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China’s Children International ! Winter 2013!

缘分            Yuan2                                      Fen4   Serendipity  

Contact!

chinachildreninternational@gmail.com! Chinaschildreninternational.org! Facebook.com/groups/chinaschildreninternational! Cci-chinaschildren.blogspot.com! Twitter @CCI_Int! Skype: Chinaschildreninternational! Youtube.com/user/chinachildrenint!


Table of! Contents!

Table of Contents:! 1. 

Announcements!

2.  Announcements Continued! 3.  New Committee Introduction! 4.  New Committee Continued! 5.  New Committee Continued! 6.  FCC Ireland YOU Project! 7.  Feature- Ming and the Sun Travel Contest! 8.  Feature- Chinese New Year! 9.  Art Corner! 10.  Art Corner Continued! 11.  Adoptee in Action! 12.  Adoptee Essays (to end)!

China’s Children International- Winter 2013!


Announcements!

Announcements:! CCI Book Club CCI’s  new  collabora:ve  projects  coordinator,  Nicole  Gidea,  is  star:ng  a  new  program  for   the  CCI  community,  a  book  club!  During  February  and  March,  CCI  will  host  a  book  club  on   The  Hundred  Secret  Senses  by  Amy  Tan,  a  Chinese-­‐American  author,  who  is  also  well   known  for  The  Joy  Luck  Club.  In  The  Hundred  Secret  Senses,  the  main  character,  Olivia,   meets  her  Chinese  half-­‐sister  Kwan.  Readers  will  learn  about  their  complex  rela:onship   through  the  unique  narra:ves  that  they  share.  This  book  describes  American  and  Chinese   cultures,  and  how  Olivia  deals  with  self-­‐iden:ty.  Nicole  is  sure  that  many  CCI  members   will  enjoy  the  novel.  So  buy  a  copy  of  the  book,  borrow  it  from  someone,  or  check  it  out   at  your  local  library.  Beginning  in  February,  there  will  be  Facebook  chats    (similar  to  the  monthly  chats)  to  discuss  the  book.  The  schedule  is  as     follows:     February  2  at  8pm  EST:  Welcome/Introduc:on  to  the  book     February  16  at  8pm  EST:  Discussion  on  Ch  1  through  5     March  2  at  8pm  EST:  Discussion  on  Ch  6  through  9   March  16  at  8pm  EST:  Discussion  on  Ch  10  through  16   March  30  at  8pm  EST:  Discussion  on  Ch  17  through  24      

Half the Sky 2013 Adoptee Volunteer Trip! This year,  CCI  is  partnering  with  Half  the  Sky  in  the  first  ever  adoptee  trip  to  volunteer  in   Half  the  Sky’s  China  Care  Home.  This  trip  is  specially  designed  with  adoptees  in  mind  and   will  give  par:cipants  the  opportunity  to  connect  to  and  create  las:ng  memories  with   other  adoptees  through  special  bonding  ac:vi:es  and  adoptee  related  discussions.   Par:cipants  will  spend  two  weeks  in  South  Chaoyang,  Beijing  from  July  8-­‐22,  2013  caring   for  and  playing  with  children  in  the  Home  with  a  short  excursion  to  Tianjin  as  well.     Applica:ons  will  be  accepted  on  a  rolling  basis  with  a  deadline  of  March  1.  To  be  eligible   for  this  trip,  you  must  be  over  the  age  of  sixteen  by  July  1,  2013.  For  more  eligibility   requirements  and  informa:on,  visit  halehesky.org/en/adopteecolunteertrip  or  contact   Sarah  Cramer  at  sarah@halehesky.org.  CCI  would  like  to  express  their  gra:tude  to  Half   the  Sky  and  Sarah  Cramer  for  making  this  all  possible!   CCI  also  encourages  all  members  to  make  use  of  the  Hometown  Friends  forum  run  by   Half  the  Sky  that  connects  adoptees  through  discussions  related  to  adop:on  and  China.  

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China’s Children International- Winter 2013!


Announcements!

Announcements:! Hat Knitting Project CCI  member  Grace  has  started  a  hat   knigng  project  to  benefit  babies  in   Chinese  orphanages.  She  asks  any   members  who  would  like  to  help  out  to   knit  hats  the  appropriate  size  for  babies   less  than  a  year  old.  The  hats  should  be   made  of  soe  baby  wool  (coion)  and  can   be  knit  any:me  during  the  year  and  sent   to  the  Half  the  Sky  Organiza:on  at  the   address  below  during  the  winter   months:   Half  the  Sky  Founda1on   715  Hearst  Ave  Suite  200   Berkeley,  CA  94710   For  tutorials  on  how  to  knit  hats,  watch   the  following  videos:   youtube.com/watch?v=5vNh4WLSWdA   youtube.com/watch?v=op34eCoDDSM  

Somewhere Between! The documentary,  Somewhere  Between,   directed  by  Linda  Goldstein  Knowlton,   follows  the  daily  lives  of  four  adolescent   girls,  Jenna,  Haley,  Ann,  and  Fang,  who   are  all  adopted  from  China.  Throughout   the  film,  viewers  get  an  inside  look  into   the  complex  and  convoluted  problems   that  these  girls  face  with  adop:on,  race,   and  gender  as  they  grow  up  between  two   na:ons.   The  documentary  has     been  screened  throughout     the  U.S.  and  is  now  available     for  order  from  Amazon,     iTunes,  and  Docurama.  

