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CHIMESNEWSPAPER.COM

VOLUME 84, ISSUE 10

MARCH 14, 2019

CHIMES

THE BIOLA UNIVERSITY

Bill Simon, 1961-2019

“But the noble man devises noble plans; And by noble plans he stands.” Isaiah 32:8

Rachel Stanley|Courtesy

NEWS

A&E

OPINIONS

SPORTS

WEB

Conference countdown As Missions Conference approaches, learn about new speakers and changes for this year. // 5

Pop-rock sizzles Pop-rock bands Fever Joy and Flight Deck are finding their audiences among both students and mainstream music fans. // 6, 7

Pro-life men persecuted In the abortion debate, pro-choice advocates unfairly discriminate against pro-life men, while welcoming allies that include pro-choice men. // 9

Renovations come to tennis The Biola Tennis Center is under construction, adding two new courts, offices and live video streaming equipment. // 10

Campus hosts speech and debate competition Biola recently hosted a homeschool debate tournament. Read more at chimesnewspaper.com/category/ news.

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MARCH 14, 2019

Jonathan Linden|Courtesy

We dedicate this issue to Professor Bill Simon, a man who was a sterling example of sincere compassion and joyful service for so many of us on this staff. He joyfully taught us, prayed with us, advised us, sang with us, showered us with generosity, brought us laughter, lived life with us and reminded us that we were always loved—not just by him, but by the Good Lord above. He will forever be our Beloved. -The Chimes Staff

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Christian Leonard MANAGING EDITOR Austin Green NEWS EDITORS Julianna Hernandez Isabelle Thompson ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Pierce Singgih OPINIONS EDITOR Logan Zeppieri SPORTS EDITOR Joel Ashor

DEPUTY EDITORS Micah Kim Brittany Ung Kayla Santos Andi Basista WEB EDITOR Sasha Terry VISUAL EDITOR Thecla Li DESIGN EDITORS Faith Lee Joshua Cheng COPY EDITORS Victoria Chiang Kyle Kohner

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS Aaron Zhang Marlena Lang Yehju Park STAFF WRITERS Amanda Frese Adam Pigott Ashley Grams OFFICE MANAGERS Jana Eller Kyle Kohner BUSINESS MANAGER Daniel Yosafat DISTRIBUTOR Filip Peia

FACULTY ADVISER Michael Longinow

The Chimes is published every other Thursday except during vacations and examination periods. The Chimes 13800 Biola Ave. La Mirada, CA 90639 Office: 562.903.4879 chimesnewspaper.com Advertising: chimes.business.manager@biola.edu

Editorials, columns and letters to the editor express the opinion of those signing and not necessarily that of the Chimes. The opinions expressed in the Chimes do not necessarily represent Biola University, nor are they endorsed by the university.


SIMON

MARCH 14, 2019

In Memory of Bill Simon

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Students and faculty write tributes to their teacher and friend, ‘A man after God’s heart.’

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illiam “Bill” Simon was an associate professor of public relations at Biola University, working as an adjunct in 2010 and 2011 before working as full-time faculty since 2015. A graduate of Westmont Colleage and Northwestern University, he was known for his joyful disposition and the love he showed to each of his students. Simon died on Feb. 28, 2019 after a brief illness. A full obituary and tribute page can be found on the Chimes website. “He was a man after God’s heart, who lavishly loved those around him and whose communication was saturated in truth from Scripture coupled with a vast knowledge of history, literature and art. On a personal level, I knew him as one of my dearest friends, a confidant and someone who championed me in every aspect of my life. In these days ahead, I feel certain that Professor Simon would remind us that this is not goodbye.” -Carolyn Kim, professor of public relations and director of public relations programs

“He was a great man. He was my first ever journalism professor. He was a genuine and caring soul. RIP Professor Simon.” -Joseph Mistretta, junior journalism major

“I remember when he told me he had been praying for me even though it had been months since I last had his class or even seen him. I was taken aback because of the love and care he had always shown to me when I thought I was just another one of his students. I will dearly miss the moments spent with Professor Simon who always reminded me I was beloved. To my professor, advisor and friend, thank you.” -Brett Nakashima, junior public relations major

“He was a joyous man familiar with suffering who—as an act of the will, every day—looked at people as human souls. And he paid special attention to those he sensed were dealing with hardship or who thought too little of themselves. Bill Simon cared for his students in ways that are rare in American higher education, and even within Christian higher education. This was an educator who exhausted himself in care for his students. To say he will be sorely missed is to understate the enormous hole his passing leaves in our department and in this university.” -Michael Longinow, professor of journalism and faculty advisor to the Chimes

Nate Norell|Courtesy

FOREVER REMEMBERED: Alumnus Nate Norell [left] says Simon was his best mentor.

