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REPORT TO

THE HAWAII DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FROM

SAFE SCHOOLS COMMUNITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ADDRESSING HARASSMENT IN HAWAII PUBLIC SCHOOLS June 25, 2007


Table of Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................... 1 Advisory Committee Members and DOE Support Staff................................................... 5 Impact of Bullying and Harassment: What We Know and Why We Care ....................... 9 Student Stories: “Two Minutes of Bullying Can Last A Lifetime” ................................... 17 Executive Summary ...................................................................................................... 25 Vision ............................................................................................................................ 31 Our Work Together........................................................................................................ 35 Recommendations ........................................................................................................ 39 Section 1 - Comprehensive Recommendations ....................................................... 41 Section 2 – DOE Policies and Procedures............................................................... 42 Section 3 – Reporting and Data Collection .............................................................. 44 Section 4 – Compliance Monitoring ......................................................................... 46 Section 5 – DOE Training/Curricula ......................................................................... 46 Section 6 – Community Involvement........................................................................ 48 Appendices ................................................................................................................... 51 Incentives and Recognitions .................................................................................... 53 Content Standards Relevant to Bullying, Harassment, and Discrimination.............. 55 Community Feedback Summaries ........................................................................... 57 Resource Materials .................................................................................................. 63 Implementation Guidelines ...................................................................................... 79 Communication Plan................................................................................................ 93


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Introduction

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In March 2005, Superintendent Patricia Hamamoto convened the Department of Education Safe Schools Community Advisory Committee (SS-CAC) to “provide input to the Department of Education (DOE) regarding the implementation of prevention strategies and interventions to ensure the safety and well-being of all students in Hawaii’s public schools”. The membership of the SS-CAC consists of twenty community representatives who work with and/or advocate for youth at-risk for bullying and harassment in public schools, based on: race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex (including gender identity and expression), religion, mental disability, socioeconomic status, physical appearance and characteristics, sexual orientation. The SS-CAC has met approximately monthly since March 2005. DOE staffs attend meetings to provide logistical support, background information, and input into discussions. The SS-CAC Steering Committee meets monthly to evaluate the previous meeting and plan for future meetings. The content of the monthly meetings has included topics as diverse and challenging as a presentation by a youth who has been the victim of harassment and bullying in her public school and several discussions regarding current DOE policies and strategies, to assist SS-CAC members to understand the issue of harassment in Hawaii’s public schools. Some of the content of the SS-CAC meetings included: • • • • •

presentations from youth and school staff regarding harassment and bullying in schools; presentations by DOE staff to inform members on DOE programs/systems currently in place to address harassment and bullying; presentations by members sharing their perspectives of at-risk youth they are representing on the SS-CAC; discussions that resulted in the draft Recommendations; and other activities, such as watching relevant films, having guest speakers.

Also, feedback sessions were held to obtain input on the draft recommendations from key informants, such as members of the Hawaii State Teachers Association and principal representatives. A website was developed that reflects the ongoing work of the SS-CAC: http://doe.k12.hi.us/safeschools/

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SS-CAC members believed that it was important that there was a common understanding of what harassment consists of in Hawaii’s public schools, and this understanding is presented in the Report in both prose and image forms. This understanding is then followed by Recommendations that were developed by the SSCAC members. When this report refers to bullying, discrimination, and harassment, it includes cyber-bullying, cyber-discrimination, and cyber-harassment. These Recommendations are intentionally wide-ranging and broad, as the SSCAC appreciates and acknowledges that the details and specifics of implementation of these Recommendations is the purview of DOE staff. These Recommendations are complemented by the recommendations of the Board of Education Ad Hoc Committee on School Safety (9/25/06). In addition, with suggestions from Superintendent Hamamoto, the final report was enhanced with the inclusion of an implementation guide and a communication plan. We present these Recommendations with the expectation that Superintendent Hamamoto and Department of Education staff will make every effort to implement them with the assistance of an ongoing Safe Schools Community Advisory Committee. With aloha from the current members of the SS-CAC. Robert Bidwell Sister Joan Chatfield Breene Harimoto Kim Coco Iwamoto Faye Kennedy Nancy Kern Susan Kitsu Kristen Lindsey-Dudley Camaron Miyamoto Dave Randall Mark Rieben Beth Schimmelfennig Christine Trecker Clarissa Villamor

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Advisory Committee Members and DOE Support Staff

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The following community members and department support staff participated in advisory committee meetings. Member Robert Bidwell Grace Caligtan Sister Joan Chatfield Jane Chung Breene Harimoto Dee Helber Louise Iwashita Kim Coco Iwamoto

Agency University of Hawaii Department of Pediatrics Domestic Violence Clearing House Institute for Religion & Social Change Sex Abuse Treatment Center Department of Education Department of Education

Faye Kennedy Nancy Kern Susan Kitsu Kristen Lindsey-Dudley

Kapiolani Children’s Hospital Foster parents, foster children, transgender children Hawaii Friends of Civil Rights Department of Health Department of Education Nutrition Therapy Consultants

Karen Loebl Lois Matsuda

Kalihi-Palama Center Department of Education

Camaron Miyamoto

University of Hawaii at Manoa Student Services Office

Jean Nakasato

Department of Education

Robin Nussbaum

Vassar University

Dave Randall Mark Rieben Beth Schimmelfennig Kerinne Smith

Department of Education Maunawili Elementary School Department of Education Department of Education

Christine Trecker Clarissa Villamor

Sex Abuse Treatment Center Pacific Gateway Immigrant Center

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Representing Adolescent medicine Victims of sexual assault Interfaith Alliance Victims of sexual assault & harassment Board of Education Student Support Section School Health Special needs children Foster parents, foster children & transgender Students of color, African American At-risk students Civil Rights Compliance Office Eating disorders At-risk students Student Support Section Comprehensive Student Support Section Students of University of Hawaii/P-20 transitions Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender (LGBT) Student Support Section Positive Behavior Support Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender (LGBT) Coordinated School Health Program Teachers as advocates for students Civil Rights Compliance Office Student Support Section Positive Behavior Support Victims of sexual assault & harassment Immigrant students


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Impact of Bullying and Harassment: What We Know and Why We Care

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Bullying and harassment are common features of American school life. A 2003 nationally representative study of 6th to 10th grade students found that in the previous year 13% had engaged in bullying behaviors, 11% had been victims, and 6% had been both victims and engaged in bullying themselves (Nansel et al., 2003). Regardless of the basis on which harassment occurs (including race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, gender identity and expression, religion, physical and mental attributes, socioeconomic status, and sexual orientation among others ) the effects are similar. The consequences of harassment (verbal, physical, and sexual) are serious and can be short-term or long-term, even life-long. They affect victims, bystanders, harassers themselves, their families, and the broader communities of which they are a part. The harmful effects of school harassment and bullying on academic achievement and the psychological, social, and physical well-being of students K-12 are welldocumented in the research literature in the fields of education, social work, psychology, psychiatry, pediatrics, and other disciplines focused on children and youth (Van der Wall, De Wit, & Hirasing, 2003; Widmeyer Communications, 2003; American Association of University Women, 2001; Ma, Stewn, & Mah, 2001; KaltialaHeino et al., 2000; Kumpulainen & Rasanen, 2000; Berthold & Hoover, 1999; Craig, 1998; Boiven, Hymel, & Bukowski, 1995; Sharp, 1995; Hoover, Hazler, & Oliver, 1992; Rigby & Slee, 1991). Victims of harassment and bullying are more likely than their peers to experience fear, shame, insecurity, poorer relationships with peers, isolation, loneliness, social anxiety, diminished self-esteem, hopelessness, depression and suicide. Their social status tends to be low compared to other students, including bullies. Research has demonstrated that depression and lower self-esteem due to school harassment can extend into adulthood, having lifelong effects on both career and personal relationships (Olweus, 1993). Perpetrators of harassment and bullying also are at increased risk of a variety of negative consequences related to their psychosocial development during childhood and adolescence. Furthermore, they are far more likely than their peers to be involved in criminal activity as adults (Olweus, 1993). Bystanders, those students who observe but do not directly participate in harassing or bullying behaviors, also are affected negatively by witnessed violence in the school setting (Nansel et al., 2001; Widmeyer Communications, 2003) . School harassment and bullying also have direct effects on students’ attitudes toward school, school attendance, and academic achievement (Eisenberg, NeumarkSztainer, & Perry, 2003; Juvonen, Graham, & Schuster, 2003; Widmeyer Communications, 2003; American Association of University Women, 2001; Juvonen, Nishina, & Graham, 2000; Kochenderfer & Ladd, 1996; Reis & Saewyc, 1996; Sharp, 1995; Olweus, 1993; Hazler, Hoover, & Oliver, 1992). Students who are harassed

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and bullied at school are much more likely than other students to see their schools as unsafe places and often dislike school intensely. They are less likely to participate in classroom activities, to be involved in extra-curricular activities, or to feel connected to their school communities. Research has shown consistently that victims of school bullying and harassment are more likely than their peers to want to avoid school, as reflected in increased rates of skipped classes, absenteeism, truancy and school dropout. School avoidance due to peer victimization has been documented from kindergarten through secondary school. Given the fear, dislike, and avoidance of school that victims of harassment and bullying experience, it is not surprising that research studies also consistently report poorer academic achievement when these students are compared to their peers. Students who bully and harass also have a more negative attitude toward school and lower grades than other students who are not involved in bullying and harassment. In fact, the entire school climate can be affected if harassment and bullying go unchecked, resulting in a negative learning environment for all students (Hoover & Hazler, 1991). The 2005 Hawai`i Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, developed in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, documented a significant degree of violence and sense of vulnerability among Hawai`i’s middle and high school students (Saka & Kumaran, 2006). For example, nearly 7 % of both middle school and high school students reported they did not go to school on one or more of the past 30 days because they felt unsafe at school or on their way to and from school. Thirty-six percent of middle school and 28 percent of high school students said they had property stolen or deliberately damaged on school property one or more times during the past 12 months. Sixteen percent of middle school and 10 percent of high school students had been in a physical fight on school property one or more times during the past 12 months. Thirty-eight percent of middle school and 22 percent of high school students reported that someone had tried to hurt them by hitting, punching, or kicking them while on school property one or more times in the past month. Fifty-eight percent of middle school and nearly 44 percent of high school students said that someone tried to hurt them by saying mean things to them (things that hurt their feelings) while on school property one or more times during the past 12 months. Nearly 15 percent of middle school and 12 percent of high school students said that during the past 12 months they were harassed one or more times because someone thought they were gay, lesbian, or bisexual. The following list represents a comprehensive summary of the consequences of school bullying and harassment from the level of the individual student to the broader community and societal levels:

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Impact at an individual level: ƒ Feelings of fear, shame, loneliness, isolation, anger, anxiety, powerlessness, unworthiness, and low self-esteem ƒ Belief that the harassment is deserved and acceptable ƒ Drug and alcohol use/abuse ƒ Increased risky sexual behaviors ƒ Self-mutilation ƒ Eating disorders ƒ Declining physical health ƒ Depression and suicide

Impact at the school level: ƒ Creation of a hostile school campus environment ƒ Creation of a hostile learning environment ƒ Loss of confidence in ability to succeed academically or to graduate ƒ Decline in academic performance ƒ Anger at school officials who do not intervene to stop harassment ƒ Increased absenteeism, truancy and drop-out ƒ Desire to change schools ƒ Difficulty making friends ƒ Ostracized by peers ƒ Not wanting to participate in class discussions, projects or other school activities ƒ Avoidance of certain places at school (restrooms, gym, cafeteria, bus stop) ƒ Increased weapon-carrying on campus ƒ Escalation to overt violence on campus, including assault and homicide (including victim response to on-going harassment) ƒ Increased burden on teachers, counselors, and administrative staff

Impact at the family level: ƒ Anger directed by child at parents and siblings ƒ Alienation from or rejection (scape-goating) by family ƒ Feelings of uncertainty, confusion, fear, shame, isolation, anger, anxiety, and powerlessness within the family

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Impact at the community and societal level: ƒ Creation and support of real-life bullies who often extend their antisocial behaviors into adulthood (domestic violence and other criminal acts), creating a new generation of harassers and bullies ƒ Promotion of antisocial behavior in the home and in the broader community ƒ Increased social costs of school drop-out, runaway behavior, substance abuse, prostitution, and violence ƒ Validation of cultural expectations of appropriate looks and behaviors which are not realistically attainable or reinforce stereotypes ƒ Negative public health impacts related to substance use and unsafe sexual behaviors (leading, for example, to the spread of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections) ƒ Workforce deprived of effective and respectful employees

References American Association of University Women Educational Foundation and Harris Interactive. (2001). Hostile Hallways: The AAUW Survey on Sexual Harassment in American Schools. Berthold, K., & Hoover, J.H. (1999). Correlates of bullying and victimization among intermediate students in the Midwestern USA. School Psychology International Journal, 29, 159-72. Boiven, M., Hymel, S., & Bukowski, W.M. (1995). The roles of social withdrawal, peer rejection, and victimization by peers in predicting loneliness and depressed mood in children. Development and Psychopathology, 7, 765-785. Craig, W.M. (1998). The relationship among bullying, victimization, depression, anxiety, and aggression in elementary school children. Personality and Individual Differences, 24, 123-130. Eisenberg, M.E., Neumark-Sztainer, D., & Perry, C. (2003). Peer harassment, school connectedness, and school success, Journal of School Health, 73, 311-316. Hazler, R, Hoover, J., & Oliver, R. (1992). What kids say about bullying.

The Executive Educator, 14, 20-22.

Hoover, J.H., & Hazler, R.J. (1991). Bullies and Victims. Elementary School Guidance and Counseling, 25, 212219. Juvonen, J., Graham, P., & Schuster, M.A. (2003). Bullying among young adolescents: The strong, the weak, and the troubled. Pediatrics, 112, 1231-1237. Juvonen, J., Nishina, A., & Graham, S. (2000). Peer harassment, psychological adjustment, and school functioning in early adolescence. Journal of Educational Psychology, 92, 349-359. Kaltiala-Heino, R., Rimpela, M., Rantanen, P., & Rimpela, A. (2000). Bullying at school—an indicator of adolescents at risk for mental disorders. Journal of Adolescence, 23, 661-674. Kochenderfer, B.J., & Ladd, G.W. (1996). Peer victimization: Cause or consequence of school maladjustment? Child Development, 67, 1305-1317. Kumpulainen, K., & Rasanen, E. (2000). Children involved in bullying at elementary school age: Their psychiatric symptoms and deviance in adolescence. Child Abuse and Neglect, 24, 1567-1577. Ma, X., Stewn, L.L., & Mah, D.L. (2001). Bullying in school: Nature, effects and remedies. Research Papers in Education, 16, 247-270.

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Nansel, T.R., Overpeck, M., Pilla, R.S., Ruan, W.J., Simons-Morton, B., & Scheidt, P. (2001). Bullying behaviors among US youth: Prevalence and association with psychosocial adjustment. Journal of the American Medical Association, 285, 2094-2100. Olweus, D. (1993). Victimization by peers: Antecedents and long term outcomes. In: Rubin, K.H., & Asendorf, J.B., eds. Social Withdrawal, Inhibition and Shyness in Children. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum, 315-341. Reis, B., & Saewyc, E. (1996). Eighty-three Thousand Youth: Selected Findings from Population-Based Studies as They Pertain to the Safety and Well-being of Sexual Minority Students. Seattle, WA: Safe Schools Coalition of Washington. Rigby, K.,& Slee, P. (1991). Bullying among Australian school children: reported behavior and attitudes towards victims. Journal of Social Psychology, 131, 615-627. Saka, S., & Kumaran, L. (2006). Highlights and Results of the 2005 Hawaii Youth Risk Behavior Surveys. Honolulu, HI: Program Research and Evaluation Office, Curriculum Research & Development Group, College of Education, University of Hawaii at Manoa. Sharp, S. (1995). How much does bullying hurt? The effects of bullying on the personal well-being and emotional progress of secondary aged students. Educational and Child Psychology, 12, 81-88. Van der Wall, M.F., De Wit, C.A.M., & Hirasing, R.A. (2003). Psychosocial health among young victims of and offenders of direct and indirect bullying. Pediatrics, 111: 1312-1317. Widmeyer Communications for the Health, Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2003). National Bullying Prevention Campaign Formative Research Report.

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STUDENT STORIES “Two minutes of bullying can last a lifetime.”

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Story #1

Story #2 A National Origin Story

Teased for Being Overweight

A 16-year old girl, who moved to Hawaii two years ago from the Philippines, tearfully described how in one of her classes at an Oahu high school, a small group of boys would mock her and mimic her accent every time she stood in front of the class to recite or give a report. This happened daily for weeks until she “couldn’t take it any more” and decided never to say another word in her class.

A 25-year old tearfully describes the pain and anguish she felt as an overweight teenager in an elementary school. She remembers the other kids teasing her calling her “Gail Whale”. She remembers that she tried very hard to get them to stop by bringing the students presents but they continued to tease her.

As a result, she began to fail the class because she was not meeting the requirements to participate in class discussions and give oral reports. She noted sadly that her teacher never intervened even once to stop the harassment, and sometimes smiled when the boys made fun of her.

She eventually became very isolated and would eat her lunch in the bathroom. One summer she became very anorexic and lost 85 pounds. Unfortunately the teasing continued and they called her “anorexic bitch” yet no teacher ever intervened and tried to help her. She remains severely eating disordered today.

Story #3 An Ethnicity & Religion Story A brother and sister, freshman and junior, entered a large public high school in Honolulu after immigrating from the mid-East. Although their schedules were different they managed to meet at breaks and for lunch. Most of their conversations focused on how things had gone for each one and mostly it was not good. Ridicule, imitation in a singsong pattern, and mimicking seemed to happen to each of them in every class. Finally the stress was too much and they both stayed out of school. When the parents discovered this and heard their story with its discontent, they realized that there had to be a change of venue. Each parent had attended a Catholic school in their home country so they approached a new friend to get a recommendation and enrolled their two Muslim children in the new school. Fortunately there was room for both of them and little by little they discovered there were other Muslim children in the student body, as well as Hindus, Buddhists and Jews. The number was small by comparison to the whole, but the spirit was welcoming. Both students graduated with honors and are currently in two different colleges, a sense of inner security having developed so they could be independent.

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Story #4 Sexual Harassment An 11 year old, 5th grade student experiences anger and frustration in response to extensive sexual harassment that occurs on a daily basis in his classroom. The student explains, “I get called gay. I want to kill myself.” Although the student has reported the harassment many times to his teacher, his counselor and the vice principal, his efforts are met with ambivalence. He continues, “I want it to stop. I want it to stop. I want to jump off that balcony right there. I can’t take it anymore.” His teacher admits that when it comes to this student’s situation, “the teachers are at a loss” and that it was difficult for her because when he reports incidents of sexual harassment, she could “see both sides.” Other school staff members describe the student as “an enigma,” implying that there is little the school can do about his inherently provocative personality. Wishing to shift responsibility onto the student’s parents, the school recommends that they take him to counseling, but they refuse to hold their son responsible for harassment that is beyond his control. As for the bullies, they remain at large in the classroom and face little to no repercussions for their actions. The teachers describe the child to be so outcast that his peers will not touch anything he has had prior physical contact with, such that in gym class, when he passes the ball, students throw their hands up to avoid catching it; such that they will not take a seat that he has previously occupied; such that after he uses a pencil from the community pencil bin, he cleans it with his own t-shirt before carefully replacing it. Yet the teachers view his accommodating behavior as sad but nevertheless amusing. The student is left feeling hopeless in a school that will not maintain the standards of Chapter 19 to ensure his safety.

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Story # 5 Safe Environments: When it Works I knew the stories had made an impression when one day a substitute was in my classroom while I did an in-house training. During the training, I realized that I had forgotten something back in the classroom so I went upstairs just as the class was returning from P.E. A girl, who was not particularly close to Johnny, pulled me aside and said, "The teacher called Johnny a bad name and hurt his feelings." So I pulled Johnny out of the class to ask him what had happened. The substitute had called him a "sissy" when they were playing tetherball in P.E. While the kids were at lunch I spoke with the teacher to find out his side of the story. He did admit to calling Johnny a “sissy.� I told him that calling students a name like that could be very damaging. I told him that it would mean a lot to Johnny if he apologized. After school I asked Johnny how the rest of his day went and if the substitute had apologized. His response came with a nonchalant flick of the wrist "Oh, yeah, I forgave him." It was a good thing that girl thought to come up to me to help her classmate. After that incident I was more proactive in my support for him. He was the most "mahu" boy I had ever had at this age. He loved everything pink, he loved to dance and be the star of the show. It wasn't always easy to support Johnny. He did have trouble with boundaries. He was often the target of teasing by 4th and 6th graders as well as some others in 5th. By the spring, however, Johnny dared to participate in the Oahu speech festival, a positive outlet for the "showgirl" inside him. He even wrote and delivered a speech at the 5th Grade Graduation ceremony. In it he thanked his classmates for giving him the "confidence to be who I am". In the beginning of the year he couldn't even read a passage aloud without repeating each line 3 or more times. He didn't stutter once while giving his speech at the graduation ceremony. Although many of my actions were motivated to support Johnny, they set an example of tolerance for the whole class while teaching the other students important Health Education Standards, like advocacy, accessing support, interpersonal communication skills, and the prevention of violence. My class rallied around him and, in my 20 years of teaching in 3 different states, there has never been a more compassionate and caring group of students.