Wuhan Child Welfare Institute Reunion Tour! Wuhan CWI  in  Hubei,  China  is  offering  a  subsidized  reunion  tour  for  all  children  adopted   through  their  ins:tute.  The  tour  will  take  place  from  July  10,  2013  to  July  17,  2013  with   op:onal  extended  tours  to  Xi’an  or  Shanghai  las:ng  through  July  20,  2013.  The  tour  will   consist  of  sightseeing  and  cultural  ac:vi:es  in  Beijing  and  Wuhan  and  will  be  coordinated   by  Gladney  China  Heritage  Tours  under  the  Vice  President  and  Managing  Director,   Gongzhan  Wu,  while  the  in  China  arrangements  will  be  made  by  Bridge  of  Love  Adop:on   Service  in  Beijing.  China’s  Ministry  of  Civil  Affairs,  through  CCCWA,  will  be  sponsoring  the   program,  awarding  all  Chinese  adoptees  aiending  the  program  and  their  adopted  siblings   a  $800  grant  (with  a  maximum  of  30  adop:ve  families).     For  more  informa:on,  please  email  chinaheritagetours@gladney.org  or  visit   gladneyasia.org  where  applica:ons  will  be  available  at  the  beginning  of  February  2013.  

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China’s Children International- Winter 2013!


New Committee!

CCI’s New Committee:! One of  China  Children  Interna:onal's  major  missions  is  to  help  empower  adoptees.  We  love  to  see  adoptees   taking  ac:on  and  making  a  difference  in  things  that  maier  to  them.  In  this  spirit,  China's  Children  Interna:onal  is   excited  to  announce  that  we've  recently  had  an  enthusias:c  group  of  adoptees  volunteer  to  become  leaders  in   our  community.  They  are  forming  our  new  CCI  commiiee  which  will  help  run  different  aspects  of  our  organiza:on   as  well  as  start  their  own  new  projects  to  excite  and  engage  all  CCI  members.  Please  help  us  welcome  them  on   board!  You  can  start  to  get  to  know  them  below.  (And  as  always,  if  you  want  to  get  more  involved  yourself,  send   us  an  email!  )  

The Communica:ons  and  China  Travel  Coordinator  is  responsible  for  crea:ng  and    

figuring out  ways  to  get  CCI’s  name  out  there  to  other  adoptees  as  well  other     organiza:ons.  Ana  will  also  be  in  charge  of  heading  a  new  China  Travel  Resource  sec:on     on  CCI’s  website.  This  includes  visa  :melines,  informa:on  on  various  des:na:ons,  how     to  visit  your  orphanage,  how  to  access  adop:on  records,  and  features  other  adoptee     travel  stories.  

Ana! Tanner!

Hi, I’m  Ana  I  am  19  and  currently  a  first  year  at  Smith  College,  in  Massachuseis.  I  was     born  in  Jiujiang,  Jiangxi  province.  I  was  adopted  when  I  was  five  months  old  and  have     been  living  in  Berkeley,  CA  with  my  two  moms  ever  since.  Growing  up,  my  moms  made     sure  that  we  were  ac:ve  in  our  local  branch  of  FCC  so  that  I  would  have  a  friend  and     peer  group  of  fellow  Chinese  adoptees  to  connect  with.  They  also  fostered  an     atmosphere  at  home  in  which  I  knew  I  could  openly  explore  my  feelings  about  adop:on     related  issues.  I  am  currently  very  interested  in  learning  Chinese.  I  took  Chinese  through     high  school  and  am  now  con:nuing  at  Smith.    I  am  incredibly  excited  to  be  part  of  CCI     and  I  think  it's  great  to  have  an  organiza:on  that  brings  together  adoptees  from  all  walks     of  life  into  one  powerful  community.      

Volunteering and  Resources  Coordinator  will  be  the  liaison  for  CCI  between    

volunteering organiza:ons  and  CCI  members.  They  will  be  in  charge  of  forging     rela:onships  between  CCI  and  relevant  volunteering  organiza:ons  and  will  help  adoptees     par:cipate  in  these  organiza:ons.  They  will  also  be  responsible  for  researching  and     introducing  resources  about  adop:on  or  adop:on  ac:vi:es/events  for  adoptees  to  the     CCI  community.    

Jaia!