Rachel Stanley|Courtesy

UNCONDITIONAL LOVE: Simon often treated students to snacks and drinks at the Talon. “Professor Simon radiated love. To his students, his colleagues and friends. His spirit of encouragement, generosity and passion for the Lord was infectious and has now become his legacy that we can all carry on.” -Anna Sinclair, professor of public relations

“Professor Simon demonstrated how genuine love of thy neighbor ought to look in the journalism and public relations industry. As my very first journalism professor, he gave me the foundation of integrity and virtue that I build upon in my storytelling and seeking of truth. Professor Simon encapsulated authentic devotion and sincere kindness.”

“Earlier last week I found a paper of mine that Simon had looked over, and it was decorated in his annotations, which were less pure corrections, but instead encouragements and affirmations for me. Something he wrote on my paper that I have cherished forever is: ‘Be encouraged, take heart.’”

“Since Professor Simon’s passing, in the best way possible, I’ve come to realize that I was not his only ‘chosen’ or ‘significant’ person. He had a way of making every person he interacted with feel as if they were his absolute favorite, most beloved and cherished person. Professor Simon knew and loved people as individuals on a profound level.”

-Caitlin Gaines, senior journalism major

-Kelsey Carlson, senior public relations major

-Aubrey Dela Cruz, junior public relations major

“Knowing the kind of teacher he was and the amount of impact he had on his students, I feel confident that he was instrumental in helping shape a new generation of excellent and godly professionals.”

“You always made us smile, made us laugh. When we were weary and tired you treated the whole class to coffee. When we were distant in our faith you reminded us of the Lord’s goodness and grace. You encouraged us to seek the truth in every ethical way possible. You taught us how to excel in our trade without having to sacrifice our beliefs. Your immense love radiated onto the class full of students. You reached out to each of us individually, seeking a deep relationship. You taught us more than academics. You taught us to seek out pure joy that comes from the Lord.”

-Jessica Nissen, junior public relations major

-Hannah Dilanchyan, freshman journalism major

-Kendall Jarboe, junior journalism major

“Professor Simon’s love and joy was overflowing. He was the first journalism professor I had at Biola, and his warmth, love and kindness made me feel welcome and excited to begin again in a new place. He started every class by calling us ‘my beloved,’ and he truly meant it. God’s love shone through him with an intensity that few of us can replicate.”

Michael Kitada|Courtesy

BIGGEST HEART: Professor Michael Kitada [far left] admired his friend’s love for students.


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NEWS

MARCH 14, 2019

Yehju Park|THE CHIMES

BOBA FUNDRAISER: Brendan Sun brews homemade bubble tea and delivers them to financially support Student Missionary Union volunteers who fulfill God’s plan for the world.

Brewing a better fundraiser Boba for Missions uses tea to alleviate the steep cost of missions trips.

By Brittany Ung brittany.d.ung@biola.edu

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businessman, a missionary and a tea specialist walk into a fundraiser. This is not the start of a bad joke. Rather, it describes the life of junior business administration major Brendan Sun over the past few months. Through Boba for Missions, a fundraiser he started for student mission trips, Sun combines his love for business, missions and tea. Sun says his passion for tea was sparked last summer, when a friend brought him to try a wintermelon oolong tea at EYEfiniTEA, a hybrid eyewear store and tea shop in Morgan Hill, California. Disappointed by the quality of local tea shops, Sun began experimenting with homemade tea. With YouTube as his primary source of information, Sun used trial and error to guide his choices of fresh tea leaves and brewing temperatures. “I was researching and I ended up buying some tea online and trying different things. My parents probably thought I was kind of crazy,” Sun said. Upon returning to Biola last semester, Sun found that his friend, sophomore cinema and media arts major DJ Schaffer, had also discovered a love for tea over the summer. The two concocted drinks from Sun’s dorm room, sharing new recipes with friends and creating a small circle of tea enthusiasts. Schaffer says he sees a divine influence even in something as niche as a shared appreciation for tea.

“I think it was a God thing that we both happened to get into tea over the summer,” Schaffer said. “Like, that doesn’t just happen, you know. So to come back both of us, and see that develop from ‘Wow, we both like tea’ to ‘We could do something with this,’ we can impact not only Biola but also parts of the world.”

Yehju Park|THE CHIMES In preparation for his mission trip to Ensenada, Mexico through the Student Missionary Union, Sun began accepting donations in exchange for his tea—not yet a full-fledged fundraising initiative, but a forerunner to Boba for Missions. After the trip to Ensenada, Sun was inspired to empower other Biolans to engage in missions. One trip can cost as much as $4,000, and support letters and Chick-fil-A fundraisers can only go so far. According to Schaffer, finances remain the insurmountable barrier for many would-be missionaries.

