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thrive VOLUME 1 • ISSUE 1

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AUG - OCT 2011

CHILLIWACK The Chilliwack

Progress

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ROLLER DERBY Derby dolls leading roller revival

CHILLIWACK’S BUSINESS OUTLOOK Local optimism despite global credit crunch

BACK TO SCHOOL HEALTH Prevent injuries by choosing the right back pack for your child HEALTH • WELLNESS • LIFESTYLE • FASHION • FOOD • FUN


2 • AUGUST 2011

THRIVE MAGAZINE

The Chilliwack

Progress

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The Chilliwack

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AUGUST 2011 • 3

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4 • AUGUST 2011

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The Evolution of Television

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THRIVE MAGAZINE

AUGUST 2011 • 5

W H AT ’ S I N S I D E PRO-BUSINESS OUTLOOK KEEPS THEM COMING

through the lens ON THE COVER

Thrive spoke with Chilliwack Mayor Sharon Gaetz to find out why there’s such a sense of optimism in the Chilliwack business community despite the ripples of a global credit crunch these days.

Nina Lehtonen, who goes by the roller derby moniker ‘Boot KickHer’, founded Voodoo Derby Dollz, Chilliwack’s all-women roller derby league, along with eight other women last year. Jenna Hauck photo.

Chilliwack’s Business Outlook p. 6 Chilliwack Mayor Sharon Gaetz tells us why business is growing in Chilliwack.

Celiac Disease

p. 9

A diagnosis means a lifetime of eliminating all gluten from your diet - how to cope.

Roller Derby Time

WINE FEST SET TO WOW FANS OF THE GRAPE

p. 12

A close look at a growing women’s sport in the Fraser Valley.

Garlic Festival

p. 14

Chilliwack’s first ever Garlic Festival is fast approaching Sept. 17,18, 2011.

Wine Festival

Organizers of the 3rd Annual Rainbow International Wine Festival will be ready to pop the corks on Saturday, Sept. 24 at the Best Western Rainbow Country Inn in Chilliwack.

p. 16

Corks are ready to be popped at the 3rd Annual Rainbow International Wine Festival

Back to school health

p. 20

GARLIC LOVERS WILL BE FLOCKING TO FANTASY FARMS

A look at backpacks and how to gear your child up properly to prevent injury.

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Gary and Lisa Moran, owners of Fantasy farms are gearing up for their first ever garlic festival September 17/18 in Chilliwack.

Publisher: Liz Lynch publisher@theprogress.com Managing Editor: Greg Knill editor@theprogress.com Advertising Manager: Kyle Williams kyle@theprogress.com Graphic Design & Layout: Tim Krulicki tim@theprogress.com

your shopping destination for 30 years is proudly growing with our community!

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Photography: Jenna Hauck, Justin Keitch THRIVE is published by: THE CHILLIWACK PROGRESS

W W W . T H E P R O G R E S S . C O M Distributed free households in Chilliwack, British Columbia. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited. The Publisher is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs.

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6 • AUGUST 2011

The Chilliwack

THRIVE MAGAZINE

Progress

C H I L L I WAC K

Pro-business outlook keeps them coming

By Jennifer Feinberg

Jenna Hauck photos

The pro-business billboard has been scanned by many motorists zooming by on Highway 1 over the years. It reads: “Chilliwack — where business grows. Phone the Mayor.” Ripples of a global credit crunch aren’t readily apparent in Chilliwack these days, where the future still looks fairly bright despite some ongoing challenges. Thrive spoke with Chilliwack Mayor Sharon Gaetz to find out why there’s such a sense of optimism afoot. “There are several reasons for it,” explains Chilliwack Mayor Sharon Gaetz. Chilliwack Economic Partners

Corporation, a separately incorporated entity from the municipality, has the City of Chilliwack as its sole shareholder, is part of it. “I don’t know of a single other community that has this type of entity working for them,” she says. Gaetz credited CEPCO staff and board for consistently using creativity and innovation to incubate business growth locally. Major employers have opted to settle in Chilliwack in recent years, like Stream International, Soprema and Kal Tire. It has successfully recruited a series of major business and industrial players to Chilliwack, which has

effectively kept it from becoming a bedroom community — where people leave the community to work, and then return to sleep. “We are not a bedroom community,” she says. “We’re pretty self contained.” Maintaining some of the lowest residential and business tax rates in the region makes a difference, too, Gaetz says. “That directly affects the decisions being made about which communities people and businesses are moving to.” Chilliwack has used a “pay-as-we-go” financing strategy for major projects, explaining why recent improvements have been paid for — up front without

financing. Recent examples include the construction of the new Chilliwack Cultural Centre as well as the newly rebuilt Cheam Centre. The Canada Education Park is a key part of the puzzle, which has attracted institutions from University of the Fraser Valley, to the RCMP and Canada Border Services. But the ongoing challenge is always business retention as well as recruitment, since competition can be stiff from other communities trying to bring in commercial owners and tenants. Any city striving to be a complete community with ample job


