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INSIDE: A family’s fate horribly altered by Huntington’s disease Pg. 5 T U E S D A Y

August 20, 2013

ban affects many 7 Fishing  N E W S ,

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Firefighters battle stinky dump blaze

BY TYLER OLSEN tolsen@chilliwacktimes.com

C

hilliwack is known for its unique fragrance, but it was a different sort of stench that forced residents to head indoors and close their windows Sunday. Fire broke out in a landfill on the

Busy crews also respond to arson and forest fire Skway First Nations Reserve early in the morning, sending pungent smoke wafting into the air and challenging firefighters for several hours. At its largest, the fire covered 75

square metres of three-metre-high trash. With roughly 17,000 cubic metres of “free burning” trash in an area without hydrants, firefighters used tanker trucks and hand lines to try to quell the blaze. An excavator

was also being used to dig through the debris to allow firefighters to get at the burning material. About seven hours after it first broke out, the fire was brought under control around noon, assis-

tant fire chief Jeff Ullyot told the Times. “The contractor brought in a big six-inch deluge line and they were able to bring another excavator in and pick it apart and basically ‘surround and drown’ it,” he said. See FIRE, Page 3

SEE MORE PHOTOS layar

Ken Goudswaard/TIMES

Wingwalker Carol Pilon dazzled the crowd Sunday during the Chilliwack Flight Fest. Pilon and other performers entertained some 10,000 spectators at the annual airshow.

Flight Fest draws in T big crowd

BY CORNELIA NAYLOR cnaylor@chilliwacktimes.com

his year’s Chilliwack Flight Fest ranked among the top two in terms of attendance, according to early estimates by organizer Ray Firkus. He put the number of attendees between 10,000 and 11,000—just a little behind the airshow’s banner year in 2002, when almost 13,000

people showed up to watch the RCAF Snowbirds 431 Air Demonstration Squadron make its first and only appearance at the Chilliwack air show. Canada’s famous aerial demonstration team had been scheduled to make a flyby appearance this Sunday, but low clouds left locals gazing at the sky in vain. “I’m sure there were a lot of people disappointed,” Firkus said. “It’s

unfortunate, but it’s the nature of the beast.” Other aircraft making appearances in Chilliwack compliments of the Comox show, however, did not disappoint. For Firkus, the crowds response to flybys by a CF-18 Hornet fighter and a military CC-150 transport jet were the highlights of the show. “The Hornet was a big big hit,” Firkus said. “Seeing the crowd and

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everybody getting that engaged with one action that’s taking place at the same time was cool.” Local aviation enthusiasts also came out in droves to the Saturday night show, the steak barbecue and the Hangar Dance. Firkus estimates 1,000 watched the show and 500 came to the barbecue and dance, which gave locals a chance to mingle with Flight Fest performers.

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CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2013

Upfront

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Council to tackle medical pot issue BY TYLER OLSEN tolsen@chilliwacktimes.com

T

What’s Layared in today’s paper

he public will get a chance Tuesday to comment on a proposal to regulate where medical marijuana grow operations can be set up within Chilliwack’s city limits A proposed bylaw would prohibit the establishment of marijuana grow ops on land zoned for agriculture use. They would be permitted only on land zoned for “special industrial” purposes. There are very few such sites within city boundaries—a staff report says there are “at least four” properties

Page 1 -

See a gallery of photos from this weeked’s Flight Fest. Also, scan to see the Times’ new redesigned website.

Page 3 -

See more photos from the scene of an accident that closed Luckakuck Way last week.

Page 13 -

currently zoned for special industrial. That means those wanting to set up a grow op would most likely have to apply to council to have their preferred site rezoned. A staff report says: “While there are potential economic development benefits with [medical marijuana grow operations] there are also implications concerning social, environmental and law-enforcement with the establishment and licensing of centralized, commercialscale indoor marihuana production facilities.” A public hearing on the proposed changes will take place Tuesday at 7 p.m. at City Hall.

Check out the latest British Columbia Football Conference stats and standings. To join the more than 28 million people who have downloaded Layar, visit layar.com or your app store and start scanning your newspaper today. Start the app, point your phone’s camera at the entire page, tap the“scan”button and Layar’s interactive buttons will appear on your screen.Tap any of them to be taken to video, image carousels, Facebook pages,Twitter and more.

Ken Goudswaard/TIMES

A dump fire sent smoke billowing over Chilliwack Sunday.

Forest Service called in FIRE, from page 1

Cornelia Naylor/TIMES

WEB EXTRAS The Times online

chilliwacktimes.com Real Estate Weekly

 You can find the valley’s premier real estate publication inside each Tuesday edition of the Chilliwack Times.

A Volkswagen Jetta sits on Luckaway Way after plunging off the Evans Road Overpass Thursday. The driver was airlifted to hospital with serious injuries.

Driver in serious condition after car plunges off overpass

A

driver was airlifted to Royal Colum- median and the southbound lane, sheared off a light pole and a metal bian hospital with seriguard rail and fell to the street ous injuries Thursday below. morning after plunging off SEE MORE PHOTOS layar The male driver, the car’s the Evans Road overpass onto only occupant, was conscious Luckakuck Way in a Volkswabefore being airlifted by air gen Jetta. The vehicle was traveling north on Evans ambulance from the Evans elementary Road at around 6:30 a.m. when it crossed the school sports field nearby.