The cool thing is getting people to think that you’re not just buying boba, but also getting them to think about missions.” - Brendan Sun, junior business administration major

“That’s one of the reasons that I couldn’t go [to Germany with the SMU team last summer], so I think if God could bless in that aspect so we could send out more people, I think that’d just be cool,” Schaffer said. Sun was inspired to launch Boba for Missions in part by Praxis Academy, an annual conference for business students. The event emphasized redemptive entrepreneurship—“redeeming the world through sacrifice”—which Sun describes as the intersection of his faith and fundraising efforts. “I love serving people and helping people,” Sun said. “Before my thoughts and my opinion on that was like, ‘Oh, I have to pick one. I can’t do both.’ So through Praxis, and then being able to do this Boba for Missions thing, I was like, ‘Wow, I can actually integrate business with missions and still hold true to both of them and do them both well.’” Now, Boba for Missions fulfills between 10 and 30 orders per night, with Sun and some volunteers working to deliver boba on Wednesdays through Fridays. Sun dedicates around 18 hours per week to the fundraiser, but he says his favorite part of Boba for Missions is being able to spread his passion for missions. Sun’s original goal was to use boba sales as a bridge to raise awareness and involvement in missions. He realized this goal through his conversations with customers. “The cool thing is getting people to think that you’re not just buying boba, but also getting them to think about missions. And like, what does missions mean to you? And what does it mean to us as Christians?” Sun said. Sun’s friend, sophomore sociology and Spanish major Liz Beth Herrera, was an early supporter of Boba for Missions. She says the fundraiser was uniquely

successful due to Sun’s vision of boba as a conversation starter, not just a sale. “When he would deliver, he would just be like, ‘How are you? How was your day?’ And that’s something that sometimes you don’t get. It’s good to have someone who cares and stuff,” Herrera said. “It’s not just about the drink but it’s also more about who’s buying the drink and kind of wanting to get to know the customer behind it, or getting to memorize their orders because he just knows them so well.” According to Sun, Boba for Missions gives students an opportunity to live missionally even before stepping off Biola’s campus. “Yeah, I’m at Biola and it’s a Christian university, but knowing that the things that I do, my day to day is that it’s actually a mission,” Sun said. “It’s fulfilling God’s plan for the world, which is to restore and to redeem us. And me, by me living faithfully and obedient, I’m also fulfilling God’s task of mission, on a daily basis.”

Yehju Park|THE CHIMES

TEA ENTHUSIAST: Tea opens and inspires conversations.


NEWS

MARCH 14, 2019

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A first look into Missions 2019 Here is what students can expect at the 90th Missions Conference next week. By Julianna Hernandez chimes.news.editor@biola.edu

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he countdown to the 90th annual Missions Conference has begun. Less than a week remains until long lines wrap around to the Bell Tower, until flags representing many nations and cultures fly through Chase Gym and until Housefires headlines the conference’s worship for the first time. In the months before Missions Conference comes in full-swing, its staff has been planning, creating and strategizing a new, unique experience for students aimed at empowering them to be ambassadors for Christ as citizens of the Kingdom. The event will feature five keynote speakers with diverse backgrounds that go with the arc of the theme: “Ambassador.” Lead pastor of Fellowship Monrovia Albert Tate will open and close the conference, speaking on the identity portion of ambassador and the practical application. The next speaker, Ben Stuart, is a pastor at Passion City Church in Washington D.C. who also led a large college ministry at Texas A&M. He was partly chosen due to his experience communicating with college students, according to Missions Conference director and senior business administration major Claire Pettit. Glenn Campbell, a missionary in South Africa, will speak about the “Go and Do” aspect of missions. Christian Mungai, a native Kenyan missionary to the United States, will bring a new perspective to missions and teach about responsibility to the global church. Margaret Yu is the executive director of Ethnic Focused Communities of Cru and has served more than 30 years in the organization, and she is the only female keynote speaker at this year’s conference. “Our speakers are kind of like going with the flow, kind of walking through our process of developing the theme,” Pettit said. “The first step is recognizing your identity as a citizen of heaven and then from that, how

Thecla Li|THE CHIMES

COUNTDOWN CUBES: Created this year, numbered blocks on the lawn outside the SUB count down the days to the conference start. that empowers us and equips us to go and share the gospel. And then the mobilization… What does that mean and how do we live. When you look at the schedule, the first day will be more identity focused and then we’ll kind of move into the empowerment process and the gospel proclamation.” The conference’s Interactions department coordinators, junior studio art major Jonah Ladesic and sophomore art major Maddie Miller, want to achieve a cohesive and sleek look for the conference in the decorations adorning campus, drawing a contrast to the crafty and homemade looks from previous years. According to Ladesic, there is a set color palette for the designs—green, blue, yellow, red and dark blue—that can be found on any marketing materials, signs and even social media. Additionally, an interactive design of QR codes

will be placed on the ground near session lines so attendees can scan them and watch videos while waiting. Along with designing the look of campus, Interactions also hosts its own events and will run its own Marketplace near Flour Fountain. The Global Lunch this year will be Moroccan-made by the executive chef of the Caf, Amin Boussaksou, who originates from Morocco. This year there will also be musical performances in the Marketplace. “In all past years, the Marketplace area has kind of been the hub of [the] conference, but I think this year with the live music that will be really fun,” Miller said. The Missionary Fair will have some incentives for visiting students this year. The Missions Conference marketing and hospitality department made passport booklets for the fair, so students can go around and get stamps