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opportunities, well-developed recreational facilities and other amenities, trying to stay relatively compact, and fighting off sprawl, stands to do well. Only a relatively small percentage of Chilliwack’s residents commute to another city to work or shop, according to numbers from the Fraser Valley Regional District, at 13 per cent. With an estimated 900 farms in the Chilliwack area, there’s a stable base of employment. Other communities that are resource-dependent don’t fare as well. For the month of July 2011, Chilliwack’s unemployment rate dipped

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to 4.5 per cent, which is below that of communities like Prince George which was at 6.6 per cent, or Vernon at 9.9 per cent, according the Statistics Canada. Next comes a steely-eyed focus on Chilliwack’s downtown core. The last major report done on the downtown predicted it would take 20 to 30 years for Chilliwackians to see key changes. “We decided we couldn’t wait that long,” said Gaetz. “We’re working hard to bring forward some bold directions for downtown.”

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8 • AUGUST 2011

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The summer vacation is nearly over and it is time to start thinking about school. Going back to school can be stressful, but Fraser Valley Regional Library (FVRL) can help ease the transition with free quality programs and services. The library is your destination for homework success! Got homework and need help? “Our experienced and knowledgeable staff can help students quickly find the resources they need to be successful this school year,” says Rita Penco, director of client services at FVRL. “Staff can assist in finding the answers to tough homework questions, sourcing trusted print and digital information, researching essays and writing bibliographies.” Like to do your homework in your pyjamas? Your FVRL card gives you free 24/7 access to 34 teacherapproved online databases for all grade levels – get a list of suggested databases at www.fvrl.ca/learn/ find_it.htm. Download audio and eBooks, including literacy classics, 24/7 to your computer or portable device from Ebsco eAudiobooks, BC’s Library to Go, Scholastic BookFlix and TumbleBook and TumbleReadable Library. Need tutoring help? Students in grades 6 through 12 can access “live” online tutoring in the subjects of math, science and social studies through the FVRL website. The free service, provided by Tutor World BC, utilizes both a text and voice chat system. Homework tutors are available online Sunday through Thursday from 6-9 p.m. FVRL offers more than just study and tutoring space! Check e-mail, surf the

internet or type up a research paper, FVRL offers free internet and word processing station access. Those with laptops can connect to free Wi-Fi at most locations. Photocopy and print services are available for a nominal fee. Don’t forget to check out FVRL’s 1.3 million item collection of print titles, DVDs, CDs and more! You can borrow up to 60 items on your account at any time and there are no fines on children’s and young adult materials when borrowed on a children’s card. FVRL offers free educational and literacy programs for all ages and stages – programs vary by location, see the website or fall program guide for listings. Remember, library membership is free! If you don’t already have an FVRL card, now is the time to stop by with your identification and sign up. For more information on these or other resources, please visit “http://www. fvrl.ca” www.fvrl.ca or your nearest FVRL library. About Fraser Valley Regional Library Fraser Valley Regional Library is the largest public library system in British Columbia, with 24 community libraries serving over 680,000 people in its service area. Established in 1930, FVRL is funded through taxes raised in the community it serves, plus a Government of BC operating grant. The governing board consists of elected officials representing 15 member municipalities and regional districts. With its mission “to connect people to the world of information and ideas,” FVRL plays a prominent role in the communities throughout the Fraser Valley.


The Chilliwack

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THRIVE MAGAZINE

AUGUST 2011 • 9

C E L I AC D I S E AS E

When ‘daily bread’ isn’t an option

by Jessica Peters, Black Press

Celiac disease is a medical condition in which the absorptive surface of the small intestine is damaged by a substance called gluten. This results in an inability of the body to absorb nutrients: protein, fat, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals, which are necessary for good health. A diagnosis means a lifetime of eliminating all gluten from your diet.

Whole grains are an essential part of the typical Canadian diet, taking prominence not only in the Canada Food Guide, but on grocery store shelves and in most popular dishes. But for a growing number of Canadians, many whole grains are strictly off-limits due to celiac disease or wheat sensitivity. Since the only way to ‘outsmart’ celiac disease is to completely avoid wheat, barley, rye and triticale, a diagnosis means a lifetime without items like take-out pizza, mom’s homemade lasagne, or a simple hamburger. And while that may have seemed limiting a decade ago, manufacturers are quickly coming in line with this growing trend. Gluten-free products are becoming more readily available, so choices are becoming more diverse. You can now find glutenfree cake mixes, breads, cereals and pastas in most grocery stores, as well as all-purpose gluten free flour mixes to substitute into your old, beloved recipes. While the number of undiagnosed celiacs remains unknown, the Canadian Celiac Association estimates

that one in 133 Canadians are affected by celiac disease. And children are certainly not immune to the trend. So, what do you make for a child that has celiac disease? Packing a celiac friendly lunchbox is getting easier every day. Here’s a step-by-step guide to help you through the process: 1). Educate your family, close friends and teachers. Having a support system that understands your child’s dietary restrictions is not only helpful when planning and cooking meals, but can help avoid painful – and dangerous – mistakes in the kitchen. Get your child involved in the meal planning process, and provide written information about celiac for your child’s teacher. 2). Remember the Canada Food Guide. Like all children your child needs fruits, vegetables, proteins, dairy products and safe grains more than they need sugar, fat and corn syrup. Start with a healthy protein. Most local delis and all grocery stores carry lunch meats you can trust, from brands like Freybe’s and Grimm’s. Pepperoni strips and cheese, deviled

