get Set Ready, off you Go -Chiraag Punjabi

A Hammam typically consists of a common pool for bathing and subsidiary spaces for steam and massage. Bathing was an everyday ritual revered and enjoyed by the populace and many a times spaces within the Hammam would facilitate discussion. It was an enjoyable experience. The social structures in today’s day and age would never permit the act of everyone bathing in a common pool of water. We have now advanced towards the modern system of quick showers and the ritual of bathing like it used to be is now merely a chore, a mechanical act devoid of a rich experience on the assembly line of everyday life. A satirical question to the paradigm of bathing, therefore, forms the crux of this project Chiraag Punjabi, Year 2, Semester 1

17


THE DESIGN

The form consists of two main components; one being the split in the ground plane to create the primary space and two being the “Bathing Pods ” that extend out in the open.to acquire light for the person bathing within them. The concept of bathing as a ritual is explored and questioned by creating experiences similar to traditional Hammams, only this time, the bathing is carried out individually and the park above is given back to the community.

30 MM THK POLYCARBONATE LOUVRES TO ALLOW VENTILATION 10 MM THK ALUMINIUM FLASHING 25 MM THK EXTERNAL PLASTER ENDING INTO BULLNOSE BRICK BAT COBA LAID TO SLOPE 40 MM THK PAR-KY ARTIFICIAL TURF FLOOR

A’

20 MM THK CHINA MOSAIC TILES ON 20 MM THK CEMENT SCREED M.S. ANCHOR BOLTS 850 MM x 200 MM RIM BEAM HOLDING PODS IN POSITION

B’ B

N A

PLAN AT +6.5 M

50 MM THK OUTER GLAZED POLYCARBORNATE SHEET 25 MM THK G.I. CHANNEL FOR TELESCOPIC MOVEMENT RUBBER GASKET ALONG WITH BOLTS TO FASTEN THE PODS 40 MM DIA. WATER SUPPLY PIPES FOR CIRCULAR SHOWER SPOUTS 50 MM THK INNER GLAZED POLYCARBORNATE SHEET 50 MM THK G.I. CHANNEL FOR TELESCOPIC OPENING 20 MM THK KOTAH STONE FLOORING WITH DRAINAGE FITOUT 20 MM THK CEMENT SCREED 80 MM THK DRAINAGE PIPE 150 MM THICK P.C.C. BED BRICK BAT COBA LAID TO SLOPE 230 MM THK DRY RUBBLE PACKING ALONG WITH RAMMED EARTH

SECTION AA’ WALL SECTION : THROUGH THE PODS

SECTION BB’

Chiraag Punjabi, Year 2, Semester 1

18


Chiraag Punjabi, Year 2, Semester 1

HOT SHOWERS IN THE BATHING FACTORY, AS PEOPLE ENJOY IN THE PARK ABOVE, Section, AutoCAD + Photoshop

19


HOUSE NO. 17, AUNIATI SATTRA

CELEBRATION OF EVERYDAY LIFE AND ITS RITUALS LOCATION - Majuli, Assam, India TYPE - Individual Academic Work TIME - Dec 2011 - Mar 2011 LEVEL - Year 2, Semester 4 MENTOR - Ar. Rohan Shivkumar (deputy.director@krvia.ac.in)

THE MAJULI MAN PERFORMING HIS EVERYDAY RITUALS, Axonometric, Ink + Photoshop Chiraag Punjabi, Year 2, Semester 2

20


ABOUT THE DESIGN

Majuli is the longest river island in the world. It houses many Neo-Vishnavite monasteries, 3 of which we studied and measure drew. Each monastry has houses where 5-6 monks live together under a Head Monk. The river Bramphaputra that runs around the island swells up during the monsoon causing extremely heavy floods and disrupting everyday life. Everyday life shifts into house boats and attics during this time. House No. 17 in the Auniati Sattra has been therefore designed accounting for the floods as fissures that change the course of everyday life at the Sattra.