from each missionary organization to be entered into a raffle. To increase interactions, there will also be a root beer float night, painting session and attempts to break some world records. “The purpose of the missionary events is to connect missionaries and students and so how can we connect both very different groups,” Pettit said. “In the past, we’ve had the ice cream social, but the problem with that is people just get ice cream and go and there wasn’t really any socialization.” Overall, the Missions Conference staff emphasizes intentional involvement of the attendees. “I… encourage students to get engaged with all the different events that are going on and just pay attention to little details, like notice what’s different and what is changed. Just to engage, because there are a lot of opportunities and cool different events,” Miller said.

Student Missionary Union|Courtesy

biola.edu|Courtesy

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: [From left to right] Ben Stuart, Glenn Campbell, Albert Tate, Christian Mungai and Margaret Yu are preparing to speak next week on the theme of “Ambassador.”


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A&E

MARCH 14, 2019

Fever Joy calls the shots Avery Robitaille’s three-piece pop-rock band is quickly rising in the independent music scene.

Aaron George|Courtesy

MAKING WAVES: [Left to right] Sean Baker, Avery Robitaille and Kevin Holm have showcased their music at premiere venues such as South by Southwest in Austin, Texas.

By Pierce Singgih chimes.arts.editor@biola.edu

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any bands birthed from Biola often venture toward worship or contemporary Christian music industries. Alumni band For All Seasons is making a name for themselves among larger worship groups like Elevation Worship and Hillsong United, while student band Flight Deck throws it back to the early 2000s with Switchfoot and Relient K vibes. However, indie pop-rock band Fever Joy seeks a different outlet for their artistry, following in similar footsteps as Biola’s most notable alumni band Cold War Kids. Fever Joy’s journey into the mainstream music industry comes nearly three years after they first jammed under the Biola Bell Tower. Since then, they have put the independent music circuit on notice with their angsty, electronic sound and cerebral, reflective lyricism. Composed of senior public relations major and vocalist Avery Robitaille, guitarist Kevin Holm and drummer Sean Baker, the three-piece band has only released two singles, but are quickly forging their identity through clever marketing and branding. With over 200,000 Spotify streams combined between their songs “Shots” and “R.Y.W.B,” listeners are clearly catching a fever for their music. They even recently performed live at South by Southwest in Austin, Texas, one of the largest music and film festivals in the nation––a far cry from when they first met at The Night Owl cafe in Fullerton. Their music shreds with strong electric tones and foot-tapping beats as Robitaille’s low, commanding voice brings the entire band together. Their pop-rock sound was developed from their love of

both genres and was formed with help from The Colourist frontman Adam Castilla as producer and Grammy winner Joe LaPorta as sound engineer, who has worked with artists like David Bowie, The Weeknd and Imagine Dragons. “We really wanted to create an amalgamation of rock and pop and hit both of those intersections [to] infuse punk with more of a brighter pop sound,” Baker said. “That’s the theme and vision of Fever Joy, to have a binary thing, two opposite [sounds] juxtaposed together, so pop and rock seemed fitting.” Currently taking 18 credits and set to graduate this May, Robitaille often finds it difficult to balance her days as a student and nights as a rockstar. However, her passion for music, songwriting and performing live knows no bounds, making it all worth it in the end. “[When I’m performing live], I literally feel like I’m on cloud nine and in heaven at the same time,” Robitaille said. “There’s no

experience that compares to it.” Their March 8 performance at the OC Observatory in Santa Ana showcased how truly impressive they are live. Robitaille has natural stage presence, commanding the Observatory with energy and grit, while Holm and Baker allow her to shine with stoic “too-cool-for-school” attitudes, punctuating their angsty demeanor. Performing live allows them to vibe with an energetic audience, creating inexplicable, blissful connections. “I always think about it like when you’re listening to a really good song, you feel a certain type of way,” Baker said. “Anybody listening to a song will feel some kind of emotion or it’ll make you feel really good. When you’re playing live, it’s like that times a thousand. You’re creating those moments and it’s always an interactive experience if the crowd’s into it.” They expect their first EP to release later this fall with more pop-centric

songs. While they infuse both pop and rock into their music, their first two singles are heavier on the rock side, but Holm says the EP will feature songs that fall more on the pop side of the spectrum. Although Fever Joy’s pop-rock sound gets toes tapping and heads bobbing, they want their songs to do more than just entertain. Their first single “Shots” is fun and electric-heavy, but they also want the song to encourage women in abusive or toxic relationships to stand up for themselves. “We don’t want to just be good music, we want to have good messages as well,” Robitaille said. “I am writing all the time. I started out writing ever since I was little. I write based on personal experiences and that’s how ‘Shots’ came about. I know there’s a lot of girls who feel like they don’t have a say in their relationship, so this song is to tell them they can and should have a say and they should be confident in what they want and what they feel.”