eggs, black bean salsa and chips, gluten-free pasta salads and gluten free protein bars are all good options. If your child enjoys gluten-free bread, remember to keep peanut butter and jam free of wheat. Invest in a couple of small freezer packs to keep those foods fresh. 3). If you don’t want your child to be tempted to dip into their friends’ lunch boxes, pack a lunch full of healthy, complex carbs. Fresh fruits and veggies are one way to keep munchies at bay. But get creative and scour store shelves for crunchy, satisfying “treats” like Mary’s Organic Crackers, Glutino Pretzels (available at Sardis Health Foods) or flavoured brown rice snaps. 4). Everyone loves cookies and other sweet treats, and your child is probably no exception. Try making rice crispy bars with gluten-free cereals, easily whip up a batch of Bob’s Red Mill Gluten-Free Brownies, or substitute gluten-free flours in your regular baking recipes, such as banana bread. Tips: Remember that rule of shopping around the edge of the grocery store for meats, cheeses, dairy, soy

and produce, and you’ll already be bringing home more gluten free food. Get to know other people with celiac or gluten intolerance, and share cooking and shopping tips with each other frequently. Don’t let things get boring. Many ethnic foods are naturally gluten free, such as Indian and Thai dishes. For the more adventurous eater, it’s a good way to spice up a limited diet. Gluten-Free lunchbox checklist: A list of your child’s favorite gluten-free lunch foods A lunchbox your child likes - with a thermos and ice packs to keep foods safe! • Gluten-free deli meats, cheeses and yogurt • Good quality, preferably whole grain gluten-free sandwich bread • Fresh fruits and vegetables • Gluten-free left-overs • Gluten-free crackers and corn chips • Gluten-free condiments including mayonnaise, mustard and ketchup • Several packable, lidded 4 ounce containers


10 • AUGUST 2011

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The Chilliwack

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AUGUST 2011 • 11

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12 • AUGUST 2011

THRIVE MAGAZINE

The Chilliwack

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R O L L E R D E R BY

Derby Dollz leading roller revival By Eric Welsh

“Roller derby can be fast and it’s definitely physical” Her name is Nina Lehtonen and she is a dog groomer. From nine to five, she makes our canine friends look good at her inhome salon in Abbotsford, cutely called Fetching Fur. She is polite and engaging with her customers, gentle and caring with the dogs. Watching her shave a sheepdog or trim a terrier, one would never suspect that by night she goes by the name Boot Kick-Her, training fresh meat (rookies) with the Chilliwack-based Voodoo Derby Dollz. Get her inside the Landing Sports Centre with women to coach and her true personality starts to shine through. She is loud, odd and quirky and she is in her element. She’s got 25-plus students and one goal, give them the skills and attitude they need to not just survive, but thrive in the rough and tumble world of roller derby. “I’m kind of like a roller derby pusher, infecting everybody,” she laughs. “It’s

great to see new recruits get in here and change, going from sheltered and closed females to being open and loud and excited. It is infectious, and as soon as you talk to someone about roller derby they go on and on and on and on and on.” Lehtonen’s roller derby history can be traced back four years, to the Taboo Naughty but Nice Show in Vancouver. The Vancouver-based Terminal City Rollergirls were recruiting fresh meat at their booth. “It seemed like something for me and I was excited,” Lehtonen recalls. “I went out and got my first pair of roller skates and for months I skated in my living room. There was only six feet of space, so I skated one way, turned around and skated the other way. I was just so excited to get started.” Like so many women, Lehtonen was looking for something to call her own. “We’re always taking care of someone else, whether it’s kids or

Jenna Hauck photos

the household or our husbands and jobs,” she explained. “This is one thing where we can get away from everyday life, focus on ourselves and have something other than getting up, making breakfast, doing laundry and going to bed.” Like most fresh meat, Lehtonen was timid at first. But her natural tomboyish nature made for a quick transition. Society expects you to behave and we’ve (women) been trained to do girly things, but I’ve always liked hunting, fishing and getting dirty,” she says with a smile. “So right away, I had 25 sisters and it strengthened my self esteem. I wasn’t the most popular kid in school. I was beaten, tortured, teased and told I was good for nothing. Roller derby made me feel good about myself.” When Lehtonen started coaching, it was in part because she wanted to witness that same growth in other women.