STEP 3 - DESIGN DEVELOPMENT B

A‘

SLEEPING PLATFORMS VERANDAH

STUDY

LIVING

PRAYER ROOM

COURTYARD

STEP 1 - MAPPING OF DAILY ACTIVITIES STORE

HOUSE BACKYARD HEAD’S ROOM

KITCHEN

COW SHED

DAILY ACTIVITIES PERFORMED ACROSS THE HOUSE DURING EVERYDAY LIFE

B’

BATHROOM

BATHROOM

A

GROUND FLOOR PLAN - SPACES USED FOR 8 MONTHS OF THE YEAR

DAILY ACTIVITIES PERFORMED ACROSS THE HOUSE DURING THE 4 MONTHS OF HEAVY RAINFALL AND FLOODS

STEP 2 - EVOLUTION OF FORM BASED ON USE OF SPACE 1

2

3

FIRST FLOOR PLAN - SPACES USED FOR 4 MONTHS OF HEAVY RAINFALL N

1. EXTRUDING THE ENTIRE VOLUME

4

2. SPLITTING IT FROM THE MIDDLE TO ALLOW RAINWATER TO DRAIN 3. STAGGERING THE MASSES TO USE THE COMPLETE LENGTH OF SITE 4. CARVING OUT SPACES FOR DAILY ACTIVITIES BASED ON NEEDS OF 5 INHABITANTS

Chiraag Punjabi, Year 2, Semester 2

SECTION AA’

SECTION BB’

21


THE COLLAGE OF EVERYDAY ACTIVITIES AT HOUSE NO. 17, Section, AutoCAD + Photoshop Chiraag Punjabi, Year 2, Semester 2

22


ONCE UPON A POL....

REGENERATION OF THE POL TYPOLOGY HOUSING LOCATION - Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India TYPE - Academic Faculty Work TIME - Jan 2016 - Mar 2016 FOR - Year 1, Semester 2 Architectural Design Studio CONTRIBUTON - Course Co-ordinator FACULTY TEAM - Anshul Sinha, Anjuri Agrawal, Pritam Mhadgut, Renuka Kale, Sonia D’Silva

THE PROCESS

Taking inspiration from the process I followed for the House No. 17 project in Majuli, I formulated a similar proceudure for my students during the semester, finding departures wherever I could. This made me realise how architectural methodologies don’t end with the project and adaptation could be key with it comes to devising pedagogic intents.

STEP 1 - MAPPING OF DAILY ACTIVITIES

THE BRIEF

A home can be simply described as a collection of spaces meant for the performance of the everyday. The activities, the rituals, the chores of the everyday and the spaces where they are carried out may be fundamentally similar for a larger community. This probably explains why there is a Chowk inside almost every house in the Pol. The Chowk functions fundamentally as the center of the house, holding within it the performance of all the everyday activities. However, the character of the spaces within every household of this community may be different. Hence, the scale, proportion, position and nature of this Chowk is different across all the houses. The differences may occur due to physical or economic constraints. If we were to take a closer look at the Pols in this light, we find that due to a morphological evolution over a long period of time, set patterns of spaces have emerged and have engrained themselves within the architecture of the Pol. These patterns emerge due to a response that the inhabitants of the Pol generated towards climatological conditions, need for warfare strategizing (escape routes) and the celebration of the everyday. How does one engage then with this Architecture? How does one interpret the making of a home in such a deeply seeded context? What is the idea of a home in the Pol in today’s day and age?

STUDENT NAME - MANSI BELNEKAR

STUDENT NAME - KRISHNA SHAH

STEP 2 - EVOLUTION OF FORM BASED ON USE OF SPACE

STUDENT NAME - AAYURSHA PATIL

STUDENT NAME - MANSI BELNEKAR

STUDENT NAME - BHAVESH PATANWADIA

STUDENT NAME - ANKITA ARORA

STUDENT NAME - SAKSHI TRIVEDI

STUDENT NAME - KUSHAL SHAH

THE PROBLEM

Rapid commercialization has led to the conversion of many Pol’s houses into shops or storage spaces for the Shops. In addition to this, many traditional Pol houses have been torn down and are being redeveloped into G+2, G+3 buildings in order to accommodate migrants moving into Ahmedabad for better job opportunities. The Pol is no longer viewed as a locality where people of a higher social class reside. The Heritage Committee of Ahmedabad is alarmed by this situation. They understand the need to not only preserve the essence of the Architecture of Old Ahmedabad but also its regeneration, so that it can sustain itself for years to come. It is keeping this in mind that 3 scholars have been invited from Mumbai to live in the Pols for a period of 12 months and help develop solutions of housing for the Pol. A family comprising of 3 people have been grateful enough to accommodate the scholars on a site owned by them in Totlagi ni Pol provided the Heritage Committee provides for the funds and building of a house on this site which had fallen apart in the earthquake of 2003 and has been run down since then.