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Story #6 Support for Transgender Concerns “Les” is a 9th grade student who recently revealed her gender preference to be female although born as a male. She is an average student who is confident with her decision and whose friends accept her as she is. The main concerns that the family had with this unexpected change were: How will she be treated at school? Will she be accepted? How will the teachers treat her? What about PE? What about restroom facilities? If she’s being harassed, where can she seek assistance? How do we, as a family, deal with this? The school responded through their Comprehensive Student Support System (CSSS): • Counselor Support ƒ Met with parent to discuss concerns ƒ Initiated principal involvement ƒ Recommended to parent to seek out of school assistance ƒ Shared with parent the 9th grade Anti-Bullying Program ƒ Provides walk-in counseling for the student whenever the student feels a need • Principal Support ƒ Met with student to provide accommodations for PE and use of restroom facilities ƒ Made personal call to parent to discuss safety issues and to explain about PE and use of restroom accommodations for “Les” • Teacher Support ƒ Provides open communication with parent ƒ Accepts reference to student by her feminine name, Lesley Student – Lesley ƒ Speaks openly about herself ƒ Feels good about support from principal, counselor and teachers ƒ Feels accepted by peers ƒ Feels safe

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Story #7 Multi Issues What do you see?

I remember Ms. Sakamoto.

She was really nice and always

wanted to help me adjust to my new school. I think she even knew my parents called me a tomboy. But anyways, I didn’t do well in her class. I’m not trying to make excuses or anything like that, but that year was one rough time for me, you know? I think she was trying to help when she made me a ‘special assistant’ for her, but I never felt comfortable telling her what always happened. I would go pass out the papers for the test or quiz or whatever, and those girls in the back of the class, you know the kind, the popular ones with all the friends, and stuff like that, would always tell me things like:

“Oh your hair, it’s so pretty brah!” *“Eh, SALAMAT por dis pepah manong” “Nice your pants, you get ‘em at Kramer’s Big n Tall?” I would always try and just be quiet and not to make a scene and not say anything to those girls. I would just go back to my desk and be mad and upset all test time.

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Executive Summary

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The following are recommendations developed by the DOE Safe Schools Community Advisory Committee (SS-CAC) for implementation in Hawaii’s public school system. Each recommendation is the result of discussion by the SS-CAC and consensus that the recommendation should be included in this Report.

In recognition of the significant task ahead of implementing these recommendations, the SS-CAC strongly endorses the concept that the DOE collaborate with the community through the establishment of an ongoing, permanent SS-CAC. Section 1. y

COMPREHENSIVE RECOMMENDATIONS Comprehensive Recommendation #1: DOE will establish a school community culture that creates and encourages an environment of safety and respect for all, and ensures that all students are recognized as unique, worthy, and valuable contributors to the school community.

y

Comprehensive Recommendation #2: The Board of Education and the Superintendent will present a strong public statement that bullying, harassment, and discrimination are unacceptable and will not be tolerated in Hawaii’s schools. This message will be clear and unambiguous, and will be communicated on an ongoing basis.

Comprehensive Recommendation #3: The Department of Education’s Comprehensive Student Support System (CSSS) will be strengthened and enhanced to serve as the foundation for the implementation of a robust and sustainable statewide school support system, accountable to students, teachers, parents and the community.

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Section 2.

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DOE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

1. Establish a school community culture in which bullying, harassment, and discrimination on any basis is not permitted in Hawaii’s public schools. 2. Develop, implement and enforce formal, comprehensive anti-bullying, antiharassment, and anti-discrimination DOE policies and procedures. 3. Institute a policy of annual training at the school level on bullying, discrimination, and harassment. 4. Mandate that every school in the DOE adopt an anti-bullying, anti-harassment, and anti-discrimination program by the year 2010. 5. Establish clear lines of accountability for the maintenance of anti-bullying, antiharassment, and anti-discrimination measures. 6. In the section of Chapter 19 outlining student characteristics against which harassment is specifically prohibited, clarify that “sex” includes “gender identity and expression.” 7. Revise Chapter 41, Civil Rights Policy and Complaint Procedure, Hawaii Administrative Rules, to clearly state the procedure a student would follow in filing a complaint related to harassment or discrimination. 8. Establish hiring practices that include questions/discussion related to how the potential DOE staff person (administrator, principal, teacher, other staff) will address establishing a positive school and classroom environment, free from bullying, harassment and discrimination. 9. Provide students (and their families) with appropriate CSSS or other DOE referrals in a timely manner. 10. Provide resources and supports to work with student victims and perpetrators as well as their parents and families. Section 3.

REPORTING AND DATA COLLECTION

1. Enhance the current implementation and documentation systems of the Comprehensive Student Support System (CSSS) for all students and their families. 2. Establish a DOE system, with dedicated personnel positions, to support and advise on preventing, investigating, and addressing student complaints. 3. Utilize reporting and data collection mechanisms system wide and at the individual school level. 4. Provide schools with incentives and supports. 5. Investigate reported incidents to ensure that student concerns of bullying, discrimination, and harassment are addressed. 6. In the event of a school-related incident, release a statement addressing the specific issue, identifying an appropriate course of action, and reaffirming that bullying, harassment and discrimination are unacceptable.

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Section 4.

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COMPLIANCE MONITORING

1. Evaluate the effectiveness of the entire system. 2. Establish a process to ensure that information from the data collection, reporting, and monitoring system is utilized to inform and revise, on an ongoing basis, current policies and procedures. 3. The superintendent shall convene annually with the SS-CAC to review eCSSS (electronic Comprehensive Student Support Services) data and feedback from stakeholders. Section 5.

DOE TRAINING/CURRICULA

1. Integrate concepts of safety and respect for all students throughout the school culture, including curricula, student activities and all aspects of school life. 2. The administration faculty, staff and school personnel of each school shall be trained annually. 3. All students shall participate in annual informational assemblies or presentations to support school curricula. 4. All parents shall receive information annually via parent assemblies, bulletins, presentations and/or workshops. 5. Develop an accessible list of programs, resources, and materials on bullying, harassment, and discrimination, to be posted on a DOE website. 6. Provide schools that have demonstrated a need for additional assistance with special training and support for resolving the issues and ensuring student safety. Section 6.

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

1. Establish a permanent SS-CAC to provide ongoing input into the implementation of these recommendations, and to encourage dialogue with the community regarding how to decrease and/or prevent bullying, harassment and discrimination in Hawaii’s public schools. 2. Encourage parents to participate in their child’s School Community Council or School Health Advisory Council and in other school activities. 3. Review strategies for enhancing community involvement in the DOE system. 4. Promote the importance of a safe and positive learning environment through the media.

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VISION

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Hawaii State Board of Education Vision for Hawaii’s Public Schools “ …All schools, regardless of size, are safe, nurturing learning communities where members work together and all students achieve high academic standards and become contributing members of society.” Goal for Hawaii’s Public Schools “Adopt policies and provide direction to effectively acquire and use human and financial resources to improve student performance, ensure the safety and well-being of students, and foster their ongoing development as responsible citizens.”

Safe Schools Community Advisory Committee Vision We envision a safe and nurturing Hawaii public schools system where diversity is valued and all of our students are welcomed and supported so that they may become educated, responsible, healthy and productive citizens. We further envision that this standard is upheld through teachers, staff, and administrators working in partnership with students, parents, and community. Creating A Shared Understanding Some of our shared understandings of the current nature of harassment in Hawaii’s public schools are: 1. There is a range of harassment from dirty looks to assault. 2. Acceptance of lower levels of harassment paves the way for more serious forms of harassment. 3. Harassment is a common occurrence in schools. 4. Students, staff, faculty, and administration may permit or allow harassment of students. 5. Experiences of harassment may differ from student to student, but there are common elements. 6. Harassment can have multiple negative consequences for students at school, home, and in their personal lives.

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Our Work Together

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Harassment Road Map This “road map� guided our work together.

6. Feedback from community groups

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Recommendations to Superintendent Hamamoto and The Hawaii Department Of Education

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Section 1. COMPREHENSIVE RECOMMENDATIONS The SS-CAC has developed the following three comprehensive recommendations to provide the foundation for this report:

• Comprehensive Recommendation #1: DOE will establish a school community culture that creates and encourages an environment of safety and respect for all, and ensures that all students are recognized as unique, worthy and valuable contributors to the school community. • Comprehensive Recommendation #2: The Board of Education and the Superintendent will present a strong public statement that bullying, harassment and discrimination are unacceptable and will not be tolerated in Hawaii’s schools. This message will be clear and unambiguous, and will be communicated on an ongoing basis. • Comprehensive Recommendation #3: The Department of Education’s Comprehensive Student Support System (CSSS) will be strengthened and enhanced to serve as the foundation for the implementation of a robust and sustainable statewide school support system, accountable to students, teachers, parents and the community.

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Section 2.

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DOE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The SS-CAC recommends the following DOE policies and procedures: 1. Establish a school community culture of safety in which bullying, harassment and discrimination on any basis is not permitted in Hawaii’s public schools. This culture will reflect a school community in which the expectation is that adults and students will model appropriate behaviors, character education will be a component of the school curriculum, and parental involvement will be promoted and encouraged.

2. Develop, implement and enforce formal, comprehensive and consistent anti-bullying, anti-harassment and anti-discrimination DOE policies and procedures which are inclusive of, but not limited to, students’ race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex (including gender identity and expression), religion, physical and mental disability, socioeconomic status, physical appearance and characteristics, and sexual orientation.

3. The Superintendent will formally charge DOE administrative staff, including the Leadership Team, with the responsibility of ensuring that all schools develop, implement and support school systems that are reflective of the recommendations contained in this document. The Superintendent’s mandate must be clear, consistent and enforceable.

4. Institute a policy of annual training at the school level on bullying, harassment and discrimination. (See Section 5 for specific training recommendations.)