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Hey! I'm  Jaia  and  I  was  adopted  from  Zhejiang  Province  when  I  was  nine  months     old.  I'm  currently  a  junior  in  high  school  and  I  love  the  outdoors,  ac:vism,  and  theater.     I'm  excited  to  join  CCI  in  hopes  of  helping  connect  more  and  more  Chinese  adoptees  to     each  other  and  their  own  iden::es.  

China’s Children International- Winter 2013!


New Committee!

CCI’s New Committee:!

Communica:ons coordinator  is  director  of  our  monthly  chat  program.  Every  month,    

Ka:e will  organize  a  poll  to  determine  the  theme  of  the  chat  and,  if  possible,  be  there     during  the  chat  to  act  as  a  monitor  and  representa:ve  of  CCI.  

Katie! Neteler!

Hi, I’m  Ka:e  Neteler.  I  was  adopted  from  Guangdong  Providence  when  I  was  a  baby.     I  am  17  and  a  sophomore  in  high  school.  In  my  spare  :me  I  enjoy  listening  to  music,     watching  movies,  helping  at  my  church,  volunteering  in  my  community  and  traveling.     When  I  was  4  years  old,  I  moved  from  southern  California  to  Malaysia.  I  lived  there  for     10  years  and  moved  back  to  the  United  States  in  2010.  While  living  there,  I  learned  a     lot  about  Chinese  culture.  I  learned  a  liile  Chinese  when  in  elementary  school.  I  am     currently  taking  Chinese  at  a  local  college.  When  I  lived  overseas  there  weren’t  any  other   children  who  were  adopted  from  China.  I  am  glad  to  have  found  a  great  group  of    adoptees  like  me.  

Newsleier coordinator  is  in  charge  of  running  the  official  CCI  newsleier.  They  oversee     the  collec:on  of  pieces,  the  gathering  of  permission  to  use  these  pieces  in  our     newsleier,  the  formagng,  and  the  overall  look  of  the  newsleier.    

Hannah! Lyon!

Hi everyone!  My  name  is  Hannah  and  I  am  from  Yueyang,  Hunan,  China.  I  am  new  here     at  CCI  and  I  will  be  working  primarily  on  the  newsleier,  so  make  sure  you  read  it!  I  am     really  excited  to  be  helping  out  here  at  CCI  because  I  love  the  adoptee  community  and  I     have  a  passion  for  learning  about  different  cultures,  foreign  languages,  and  interna:onal     poli:cs,  especially  those  of  China.  I  know  that  it  takes  all  adoptees  different  lengths  of     :me  to  understand  their  adop:on  and  for  interna:onal  adoptees,  this  struggle  is     heightened  in  the  addi:onal  search  for  a  unique  cultural  iden:ty.  I  believe  CCI  is  a  great     resource  for  adoptees  no  maier  where  they  are  in  that  process  because  it  gives  them     resources  to  learn  about  their  culture  and  connects  them  to  others  going  through  the     same  feelings  and  struggles  as  them.  I  am  currently  a  senior  in  high  school,  balancing  my     last  few  months  of  classes  with  learning  Mandarin,  drinking  bubble  tea,  watching  Asian     dramas,  and  now,  helping  out  with  CCI!  Feel  free  to  send  me  an  email  any:me  if  you     want  to  talk  at  celes:al9795@gmail.com!  

The collabora:ve  projects  coordinator  is  responsible  for  designing  their  own  project    

and wri:ng  up  a  descrip:on  of  this  project  to  tell  the  CCI  community.  Nicole  has  decided     to  run  a  book  club  project  for  CCI  with  discussions  held  on  CCI’s  Facebook  page.  

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Nicole! Gildea!

Hello everyone,  my  name  is  Nicole.  I  was  adopted  from  Wuhan,  China  when  I  was  fieeen     months  old.  I  am  a  crea:ve  person  who  likes  reading,  swimming,  and  exploring  new     things.  I  am  now  a  high  school  junior  in  Boston,  Massachuseis.  At  school,  I  am  in  my     fourth  year  of  learning  Mandarin.  I  am  really  excited  about  CCI  because  I  think  it's     important  for  adoptee  to  share  their  stories  and  build  a  strong  community.    

China’s Children International- Winter 2013!


New Committee!

CCI’s New Committee:! The Facebook  coordinator  will  help  the  Facebook  group  run  smoothly,  create  new  ideas     for  the  group,  keep  discussions  going,  and  serve  as  a  moderator.  

Ming! Foxweldon!