“I smirked when Donna (now known as Poison Allie) joined because she’s prim and proper and goes to church and seems very nice on the outside,” Lehtonen laughs. “All of a sudden she was getting really aggressive in practice. And now, she’s in there and you can see on her face that she’s going to get you.” Roller derby can be fast and it’s definitely physical. With positions like ‘blockers’ and ‘jammers,’ you know there’s going to be contact as packs of women circle a relatively small track. But Lehtonen bristles when her sport is called violent. “Roller derby has changed since 2002 and it’s not your mama’s roller derby from back in the day,” she says. “There’s no fighting. No kicking the ankles. No punches or elbows. It’s been fine-tuned to be an authentic and athletic women’s sport.” Lehtonen bristles even more at the perception that roller derby is little


The Chilliwack

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THRIVE MAGAZINE

8-11LG D

more than ‘fishnets, short skirts and sluts on skates.’ “We do have a dress code because we want to remove that stigmitism,” she said. “We want to look like a sports team and we’re saving up for uniforms. The girls can still add their flair, but we want to be sexy but not whorish.” Lehtonen and eight other women founded the Voodoo Derby Dollz last year. Their first public event is Saturday, Oct. 1 at 7 p.m. at the Landing Sports Centre, and Lehtonen plans on having a team competing full time against other associations next spring. The long term goal is to have four teams (they currently have enough members for three). “We want to be inclusive, and no matter what your skill level or physical level, I’m going to teach you to play,” she promises. “I want women who are going to be excited to come to practice, get their butts kicked by me and feel good going home afterwards. And I think Chilliwack can handle it.” Get Voodoo Doll info online at www.voodooderbydollz.com or email voodooderbydollz@gmail.com. They also have a Facebook fan page. Learn the rules of the sport online www.wftda.com.

AUGUST 2011 • 13

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14 • AUGUST 2011

The Chilliwack

THRIVE MAGAZINE

Progress

GAR LIC

Garlic lovers will be flocking to Fantasy Farms By Jennifer Feinberg

They’re doing it for the sheer love of garlic. The folks at Fantasy Farms are gearing up for their first ever garlic festival Sept. 1718 in Chilliwack. Gary and Lisa Moran, owners of Fantasy Farms are aiming high, right out of the gate. They’re out to make Chilliwack the garlic capital of B.C. with the launch of the festival — in much the same way the town of Gilroy has become in California. “We honestly don’t know where this garlic festival is going to go, but we promise it will be a celebration of all things garlic,” Gary says. The new festival is going to add another layer of excitement to offer visitors who search out their Gibson Road farm for the infamous

Reapers Haunted Attraction, the Maze of Terror, and their kid-friendly pumpkin patch. “We planted about 18 varieties that range from mild

Get ready for the First Annual Chilliwack Garlic Festival at Fantasy Farms, September 17-18 to oh-my-God,” says Gary. The Morans truly love the “stinking rose,” which is what the ancient Romans called garlic.

“Are you kidding? Lisa would put garlic on my corn flakes,” he jokes. “She makes her own Caesar dressing with garlic that is just fantastic.” The buzz around this tasty new event is growing already. Garlic is known for health benefits like lowering blood pressure and blood thinning. It has gained a reputation as a super-food, natural antibiotic, antifungal, and antiviral. Eventually the business plan at Fantasy Farms will include the sale of garlic starts, for other garlic growers, Moran says. Some of the garlic varieties they planted the first year have tantalizing names: Thai, Russian Elephant, Korean Spicy, or Yugoslavian. The best of those will go into the greenhouse for next year’s

Justin Keitch photos

crop. The Morans have been building their entire multifaceted business for years, around the experience-based concept of agri-tourism. Thousands of visitors make the trek to the farm every year to see how things are grown, and to be entertained in the process. “We are one of the few in the region, and even the province, to become 100 per cent dedicated to agri-tourism,” Moran notes. Also at the festival, kids will get a kick of out the family fun zone, or riding on Petey’s Pumpkin express to visit this year’s patch on a little train where they can see the pumpkins while they’re still on the vine. Although their garlic crop will be harvested by the time the event opens, there will be several garlic-themed activities going on. Foodies and garlic lovers will be tasting samples, watching

demonstrations, and perusing a gaggle of garlic-related products. A celebrity chef challenge is in the works, along with a contest for the best recipe. Mayor Sharon Gaetz will figure prominently as the honourary Mayor of All Things Garlic, and Steve “Elvis” Elliott will be entertaining crowds along with Patsy Bartholemew as Patsy Cline. There will be a section for vendors and artisans, too. “We put the word out to garlic growers from the four corners of B.C. to bring their very best to dazzle your senses,” he says. There’s even a community service angle, with partial proceeds from the event going to the Chilliwack School Garden program, which teaches children the joy of gardening. Get ready for the First Annual Chilliwack Garlic Festival at Fantasy Farms, September 17-18. For more call 604-7928572 or www.garlicfestival.ca or info@garlicfestival.ca


The Chilliwack

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THRIVE MAGAZINE

AUGUST 2011 • 15

ADVERTORIAL

Do You Have Unwanted Hair?

Janine Desloges, CCE, CPE

While looking for a solution, many are Ànding that their problems are not solved but only postponed. Laser hair removal, the newest fad, will not deliver permanently beautiful hair free skin. In fact, recent studies show it could actually result in an accelerated hair growth and/or pigment discoloration.