5. Mandate that every school in the DOE system implement an anti-bullying, anti-harassment and anti-discrimination program by the year 2010. The key focus of the program will be to promote, highlight and reward positive behavior. This program will include, at a minimum, the following components:

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• • • • • • • • •

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establishment of a school-wide, proactive system that supports positive behavior change strategies to acknowledge and reward students and staff for positive, inclusive behavior in-service training for all school staff prevention curricula in the classroom clear rules and sanctions that are posted, distributed and discussed with students, staff and parents supervision in areas that are “hotspots” for bullying and harassment a requirement that staff take immediate action when bullying, harassment or discrimination is observed a safe and confidential reporting system a thorough and timely process to investigate and resolve complaints of bullying, harassment and discrimination to ensure those targeted are protected

6. Establish clear lines of accountability for the maintenance of anti-bullying, anti-harassment and anti-discrimination measures and the implementation of appropriate training, reporting and response procedures system wide and at the individual school level.

7. In the section of Chapter 19 outlining student characteristics against which harassment is specifically prohibited, clarify that “sex” includes “gender identity and expression.” Thus, the section should read: “…race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex (including gender identity and expression), religion, disability, or sexual orientation…”

8. Revise Chapter 41, Civil Rights Policy and Complaint Procedure, Hawaii Administrative Rules, to state clearly the procedure a student would follow in filing a complaint related to bullying, harassment and discrimination. When responding to incidents of bullying, harassment and discrimination, focus on results that promote education and learning, rather than punishment, suspension, expulsion or criminalization.

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9. Establish hiring practices that include questions/discussion related to how the potential DOE staff person (administrator, principal, teacher, other staff) will address establishing a safe, proactive and positive school and classroom environment, free from bullying, harassment and discrimination.

10. Provide students (and their families) who are identified as victims or perpetrators in incidents of bullying, harassment or discrimination with appropriate CSSS or other DOE referrals in a timely manner by administrative staff.

11. Provide resources and supports to work with student victims and perpetrators as well as their parents and families to provide appropriate programs, services, and training.

Section 3.

REPORTING AND DATA COLLECTION

The SS-CAC recommends the following DOE reporting and data collection procedures:

1. Enhance the current implementation and documentation systems of the Comprehensive Student Support System (CSSS) for all students and their families. Examples of components of such an enhanced system would include: •

teachers being committed to supporting all students, including gathering comprehensive data about the student before making decisions, and making team decisions for all students, not just Special Education students

•

developing intervention strategies to encourage expected behavior changes among students

•

developing specific outcomes that will indicate student progress

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2. Establish a DOE system, with dedicated personnel positions, to support and advise on preventing, investigating, and addressing student complaints of bullying, harassment and discrimination (based on Chapter 19 and the antidiscrimination/anti-harassment policy). District personnel will assist in: •

curriculum selection, implementation, and alignment with standards and General Learner Outcomes

•

developing/coordinating community partnerships

•

supporting families

3. Utilize reporting and data collection mechanisms system wide and at the individual school level to reflect accurately the true incidence and nature of bullying, harassment and discrimination in Hawaii schools (e.g., eCSSS: electronic Comprehensive Student Support System). 4. Provide schools with incentives and supports for creating environments where students, teachers and parents feel safe in reporting incidents of bullying, harassment and discrimination, and where school personnel feel safe in providing accurate data on such incidents occurring on their campuses.

5. Investigate reported incidents to ensure that student concerns of bullying, harassment and discrimination are addressed thoroughly and in a timely manner by administrative staff.

6. In the event of a publicized school-related incident, collaborate with the appropriate educational office to release a timely statement addressing the specific issue (without violating confidentiality), identifying an appropriate course of action, and reaffirming that bullying, harassment and discrimination are unacceptable.

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Section 4.

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COMPLIANCE MONITORING

The SS-CAC recommends the following DOE accountability procedures: 1. Evaluate the effectiveness of the entire system of training, reporting, data collection, and response to incidents in an on-going manner.

2. Establish a process to ensure that information from the data collection, reporting, and monitoring system is utilized to inform and revise, on an ongoing basis, current policies and procedures. This will ensure that this system reflects current data, monitoring, and reporting information.

3. The superintendent shall convene annually with the SS-CAC to review eCSSS data and feedback from stakeholders to determine further changes/recommendations to be implemented. Section 5.

DOE TRAINING/CURRICULA

SS-CAC recommends the following regarding training and curricula: 1. Integrate concepts of safety and respect for all students throughout the school culture, including curricula, student activities and all aspects of school life.

2. The administration, faculty, staff and school personnel of each school shall be trained annually in the following areas: i. what constitutes bullying, harassment and discrimination ii. the harmful affects of bullying, harassment and discrimination iii. how and to whom to report incidents of bullying, harassment and discrimination iv. DOE policies for preventing and addressing bullying, harassment and discrimination

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v. the legal requirement for educators and personnel to report and address cases of bullying, harassment and discrimination vi. the potential for institutional and personal liability of school personnel if bullying, harassment and discrimination are not addressed in a timely manner

3. All students shall participate in annual informational assemblies or presentations to support school curricula on: i. what constitutes bullying, harassment and discrimination ii. the harmful affects of bullying, harassment and discrimination iii. how and to whom to report incidents of bullying, harassment and discrimination, whether they are victims or witnesses iv. the legal and disciplinary consequences of perpetrating bullying, harassment and discrimination

4. All parents shall receive information annually via parent assemblies, bulletins, presentations and/or workshops on: i. what constitutes bullying, harassment and discrimination ii. the harmful affects of bullying, harassment and discrimination iii. how and to whom to report incidents of bullying, harassment and discrimination, whether their children are victims or witnesses iv. the legal consequences of perpetrating bullying, harassment and discrimination v. Hawaii State laws pertaining to bullying, harassment and discrimination

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vi. parenting strategies to prevent and decrease bullying, harassment and discrimination

5. Develop an accessible list of programs, resources, and materials on bullying, harassment and discrimination, to be posted on a DOE website.

6. Provide schools with serious incidents of bullying, harassment and discrimination, as well as schools that identify this as a priority need, with additional support and resources. Section 6.

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

The SS-CAC recommends the following regarding community involvement: 1. Establish a permanent SS-CAC to provide ongoing input into the implementation of these recommendations. This group will include at least one youth member who represents Hawaii public school students. The SS-CAC will engage in dialogue with the community regarding how to decrease and/or prevent bullying, harassment and discrimination in Hawaii’s public schools. The SS-CAC will make recommendations based on this dialogue. The SS-CAC will be similar in composition to the group that developed these recommendations, reflecting community representation on behalf of students who may experience bullying, harassment or discrimination.

2. Encourage parents to participate in their child’s School Community Council or School Health Advisory Council, to join the school action team for family/community involvement planning, and to collaborate with their school in encouraging more parent involvement in school activities.

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3. On a regular basis, review strategies for enhancing community involvement in the DOE system (e.g., Coordinated School Health), and revise or develop policies and/or activities that will support and enhance links and partnerships with the community.

4. Promote the importance of a safe and positive learning environment through the media.

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Appendices A B C D E F

Incentives & Recognitions Hawaii Content & Performance Standards III Community Feedback Summaries Resources Implementation Guidelines Communication Plan

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Appendix A

Incentives and Recognitions Incentives may help to promote the reporting of incidents and follow-up actions to be taken. Schools might receive awards for effectively addressing and responding to incidents proactively, or for implementing innovative ways of raising awareness and discouraging bullying, harassment and/or discrimination. Utilizing DOE Professional Development (PD) credits as incentives for teacher training was suggested. Examples of Recognition Awards Category Acts of Kindness, Empathy, & Compassion

Annual Yearly Progress

Civic Responsibility

Comprehensive Student Support System

Safety and Well Being of All Students

Award Type Student & parent recognition award

Exemplified By Students demonstrating acts of kindness, empathy or compassion in their school community settings School recognition for • Achieving AYP through student achievements demonstration of through positive teaching and positive learning and learning environments teaching environments Student, school & community • School, students and partnership award community recognized for service-learning projects School recognition awards • Maintaining a with monetary stipend continuum of academic, social, & emotional student & family supports for all students School recognition award • Positive teaching and with monetary stipend learning environments • Sustaining a schoolwide proactive positive behavioral support system • Best practices implementation & demonstrate “turn around” with incidents of bullying, harassment and/or discrimination

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Appendix B Hawaii Content & Performance Standards III Database Content Standards Relevant to Bullying, Harassment and Discrimination The Department of Education’s Instructional Services Branch office has integrated the promotion and education of safety, multiculturism and respect into the benchmarks required for each grade level and core content areas. The following are examples. Keyword Search: Harassment Standard Health Grade 3-5 Standard 5: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION: Use interpersonal communication skills to enhance health Health Grade 9-12 Standard 1: CORE CONCEPTS: Understand concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention Keyword Search: Bullying Standard Social Studies Grade 3 Standard 4: Political Science/Civics: GOVERNANCE, DEMOCRACY, AND INTERACTION-Understand the purpose and historical impact of political institutions, the principles and values of American constitutional democracy, and the similarities and differences in government across cultural perspectives.

Topic Communication Skills Across Topic Areas

Benchmark Use strategies to avoid inappropriate communication (e.g., name-calling, put downs, and harassment)

Promoting Safety and Preventing Violence and Unintentional Injury

Know how to use appropriate strategies to avoid, reduce, and report threatening situations.

Topic Governance,, Power and Authority

Benchmark Describe ways in which people exercise power without authority.

Keyword Search: Respectful Behavior Standard Topic Mental and Emotional Health Health K-2 Standard 3: SELFMANAGEMENT: Practice health: enhancing behaviors and reduce health risks Discussion and Presentation Language Arts Grade 6, 8, 10 Standard 6: Oral Communication: CONVENTION AND SKILLS: Apply knowledge of verbal and nonverbal language to communicate effectively in various situations: interpersonal, group, and public: for a variety of purposes

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Benchmark Describe personal stressors and ways to deal with stressful situations.

Use language that facilitates open communication (e.g., phrasing comments in a positive way, using descriptive language to communication a point)


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Appendix B Hawaii Content & Performance Standards III Database Content Standards Relevant to Bullying, Harassment and Discrimination Keyword Search: Respectful Behavior Standard Topic Workplace behaviors Career and Technical Education Grade 7 Standard 2: CAREER PLANNING: Explore and understand educational and career options in order to develop and implement personal, educational, and career goals World Languages Stage I: Year 2 Standard 4: CULTURES: Understand relationships among perspectives, products, and practices of target culture

Cultural Knowledge

Keyword Search: Healthy Behaviors Standard Topic Advocacy Across Topic Areas Health Grade 3-5 Standard 7: ADVOCACY: Advocate for personal, family, and community health World Languages Advanced Standard 4: CULTURES: Understand relationships among perspectives, products, and practices of target culture

Cultural Comparisons

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Benchmark Apply appropriate and safe behaviors for school, community, and workplace.