My name  is  Ming  Foxweldon,  an  undergraduate  studying  at  the  University  of  Vermont,     majoring  in  Mandarin  Chinese,  and  minoring  in  Anthropology.  It's  my  last  semester,  so     it's  a  biiersweet  moment  for  me.  However,  I'm  looking  forward  to  what  adventures  I've     ahead.  A  liile  about  myself.  I  was  adopted  from  Kunming,  in  1994,  and  since  then  have     lived  in  a  few  places  in  America  since  my  arrival.  The  first,  was  Milwaukee,  then  for  some     :me  in  Costa  Rica,  and  then  to  the  East  Coast  to  New  England  where  I've  lived  the     majority  of  my  life.  A  liile  about  my  family,  I've  an  older  sister  who's  biological  to  the     parents  that  adopted  my  younger  brother  (who's  adopted  too,  but  not  from  China).     We've  a  cat  who  we've  had  since  we  moved  to  New  England,  which  is  preiy  incredible.     She's  a  calico,  very  sweet,  yet  can  be  moody  as  most  of  you  know  what  female  cats  are     like.  She's  very  ac:ve,  which  is  nice…  However  not  seeing  her  oeen  can  be  sad     some:mes.  I  love  being  around  animals,  mostly  mammals,  rep:les  and  insects  aren't  my     favorites.  I'll  go  into  that  later.  It's  been  quite  an  interes:ng  journey,  called  life.  In  the     summer  of  2011,  I  was  able  to  travel  abroad  with  my  college  friends  to  the  province  in     which  I'm  from,  Yunnan.  I  spent  6  months  there  and  enjoyed  my  :me  with  a  few  bumps     in  the  road.  That  was  the  first  :me  I'd  been  back  to  China  since  the  adop:on,  so  it  was  a     big  deal....During  that  :me  I  was  able  to  travel  and  reconnect  with  others  from  the  past.     That  was  an  unforgeiable  :me.  If  you  wish  to  know  more  about  my  adventures  in  China,     you're  welcome  to  contact  me,  mfoxweldon@gmail.com.  Another  thing  I'd  like  to  note,     my  hobbies  include,  reading,  listening  to  music,  playing  piano,  dancing  (hip  hop,  social     dances,  ballroom,  etc),  cooking,  shopping,  traveling,  research  of  any  kind,  watching  films,   aiending  concerts,  fes:vals,  conferences,  staying  fit,  ZUMBA,  flying  trapeze,  surfing,     exploring,  and  the  list  goes  on.  :)  Lastly,  I'd  like  to  thank  the  CCI  officers  for  welcoming  me     into  the  CCI  group,  and  I  hope  to  con:nue  to  add  to  the  group's  goals  and  be  a  great     support  to  you,  members  of  CCI!  All  the  best  in  your  new  year,  and  may  you  all  be  well!  

The pen  pal  coordinator  is  responsible  for  running  CCI’s  long  standing  pen  pal  program.     They  are  in  charge  of  looking  through  applica:ons  and  matching  adoptees  based  on     common  interests  and  other  criteria.    

Brianna! Brennan!

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Hey! My  name  is  Brianna.  I  was  adopted  from  Jiangmen,  in  Guangdong  Province,  China     when  I  was  3  months  old.  I  am  currently  finishing  my  senior  year  in  high  school  in  the     Pacific  Northwest,  before  I  move  on  to  Oregon  State  University  where  I  will  study  Animal     Sciences  and  Asian  Culture.  I  have  had  the  best  of  both  worlds,  being  able  to  celebrate     and  embrace  both  my  Chinese  and  American  culture  and  heritage  from  an  early  age.  I     couldn't  ask  for  anything  beier.  CCI  has  given  me  the  opportunity  to  talk  and  relate  my     experiences  to  people  who  understand  what  it  is  like  to  be  a  Chinese  adoptee  from  all     around  the  world.      

China’s Children International- Winter 2013!


You Project!

FCC Ireland YOU Project! Recently CCI  has  been  in  contact  with  the  Irish  Chinese  Contact   Group  (ICCG).  "ICCG    is  a  volunteer  run  support  group  for   families  who  have  been  or  are  in  the  process  of  adop:ng  from   China”  (www.iccg.ie).  We  are  so  excited  to  be  working  with  our   new  Chinese  sisters  in  Ireland!  Some  of  the  older  girls    will  be   pos:ng  their  responses  to  CCI's  YOU  project  and  some  younger   girls  will  be  drawing  pictures.  These  will  be  posted  soon!  We   hope  to  con:nue  the  cross-­‐Atlan:c  rela:onship  with  ICCG  as  it   is  important  for  all  Chinese  adoptees  to  know  that  they  are   never  alone!     If  you'd  like  to  par:cipate  in  the  YOU  project  visit  our  YouTube   page  at  hip://www.youtube.com/user/chinachildrenint  

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China’s Children International- Winter 2013!


Feature!