THE DESIGN

You are required to design this House, which after a period of 12 months can also function as a paying guest facility for visitors once the Scholars leave. This house shall include – Spaces of Living, Dining, Kitchen and Bedrooms for the Family and the 3 Scholars. Spaces for solitude, gathering and interaction and other spaces you deem necessary. The built form shall not extend more than 3 floors. The family of 3 comprises of a Husband who is a businessman, a Wife who operates a Pickle making business from home while taking care of the Child who is currently in the 9th Std.

STEP 3 - DESIGN DEVELOPMENT THROUGH DETAILED MODELS

STUDENT NAME - PRITESH JAIN

STUDENT NAME - KUSHAL SHAH

STUDENT NAME - KRUTIK VAPIWALA

STUDENT NAME - BHAVESH PATANWADIA

STUDENT NAME - ANKITA ARORA

STUDENT NAME - PRASANN SHAH

23


ATLANI HOUSE BUILDING AS A CRAFT

LOCATION - Raipur, Chhatisgarh, India TYPE - Professional Work TIME - Jun 2014 - May 2015 CONTRIBUTION - Presentation/ Design Drawings, Working Drawings, Design Development, Model Making PROJECT HEAD - Ar. Advait Potnis (advait@digarch.net)

INTERIOR SPACES AT THE ATLANI HOUSE, View, Model

Chiraag Punjabi, Advait Potnis, Parthiban Manohar, Vatsal Upadhyay, Professional Work

24


THE EVOLUTION OF THE FORM

PROGRAMMATIC ARRANGEMENT OF SPACES

EXTRUSION OF CUBOID

ADDITION OF CENTRAL COURTYARD SPACE

DIVISION OF VOLUME INTO 4 PARTS

ADDITION OF LOUNGE SPACES

ROTATING THE UPPER FLOOR PLATE BY 90

PLACEMENT OF UPPER FLOOR PLATE

OPEN

ABOUT THE HOUSE

Sitting on a sprawling plot of 40,000 sq. ft. the proposed design investigates the idea of traditional “Courtyard Type” vs “Modern Glass” house. The internal spatial organization is worked around the courtyard such that individual inhabitant gets a private terrace and is reflected externally by means of modulated glass façade. This individualistic experience is further enriched by integrating the landscape into the house. Designing houses is all about experiences and this house was no different.

SCREENS DESIGNED FOR ELEVATIONS

SCREENS APPLIED ONTO ELEVATIONS

Chiraag Punjabi, Advait Potnis, Parthiban Manohar, Vatsal Upadhyay, Professional Work

FINAL FORM

The challenge for this project was to create an experience of its own as the site was devoid of any context. Taking advantage of the squarish nature of the plot, the house was designed to have a large central courtyard as the main social space for the family members. The courtyard forms the heart of the house around which the 5 bedrooms are arranged. The other spaces include the living room and the dining room on the ground floor and the recreation room on the first floor.

25


B’

SECTION AA’

A

A’

SECTION BB’

N

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

B

NORTH ELEVATION

THE SCREENS

Raipur typically has a tropical wet and dry climate throughout the year. However, the months between March to June experience a soaring rise in the temperature, sometimes rising upto 48 degrees C. This prompted a climatogical response towards the inner elevations of the courtyard. Screens were designed to provide for the necessary privacy as well as bring about the required flow of air

VIEW FROM SOUTH WESTERN CORNER

Chiraag Punjabi, Advait Potnis, Parthiban Manohar, Vatsal Upadhyay, Professional Work

MODEL VIEW OF THE SOUTHERN ELEVATION

26


THE HEART OF THE HOUSE - THE CENTRAL COURTYARD SPACE, View, SketchUp + 3DMax + Photoshop