After spending two years and $1800 on laser hair removal treatments and still suϝering from unwanted hair in the same spots, Angela MacKenzie turned to Jade Electrolysis because of their unheard of guarantee which promises permanent results. “I have Ànally had permanent hair removal and, most importantly, I trust Jade Electrolysis completely,” says Angela. Invented in 1869, Electrolysis has stood the test of time as the only permanent solution. As with many things, with time and technology, it·s only improved. By using computerized machines and Ziess microscopes, skilled Electrologists are able to work more accurately to deliver permanent results in less time with a one-time investment.

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“After spending two years and $1800 on laser hair removal treatments and still suϝering from unwanted hair in the same spots, Angela MacKenzie turned to Jade Electrolysis because of their unheard of guarantee*”

Although Electrolysis is the only treatment that can promise permanent results, Jennifer Desloges, found of Jade Electrolysis, explains that success is also contingent on the skill of the Electrologist. To help us understand why, she explained a few basics. Electrolysis is the procedure of inserting a very Àne needle into the hair follicle (a pre-existing hole) so you should not feel the needle poke or break the skin. Once inserted, the needle delivers a controlled current to “kill” the

Tony Thurston - CPE

What about the pain? Desloges has also been using local anesthetic to block pain, making treatments pain-free. She was instrumental in having the use of anesthetic by electrologists approved by Health Canada in 1998.

Jennifer has been on both sides of the table, having gotten into the industry because of a medical condition that had caused male type facial and body hair. “I know how people feel and I want to help” says Desloges. “We started franchising in 2010 and I·m very excited about that. While Jennifer works out of her Kitsiliano location, Janine Desloges, Jennifer·s daughter and Tony Thurston, her brother will be operating a franchise location at #1037408 Vedder Rd. Trained by Jennifer in 1998 and working alongside her for many years, Janine and Tony bring great passion and skill while delivering permanent hair removal...guaranteed. Learn more about electrolysis and Jade Electrolysis’s free consultation plus sample treatment for new clients at www.hairfreeforlife.com. Contact the Chilliwack location at 604.846.5566 and the Vancouver location at 604.694.1332. *restrictions apply.

founder of Jade Electrolysis, has been educating the public on hair removal and training electrologists since 1996. She gives us some tips to help us know what to look for... * You should NOT feel the needle being inserted * You should NOT feel the hair being pulled out * Your Electrologist should dispose of needles and gloves and use hospital grade sterilization techniques * Jennifer formerly practiced Electrolysis in Chilliwack from 1990 until 2000


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WI N E

Wine fest set to wow fans of the grape It’s the perfect opportunity to sample and savour wines and spirits from around the world. Organizers of the 3rd Annual Rainbow International Wine Festival will be ready to pop the corks on Saturday, Sept. 24 at the Best Western Rainbow Country Inn in Chilliwack. “We will be sampling more than 90 wines,” says Deanna Johnston, manager of the liquor store at the BWRCI. Wine popularity has been growing exponentially and with so many new vineyards being planted, everyone is becoming a just a little more wine savvy, she says. On the incredible tasting list this year are some some crisp sauvignon blancs from New Zealand, rich amarone and Chianti from Italy, some amazing B.C. wines, fresh German rieslings, and

fruit-forward cabernet sauvignon from California. Three ice sculptures will be filled with ice wines and champagne to try. Some people may have the perception that concentrated ice wines will be too sweet or cloying. But Johnston suggests it’s more of an intense flavour explosion. “The flavour just pops when it hits your mouth,” she says. For fans of the suds, some international and local beer will be on tap. A special addition this year is a scotch table, with a variety of single malts and blended scotches. As an oenophile with a penchant for Italian wines herself, Johnston is looking forward to sampling the amarone wines. It’s a little known fact that “amarone” actually describes a

process — not a grape. “They hang the grapes, where they’re dried naturally on trays,” she says. “They leave them there until the fruit is mostly dehydrated. When it hits your tongue, it’s like velvet. It’s fantastic.” Many will want to try one of the three different Eco wines from Chile. “The winemaker (of the Eco Balance series) created one of the most bio dynamic areas on earth, with an organic farm and vineyards.” So here’s what you do. Buy your tickets and show up. Feel good just knowing that partial proceeds from the night are going to Rotary International’s End Polio Now campaign. When you get to the Best Western, grab a tasting booklet and throughout the evening make

ADVANTAGE O’CONNOR EVERYTHING WE DO IS DRIVEN BY YOU! O’CONNOR TOWING is ready to serve you any time of day or night. We provide recovery service and roadside assistance 24/7. We can tow your vehicle to our shop, your home or anywhere you choose. Our drivers know how to get the job done right.

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O’Connor’s Towing fleet consists of 10 units: 2 3-Ton, 2 1-Ton, 2 Flatdeck/Tilt, 1 4x4 Off Road Recovery Unit, 1 Tandem Axle for hauling bobcats, skid steers, mammoth style equipment and 1 BCAA Service Vehicle for unlocks, battery boosts and mobile sales unit. We supply towing for class A-C motorhomes and all other towing requirements.