Ming and the Sun Travel contest! CCI member,  Ming,  recently  applied  for  and  won  the  Sun  Travel  contest  offered  to  the  CCI   community.  Sun  Travel  is  a  company  specializing  in  heritage  tours  who  has  partnered  with  CCI  to   reward  one  deserving  member  who  has  made  a  significant  contribu:on  to  the  adoptee   community  with  the  opportunity  to  travel  to  China  and  serve  as  a  mentor  for  the  younger   adoptees  on  one  of  the  upcoming  summer’s  Kids  Travel  Free  tours.  Next  summer,  Ming  has  the   op:on  to  go  to  China  with  Sun  Travel  and  where  she  can  serve  as  a  posi:ve  role  model  for  young   adoptees  while  helping  them  to  process  their  experience.  For  more  informa:on  on  Ming,  see  the   New  Commiiee  page  as  she  is  also  a  new  commiiee  member  here  at  CCI.   Here  is  the  essay  that  Ming  wrote  in  her  applica1on:   Growing  up  as  a  Chinese  adoptee  in  a  predominantly  white  community  has  provided  an  interes:ng     scope.  For  some  years  I  aiended  Chinese  New  Year’s  celebra:ons  with  my  family,  and  mee:ng     other  families  with  children  adopted  from  China.  Those  memories  of  ea:ng  “Chinese”  food,     conversing  with  others  about  my  experience  lee  a  mark  on  me.  I  was  lee  to  contemplate  my     iden:ty  and  given  that  I  was  a  few  years  older  than  the  majority  there,  the  kind  of  impact  I  would     have  on  the  younger  children  there  would  soon  serve  me  in  the  future.  I  felt  a  certain  pressure  that     at  :mes  lee  me  ques:oning  myself,  however  I  think  that’s  only  made  me  stronger  as  a  person.     When  I  was  in  8th  grade,  I  had  to  make  a  project  about  something  I  was  truly  interested  in,  so  I     chose  to  study  two  ethnic  groups  of  China  Bai  and  Yi  groups,  the  one’s  I  thought  I  may  have  past     connec:ons  with.  I  then  presented  this  to  an  audience  for  my  grade  school  friends  and  their     families.  I  was  also  asked  to  present  this  folk  tale  from  one  of  the  ethnic  minori:es,  while  wearing     a  costume  I  designed  with  the  guidance  of  my  mother.  A  year  or  so  later,  I  was  asked  to  perform     for  a  private  party  in  celebra:on  for  Chinese  New  Year’s.  This  event  brought  a  new  perspec:ve  to     that  adop:on  community  that  year.  These  sorts  of  experiences  clearly  lee  a  mark  on  me  as  well  as     to  con:nue  my  pursuit  with  connec:ng  to  the  adop:on  community  in  various  ways.     Skip  a  few  years  ahead,  where  I’m  studying  at  the  University  of  Vermont  where  my  goals  have     become  a  reality.  By  aiending  conferences  through  the  Asian  American  student-­‐run  organiza:on     this  opened  the  doors  to  new  opportuni:es  to  talk  with  other  adoptees  and  hold  dialogues.  Aeer     my  study  abroad  in  China,  I  was  becoming  more  aware  of  my  iden:ty  and  what  it  signified  to  me.  I     wanted  to  be  more  involved  with  the  adop:on  community  and  did  some  research  and  was  able     to  connect  with  some  groups  and  con:nue  to  want  to  involve  myself  any  way  I  can.                   Addi:onally,  my  study  abroad  experience  taught  me  a  lot  and  I  was  able  to  blossom  in  to  a  more     confident  being,  however  recognizing  this  a  path  that  I  take  as  an  individual,  but  can  also  show     my  support  to  others  with  knowledge,  support  and  love.  I  wanted  to  reach  out  to  the  adop:on     community  no  maier  the  age  and  become  a  role  model.  By  promo:ng  the  movie  Somewhere     Between,  gave  me  another  reason  to  connect  with  others  beier  in  regards  to  adop:on.  Giving     my  point  of  view  was  my  method  to  support  others  in  their  quests,  an  unforgeiable  experience!  

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China’s Children International- Winter 2013!


Feature!

Chinese New Year!

February 10,  2013  marks  the  start  of  the  fiKeen  day  Chinese  New  Year   celebra1on  period.  CCI  wants  to  wish  all  members  a  happy  year  of  the  snake   with  these  fun  facts  about  Chinese  New  Year!  

• Many New  Year  decora:ons   are  red,  the  most  popular  of   which  is  an  image  of  the   character,  fu,  upside  down.  

• The New  Year’s  Eve  dinner  is  the   most  important  meal  at  which   reunited  family  members  feast  on   delicious  tradi:onal  foods  such  as   dumplings,  fish,  eight  treasures   rice,  and  noodles.  

• To prepare  for  the  new   year,  Chinese  families  will   clean  their  homes  and  buy   new  clothes  to  clear  out  the   old  and  make  room  for  the   new.  

年 • Red  envelopes,  hong  bao,   • Chinese  New  Year  started  out  of   • At  12:00  p.m.  on  New  Year’s   containing  money  are  oeen   people’s  fear  of  an  evil  beast   Eve,  fireworks  are  lit  to  scare   given  to  children  from  adults  to   named  Nian  (year)  who  came   away  evil  and  welcome  in   symbolize  fortune  and   during  the  end  of  the  year.  They   the  new  year.   happiness  in  the  upcoming   found  that  he  was  scared  away  by   year.   fire,  red,  and  loud  sounds,  hence   many  tradi:ons  of  the  holiday.  