Use appropriate language and gestures to interact in a wide range of social contexts.

Benchmark Use appropriate strategies to express individual opinions about health issues.

Investigate how basic cultural ideas affect behavior and languages through comparison of culture being studies and native culture.


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Appendix C

Community Feedback Summaries The SS-CAC gathered input from various community and school groups regarding the functionality of the draft recommendations and findings. Input was received from the following groups: • Participants from Statewide Coordinated Health Conference, November 30, 2006, Hawaii Convention Center • Hawaii State Teachers Association (HSTA) Board of Directors, December 2, 2006, HSTA State Office • Representatives of School Administrators, December 11, 2006, Tokai University • Student Members of Hawaii Families As Allies (HFAA), April 14, 2007, HFAA Office The key questions asked were: • What would you need to make Hawaii schools safe? • Are the draft recommendations that have been developed by the SS-CAC realistic? • Which are the most important recommendations to make schools safe? • What resources would you need to make this happen? • Are there any missing recommendations? The following pages summarize the comments received from the various role groups.

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Appendix C Statewide Health Conference Hawaii Convention Center November 30, 2006 What resources would you need to make this happen? •

Funding to support training at school level

Additional funding for: o Comprehensive Student Support System o School counselor positions o Parent Networking Center positions

Which are the most important recommendations to make schools safe? • Training for: • Administrators, teachers, & students •

Student training o Training for students is key; students need to know to report o Develop K-12 flow chart for all students on training needs o Need time to train students when under restructuring

Utilize community resources & outside agencies for training schools

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Are there any missing recommendations? Implementation guidelines o How are you going to teach it in the school? o Where are the supports for implementation? o How do we incorporate into existing resources? Need systemic way. o How do we get a balance between standards focus and teaching of respect? o Curricula integration needed 4 One program will not do it 4 Need to tie into value & character education & Chapter 19 training o What is Honolulu Police Department’s involvement with this? •

Parent Education & Training o How do we get resistant families to come? o Kids need to know the consequences and parents need to support us.

At-risk students o How do we address & support repeat offenders? o How to prevent students who are bullied from dropping out? o What about alternative education centers? Need additional alternative centers.


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Appendix C Hawaii State Teachers Association (HSTA) Board of Directors HSTA State Office December 2, 2006 What would you need to make Hawaii schools safe? •

• • • •

Accountability o Let students, parents, teachers, & administrators know they have rights and obligations under the law. o Hold schools “accountable” for training, teaching, & supporting these recommendations with ongoing curriculum, fully funded. o Make parents accountable for the “hate” actions of their children because most values have been learned in the home. Enforcement of Policies o Zero Tolerance Incentives Personnel o More safety resource officers Training & Curriculum o Curriculum to teach tolerance o Provide less stressful learning environments for students o Less emphasis on core academics and more on developing good human beings o More emphasis on General Learner outcomes o More focus on relationships Family Involvement o Target at risk families, not just at risk students

Are these recommendations realistic?

Are there any missing recommendations?

• Implementation o They are realistic. What is not realistic is getting 100% implementation from all teachers and administrators. o Yes! I hope that they will be adopted and implemented. o I believe that these are realistic, but may take time to implement.

• Curriculum Funding o Need to focus more • Yes, with proper funding extensively on the of coordinator positions. prevention, teaching • Who pays for the tolerance. annual training for school staff? parents? • Parent Involvement students? o Mandating parents would not be realistic, Training but bringing parents o Training of teachers is into discussions, key. trainings, etc. is great. o Training of students is We need this essential. component.

Accountability/Sanctions o Demanding accountability of principals must be put in place. o Need clear sanctions for the enforcement of the policy. Unless there are significant sanctions for enforcement, the bullies themselves will laugh at such ideals.

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Incentives o School incentives for reporting? Reinvent the wheel (use CSSS already, peer education)


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Appendix C School Administrators Representative Group Tokai University December 11, 2006 Which are the most important recommendations to make schools safe? •

Parent education o Believe issues come from home; need same message from home. o How do you mandate training for parents? o We offer training for parents and common occurrence is that those who do not need come. o Parent training takes all kinds of shapes and they are not well attended. o How do we deal with parents who are angry and are bullies; parents who back up their child? o How can we guarantee that parents will followthrough – so we are not left with consequence end. Suspension does not ensure bullying to stop. • Suspension works for general population with a positive behavior supports system, but suspensions do not work for high-end students.

What resources would you need to make this happen? •

Staffing o People make things happen. We need bodies. o Funded positions in schools to handle paperwork and the students. • Training o Finding capacity & expertise within state for specific training. o Having local staff to conduct training. For example, had civil rights issue at school and had to find contractor to come into school to do presentation for $500. o Training needs to be tailored to needs of school, not canned presentation. o Mandated training to cover all protective classes. o Developing CD type of materials helpful to school, but not for parents. • Reporting and Accountability o Harassment under reported o Schools are “dinged” for reporting harassment o Takes too long to log referral into Safe Schools Information System Supports for Comprehensive Student Support System o How does it work in all schools?

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Are there any recommendations unrealistic? Have we missed any? • We struggle – is not realistic goal to have no bullying at each school. • How can schools be more accommodating and inviting? • •

• •

Competing initiatives – are these recommendations one more thing? All kinds of recommendations can be made to schools, but frustrating when we are not supported. Need people support at school level. Regardless of weighted student formula, provide schools with 1-2 additional security positions. Connecting recommendations to General Learner Outcomes (GLOs) o Goal is not standards – is vehicle to achieve GLOs. o GLO #6 – ethical technology – prevent harassment on MySpace o Teachers need to translate GLOs Engaging in proactive activities Harassment against homeless children Staff being bullied by parents


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Appendix C Hawaii Families As Allies Student Members Feedback April 14, 2007 Negative Impacts • “Two minutes of bullying can last a lifetime.” • “Being identified and isolated as one that doesn’t fit in elementary school – the memories still last even through high school.” • “It’s going to take time and hard work to get these recommendations accomplished. Our experiences being bullied/harassed/discriminated . . . School Adult to Student Student to Student Relationships Relationships “Want to be part of the “in “Teacher did not do anything group” and so we do not tattle, when a student was being i.e., report incidents of being harassed by another student bullied or harassed.” I think the teacher did not do anything because she did not “Don’t want to be part of the want to get hit by the student.” bottom group – so if you tell it’s worse – You’re a baby and you “If I report an incident, it can’t pick your battles.” becomes personal between a student and teacher.”

Parent-Child Relationships “Don’t go to parents with problems because when parents intervene it becomes a bigger commotion.”

“With my therapist, I was pulled out of class without stated purposes. They would say, “How are you/” and play a game with me. Why was I there?” “We need someone to talk to. When I got better. My therapist was taken away and the therapy sessions ended. But I still needed transitional help.” “I had to transfer schools as I was being harassed and the school principal told me, “We just don’t understand you.” Suggestions • Need to educate all students and not only parents and teachers o Is more effective getting kids talking to kids; for example showing DVD o Is more comfortable talking to age group peers; as talking to parents may be difficult as parents have pride in their children o Student should take responsibility to change their own behaviors o Children don’t understand the consequences of being bullied • Need to teach adults to recognize the signs because we may be afraid to tell • Have more student discussion groups, assemblies to talk about these issues • Get more students involved in activities, for example HFAA students created posters and public service announcement for local TV airing • Start programs and awareness with younger student groups o Provide places where students can go for help before they get older

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Appendix D

Resource Materials The following resource materials were reviewed by Safe Schools Community Advisory members in several ways. 1. Committee members with expertise in certain types of harassment reviewed and prepared summaries which were represented to the group. These included websites, videos, sample programs and community resources. 2. The educational specialist for Coordinated School Health provided advice and assistance on content and ways to access materials in the DOE. These materials are not meant to be comprehensive but provide a starting point.

Videos The following programs are available for duplication from the Teleschool Branch. If you would like a copy of any title, please locate our website (www.teleschool.k12.h.us), click on the “Express” tab and follow the instructions to order your title(s). Print out a copy of your request, attach the appropriate number of blank VHS tapes or DVDs, and send or bring both to: Teleschool Branch, 1122 Mapunapuna Street, Suite 201, Honolulu, HI 96819. The videotapes/DVDs will be dubbed and mailed back to you.

DON'T CALL ME NAMES Grade: K-2 TRT: 15 minutes 2000 • Uses realistic vignettes to highlight the reasons behind name-calling, the effect it has on others, and strategies children can use to stop others from calling them names. GOSSIPING, TAUNTING, BULLYING: IT'S ALL HARASSMENT Grade: 5-8 TRT: 24 min., 12 sec. 2001 • With the encouragement of a school counselor, young teens share their own experiences coping with bullying, taunting and teasing. They view and react to dramatic vignettes that show realistic situations of harassment. Dr. Michael Furlong offers expert advice about how students can handle these situations. I WAS JUST KIDDING! LEARNING ABOUT HARASSMENT Grade: 3-5 TRT: 16 min., 39 sec. 2001 • Learn to identify what behavior constitutes harassment, the different kinds of harassment, steps that can be taken to stop it, and how observing harassment while doing nothing about it contributes to the problem.

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Appendix D

Videos IN REAL LIFE: SEXUAL HARASSMENT IN SCHOOLS Grade: 7-12 TRT: 22 min., 20 sec. 1994 • Using realistic, everyday situations, this dramatic program introduces a variety of forms of sexual harassment, the complicated feelings it can evoke, and the actions students and adults can take to address it. MILTON MEATBALL Grade: K-3 TRT: 4 min., 57 sec. 2001 • Milton Meatball becomes a karate expert to overcome being teased. He learns that strength must be used responsibly. NO NAME CALLING: CREATING SAFE ENVIRONMENTS Grade: 4-8 TRT: 27 min., 01 sec. 2004 • Explores the issue of name-calling and identifies how this form of teasing impacts self-esteem in adolescence. Examines how name calling often leads to bullying and harassment. Combines real life scenarios and interviews with teenagers to demonstrate the emotional damage associated with hurtful words. Emphasizes constructive ways for creating a positive school environment where everyone will feel safe and free to learn. SOLVING CONFLICTS WITH TEACHERS, PARENTS AND PEERS Grade: 4-8 TRT: 16 min., 31 sec. 2001 • Viewers learn why bullying, sarcasm, threats, shouting, and hitting are ineffective ways to deal with friction and discover better techniques for solutions to conflicts. SEXUAL HARASSMENT: GUIDELINES FOR INTERVENTION AND PREVENTION Grade: 7-12 TRT: 20 min., 45 sec. 1994 • Clarifies for school administrators and personnel what exactly sexual harassment entails. Procedures for investigating a claim of harassment, the student's legal recourses, developing an effective policy against sexual harassment, educating personnel, and prevention strategies that work are covered. Enables viewers to create intervention and prevention programs for their own school district. SEXUAL HARASSMENT: WHAT IT IS AND HOW TO HANDLE IT Grade: 7-12 TRT: 20 min., 30 sec. 1996 • Clearly explains what sexual harassment is, what it isn't, and the appropriate ways to confront and report it, especially in school. Played by high school students in real-life scenarios.