44840 Yale West, Chilliwack | 604.792.3170 COLLISION, TOWING & GLASS

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8/11 O18

“EVERYTHING WE DO IS DRIVEN BY YOU”

By Jennifer Feinberg

Making Customers for Life.

“The best advice I ever got was to call Musicworx” There are so many details to take care of when you’re setting up a new restaurant. Atmosphere and ambiance are an important part of the recipe for success. Jim and the Musicworx team were a huge help to me and my staff in the design and installation of our audio/video systems at both Frankies Italian Kitchen & Bar and the Rinkside Bar & Grill at Prospera Centre. Jim’s advice is well considered and their follow-up service is exceptional. He’s here at a moment’s notice if we’ve had a power outage or something needs adjusting. It feels like a partnership and that’s how I like to do business. I wouldn’t shop anywhere else for electronics!

- Raffaele Aielo - Tiara Food & Beverage Ltd.

MUSICWORX AUDIO VIDEO U N L I M I T E D

Making Customers for Life

8755 Young Road OPPOSITE VALLEY TOYOTA 604-795-6655 Tuesday - Saturday • 10am - 6pm • www.musicworx.ca

8/11t MW23


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AUGUST 2011 • 17

WI N E

Justin Keitch photo

notes on your favourite wines, or most take advantage of the amazing local unique vintages sampled. bounty. There will be several tables set up From their West Coast smoked around the room, and the wines range salmon pinwheels to Derbyshire from about $10 to stilton and bacon about $45. cheesecakes, taste “Our Belgium It’s all about sipping, buds will be piqued, and savouring he promises. Tender milk chocolate the moment, and AAA Canadian enjoying the sounds tenderloin wrapped of a live band, the around asparagus fountain will be Jazz Banditz. spears will be on offer But it’s also about along with a range of flowing for those scrumptious flavours hors d’oeuvres for cooked up by Chef those with a sweet who wish to sample Bill Schildpatt. Chef tooth as well. has been preparing “Our Belgium milk the menu in earnest, chocolate fountain our Pinot Noir with a selection of hot will be flowing for and cold appetizers those who wish to selections” to go with the wines, sample our Pinot Noir and a focus on local. selections,” he says. “This year’s wine festival is going to The doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the be our best to date,” the chef says. wine fest starts at 7 p.m. on Sept. 24. An array of tasty cheeses, both local Tickets are $50 at the Best Western and imported, and as many local Rainbow Country Inn Chilliwack. veggies and fruits as they can display, 43971 Industrial Way, 604-795-3828 for the aesthetics as well as reducing or www.rainbowcountryinn.com everyone’s carbon footprint, and to

ROCOCO HOME DECOR

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At the Vedder Village Centre 16-5275 Vedder Rd., Chilliwack 604-858-3452 www.rococohomedecor.com 8/11 R19


18 • AUGUST 2011

RECIPES

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here’s something wonderfully satisfying about the rich, hearty nature of fresh vegetables that lends them star status on the plate. The following two end-of-summer recipes put the spotlight on two stellar vegetables

I grew in my garden for the first time this season: beets and yellow zucchini. Beets were always front and centre in the ruby-red borsht soup I often had as a kid. It was a part of the cuisine my Russian-Polish relatives brought with

Yellow or golden zucchini are just as appealing as their green cousins, but both are extremely versatile players of the summer squash family. Barbecued, fried, sautéed, steamed or baked there are so many tasty options to explore with a range of texture options. Here we’re blending a delicious soup that can be served hot on a cool, fall day, or chill it for a refreshing treat on a warm night. • 1 tbsp olive oil • 2 minced shallots • 3 cloves garlic • 2 lbs. yellow or green zucchini • pinch of madras curry powder • 3 c. veg or chicken stock • handful of mint or cilantro • lemon juice and zest • salt and pepper to taste • 1/2 c. table cream Sauté the shallots and garlic until soft, add zucchini sliced in coins, herbs and spices, and continue until just cooked. Add spices and lemon juice, mix, and then add stock and bring heat up to just before boiling, and then simmer for half an hour. When mixture cools, purée in a food processor, blender or in the pot with an immersion blender. The cream should be added slowly at the end of the cooking process, and just before serving.

LOCATED

IN

GARRISON CROSSING

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them to remind them of home when they came to this country at the beginning of the last century. But I’m going to take the beets in a slightly different direction here, presenting them in a fresh salad that could easily be served as a side dish,

• 3 beets • 1 sweet potato • 1/2 red onion • 4 oz herbed goat cheese • handful sunflower seeds • pancetta (optional) • fresh tarragon or dill sprigs Boil the beets and sweet potato separately in their skins, cool and then peel. Slice into bite-sized pieces. Shave slices from half the red onion. Toss all veg into a bowl and add cheese chunks, seeds, fresh herbs, and fried, crumbled pancetta. Top with a light dressing of extra virgin olive oil and your favourite vinegar, salt, pepper, tarragon and a bit of honey.