Chiraag Punjabi, Advait Potnis, Parthiban Manohar, Vatsal Upadhyay, Professional Work

27


THE ENTRANCE FACADE FRAMING VIEWS OF THE BOX, View, Photograph

KARMA CONSULTANCY OFFICES BOX WITHIN A BOX

LOCATION - Mumbai, Maharashtra, India TYPE - Professional Work TIME - October 2014 - April 2015 CONTRIBUTION - Presentation/ Design Drawings, Working Drawings, Design Development/ Execution/ Correspondence PROJECT HEAD - Ar. Advait Potnis (advait@digarch.net) | PHOTOS - Sebastian Zacchariah

Chiraag Punjabi, Advait Potnis, Karina Shetty, Parthiban Manohar, Professional Work

28


EVOLUTION OF FORM

The series of operations performed to create this object of interior architecture are -

a a

WHAT?

This project designed for a Human Resources Consultancy firm aims at modulating space to create a box within a box. The idea is to create an narrative through a series of spaces experienced while inside the office.

WHY?

EVOLUTION OF DIAGRAM

The site is an industrial area amidst a suburb in Mumbai. The client required an office consisting of requirements ranging from meeting areas, formal seating spaces, informal seating spaces, conference rooms, and cabins for the directors. At the heart of it all however, we wanted to create a space for ease, a space to pause, a necessary distraction from the otherwise banal industrial offices packed next to one another. The height of the inside of the office also provided for the creation of double heighted spaces.

HOW? SQUARE AS A PRIMITIVE FORM

a/2 a/2

The form of the box resulted from the idea of creating an insulation from the outside world. Operations AUGMENTING THE SHAPE BY MIRRORING were carried onto it in order to generate interesting openings for light and reception spaces. SQUARE ASofAthe PRIMITIVE X-Y-Z AXIS TO CREATE A 3-D FORM. As one stands outside the office, glimpses white box are revealed from the square windows onALONG the SHAPE facade. Once you enter the office, you are guided through to the reception space, a table jutting out from a champhered triangular volume carved from the box itself. Once inside, the waiting area reveals a play of materials that highlight the presence of the box - asbestos sheets are used to line the back wall that is THE SITE BEFORE WE INTERVENED revealed as a result of the operations performed on the box.

CHAMPHERING THE SHAPE TO NEGOTIATE THE MOVEMENT

CHAMFERING THE SHAPE TO NEGOTIATE THE MOVEMENT & LIGHT

APPROPRIATE SHAPE

APPROPRIATE SHAPE

AUGMENTING THE SHAPE BY MIRRORING IT ALONG X-Y-Z AXIS TO CREATE 3D-FORM

THE RESULTED 2D SURFACE

THE RESULTING 2D- SURFACE

AXONOMETRIC VIEW EXPLAINING THE BOX

Chiraag Punjabi, Advait Potnis, Karina Shetty, Parthiban Manohar, Professional Work

THE REGULATING LINES

THE SPACE INSIDE THE BOX

29


A

A’

PLAN

PROJECT SECTIONS

SECTION AA’

SPATIAL ELEMENTS

The other elements include the Tetrahedron light fixture which hangs from the centre of the box. This light fixture was awarded “Light Fixture 2015” at the Trendz Excellence Awards 2015. Once the user has experienced the central entrance space, he/ she is guided to the offices arranged along a 5 ft. wide passage that runs across the office space like a spine. This circulation passage is flanked by informal spaces and lounges that act as releif pockets to the otherwise tight passage. The staircase that leads to the mezzanine space where all the workstations are arranged, cantilevers from the wall. The stringer is hidden so as to give a sense of treads plates flying out.