Aaron George|Courtesy

ELECTRIC ANGST: Robitaille’s band shows off their “too-cool-for-school” attitude and careful messages through upbeat, energetic music.


A&E 7

MARCH 14, 2019

Holly Chang|Courtesy

Flight Deck soars ROCK ON: At the student showcase edition of The Eddy on Feb. 7, Flight Deck performed their signature alternative songs that entertain and reflect Christian themes.

The alternative rock band shares upcoming plans, including an experimental pop-rock EP. By Kayla Santos kayla.santos@biola.edu

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rom the 2018 release of their self-titled debut EP to their lively Eddy performance last month, Flight Deck has made a name for themselves around campus and beyond. Having played shows in Los Angeles and the Bay Area in the months following the EP’s release, the band—composed of former Biola student Ricky Brandon, sophomore business majors Bryce Mckee and Will Kizanis, Concordia University Irvine student Tyger Cortazar and Cal Poly Pomona student Jordan Harris—

seeks to expand its fanbase through its next EP, set to release this spring. Since October, the band has released four singles, two of which they performed at the Eddy on Feb. 7. Introducing the crowd to “Rewind” and “Headstrong,” Flight Deck shared their perspectives on dealing with the past and expressing opinions through their 2000s alternative rock style. After understanding he could not change the past, frontman Brandon wrote “Rewind” to embrace what shaped who he is today. “Headstrong,” on the other hand, encourages listeners to stay firm in their beliefs. “I wrote [“Headstrong”] to just encourage people to be strong in

Holly Chang|Courtesy

EXPERIMENTAL EP: Flight Deck’s upcoming EP will push their musical creativity.

Holly Chang|Courtesy

NEW SOUND: The alternative rock band will introduce lighter pop sounds into its music.

what they believe and not give up on something just because someone might not like you,” Brandon said. Knowing many Biolans favor indie pop, Kizanis did not expect the crowd to enjoy his band’s different style as much as they did at the Eddy. “Everyone there seemed to really get into it, which kind of surprised me if I’m being honest,” Kizanis said. After the Eddy performance, the band has projected its main focus to the upcoming EP, which aims to experiment more with its style of pop. In contrast to its somber and serious debut EP, the band strives for a more lighthearted sound in the follow-up. As the band draws influence from Imagine Dragons, Switchfoot and The Band CAMINO, listeners can expect upbeat pop vibes in their new songs. Still seeking to keep their rock foundation, the band members want to stretch their rock experiences to meet pop in hopes of expanding their fanbase. With Brandon and songwriting sidekick Adam Watts crafting most of their lyrics, the rest of the band collaborates with the instrumentation. “It’s definitely going to represent the first shift we’ve had musically, and I think it’s going to be

good for us in terms of getting a more diverse fangroup,” Kizanis said. Taking a break from their typical rock style, the guys will increase synth usage and pop melodies in their newer tracks while maintaining messages of joy in simplicity. “Let Time Fly,” an unreleased song off the upcoming EP, expresses the happiness found in putting phones down and enjoying time with family and friends. Although the band plans to release songs with messages as simple as hanging out with loved ones, its members still seek to incorporate underlying Christian themes. “Now that we’ve said what we wanted to say about the more serious topics, we want to tread light,” Brandon said. Ultimately, through this upcoming project the band aims to let listeners know they are not confined to one style of music. “I want listeners to take away that we’re not musicians that are limited to a style or genre, but we can do all kinds of stuff,” Brandon said. Following the springtime release of their latest effort, the band plans to focus on gaining exposure through playing shows throughout summer. Until then, fans of Flight Deck can excitedly await the four-to-five track EP.


OPINIONS

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MARCH 14, 2019

Thecla Li | THE CHIMES

WORTHWHILE WORK: Your time at Biola is very brief, so take this opportunity to seek areas to grow yourself, meet people outside your bubble and connect with your creator.

Getting involved is worth the sacrifice Before you graduate, take advantage of the many opportunities you have to grow yourself and impact Biola’s campus.

By Austin Green chimes.managing.editor@biola.edu

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n March 12, the United States Department of Justice brought criminal charges against 50 people involved in a scheme to get undeserving students from wealthy families into expensive, competitive colleges. Reaction to the news on social media brought swift condemnation, not only on those who cheated the college admissions system, but also the system itself. Many took the opportunity to voice their disapproval of traditional universities as a whole. And there are indeed some valid criticisms of the typical brick-andmortar university system in today’s culture, as laid out in this very section last semester. The far more deserving targets of outrage, though, are the families who skirted the rules so they could brag that their children had seemingly earned spots in prestigious universities. I do not personally know any of the parents who were indicted on Tuesday, nor any of their children, but simple logic would indicate that these students probably take their privileged college life for granted more than those who earned

the right to be there. Thankfully, I do not see this attitude too often among my friends at Biola. In fact, I often see the opposite—thankfulness at the ability to attend a college like this one and a desire to give back by becoming involved in different groups, jobs and leadership on campus. In other areas of this community, though, I see an increasing lack of that desire to become involved. I do not know why that is the case. There is certainly no lack of opportunities to serve. For instance, there were only nine total candidates in 13 possible Student Government Association election races. Not only was there only one ticket for president and vice president this year, the first time that has happened in recent memory, but no candidates ran for four of the seven on-campus senate seats. Nobody ran for the Block and Bluff senate positions, either, and only one ran for either of the two positions available to represent off-campus commuters. People eventually did apply for those positions after the elections. But the Student Missionary Union, meanwhile, had to extend the application deadline for its global missions trips because no male students had signed up at first.