G R E AT L O C AT I O N • L O T S O F PA R K I N G TA S T I N G S • F R I E N D LY S TA F F G R E AT S E L E C T I O N • G R E AT S E R V I C E S E N I O R S D I S C O U N T S E V E R Y D AY FREE ICE WITH PURCHASE

Wine & Liquor M E R C H A N T S G A R R I S O N

C R O S S I N G

KEITH WILSON & VEDDER • 604.846.2200

By Jennifer Feinberg

or as the main event on a warm summer night. I had something similar in Whistler this year and it was something about bringing together the brightly coloured beets with a zingy cheese taste, and a nutty crunch that just made it a winner.

Sweet Beet Salad

GARRISON

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Cream of Zucchini Soup

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RECIPES

AUGUST 2011 • 19

15% OFF

By Jessica Peters

Gluten-Free Banana Bread

YOUR PURCHASE OF $10 OR MORE

This is an easily converted recipe that bakes up so true to regular banana bread, your fussiest eaters won’t even know it’s good for them. Have all ingredients at room temperature, except for bananas. Once bananas are just overripe, store them in the freezer for baking day. Take them out an hour before you need them, and you’ll be adding much needed moisture to your bread. Note: While xantham gum is very pricey, it goes a very long way, adding elasticity to gluten free flours. Make sure all ingredients and baking tools are free of flour. Sift together, then set aside: 1 3/4 cups Bob’s Red Mill All Purpose Baking Flour 1 1/2 tsp Bob’s Red Mill xanthan gum 2 1/4 tsp baking powder 1/2 tsp salt Blend together until creamy: 1/3 cup shortening 2/3 cup sugar 3/4 tsp grated lemon or orange grind Into the shortening, blend: 2 small mashed bananas 1 or 2 beaten eggs or egg replacement Add your sifted flours into the batter, little by little. Add a handful of walnuts, apricots or chocolate chips to the batter before placing into buttered cake pan. Alternatively, sprinkle with sweet spices such as cinnamon and nutmeg. Bake at 350 degrees, until top of bread browns and you can ‘tap’ the top of the loaf.

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20 • AUGUST 2011

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BAC K TO S C H O O L

Backpack shopping need not be a pain

Whether it sports a cartoon superhero like Batman, pop star Miley Cyrus or is covered in band logo patches, a backpack can be the ultimate way for students to express their unique personality. While style is surely detrimental to little tykes, tweens and teens, safety should also play a deciding factor in the purchase of a brand new backpack. When it comes to backpack safety, most people tend to think about injuries caused by a heavy backpack or one worn improperly. However, there are other dangers associated with backpacks and caution should be used. Backpacks come in all shapes and sizes and can be a handy tool for students or adults. When worn correctly, with weight evenly distributed across the back and shoulders, backpacks can be safer and more effective than using a purse or briefcase. But many people wear overly loaded backpacks slung over one shoulder, which can pose problems with posture and lead to

back issues. In addition to the physical strain backpacks can cause, they can be a danger in other ways. Many people fail to recognize how much space

by the pack can cause injuries. Also, backpacks taken off and placed in bus aisles can be a tripping hazard. Students also can be injured if a heavy pack falls on them. Children

“Choose a lightweight backpack. Canvas backpacks are generally lighter in weight than leather backpacks” a backpack can take up. Entering the tight quarters of a school bus or commuting on a train or bus means a bulky backpack can knock into other people. If that backpack is full of heavy, cumbersome books or even a laptop computer, an inadvertent bump

tucking backpacks into lockers or classroom cubbies may find that they slide out and hit another classmate. Backpacks change the way individuals walk. Because the person is carrying around extra weight, he or she may lose balance or trip and fall,

especially when going down steps. To avoid these secondary hazards from backpacks, consider these tips. • Don’t overload a backpack. Carry only what is necessary. If too many books are the issue, parents should talk to the school administrators and teachers to reach a happy medium regarding textbook usage. • When on the bus, safely store the backpack on a lap or under the seat. Be sure straps or the pack itself is not extending into the aisle. • Avoid rolling backpacks, which can be difficult to roll. Some schools ban these styles because of tripping hazards. • Recognize how much space the backpack takes up when worn. Be conscious of others when turning around or entering a confined space. • Hold on to stair rails and do not run with a heavy backpack to help avoid slips and falls. • Choose a lightweight backpack. Canvas backpacks are generally lighter in weight than leather backpacks. Do not add extra weight unnecessarily.


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AUGUST 2011 • 21

BAC K TO S C H O O L Practical solutions to organize your child by Ranka Burzan Clean your room! Your child might tune you out because you’re nagging him or her again or know that, if you get frustrated enough, you’ll clean the room yourself. Nobody wins this one. Your child needs your help and guidance. More likely your child doesn’t have the skills, enough space, shelves or containers to organize his room. Also routines are a great way to get your kids to keep their rooms clean. At the beginning of the school year, have a family meeting and assign a chore for each of your children. Make sure this will include morning routine, homework, help with a dinner and bedtime routine. Kids thrive on

predictability, it gives them security knowing what comes next. Talk to your child and choose a date to organize and clean his or her room. In order to commit, persuade your child to mark it on the calendar. This is a perfect opportunity to spend quality time with your child, teach him a skill and accomplish something. • Pull everything out of his or her closet. Sort the items that belong together: clothes, shoes, books and toys. • Ask him or her to try on the clothes to make sure they fit. Get two big boxes and mark them: donate, and keep. Go through every piece of clothing, keeping only what fits and what your child likes.