TETRAHEDRON LIGHT

UPLIGHTERS

15 WATT LED STRIP LIGHTS

FRAMEWORK

8 NOS. 25 MM DIA. M.S. RODS

DOWNLIGHTERS

15 WATT LED STRIP LIGHTS

THE ENTRANCE RECEPTION CARVED OUT FROM THE BOX

RELIEF POCKETS CREATED ACROSS THE CIRCULATION PASSAGE

Chiraag Punjabi, Advait Potnis, Karina Shetty, Parthiban Manohar, Professional Work

CANTILEVERED STAIRCASE TOWARDS WORKSTATIONS ON UPPER LEVEL

THE FINAL FIXTURE INSTALLED ON SITE

30


THE BOX - CHAMPHERED, CUT, LIT & THE GLASS BOX THAT SITS WITHIN, View, Photograph Chiraag Punjabi, Advait Potnis, Karina Shetty, Parthiban Manohar, Professional Work

31


ACA’s INTERNATIONAL DESIGN COMPETITION A DESIGN COMPETITION HOSTED BY ACA, INDIA

LOCATION - Mumbai, Maharashtra, India TYPE - Academic Faculty Work TIME - Jun 2015 - Dec 2015 & Jun 2016 - Dec 2016 CONTRIBUTION - Co-Author of Brief, Design Problem, Competition Rules, Schedule Set Up of Website, Graphics, Jury Exhibition, Awards Ceremony, Media Outreach FACULTY TEAM - Aparna Surve (Principal), Pritam Mhadgut, Shishiir Saawant, Tanuj Jain, Tripti Biswas

THE ARTWORK AND THE LOGO OF THE COMPETITION, Graphic Design, Adobe Illustrator Chiraag Punjabi, Aparna Surve, Shishiir Sawant, Pritam Mhadgut, Tanuj Jain, Academic Faculty Work

ACA

M U M B A I

-

I N D I A

32


KEY FACTS ABOUT THE COMPETITION

ACA’s

THE

4

th

ARCHITECTURE

OF

BOUNDARIES

Competition Title - The Architecture of Boundaries Competition Edition - 4th EDITION No. of Nations Invited - 118 (Nations Part of the UIA) No. of Participating Nations - 21 No. of Entries Received - 94 No. of Students engaged - Over 500

THE JURY PROCESS

“The fascination of boundaries lies in their ambivalent role of dividing and connecting at the same time. They mark the transition between different modes of existence. They transmit and control exchange between territories. They are the playground for discovery and conquest”

-Richter and Peitgen, 1985. Beyond the ‘Self’, we are inherently a part of ‘collectives’ such as a family, a community, a city, a village, a country, a culture, an ethos, and the universe. In the natural course of life we become aware about the geographical edges and social boundaries such as language, culture, religion and economy that segregate Us from Them. And yet we feel connected to these various ‘collectives’ almost simultaneously. To feel connected we learn about other cultures, art, languages, share ideas, do trade, or just come together and celebrate. The transitory events such as family rituals, work, education, festivals, recreation, public events, journeys, pilgrimages are the means through which we constantly traverse from one domain to the other. In today’s world the digital media has made this transition through the boundaries a lot quicker. The connectedness takes place when the ’edges’ defining the territories allow for exchange. Prof. Richard Sennett, renowned Sociologist, teaching at the London School of Economics, has demonstrated through the natural phenomenon of “Edge Effect”, how the boundary conditions between diverse habitats are conducive for exchange and hence generate a greater biodiversity. He therefore asks whether the ‘natural systems’ of ‘edge effects’ could be simulated as ‘man-made systems’ for human habitat thereby proposing that the ’public realms’ to be pushed to the ‘edge’ where the human activity is heightened and rich. Architecture has always facilitated this transition by providing spaces where the territorial or socio-cultural boundaries are negotiated– dissolved, consolidated or maintained. The Haskell Free Library that sits on the border between the United States and Canada speaks of a knowledge exchange between countries. The Hammam restoration project in Kabul, Afghanistan aims at reviving the traditional bathing house culture. It is an example that shows how Architecture can facilitate a boundary that breaks the barriers of social restriction. The Tabiat Pedestrian Bridge in Tehran, Iran is a beautiful example showing how architecture can transform the idea of bridging a physical boundary beyond its functional connotation. The Great Wall of China built in 14th century to divide the kingdoms and protect them from invasion has over time transformed into a world heritage site visited by millions every year exemplifying how architecture adapts and blurs boundaries in time. Christopher Alexander, in his book A Pattern Language emphasizes the importance of having boundaries in order to ensure a thriving mosaic of subcultures. He further suggests ‘Let this boundary be natural – wilderness, farmland, water-or man-made-railroads, major roads, parks, schools, some housing. Along the seam between two subcultures, build meeting places, shared function, touching each other’