I cannot imagine my Biola experience if it was just limited to school and friend groups.”

Want to get your opinions heard? Email chimes.opinions.editor@biola.edu for more information about how you can submit an article! So why this lack of involvement? Of course, there are plenty of valid reasons—overwhelming schoolwork, financial need and physical and mental health issues just to name a few—that limit students from being able to participate in campus leadership. Many others on this campus, though, are blessed with the means and ability to give back to Biola, even in a limited capacity. For whatever reason, some just refuse to. That breaks my heart, because they are missing out on so much. I cannot imagine my Biola experience if it was just limited to school and friend groups. Some of my most formative experiences during my college years have come through my involvement as an editor at the Chimes and as a SMU team member. I have met people I never would have met, and made friends I never would have made. I have been stretched, I have grown and I have encountered God’s love in ways I never would have otherwise. Often, it was a sacrifice. I have spent hours during school nights working in the Chimes office during my two years as an editor here. Even now, I am finishing this article during a production night for the print issue that you are now reading. If you are reading this piece online, I have poured plenty of time and stress into helping build the website you are reading it on. During my first semester as the

Chimes’ sports editor, I also applied to be on an all-guys SMU missions team over winter break of my sophomore year. Before long, I found myself adjusting to a stressful new job, dealing with a heavy load of schoolwork and sacrificing much of the free time I had left in order to train and fundraise for my trip. It was one of the most anxiety-riddled stretches of my life. Ultimately, though, it was so worthwhile. I learned new things about myself and the world around me, and left that season having been changed for the better. This is just one example. Over the past couple years, I have watched with pride as friends of mine have grown into leadership roles within SGA, SMU, Student Programming and Activities, Global Student Programs and Development, Student Orientation Services, Admissions, Residence Life, clubs and many other organizations in and around Biola. It was not always easy for them, either. A lot of times, the work caused us to go longer than we would like without seeing each other. These jobs are not always glamorous. They may not always look great on resumes or on social media. They require a sacrifice of what free time you have on your busy schedules. However, they give you an invaluable chance to grow as a leader and as a person as well as to learn more about yourself and, more importantly, your relationship with your creator.


OPINIONS 9

MARCH 14, 2019

Men should be able to hold pro-life views Excluding male voices from the abortion debate is immoral and fallacious.

Gettyimages | Courtesy

PRO-LIFE MEN: The pro-life movement cannot tolerate the hypocrisy of the pro-choice agenda. Men are just as part of the abortion debate as women. By Brian Brooks brian.d.brooksjr@biola.edu “

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o uterus, no opinion.” This sentence was uttered by “Friends” star Jennifer Aniston while playing a pregnant Rachel Green in the show. Although Green was speaking to her male friends who were giving her delivery advice, her words have since taken on a political tone in national discourse-–pro-choice activists use this line as a weapon to wield against men who have qualms about abortion. Curiously, the slogan is only used one way. No one to my knowledge as ever told a pro-choice man that his opinions are invalid because he lacks a uterus. Pro-choice men are lauded by abortion activists for “extending their privilege” to the sacred struggle against “unwanted pregnancy.” Presumably, women who have had hysterectomies have not been sidelined by pro-choice activists, so long as they support “a woman’s right to choose.” Furthermore, transgender women who have no biological ability to become pregnant are also not sidelined by the slogan’s derision. The only people expected to sit out of the discussion are pro-life men. Abortion activists insist that men—presumably half of the voting population—have no right to express an opinion on the most polarizing and morally significant issue today. We must, the implication is, leave that

subject to the individuals for whom the issue directly applies, as if that were the way a free society always comes to its conclusions. I believe I speak for the vast majority of men when I say that I have zero interest in controlling the bodies of fully autonomous human beings. The Atwoodian notion that pro-lifers secretly want every woman to consult some committee of men before making a medical decision is wild-eyed fiction. That was never the issue. The unavoidable question is whether a pregnant woman is responsible for more than just her body. If a human fetus is nothing more than a parasitic growth, of course it would be moral to remove it and that decision would be no one’s business but the woman’s and her doctor’s. If it is a life, however, the decision is of broader interest to society and even the government. Even the most ardent libertarian believes that government has the duty to protect life. If government does not have the responsibility to forbid murder, what responsibilities do they have left? Our culture has been divided on this subject for decades in complex ways. According to Gallup, 60 percent of Americans believe that abortion should be legal during the first trimester, implying that over one-third of all Americans believe that even the most basic abortive procedure should be banned in most cases. Support for abortion later in the pregnancy is stunningly low—28 percent of Americans support legalizing second-term

abortion and only 13 percent support third-term abortions, at which point the baby is viable outside of the womb. The percent of Americans who want to stop a woman from having a root canal or open heart surgery is presumably zero, yet for this question of human worth and its implications, the majority of Americans seem willing to impose their opinion by passing some form of abortion restriction.