Keep in mind that 25 T-shirts is a barrier to the things they really need. • To reward your child for donating his or her clothes and toys to a less fortunate child, take him to a movie, offer to do some of his or her chores or have his or her friend over for a sleepover. • Use open shelves and containers instead of a toy box to store his toys. He will have a better view of their belongings and easy access. • Help your child choose a color for their personal containers, baskets or shelves. Let your child decorate his or her containers with stickers, stenciling or pictures of animals, flowers or their favorite sports stars. Label everything. Buy a laminated chores poster and help him or her write down weekly chores, then erase the board when the chores are finished. • Lower the rods in your child’s closet to make it easier for him to hang clothes. • To make it easier for your child to hang his or her clothes, buy child-size hangers. • For older children, buy a portable

filing system to store their documents, awards and pictures. • Mount on the wall attractive big pegs to hang robes or pajamas or buy over the door hanging pegs. • Buy a laundry hamper and garbage can for your child’s room. Write down the laundry and garbage day. Help your child to maintain his or her room by having him or her make the bed every morning and putting the dirty laundry in the hamper. Once the room is organized and cleaned, it will take him or her three to five minutes to keep it clean and tidy. Ranka Burzan is the owner of Solutions Organizing Simple, and the author of numerous articles including Your Junk or Your Life, 10 Tips to Organize Your Child, and Praise Helps to Get Children Organized, Everything in its Place, 12 simple Tips to Get You Organized, and her new book “S.O.S. Guide to Organize and Clean Your Home” Visit her website for books, articles and Ranka’s own S.O.S. all natural cleaning products to help you get your home organized and clean. www.solutionsorganizing.com.

rd Anniversary Sale! all regular priced Save 40% On

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• We will help you connect with community resources. • Professional after-loss counselling program • Arrangements can be made in the comfort of your own home.

Partners: Partial Proceeds from this event will go to End Polio Now campaign.

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email: macleansfunerals@shaw.ca

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2 days d only only...September ly September Se 2&3


22 • AUGUST 2011

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Stand out from the rest.

Back to school with the best. We’re your neighbourhood store Vedder • Vedder Plaza

Chilliwack • 46020 Yale Road.

Garrison • 45635 Tamihi Way

8/11H SOF18


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AUGUST 2011 • 23

Install A Heat Pump Now!

Start Saving $$$ Be Warm For The Winter & Cool For The Summer

M

ost of us have heard the term heat pump and savings in the same phrase. You probably wonder what a heat pump is and how it can save money. Here is a brief explanation. A heat pump is an air conditioner that works year round. In the summer, a heat pump uses the process of refrigeration to remove heat from your house. If you can imagine, there is a temperature of 30 degrees Celsius in your house and 30 degrees outside, it is uncomfortable, you turn on the air conditioner and you feel cool air from your registers. This process is moving heat from the inside of your house and transferring it to the outside where it is blown away. Before too long, your house is cool and comfortable. This is the same process as your refrigerator uses in your home. When your fridge gets too warm inside, the fridge turns on and brings the temperature in the fridge down to a safe level for your food to last. What a great process! The heat from your fridge is actually being transferred to the room. If you feel the air rising off the back of the fridge, when it is running, it is warm, this is the heat removed from the inside of the fridge being moved to the room. The process for a heat pump is the same as your fridge. You have the heat from the outside being transferred to the inside of the house. How can this be? Refer to your freezer. Your freezer works again on the same process as your fridge except in more extreme conditions. Your fridge keeps food cool, your

Heating And Air Conditioning Ltd.

freezer freezes food. When your fridge is cold, your freezer is colder. The heat difference just means there is heat there (in your fridge) and less in your freezer. So if we can harness the power of refrigeration to move heat from the cold outside in the winter and move it into the house, you have just created a fridge that becomes a freezer and the heat difference is transferred in to the house. A heat pump moves heat at a minimum of 200 per cent efficiency in the Lower Mainland so for every dollar you would spend on heating on electricity, you get at least $2 of heat. The average in our climate is $2.40 of heat per dollar spent. You are spending the money transferring heat instead of burning your money creating it! In the Lower Mainland, we have a mild enough climate that we can use heat pumps to heat our houses year round at a reasonable cost and save money. This includes savings over burning natural gas to heat our homes. There are incentives available now to reduce your energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions for your home, these can range up to $4190 back on your retrofit to a high efficiency furnace and heat pump. Call the local heat pump specialists to find out more and find out how much your retrofit will cost. You will be warm in the winter and cool in the summer and save money. Class A Heating and Air Conditioning Ltd, (604) 856-2147; toll free: 1-877-795-2173

It’s Time To Get Comfortable Install a Heat Pump, Furnace or Air Conditioner and SAVE!

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Where El se Would Good Friends Meet?

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CHIL LIWACK’S

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