This year’s ACA’s International Design Competition-2016 has set out to discover, the layers of the architecture of boundaries. The Competition eagerly awaits your unique narrative of these ‘spaces on edge’ that represent a core transformational condition, theme or an event set in your part of the world. For this you may need to take a deep dive into the inheritance of the ethos you belong to and simultaneously take a leap out of it to embrace the world beyond it. The English musician John Lennon immortalized an imagination of a world free of boundaries, barriers and borders at a time when it seemed like control over them were the only things that could prove supremacy. He says Chiraag Punjabi, Aparna Surve, Shishiir Sawant, Pritam Mhadgut, Tanuj Jain, Academic Faculty Work

“Imagine there’s no countries It isn’t hard to do Nothing to kill or die for And no religion too Imagine all the people Living life in peace... You.... You may say I’m a Dreamer But I am not the only one I hope someday you would join us And the world will live as one....”

AR. JAYANTHA PERERA, UIA WORK PROGRAMME DIRECTOR, SRI LANKA

AR. PREM CHANDAVARKAR, MANAGING PARTNER, CnT ARCHITECTS, BANGALORE

AR. RATAN BATLIBOI, PRINCIPAL ARCHITECT, BATLIBOI ARCHITECTS, MUMBAI

AR. ARJUN MALIK, PARTNER, ARCHITECTS, MUMBAI

THE JURY HAVING A ROUND OF DISCUSSION REGARDING THE ENTRIES

THE JURORS DELIBERATING OVER ENTRIES

MALIK

THE AWARD CEREMONY

HONOURABLE GOVERNOR OF UTTAR PRADESH, INDIA SHRI RAM NAIK JI ADDRESSING THE AUDIENCE

PADMABHUSHAN AR. HAFEEZ CONTRACTOR FELICITATING FIRST PLACE WINNERS FROM BANGLADESH

33


THE JURY AND COMMENTS

URY MEMBERS Ar. Prem Chandavarkar Managing Partner Cnt Architects India

Ar. Ratan Batliboi Principal Architect Batliboi Architects India

“A college that sustains an enthusiasm for design competition that focus on ideas and for listening to lectures, discussions, questions will always be m Chandavarkar g Patner a worthwhile place to study. Keep itects up the good work, Aditya college of ru, INDIA Architecture. “ Ar.Jayantha Perera UIA Work Programme Director Sri Lanka

“Another exciting 2 days spent at Aditya College of Architecture and I am impressed once again. I urge the Armanagement, Ratan Batliboi Faculty and students Principal Architect the standards & quality to uphold RJB Architects established & strive to create new Mumbai, INDIA horizons in our National Architecture!“ Ar. Vijay Garg Vice Preisdent Council of Architecture India India

SELECTED GRAPHIC ARTWORKS

“First of all thank you for inviting me “Students of the institution have given Vijay Garg ntha Perera to be a jury member at your ACA’s 4th Ar.good response. It was exciting to attend Vice-president Programme Director IDC. The work submitted was credible COA the jury panel meeting and found it a mmunication - CAA Delhi,idea INDIAto inspire students to create and the school should be congratulated New great o, SRI LANKA for inviting such a competition.“ good work. Wish good luck!. “ Ar. Jayashree Ar. Arjun Malik Deshpande Partner Director Malik Architects National Institute India of Advanced Studies in Architecture, India

“The work displayed by the students “It was interesting to once again to be sh Patelwere certainly thought provoking. It Arengaged Arjun Malikin the academic enviornment Architect Partner was great to work with this panel of and with a jury panel that encouraged tel Architects Malik Architects INDIAjurors.“ extensive Mumbai, INDIAdialouge.“ Ar. Rajesh Patel Pratap Jadhav Rajesh Patel President Architects Institute of Indian India Interior Designers India

“Nicely organized competition, it is inspirational for other students.“ Chiraag Punjabi, Aparna Surve, Shishiir Sawant, Mr Pritam Mhadgut, yashree Deshpande Pratap Jadhav Tanuj Jain, Academic Faculty Work