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China’s Children International- Winter 2013!


Art Corner!

Art Corner:! Check out  these  amazing  pain1ngs  done  by  CCI  Member  Linzi!  

I Promise   "I  recently  was  informed  that  I  have  a  biological  brother  living  in   China.  We  were  in  the  same  orphanage;  I  was  adopted  by  my   American  parents  and  he  was  adopted  by  a  family  in  China.  I  don't   know  where  or  who  he  is,  but  I  am  going  to  find  him.  I  was  thinking   about  the  "red  thread"  concept  that  :es  people  des:ned  to  meet   together.  ”  -­‐  Linzi  

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China’s Children International- Winter 2013!


Art Corner!

Art Corner:! Check out  these  amazing  pain1ngs  done  by  CCI  Member  Linzi!  

The Pearl  and  The  Clam  

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China’s Children International- Winter 2013!


Adoptee Essays!

Adoptee Essays:! Thoughts from  Places:  Reflec4ons  of  a  Summer  Experience  in  China-­‐  Nicole  Gildea   Our  rela:onship  is  an  evanescent  memory  that  has  flickered   away.  It's  been  an  opaque  glass  paperweight  on  my  mind.   That's  why  I  felt  compelled  to  visit  you,  to  see  you  clearly.     You're  complex,  mul:faceted,  and  absolutely  unpredictable.  You're   a  place  where  tradi:onal  elements  mingle  with  the  modern,  where   contemporary  buildings  will  never  shadow  your  rich  culture  and  history.   It's  easy  to  be  swept  away  by  millions  of  people.  You  immerse  me  in  a  new   world,  and  I  am  excited  by  it.  I've  never  before  experienced  anything  like  it.       You're  a  place  of  old  roots  that  have  been  buried  by  the  dirt  of  inequality.   I  fell  from  a  blossom  into  the  water,  whose  currents  lead  me  to  liberty.   But  I've  returned  to  decode  your  mysteries,  though  I  am  captured  by  your   beauty  and  lose  my  sense  of  direc:on.  I  only  know  that  I  want  to  find  you,   to  learn  about  you  for  myself.  No  history  books,  travel  guides,     or  newspapers  can  let  me  dive  beneath  your  surface.     Take  me  back  to  those  hot  summer  days  when  our  voices  drie   away  in  the  air.  You  are  full  of  excitement  and  I  am  seeking   adventure.  You  show  me  beyond  photos  and  tourism.  You  lead  me   through  secret  passageways  and  allow  me  to  see  you  like  a  traveler.   The  sweet  taste  of  eggplant  s:ll  dances  on  my  tongue.     You're  a  place  that  first  appears  hec:c  like  the  celebra:ons  of   New  Years,  but  on  the  outskirts,  you  are  free  from  thick  smog   and  public  transporta:on.  Cars  are  only  specks  in  the  distance;   I  breathe  in  this  fresh  air.  I  witness  vibrant  earth  tones  paint  the   landscape.  Every  mountain  bears  the  formidable  appearance  of   past  emperors.  If  it  isn't  for  your  dare,  I  may  not  have  climbed   such  vast  structures,  but  you  grab  my  hand  and  guide  me  across   flowing  rivers  and  down  slopping  hills.  I  remember  reaching  the   edge  of  the  wall;  head  up,  arms  flying,  legs  shaking.   Your  mountains  dwarf  me,  yet  I  feel  so  infinite.  

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China’s Children International- Winter 2013!


Adoptee Essays!

You're a  place  where  rain  pours  from  the  sky,  plopping   the  tarps  that  shield  the  roofs  of  the  village  inns.  We   dance  in  the  puddles  and  chase  the  drops  that  soak  us.   These  rainstorms  wash  away  the  sweat  of  the  day.     You're  home  to  cute  babies  and  erra:c  driving.  I'll  never   forget  the  conversa:ons  we  share.  Your  friendliness  warms   my  heart.  We  jump  through  the  air  and  engrave  our  own   seals.  The  ink  stains  my  palms,  but  I  like  it  that  way.     You  show  me  a  school  whose  students  have  the  spirits  of  stars   that  dream  of  growing  up  into  constella:ons.  Those  glass  mosaics   and  chroma:c  murals  illuminate  their  light  even  in  the  dark.  I  wish   we  could  give  them  spaceships,  but  we  press  our  hands  together,   and  let  them  run  through,  back  to  their  classrooms.     I  am  walking  for  miles  just  to  get  to  know  you.  Red   lanterns  light  up  the  night  sky  as  I  wander  through   myriad  markets,  ancient  alleys,  and  picturesque  parks.       You're  the  place  where,  aeer  an  exhaus:ng  day,  the  gentle   notes  of  a  wooden  flute  wae  down  the  underground  tunnel.   The  light  melody  echoes  as  the  sunlight  pierces  the  opening   of  the  passage.  Above  ground,  a  warm  breeze  rustles  the     leaves  and  swirls  through  the  air.  It  carries  our  laughs  and   stories  so  that  you  can  hear  them.     I’ve  never  felt  so  boundless.  !