We must be willing to philosophically entertain a variety of possibilities on this issue—to duke out in the court of public opinion this “clash of absolutes” basing our opinions in logic and moral courage, not identity. Yet, for many pro-choice activists, the conversation is not worth having. Worse, male pro-life activists are derided as sexist, biologically privileged individuals who, if they have any qualms about “a woman’s right to chose,” must be merely paving the way for a “Handmaid’s Tale”-esque hellscape. Since “Roe v Wade” was decided in 1973, 60 million babies have been legally aborted in the United States— babies of every race, class and gender. In order to reckon with this and other biomedical conflicts of conscience, we must have a candid societal conversation involving Americans of every race, class and gender. Perhaps we shall decide that unborn children really are soulless blobs of cells. Or, perhaps, we shall recognize them as human beings created in the image of God with entire futures ahead of them. I know how I answer that question, but we may never be able to resolve the issue as a nation if half the country is not allowed to speak to the other. The conversation concerning the beginnings of human life is not a gendered one. The issue is not whether a particular woman should have a particular medical decision made by the government and its bureaucrats— many of whom are male—but whether an unborn child should be pulled apart with forceps and sucked up by a vacuum. As new discoveries about the miracle of life are made on a daily basis and as we are being asked to answer new biomedical questions, the last thing we should do is invalidate half the consciences in America. The right to life is an important issue and it would be a terrible question to get wrong. At stake are the lives of our children and by extension, the soul of this country. But what do I know? I am just a man.

Lifenews.com | Courtesy

PRO-CHOICE HYPOCRISY: The fight to protect life is not a women’s issue–it is a social issue.


10

SPORTS

MARCH 14, 2019

Biola Tennis Center begins expansion The Eagles receive funding to add more courts and video streaming technology.

Marlena Lang|THE CHIMES

EXCAVATION BEGINS: Biola has started construction in Parking Lot C near the Grove to make room for two new tennis courts, offices, a new storage area and a projected team locker room.

By Andi Basista andrea.l.basista@biola.edu

T

he sounds of construction can be heard around south campus as the Biola Tennis Center is undergoing major renovations. An old parking lot next to the current tennis courts is being excavated to make room for two new courts, a new office and a storage area. If that was not enough for the program, the athletics department will also install a live streaming system for all of the courts. Some of the athletes are understandably excited about the additions. Sophomore tennis player Logan Blair says the renovations will be enjoyable for younger players in years to come. “I feel like this is really just going to put us a step above everyone else in the conference and really gives us the advantage and facilities we need to compete at the highest level and be at the top of our conference,” Blair said. Biola Athletics announced the construction on social media during spring break, thanking donors who had contributed to funding the project. Work got underway just one week later. “The tennis court expansion has been on Biola’s master plan for over a decade. It was included as part of the university’s last capital fundraising campaign and has had several large fundraising pushes over the past few years, which has helped make it a reality,” said assistant athletic director for communications and game management Neil Morgan via email.

Morgan says that the renovation is planned to be a two to three months long project. He also says having such a quick turnaround will allow for the tennis program to go into next semester able to use the new facility to its full potential. However, Neil Morgan says some of the add-ons will need more funding before coming to life. The clubhouse for the players and staff will be added in the future when funding becomes available, but the total cost for the renovations is not yet determined. Regardless, he believes upgrades that are in progress will allow the program to advance their training and draw in a larger crowd. “We will have better facilities for the players and recruiting becomes better and just makes Biola tennis a more player-friendly space,” Blair said. Even after the fresh makeover, Neil Morgan says there are no plans to put up a cover charge for tennis matche even after the renovations are complete. “Public use hours may eventually become more restrictive in an attempt to protect the university’s investment in the upgraded facility. Those conversations are still ongoing,” Morgan said via email. The Eagles’ coaching staff and athletes are looking forward to the potential that this expansion will bring to the team and the sport as it attempts to grow popularity on campus. “We are thrilled. We just feel completely blessed that it is happening. I think we are going to have one of the best college tennis facilities in the nation,” said head tennis coach David Goodman. Adding additional courts will also allow for the athletes to have more flexibility during practices and games. “I think it will allow us to get more