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Appendix D

Videos SEXUAL HARASSMENT: YOU DON’T HAVE TO TAKE IT Grade: 7-12 TRT: 18 min., 19 sec. 1994 • Demonstrates clearly what sexual harassment is, shows what response to take, and models appropriate behavior. Students will learn to differentiate between flirting and harassment, and who to go to for help. Takes a positive approach towards changing students' behavior through creating an awareness of the issues. SEXUAL VIOLENCE: WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO ABOUT IT Grade: 9-12 TRT: 17 min., 28 sec. 2002 • Uses role-plays created by teens to show simple steps bystanders can take to stop sexual violence without jeopardizing their friendships or their safety. Covers sexual harassment, controlling relationships, pressured sex and date rape. SOLVING CONFLICTS WITH TEACHERS, PARENTS AND PEERS Grade: 4-8 TRT: 16 min., 31 sec. 2001 • Viewers learn why bullying, sarcasm, threats, shouting, and hitting are ineffective ways to deal with friction and discover better techniques for solutions to conflicts. STUDENT WORKSHOP: HARASSMENT HURTS: GOSSIPING, TAUNTING, AND BULLYING Grade: 5-9 TRT: 17 min., 15 sec. 2003 • Uses role-plays to provide advice on ways to combat rumors and gossip, and also provides strategies for dealing with bullies. SUPPOSE THAT WAS ME Grade: 5-8 TRT: 18 min. 2001 • Asks viewers to think about and discuss how they would feel if they were made a target by other students. Shows short, open-ended vignettes that illustrate how an innocent joke can lead to an insulting nickname, a thoughtless rumor can turn into a tarnished reputation, or academic achievement can be twisted into a social stigma. Focuses on the importance of empathy and thinking about how one's words and actions can hurt others.

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Appendix D

Videos Professional Development and Adult Education Programs SAFE AT SCHOOL (10) 30-minute programs Grade: Teacher/Staff • This timely series delves into pressing safety topics and explains proactive techniques for prevention. Designed to be shown at in-service session or staff meeting, each program encourages teachers and school staff to watch for danger signs and react appropriately. SEXUAL HARASSMENT IN THE 21ST CENTURY Grade: Adult Education 2000 • Defines what sexual harassment is, emphasizing how this abusive, demeaning behavior is unacceptable in the workplace. Uses real-life scenarios to depict common types of sexual harassment situations in a work environment and outlines possible consequences for the harasser. Provides general advice regarding the parameters of acceptable behavior in a work environment and presents the most recent Supreme Court rulings on sexual harassment cases. STICKS AND STONES Grade: High School 2002 • Three homosexual young adults discuss the problems and harassment they encountered while attending public schools in Hawaii. An appeal is made for educators to help provide a safe environment and the best educational opportunities for all students.

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Appendix D

Websites Resource GLSEN Gay, Lesbian, & Straight Educator’s Network

Website Address www.glsen.org

Safe Schools Coalition

www.safeschools.org

• •

National Education Association

www.nea.org

National Youth Violence Prevention Resource Center (NYVPRC)

http://www.safeyouth.org

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• •

Information Appropriate for all ages. Multiple resources, curricula and classroom ideas for supporting LGBT youth and creating safe classrooms. • Provides research and data Is from Washington state Provides lots of resources, curricula and classroom ideas for supporting LGBT youth and creating safe classrooms. NEA supports legislation that would require states, districts, and schools to have policies to prevent & respond effectively to bullying and harassment as condition of receiving federal funds under the Safe & Drug-Free Schools Program. Provides a single point of access for information and materials available from federal government organizations working to prevent violence and suicide among nation’s youth. The NYVPRC website, toll-free information line, and faxon-demand service offer information about prevention programs, publications, statistics, and other resources to enable individuals and communities to prevent youth violence.


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Appendix D

Websites Resource National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC)

Website Address http://www.nsvrc.org/

Preventing Violence through Education, Networking, and Technical Assistance (PREVENT)

www.prevent.unc.edu

National School Boards Association

www.nsba.org/

No Name-Calling Week

www.nonamecalllingweek.org

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Information Provides information, resources, and research on all aspects of sexual violence. Activities include collecting, reviewing, and disseminating information; coordinating efforts with other organizations and projects; and providing technical assistance. The NSVRC also produces a newsletter and maintains a website, which includes information about upcoming conferences, funding opportunities, research, Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) activities, and links to state and territory coalitions. Contact NSVRC toll free at 877-739-389. National training program for violence prevention practitioners. PREVENT works with individuals and organizations to build skills in identifying community needs and assets, creating partnerships, developing and implementing prevention programs, measuring success, and funding and sustaining programs. Presents a compilation of viewpoints and resources about how school districts can address antiharassment and antibullying. Provides resources to support the work done to stop name-calling and bullying of all kinds.


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Appendix D

Websites Resource Playground Heroes: How can we teach kids to stick up for peers whoa re bullied?

Website Address http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/

ADL Curriculum Connections

www.adl.org/education/

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

www.cdc.gov/inquiry

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Information Offers concrete strategies for helping children act on their best intentions when being bullied and watch as bystanders. Based on results from a six-country study called International Bystander Projects by Rigby and Johnson. Has a section on statistics and studies on bullying – the prevalence of bullying and harassment among students. Work in injury and violence prevention Youth Risk Behavior Survey


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Appendix D

Sample Programs Program Name Bullyproof: A Teacher’s Guide on Teasing and Bullying

Authors/Publisher Nan Stein and Lisa Sjostrom NEA Professional Library & Wellesley College Center

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Flirting or Hurting? A Teacher’s Guide on Student to Student Sexual Harassment in Schools

Nan Stein and Lisa Sjostrom NEA Professional Library & Wellesley College Center

Let’s Get Real (Video/DVD)

Debra Chasnoff, Helen Cohen, Bib Kim, and Judy Logan The Respect for All Project 2004 Women’s Educational Media

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• •

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Information Contains 11 sequential lessons including class discussion, role plays, and case studies, writing exercises, reading assignments, art activities and nightly homework. Opportunity to explore distinctions between “teasing” and “bullying.” Found to be successful in increasing student and staff knowledge about sexual harassment. Curriculum on sexual harassment for Social Studies, English, Psychology or Health classes. Includes handouts, teacher materials and supplemental reading; including Supreme Court cases and articles from teen magazines and popular education press. The Sex Abuse Treatment Center in Honolulu has successfully used various activities from the curriculum for presentations to students on sexual harassment. User-friendly, flexible, comprehensive. Focuses on middle school students who are bullied and student bystanders. Is a documentary featuring middle school students speaking about bullying and harassment at school. Designed to create understanding and empathy among youth. Explores the stereotypes and prejudice that allows for bullying to continue. The curriculum guide includes classroom activities that tie into video.


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Appendix D

Sample Programs Program Name Olweus Bullying Prevention Program

Authors/Publisher Dan Olweus Clemson University Institute on Family and Neighborhood Life

Choose Respect

www.chooserespect.org

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Information Focus is on elementary, middle and junior high potential victims of bullying and harassment. Comprehensive antibullying program focused at the individual, classroom, school and community levels. Considered a model program by the US Department of Human Services Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Initiative to help adolescents form healthy relationships to prevent dating abuse before it starts. Provides information on how to effectively handle conflicts and does so by encouraging positive action on part of the youth.


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Appendix D

Health Education Curricula Here is the link from the DOE website of approved curriculum materials for Health Education 2003: http://standardstoolkit.k12.hi.us/imr/index.html. The following are examples from this listing. The Health Education program staff is currently in the process of gathering materials for a curriculum review in 2007-2008. Title Health Education

Health Teacher

Hands-On Health

LifeSkills

Personal & Social Skills

Reducing the Risk Making A Difference

Description K-8 general health education curriculum with teaching strategies & assessment ideas. Especially good for new teachers to health education. Content setup by “risk areas”. Grades 7-12 variety of hands-on activities to motivate student thinking & involvement. Substance abuse prevention curriculum with emphasis on skill building of communication, coping and social skills. Grade 7-12 skill based foundation for health education Grade 9-12 sexual health curriculum Grade 6-8 sexual health curriculum

Let’s Talk About Touching

Coloring & activity book Discusses good touching, bad touching & reporting

Bully Free Classroom

Grade K-8

Bully Proof

Grade 4-5

Quit it!

Grade K-3

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Publisher/Resource McGraw Hill Mhhe.com/telljohann4e

DBA Health Teacher 1889 General George Patton Drive #500 Franklin, TN 37067 Healthteacher.com = Lessons on-line Glencoe.McGraw Hill 21600 Oxnard Street, #500 Woodland Hills, CA 91367 Princeton Health Press 711 Westchester Avenue White Plains, NY 10604 lifeskillstraining.com etr.org/pub

etr.org/pub Select Media, Inc. PO box 1084 Harriman, NY 10926 800-343-5540 The Sex Abuse Treatment Center Kapiolani Medical Center for Women and Children 808-524-7273 freespirit.com or HEALTH EDCO Healthedco.com Wellesley Colleen Center for Research on Women Publications Wellesley.edu/WCW/projects/bullying.html Wellesley Colleen Center for Research on Women Publications Wellesley.edu/WCW/projects/bullying.html


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Appendix D

Community Resources Agency American Friends Service Committee 2426 Oahu Avenue Honolulu, HI 96822 Phone: 988-2184 Contact: Kyle Kajihiro The Center’s Speaker’s Bureau The Center Hawaii Phone: 545-2848

• • •

Domestic Violence Clearing House PO Box 3198 Honolulu, HI 96801 Phone: 534-0040

Hawaii Multicultural Learning Center/Children’s Books 1311 Kapiolani Blvd. #203 Honolulu, HI 96814 Phone: 597-1341

• • •

Hawaii Friends of Civil Rights 3071 Felix Street Honolulu, HI 96816 Phone: 732-4987 Contact: Faye Kennedy or Amy Agbayani

Hawaii State Teachers Association 1200 Ala Kapuna Street Honolulu, HI 96819 Phone: 808/833-2711 Contact: Roger Takabayashi, President

Hawaii Youth Helping Youth Hawaii Families As Allies 99-209 Moanalua Road, Suite 305 Aiea, HI 96701 Phone: 808/487-8785 Contact: Donna Makaiwi

Honor Thy Children, Inc. 22 Puuaina Place Kahului, HI 96732 Phone: 808/244-3175 Contact: Al & Jane Nakatani www.honorthychildren.org/HTC_Inc_home.html

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Description Provides supports for gay lesbian bisexual transgender youth.