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China’s Children International- Winter 2013!


Adoptee Essays!

Adoptee Essays:! A Change  of  Hurt-­‐  Hannah  Lyon   A  short  piece  I  wrote  for  a  school  assignment  and  a  college  applica1on  essay.   Standing  in  the  middle  of  the  Chinese  Garden  of  Friendship,  I  suddenly  found  myself  covered  in   goose  bumps,  but  whether  they  were  from  the  brisk  winter  air  or  from  the  biiersweet  revela:on   that  I  had  just  had,  I  was  not  sure.  Exo:c  plants,  dragon  sculptures,  and  tranquil  ponds  surrounded   me,  but  all  that  I  saw  around  me  was  all  that  could  have  been  and  all  that  was.  This  was  the  moment   at  which  I  realized  the  full  implica:ons  of  my  adop:on  and  became  proud  to  be  myself.     As  a  Chinese-­‐adoptee  growing  up  in  an  ethnically  homogenous  community,  I  was  exposed  to  very   liile  diversity  growing  up  which  made  it  even  harder  for  me  to  come  to  terms  with  being  different.   As  a  kid,  you  think  that  being  different  is  the  worst  possible  thing  you  can  be  and  as  such,  I  came  to   resent  the  most  basic  part  of  myself.  Like  my  parents,  I  tried  to  ignore  the  fact  that  I  was  adopted   and  only  dealt  with  it  as  a  remote  idea  as  if  it  wasn’t  an  integral  part  of  my  life  and  my  iden:ty.    I   knew  nothing  about  being  Asian  aside  from  the  stereotypes  I  heard  from  my  peers  and  based  on   these  stereotypes,  it  didn’t  seem  like  it  was  a  good  or  “cool”  thing  to  be  Asian.  I  looked  away   whenever  China  was  brought  up,  glared  into  the  distance  with  every  Asian  joke  I  heard,  and  falsely   declared  my  hatred  of  Chinese  food.  I  would  even  go  to  extreme  lengths  to  hide  my  middle  name,   my  given  name,  the  only  thing  I  had  lee  from  the  first  six  months  of  my  life.     Before  my  revela:on  in  the  Chinese  Garden,  I  hadn’t  realized  the  full  extent  of  what  my  adop:on   meant.  I  realized  that  I  would  never  get  to  know  my  real  mother,  never  know  if  I  had  siblings.  I  had   lost  my  culture,  my  language,  and  my  ancestors.  This  realiza:on  made  me  upset,  but  it  also  sparked   something  inside  of  me  that  wanted  to  regain  some  of  what  I  had  lost.  This  was  my  second   revela:on:  I  was  proud  to  be  Chinese,  proud  to  be  myself.  As  a  child,  I  had  always  felt  as  if  “Asian”   was  a  term  I  was  obligated  to  accept,  but  aeer  seeing  other  Asian  people  who  were  completely   comfortable  with  being  who  they  were,  I  realized  that  I  wanted  to  be  like  them.  I  wanted  to  be  proud   of  my  appearance  and  culture,  even  if  it  made  me  different.  Being  Chinese  was  not  shameful,  as  Amy   Tan’s  mother  said  to  her,  “your  only  shame  is  to  have  shame”.     Today,  I  am  very  grateful  to  have  had  these  revela:ons  when  I  did.  Aeer  opening  my  mind  to  Chinese   culture,  I  began  to  accept  my  heritage  and  explore  the  rich,  intriguing  cultures  of  many  countries  in   Asia  which  has  become  my  greatest  passion.  I  could  never  be  as  accep:ng  of  diversity  as  I  am  now  if   I  had  not  accepted  myself  first.  Through  this  explora:on,  I  decided  that  I  wanted  to  travel  and  make   a  difference  in  the  world.  My  own  struggles  moved  me  to  want  to  help  others  who  may  be  trying  to   hide  themselves.  However,  I  am  not  fully  over  my  struggle  yet.  I  s:ll  have  a  long  way  to  travel  in   order  to  find  out  more  about  myself  and  who  I  feel  I  am  meant  to  be.  

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China’s Children International- Winter 2013!


Adoptee Essays!