34


KEY FACTS ABOUT THE COMPETITION

ACA’s

3

rd

SACRED SPACES “Where’s your church?” “We’re standing in it.” “But this is a bookstore and it’s a Friday.” “Yes, but you might also choose to see it as a cathedral of the human spirit-a storehouse consecrated to the full spectrum of human experience. Just about every idea we’ve ever had is in here somewhere. A place containing great thinking is a sacred space.” -Excerpt from A Chosen Faith: An introduction to Unitarian Universalism by Forrest Church Man has always had an inherent relationship with things ‘Sacred’ to him. The notion of what this non-manifest, sacred world is to an individual, stems from his intuition combined with his external influences. A person through his religious perspective would perceive a place of worship sacred, he who indulges in reading would find solitude in a library, while he who has pledged his devotion to dance would consecrate the stage. The experience of ‘Sacred’ may stem from a Space, a Deity, a Belief, a Memory, a Ritual, an Object, a Ceremony, a Geographical terrain, an Event or even just an everyday Activity. The human civilization has witnessed a plethora of cultures. Each of them has always had an anchor of sanctity grounding them. For some cultures it may be the act of holding weekly prayers, for some it may be bathing in a river – the water of which is considered pure enough to wash away their sins – once in their entire life span, while for some it might be the act of drinking tea with their dear ones. And that what is sacred, was and will always be formalized into Architecture. Charles Correa in his essay, ‘The Public, The Private and The Sacred’, very aptly points out, “The principle vehicles through which we explore and communicate our notions of the non-manifest world are religion, philosophy and the arts. Like these, Architecture too is generated by mythic beliefs, expressing the presence of a reality more profound than the manifest world in which it exists.” What then is the experience and expression of the Sacred Space? Does the experience manifest itself through built architecture or landscape interventions? What is the nature, scale, form and character of this design intervention?

The INTERNATIONAL DESIGN COMPETITION this year, invites all young designers to express through design interventions, their idea of “SACRED SPACES”.

Competition Title - Sacred Spaces Competition Edition - 3rd EDITION No. of Nations Invited - 18 (Nations Part of ARCASIA) No. of Participating Nations - 9 No. of Entries Received - 97 No. of Students engaged - Over 500 Jury 1. Prof. Neelkanth Chhaya, Ex- Dean, CEPT University, India 2. Ar. Sameep Padora, Principal, sP+a Architects, India 3. Ar. Manoj Parmar, Principal, Manoj Parmar Architects, India 4. Ar. Pinkish Shah, Principal, S+PS Architects, India

Jury Comments “There was a wide range of ideas and enthusiastic Participation by students in this Competition. The Jury appreciates the time and effort put in by the students. “ “In General, the standard of the work was reasonably good with outstanding ideas and very good representations of the same.”

THE JURY PROCESS AND THE AWARDS

AR.SAMEEP PADORA, PROF. NEELKANTH AR. MANOJ PARMAR, AR.SAMEEP PADORA, IDC JUROR AR. PINKISH SHAH KEENLY CHHAYA & AR.PINKISH SHAH LOOKING AT THE PROF.NEELKANTH CHHAYA & AR.PINKISH SHAH LOOKING AT THE ENTRIES DISPLAYED ON THE 3RD IDC ENTRIES. DISCUSSING THE ACA’S 3RD IDC ENTRIES. JURY DAY.

Chiraag Punjabi, Aparna Surve, Pritam Mhadgut, Tripti Biswas, Academic Faculty Work

IDC JUROR AR. MANOJ PARMAR MARKING THE PADMABHUSHAN AR. HAFEEZ CONTRACTOR ENTRIES DISPLAYED ON THE JURY DAY. PRESENTING THE AWARD TO THE FIRST PRIZE WINNER FROM CHINA

35


THE COCOON, Axonometric View, Free-Hand Sketch First Year, Architectural Design Studio, K.R.V.I.A., Mumbai, Jan 2010.

CHIRAAG PUNJABI chiraagpunjabi@gmail.com +91 9920310010

SELECTED WORKS (2009-2017)  

This publication is a portfolio of selected works, both academic & professional, carried out over 8 years in the field of architecture and d...

SELECTED WORKS (2009-2017)  

This publication is a portfolio of selected works, both academic & professional, carried out over 8 years in the field of architecture and d...

Advertisement