Consists of diverse local people who can speak from their own experiences. Presentations can be tailored to be appropriate for all ages. A panel of diverse members of the community will come speak to classes or other youth groups or adults on LGBT issues. Provides legal representation in addition to direct services to youth and adults facing challenges as victims of abuse. Cost of legal services and training and technical assistance based on sliding fee scale. Specializes in multicultural materials. Literature from all cultures. All materials meet DOE’s curriculum standards and No Child Left Behind. Provides sensitivity workshops for teachers and parents. Promotes civil rights and values of Dr. Martin Luther King. Diverse members of advisory board come from community organizations, government and the private sector. Offers number of workshops designed specially for school level personnel including the new Safety and Bias Issues for GLBT (Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender) Students. Has a standing committee on Youth, Human & Civil Rights. Mission is to strive to advocate for better mental health services for this generation and next. Young people (ages 14-25) coming together to share their experiences and ideas to make things better for children & youth of Hawaii. Youth members have had firsthand experience with special education, mental health, foster care and/or juvenile justice system. Non-profit corporation established in 1999. Goal to promote acceptance of human diversity through the understanding and management of human and self denigration.


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Appendix D

Community Resources Agency Kalihi-Palama Health Center 915 North King Street Honolulu, HI 96817

Description Full service out patient health center offering behavioral health, dental, internal medicine & family practice, healthcare for the homeless, health education, health professions education, midwifery, optometry, pediatrics, women’s health, women, infants and children’s nutrition program. This agency provides access to services for individuals at risk for HIV, STD, and hepatitis, including youth. Among these youth are gay youth, transgender youth, and young women at-risk. Services available to them are HIV and Hepatitis C counseling and testing, access to STD screening, access to hepatitis A and B vaccinations, as well as interventions to assist them in developing strategies that will place them at less risk for transmission. These three neighbor Island agencies provide access to services for individuals at risk for HIV, STD, and hepatitis, including youth on Hawaii Island, Maui and Kauai. Among these youth are gay youth, transgender youth, and young women at-risk. Services available to them are referrals to HIV testing, STD screening, hepatitis A and B vaccinations and hepatitis C testing, as well as interventions to assist them in developing strategies that will place them at less risk for transmission.

Life Foundation 677 Ala Moana Blvd., Suite 226 Honolulu, HI 96813 Phone: 808/521-2437 www.lifefoundation.org/

Malama Pono, the Kauai AIDS Project P.O. Box 1950 Lihue, HI 96766 Phone: 808/246-9577 www.malama-pono.org

Maui AIDS Foundation 1935 Main Street, Suite 101 Wailuku, HI 96793 Phone: 808/242-4900 www.mauiaids.org Molokai – Phone: 808/553-9086 Lanai – Phone: 808/242-4900 Hawaii Island HIV/AIDS Foundation (HIHAF) Hilo Office: 16-204 Melekahiwa Place, Suite 1 Kea`au, HI 96749 Phone: 808/982-8800 http://hihaf.org Kona Office: 75-240 Nani Kailua Drive, Suite 5 Kailua-Kona, HI 96740 Phone: 808/331-8177 http://hihaf.org/ Nutrition Therapy Consultants, Inc. 3465 Waialae Avenue Suite 270 Honolulu, HI 96816 Phone: 808/737-3993 Contact: Kristen Lindsey-Dudley R.D., MPH

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Comprehensive services provided for eating disorders and weight control issues.


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Appendix D

Community Resources Agency Pacific Gateway Center 720 North King Street Honolulu, HI 96817 info@pacificgateway.org

• •

Sex Abuse Treatment Center Harbor Court • 55 Merchant Street, 22nd Fl. • Honolulu, Hawaii 96813 24-hour Hotline: 808-524-RAPE (7273) www.SATCHawaii.com

The Safe Zone Foundation 4224 Waialae Avenue #248 Honolulu, HI 96816 Phone: 808/599-3931 Contact: Kathryn Xian

• • •

• The Spark M. Matsunaga Institute of Peace University of Hawaii at Manoa

University of Hawaii at Manoa Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Student Services 2600 Campus Road QLCSS 211-C Honolulu, HI 96822 Phone: 956-9250 LGBTQ@hawaii.edu Contact: Camaron Miyamoto

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Description Offers range of direct and support services to meet needs of immigrant and refugees. Has the capability to communicate in many different languages and in a culturally sensitive manner. The Sex Abuse Treatment Center's mission is to support the emotional healing process of those sexually assaulted in Hawaii, to increase community awareness about their needs and to reduce the incidence of all forms of sexual assault. Non-profit grassroots organization. Created GIRL FEST Hawaii. Mission is to create educational multimedia projects & policy change initiatives that benefit the community in order to create a safe, sustainable and peaceful environment for all by using media, art, advocacy and education to influence policy, social consciousness and behavior. Registered social service with Department of Health. Multidisciplinary community of scholars, students, practioners, and visitors who through teaching, research, service and application seek to: educate and train professionals in applied peacemaking and conflict resolution; develop and apply innovations to peaceful resolution of conflicts; use the Pacific location to bring people together to provide safe sanctuary for civil and respectful exchange of perspectives and ideas. Counseling supports and services for Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender students


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Appendix E

Implementation Activities

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Appendix E SAFE SCHOOLS COMMUNITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Suggested Implementation Activities

Section 1. COMPREHENSIVE RECOMMENDATIONS Proposed Recommendations Comprehensive Recommendation #1: DOE will establish a school community culture that creates and encourages an environment of safety and respect for all, and ensures that all students are recognized as unique, worthy, and valuable contributors to the school community.

Suggested Implementation Activity Collaborate with appointed SS-CAC to help schools in establishing this culture. Results from School Quality Survey & Youth Risk Behavior Survey will be used to assess student perceptions of safety and well being to guide implementation of recommendations.

• •

Comprehensive Recommendation #2: The Board of Education and the Superintendent will present a strong public statement that bullying, harassment, and discrimination are unacceptable and will not be tolerated in Hawaii’s schools. This message will be clear and unambiguous, and will be communicated on an ongoing basis. Comprehensive Recommendation #3: The Department of Education’s Comprehensive Student Support System (CSSS) will be strengthened and enhanced to serve as the foundation for the implementation of a robust and sustainable statewide school support system, accountable to students, teachers, parents and the community.

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• •

Annual memo from Superintendent to all schools. Annual press release at the beginning of the school year with DOE/DOH announcing safe schools initiative.

A review of CSSS implementation will be conducted at the school, complex and/or state levels to determine how to strengthen and enhance CSSS as a comprehensive, seamless, and sustainable system. Evaluation tools used in a review will need to be developed and considered with External and Internal Review protocols.


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Appendix E

Section 2. DOE POLICIES and PROCEDURES DOE/Superintendent will convene a work group to review, develop and submit for approval formal anti-bullying, antiharassment, anti-discrimination policies and procedures from the following recommendations: Proposed Recommendations Suggested Implementation Activity 1. Establish a school community culture of safety • BOE Policy 2109 Character Education will be in which bullying, harassment, and enforced in every school as a component of the discrimination on any basis is not permitted in school curriculum. Hawaii’s public schools. This culture will reflect a • Parent & community involvement will be promoted school community in which the expectation is that and encouraged throughout the school year to adults and students will model appropriate support and maintain cultures of safety. behaviors, character education will be a component of the school curriculum, and parental involvement will be promoted and encouraged. 2. Develop, implement and enforce formal, comprehensive and consistent anti-bullying, anti-harassment, and anti-discrimination DOE policies and procedures which are inclusive of, but not limited to, students’ race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex (including gender identity and expression), religion, physical and mental disability, socioeconomic status, physical appearance and characteristics, and sexual orientation.

Comprehensive and consistent anti-bullying, antiharassment, anti-discrimination policies and procedures respective of the protected classes as proposed will be developed by BOE.

3. Institute a policy of annual training at the school level on bullying, harassment, and discrimination. (See Section 5 for specific training recommendations.)

Annual trainings of all school-level staff will be developed and implemented. (See Section 5 for specific recommended components)

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Appendix E

Section 2. DOE POLICIES and PROCEDURES Proposed Recommendations 4. Mandate that every school in the DOE system implement an anti-bullying, anti-harassment, and anti-discrimination program by the year 2010. This program will include, at a minimum, the following components: The key focus of the program will be to promote, highlight & reward positive behavior. • establishment of a school-wide, proactive system that supports positive behavior change • strategies to reward students for positive, inclusive behavior • in-service training for all school staff • prevention curriculum in the classroom • clear rules and sanctions that are posted, distributed and discussed with students, staff and parents • supervision in areas that are “hotspots” for bullying and harassment • a requirement that staff take immediate action when bullying, harassment or discrimination is observed • a safe and confidential(when applicable) reporting system • a thorough and timely process to investigate and resolve complaints of bullying, harassment and discrimination to ensure those targeted are protected

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Suggested Implementation Activity All school principals to be informed that by school year 2010-2011, each school is to have implemented an anti-bullying, anti-harassment, and antidiscrimination program with the recommended components as outlined.


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Appendix E

Section 2. DOE POLICIES and PROCEDURES Proposed Recommendations 5. Establish clear lines of accountability for the maintenance of anti-bullying, anti-harassment, and anti-discrimination measures and the implementation of appropriate training, reporting, and response procedures system wide and at the individual school level.

Suggested Implementation Activity Clear lines of accountability at the state, complex, and school levels will be identified for the implementation and maintenance of anti-bullying, anti-harassment, and anti-discrimination training, reporting, and response procedures.

6. In the section of Chapter 19 outlining student characteristics against which harassment is specifically prohibited, clarify that “sex” includes “gender identity and expression.” Thus, the section should read: “…race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex (including gender identity and expression), religion, disability, or sexual orientation…”

Chapter 19’s protected classes under harassment to be revised to read: “…race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex (including gender identity and expression) religion, disability or sexual orientation…”

7. Revise Chapter 41, Civil Rights Policy and Complaint Procedure, Hawaii Administrative Rules, to clearly state the procedure a student would follow in filing a complaint related to bullying, harassment, and discrimination. When responding to incidents of bullying, discrimination and harassment, focus on results that promote education and learning, rather than punishment, suspension, expulsion or criminalization.