Adoptee Essays:! Maia Stack   The  baby’s  emaciated  and  fragile  body  contrasted  sharply  with  her  large  head.    Named  "No   Name,”  she  had  been  lee  for  days  in  the  orphanage’s  dark  room  to  die.    I  had  to  close  my  eyes   and  remind  myself  that  I  was  a  world  away  from  this  Chinese  orphanage.    The  Dying  Rooms   (1995)  exposé  hit  me  incredibly  close  to  home,  and  made  me  ask  what  difference  I  could  make   for  the  No  Names  that  s:ll  live  in  orphanages  worldwide.    I  have  found  myself  increasingly   drawn  toward  interna:onal  service  work  for  these  children  who  would  otherwise  not  receive   the  help  they  need  -­‐  therapy,  teaching  or  simple  touch.       I  was  steered  toward  this  kind  of  career  by  a  combina:on  of  traits:  empathy,  curiosity,  and  a   love  of  challenges.    The  empathy  stems  from  my  own  origins  in  a  Chinese  orphanage.    Like  "No   Name,"  I  was  abandoned  by  my  birth  family  and  had  a  part  of  myself  that  was  lee  un-­‐nurtured.     This  start,  once  a  burden,  has  since  given  me  the  opportunity  to  resonate  with  and  respond  to   others’  needs.   Of  course  I  could  meet  local  needs  -­‐  there  is  no  lack  of  them.    But  another  trait  makes  me  lean   toward  interna:onal  service:  curiosity.    This  inclina:on  has  been  nurtured  by  homeschooling:  I   could  run  with  every  passion  I  had,  from  renewable  energy  to  the  Holocaust  to  a  semester   studying  in  Beijing.   I  have  talked  to  enough  people  who  worked  abroad  for  non-­‐profits  to  know  that  interna:onal   work  is  no  cake-­‐walk.    I  know  there  will  be  challenges,  and  at  some  points  I  will  doubt  myself.     But  challenge  isn’t  just  an  obstacle  for  me,  it’s  something  I  crave.    That’s  why  I  enjoy  diving  into   new  and  different  peer  groups,  including  the  one  at  Conserve  School,  where  I  currently  study   environmental  stewardship.    The  challenge  of  connec:ng  to  each  new  person  is  exci:ng  -­‐   everyone  has  something  unique  to  offer.   I  do  realize  that  even  with  these  traits,  I  can’t  just  bounce  into  an  impoverished  orphanage  and   announce,  “I’m  here  to  help!”    I  need  the  right  skills.    I  learned  this  the  hard  way  when  I   volunteered  in  a  first-­‐grade  classroom  as  an  untrained  reading  helper.    I  loved  working  with  the   kids,  but  the  experience  taught  me  that  I  need  more  than  a  good  heart  to  really  make  a   difference.       I  don’t  know  exactly  where  I  will  end  up  -­‐  in  fact,  the  very  nature  of  curiosity  and  love  of   learning  is  to  open  many  doors.    What  I  do  know  is  that  I  will  work  for  change.    The  poet  Janice   Mirikitani  once  said  that  “ac:on  is  the  name  for  hope.”    In  the  end,  by  ac:ng  for  and  giving  hope   to  others,  I  give  hope  to  myself.    Aeer  all,  by  caring  for  No  Name,  I  will  also  be  caring  for  myself  -­‐   the  No  Name  I  once  was.      

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China’s Children International- Winter 2013!


Outside Sources:! Red Envelope  Picture:  hip://www.kids-­‐n-­‐fun.com/Wallpaper/Chinese-­‐new-­‐year-­‐widewcreen/ 6942/Chinese-­‐new-­‐year-­‐widewcreen   Hundred  Secret  Senses  Cover:  hip://books.google.com/books/about/ The_Hundred_Secret_Senses.html?id=yrdVIz0OACAC   Somewhere  Between  Movie  Poster:  hip://www.amazon.com/dp/B009MBSWQW/? tag=somewherebetw-­‐20     ICCG  Logo:  hip://www.iccg.ie   Ireland  Picture:  hips://www.cia.gov/library/publica:ons/the-­‐world-­‐factbook/geos/ei.html   Chinese  New  Year  Sources:  hip://www.history.com/topics/chinese-­‐new-­‐year-­‐tradi:ons-­‐and-­‐ symbols   hip://www.chinesenewyears.info/chinese-­‐new-­‐year-­‐tradi:ons.php   Dumpling  Picture:  hip://www.bonappe:t.com/blogsandforums/blogs/badaily/2013/02/ chinese-­‐new-­‐year-­‐dumpling-­‐recipe.html   Fu  Sign  Picture:  hip://www.chinasprout.com/store/media/ANW074L01.jpg   Firework  Picture  and  Dust  Pan  Picture:  Microsoe  Clip  Art   Second  Red  Envelope  Picture:  hip://www.kcfortunecookiefactory.com/shop-­‐now/products/ lucky-­‐red-­‐envelopes-­‐chinese-­‐new-­‐year   Great  Wall  of  China  Picture:  hip://famouswonders.com/the-­‐great-­‐wall-­‐of-­‐china/  

新年快乐! Thank  you  everyone  for  reading!     Hannah  (CCI  Newsleier  Editor  in  Chief)  

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China’s Children International- Winter 2013!

CCI Winter 2013 Newsletter