one-on-one practice with each other and also with the coaches. It will allow more groups to play at the same time. Sometimes recreational players come out when we are playing and this will give them the chance to use the courts with us,” said sophomore Sarah Morgan. Goodman remains thankful for what they have already been blessed with. “I think we already have a great facility, but this is going to put us over the top with having eight courts and then live streaming video on all the courts. It is pretty unique for Division II tennis,” Goodman said. Adding two new courts to the tennis center will allow for shorter matches. “We will be able to run more matches through quicker. We can play

at the same time as the guys and that always keeps the energy really high,” Sarah Morgan said. This is just the beginning of a series of future expansions within Biola Athletics, according to Neil Morgan. Investments on the south side of campus have no plans of stopping at the tennis courts. The master plan involves potential future funding for baseball and softball facility upgrades, a full-length track and a convocation/event center. “We are so excited to have new courts that allow for better practice and a more professional feel to our facilities. We are excited for the progress and effort it took to make this happen and the opportunities that will present itself because of this,” Blair said.

Marlena Lang | THE CHIMES

SERVING ACES: Sophomore Sarah Morgan serves the ball against Western New Mexico.


SPORTS 11

MARCH 14, 2019

Athletics merges with Student Development With the NCAA transition nearly over, a big internal change reunites two old co-workers.

By Austin Green chimes.managing.editor@biola.edu

B

y now, Bethany Miller can hopefully start to see light at the end of the tunnel. The former Eagles women’s basketball coach was promoted to athletic director in January 2016 and given an overarching task—to oversee Biola Athletics’ lengthy transition process into the NCAA. Just over three years later, the Eagles stand closer than ever to fully accomplishing that goal. NCAA officials made their annual visit to Biola’s campus on Tuesday as the 2018-19 academic year enters its home stretch. This year also marks the end of a mini-era. If all goes well, fall 2019 will mark the start of Biola’s full, unrestricted

membership into the NCAA. That means that for the first time since leaving the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics—and for the first time since my freshman year—the Eagles will be able to compete in national postseason play, as well as the PacWest championship tournament for men’s and women’s basketball. It will mark a major accomplishment for a deserving person. Miller is one of the most courteous, graceful people I have had the pleasure of meeting. She has been known to give grace to a certain student reporter when his phone deletes a 20-minute interview recording, or when a busy day of classes and meetings means they keep missing chances to talk. In all my interactions with her, she has remained extremely open and kind. Her personality draws a stark contrast to nearly everything I have heard and read about the leader of a certain other Southern California collegiate athletic program. “Fighting On” seems more difficult than ever these days for this longtime USC fan, whereas getting to know Miller makes it a privilege to flash some “Eags Up” hand wings. Now, Miller will take that same great

mentality into adjusting to a new boss. Biola Athletics will merge with Student Development, effective May 20, President Barry Corey announced in an internal email that was provided to the Chimes. The move coincides with the departure of longtime administrator Greg Vaughan, who has most recently served as special advisor to Corey for athletics and talent management. Vaughan has decades of experience and familiarity with Biola Athletics. Vice President of Student Development Andre Stephens has far less of that, although he is a Biola alumnus. Whatever obstacles this adjustment poses for Miller and Stephens, I suspect they will be able to overcome them fairly easily. According to Corey’s email, the two have a long history of working well together in admissions—which, ironically, is the department Vaughan used to oversee.

Stephens himself deserves plenty of praise. Student Development has made wonderful strides under his leadership in recent years, most notably its continued focus on student mental health. I do not present all this good news to make the case that Biola Athletics is perfect. Just less than two months ago, I used this space to share my concerns for the immediate future of men’s basketball, the school’s flagship program. Those concerns have not changed. Sometimes, though, it is worth taking a step back and looking at the big picture. But from where I stand, Biola Athletics is moving in a positive direction under phenomenal leadership as it prepares for an exciting new era. That gets me as hyped as I would be for an epic win over that school in Azusa. Well, almost.

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12

SPORTS

MARCH 14, 2019

Full Swing

Freshman Ines Diaz hits the ball during a match at home on Monday against Western New Mexico University. Diaz won her doubles match and was leading in her singles match, helping her team to a 4-1 win. Read full game coverage at chimesnewspaper.com.

Marlena Lang|THE CHIMES

NEWS

A&E

OPINIONS

SPORTS

WEB

Conference countdown As Missions Conference approaches, learn about new speakers and changes for this year. // 5

Pop-rock sizzles Pop-rock bands Fever Joy and Flight Deck are finding their audiences among both students and mainstream music fans. // 6, 7

Pro-life men persecuted In the abortion debate, pro-choice advocates unfairly discriminate against pro-life men, while welcoming allies that include pro-choice men. // 9

Renovations come to tennis The Biola Tennis Center is under construction, adding two new courts, offices and live video streaming equipment. // 10

Campus hosts speech and debate competition Biola recently hosted a homeschool debate tournament. Read more at chimesnewspaper.com/category/ news.

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The Chimes: March 14, 2019  

The Chimes: March 14, 2019  

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