Clearly stated procedures for students filing a complaint to be included in the revisions of Chapter 41, Civil Rights Policy and Complaints Procedure, Hawaii Administrative Rules.

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Appendix E

Section 2. DOE POLICIES and PROCEDURES Proposed Recommendations 8. Establish hiring practices that include questions/discussion related to how the potential DOE staff person (administrator, principal, teacher, and other staff) will address establishing a safe, proactive and positive school and classroom environment, free from bullying, harassment and discrimination.

•

•

9. Provide students (and their families) who are identified as victims or perpetrators in incidents of bullying, harassment, or discrimination with appropriate CSSS or other DOE referrals in a timely manner by administrative staff. 10. Provide resources and supports to work with student victims and perpetrators as well as their parents and families to provide appropriate programs, services, and training.

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Suggested Implementation Activity Questions relating to how a potential DOE employee would address establishing a safe and proactive school and/or classroom environment will be included in interview protocols.

Evidence of providing specific level(s) of CSSS support will be documented for reported incidents of bullying, harassment, and discrimination for victims, perpetrators, bystanders and their respective families in the eCSSS database.


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Appendix E

Section 3. REPORTING AND DATA COLLECTION Proposed Recommendations 1. Enhance the current implementation and documentation systems of the Comprehensive Student Support System (CSSS) for all students and their families. Examples of components of such an enhanced system would include: • teachers being committed to supporting all students, including gathering comprehensive data about the student before making decisions, and making team decisions for all students, not just Special Education students • developing intervention strategies to encourage expected behavior changes among students • developing specific outcomes that will indicate student progress

2. Establish a DOE system, with dedicated personnel positions, to support and advise on preventing, investigating, and addressing student complaints of bullying, harassment, and discrimination (based on Chapter 19 and the anti-discrimination/anti-harassment policy). District personnel will assist in: • curriculum selection, implementation, and alignment with standards and General Learner Outcomes • developing/coordinating community partnerships • supporting families

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Suggested Implementation Activity Administrators will encourage and reinforce accurate and timely data entry of student referrals, incidents, services and programs related to student support for effective schoolwide and individual student systems data-decision making purposes.

Establish dedicated personnel positions to support and advise in preventing, investigating, and addressing student complaints related to bullying, harassment, and discrimination. Develop local expertise cadres of identified personnel within complex areas who are capable of providing support and technical assistance for the prevention, investigation, and training of bullying, harassment and discrimination.


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Appendix E

Section 3. REPORTING AND DATA COLLECTION Proposed Recommendations 3. Utilize reporting and data collection mechanisms system wide and at the individual school level to accurately reflect the true incidence and nature of bullying, harassment, and discrimination in Hawaii schools (e.g., eCSSS: electronic Comprehensive Student Support System).

Suggested Implementation Activity Administrators will encourage, reinforce, and monitor the data entry of referrals and incidents related to bullying, harassment, and/or discrimination to ensure increased consistency in reporting. Administrators will receive training and/or guidelines in achieving greater consistency in reporting incidents between all schools. Administrators will establish and maintain a schoolwide culture that promotes safe reporting through a system of relevant incentives and supports.

4. Provide schools with incentives and supports for creating environments where students and parents feel safe in reporting incidents of harassment, bullying, and discrimination, and where school personnel feel safe in providing accurate data on such incidents occurring on their campuses.

5. Investigate reported incidents to ensure that student concerns of bullying, harassment, and discrimination are addressed thoroughly and in a timely manner by administrative staff.

Administrators and their school team members will document all actions taken to address bullying, harassment, and/or discrimination to ensure timeliness of referred incident.

6. In the event of a school-related incident, collaborate with the appropriate educational office to release a statement addressing the specific issue (without violating confidentiality), identifying an appropriate course of action, and reaffirming that bullying, harassment and discrimination are unacceptable.

Superintendent will communicate with the DOE Communications Department to release a statement regarding the incident.

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Appendix E

Section 4. COMPLIANCE MONITORING Proposed Recommendations 1. Evaluate the effectiveness of the entire system of training, reporting, data collection, and response to incidents in an on-going manner.

•

Suggested Implementation Activity A formal program evaluation will need to be established to address all components listed in #1 and #2.

2. Establish a process to ensure that information from the data collection, reporting, and monitoring system is utilized to inform and revise, on an on-going basis, current policies and procedures. This will ensure that this system reflects current data, monitoring, and reporting information. •

3. The superintendent shall convene annually with the SS-CAC to review eCSSS data and feedback from stakeholders to determine further changes/recommendations to be implemented.

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Superintendent will meet annually with the SS-CAC team members.


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Appendix E

Section 5. DOE TRAINING/CURRICULA SS-CAC recommends the following regarding training and curricula: Proposed Recommendations 1. Integrate concepts of safety and respect for all • students throughout the school culture, including curricula, student activities and all aspects of school life. •

2. The administration faculty, staff and school personnel of each school shall be trained annually in the following areas: vii. what constitutes bullying, harassment, and discrimination viii. the harmful affects of bullying, harassment, and discrimination ix. how and to whom to report incidents of bullying, harassment, and discrimination x. DOE policies for preventing and addressing bullying, harassment, and discrimination xi. the legal requirement for educators and personnel to report and address cases of bullying, harassment, and discrimination xii. the potential for institutional and personal liability of school personnel if bullying, harassment, and discrimination are not addressed in a timely manner

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Suggested Implementation Activity Schools to determine how to integrate safety and respect into existing curricula, student activities and all aspects of school life. Safety and respect for all should be conscious, visible, and consistent. School level & community trainings will be documented, established and implemented. Administrators will document, establish and implement with their school teams. Cyberbullying is included in the “bullying, harassment, and discrimination” training


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3. All students shall participate in annual informational assemblies or presentations to support school curricula on: v. what constitutes bullying, harassment, and discrimination vi. the harmful affects of bullying, harassment, and discrimination vii. how and to whom to report incidents of bullying, harassment, and discrimination, whether they are victims or witnesses viii. the legal and disciplinary consequences of perpetrating bullying, harassment, and discrimination 4. All parents shall receive information annually via parent assemblies, bulletins, presentations and/or workshops on: vii. what constitutes bullying, harassment, and discrimination viii. the harmful affects of bullying, harassment, and discrimination ix. how and to whom to report incidents of bullying, harassment, and discrimination, whether their children are victims or witnesses x. the legal consequences of perpetrating bullying, harassment, and discrimination xi. Hawaii State laws pertaining to bullying, harassment, and discrimination xii. parenting strategies to prevent and decrease bullying, harassment, and discrimination

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Appendix E

Section 5. DOE TRAINING/CURRICULA Proposed Recommendations 5. Develop an accessible list of programs, resources, and materials on bullying, harassment, and discrimination, to be posted on a DOE website.

•

•

6. Provide schools that have a high number of incidents of bullying, harassment, and discrimination, as well as schools that identify this as a priority need, with special training and support for resolving the issues and ensuring student safety.

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Suggested Implementation Activity A resource list of programs, resources, and materials on bullying, harassment, and discrimination will be posted on a DOE website. Schools with high number incidents of bullying, harassment, and discrimination will receive additional training and support.


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Appendix E

Section 6. COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT Proposed Recommendations 1. Establish a permanent SS-CAC to provide ongoing input into the implementation of these recommendations. The SS-CAC will engage in dialogue with the community regarding how to decrease and/or prevent bullying, harassment and discrimination in Hawaii’s public schools. The SS-CAC will make recommendations based on this dialogue. The SS-CAC will be similar in composition to the group that developed these recommendations, reflecting community representation on behalf of students who may experience bullying, harassment, or discrimination.

2. Encourage parents to participate in their child’s School Community Council or School Health Advisory Council, to join the school action team for family/community involvement planning, and to collaborate with their school in encouraging more parent involvement in school activities. 3. On a regular basis, review strategies for enhancing community involvement in the DOE system (e.g., Coordinated School Health), and revise or develop policies and/or activities that will support and enhance links and partnerships with the community. 4. Promote the importance of a safe and positive learning environment through the media.

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Suggested Implementation Activity Establish a permanent SS-CAC.

Administrators and school teams to develop and implement.

DOE Public Relations Department/Communication will report increased promotion of how schools are creating safe & positive learning environments.


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Appendix F

Communication Plan

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Appendix F

Safe Schools Community Advisory Committee (SS-CAC) Communication Plan Date/Time June 25, 2007 to June 30, 2008

Target Audience(s) • • • • • • •

Superintendent BOE on Superintendent’s recommendation Superintendent’s leadership team School administrators School community councils Office of Curriculum, Instruction and Student Support Complex area schools

Key Messages and Objectives •

• •

• • • •

Vehicle/Channel Face to face presentations Video/CD clips SS-CAC website News media

• • •

Sender(s) Safe Schools Community Advisory Committee members DOE Student Support Section Complex area superintendents & support staff

Harassment & bullying cannot be ignored. Consequences of harassment (verbal, physical, sexual) are serious and can be short-term or long-term or even life long. It affects victims, bystanders, harassers themselves, their families, and the broader communities. Harmful effects of school harassment & bullying on academic achievement & the psychological, social & physical well-being of students K-12 well documented in research literature. Implementation efforts to address harassment, bullying, discrimination must begin with establishment of a school-wide, proactive system that supports positive behavior change. Systemic change needs to be addressed by strengthening & enhancing schools. Implementation fidelity of CSSS. A major component of the training curriculum needs to include family involvement & participation. Accountability & reporting means being responsible for students’ lives. Reporting of incidents does not mean schools will be “dinged.” Feedback Plan Annual meeting of SS-CAC with Superintendent to review data and implementation status

Communication Results •

• • •

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Superintendent’s buy in to proposed recommendations with Superintendent appointing a new SS-CAC sub committee to continue to work with DOE staff to actively implement the recommendations . Develop a master timetable and proposed budget for implementation to meet goal of 2010 for all schools within individual complex areas. Working collaboratively with community resources & agencies to develop meaningful and integrated curricula to address harassment, bullying and discrimination. Assist schools to align proposed recommendations with their Academic/Financial Plan and Goal 2 of the Strategic Plan.

Materials Needed PowerPoint presentations CD/DVD/video training materials & resources Hosted website


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Addressing Harassment in Hawaii's Schools