The smoke—which prompted officials to urge those with breathing troubles to head indoors—dissipated by the middle of afternoon. Ullyot said such fires are tricky to fight. “It’s very dense; it’s very compacted. Terrain is always an issue; the footing’s unsafe and it’s very difficult to get to without some sort of machine,” he said. Fire officials have not pinpointed what sparked the fire. Firefighters have had a couple of busy days. Just a half hour after the dump fire was reported, firefighters were called to a structure fire in the 46000 block of Fourth Avenue. They arrived to find a detached garage in flames. The flames had spread to the

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adjacent home, which was vacant and boarded-up. The garage was destroyed. The fire in the house spread to the attic. The home, already slated for demolition, sustained significant damage. Fire officials say the fire is suspicious. “There was no electricity and no gas to either of the structures so we really don’t have an ignition source,” Ullyot said. And Monday morning, a ground fire was reported over a 3,000-square-foot area of duff (decaying forest material) and old wood on Little Mountain. The fire department asked for help from B.C. Forest Service personnel in Hope “to dig out the fire before it spreads.”


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Your actual fuel consumption may vary. ¥For retail customers only. $7,500/$3,500/$4,000 manufacturer-to-dealer credit available on cash purchases of 2013 Sierra EXT 4X4/2013 Terrain FWD/2013 Acadia FWD. Dealers may sell for less. Other cash credits available on most models. By selecting lease or financing offers, consumers are foregoing such discounts and incentives which will result in a higher effective interest rate. See participating dealer for details. Offers end September 3, 2013. ‡‡Offer only valid from July 3, 2013 to September 30, 2013 (the “Program Period”) to retail customers resident in Canada who own or are currently leasing (during the Program Period) a GM or competitor pickup truck to receive a $1,000 credit towards the purchase, finance or lease of an eligible new 2013 GMC Sierra Light Duty or GMC Sierra Heavy Duty. Only one (1) credit may be applied per eligible vehicle sale. 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CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2013

News

A family’s

fate

A5

Huntington’s disease was a death sentence for David Miller, but few could have imagined how much more his family could lose

Submitted photo

Susan, Lee and David Miller famly pose for a picture on Christmas Day, 1999.

A KILLER GENE

Part one of a three-part series.

BY TYLER OLSEN tolsen@chilliwacktimes.com

T

he date is Dec. 25, 2009. A happy family gathers around a steaming meal. There are laughs and smiles and stories from a lifetime spent together. It is your generic Hollywood Christmas dinner. Almost. Only the solitary silence of a middleaged man betrays the scene. Ten years ago, his thick English

Part 1 - Getting the news Part 2 - A family forgives Part 3 - Research continues

accent joined in the family banter. Now he is quiet, withdrawn from the business of the holiday. The man is obviously medicated, but there is nothing particularly ominous about dinner or this holiday. There are no premonitions, no warning signs that within 24 hours, everything will change. A really happy time David and Susan Miller were an unlikely match from the start. At the age of 20, Susan worked at the Vancouver Stock Exchange

as just one of two female stockbrokers in a workplace traditionally dominated by testosterone-fuelled men. A continent and an ocean away, David was a country boy with a country accent working as a stonemason in a tiny English village. They met after Susan burned out of her fast-paced job and travelled to David’s village, where her relatives ran a pub. Love and a daughter followed, as did trips to Canada. Susan’s mother, Jean Anderson,

remembers one of David’s visits to her home, when she lived in Vancouver. “He stood looking out of the sitting room window at the expanse of lights and the Lion’s Gate Bridge and he kept saying ‘By gum!’” In the mid-90s, and with their daughter Lee (not her real name) still a toddler, the pair packed up and moved to Chilliwack, where Susan had grown up. The Millers made their home in

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CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2013

A7

News

Fraser fishing ban School board gets its treasurer due to warm water BY CORNELIA NAYLOR cnaylor@chilliwacktimes.com

BY CORNELIA NAYLOR cnaylor@chilliwacktimes.com

A

ban on salmon fishing on the Fraser River announced last week will hit local First Nations hard and take a bite out of local guiding company revenues. The closure, which applies to all species of salmon from the Alexandra Bridge in the Fraser Canyon to the mouth of the Fraser, was announced Thursday as a measure to protect vulnerable sockeye salmon stocks. L ow e r- t h a n - e x p e c t e d numbers combined with record-high water temperatures that could kill up to 70 per cent of returning sockeye before they have spawned have prompted the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) to shut down not only sockeye fisheries, but all salmon openings to prevent sockeye from being lost as a bycatch. While local First Nations fishers understand the need for the closures, the loss of the catch will cause hardship, according to Sto:lo Tribal Council fisheries advisor Ernie Crey. “Most of the First Nations [along the Fraser River Watershed] are small and impoverished, living on fixed incomes like pensions and social assistance,” Crey told the Times. “Residents of the First Nations tend to be very young families, and the elderly. These communities put away sockeye for the fall and winter months . . . For the First Nations, it’s never a choice between playing 18 holes or fishing. They must fish.” Crey said high temperatures in the Fraser have been an issue for some time and that recommendations for

dealing them are included in the report by Justice Bruce Cohen commissioned to investigate the Fraser sockeye collapse in 2009. But none of the 75 recommendations in the so-called Cohen Commission’s final report issued last October have been implemented, according Crey, and the federal government has yet to make an official response. “For the long term, Ottawa needs to get squarely behind the Wild Salmon Policy and start implementing the recommendations made by Justice Bruce Cohen,” Crey said. But First Nations aren’t the only ones impacted by last week’s Fraser salmon ban. The closure could cost Chilliwack-based Great River Fishing Adventures 30 pre-booked boat days worth of revenue and put its eight full-time guides out of work for weeks. “The impact on us is very significant,” Great River Fishing Adventures vice-president of sales and marketing Matt Clive told the Times. Clive expects the salmon closure to last about two weeks, and he said that would affect about 200 clients from places like Europe and the United States who have booked trips specifically for salmon. While some are willing to make the switch to sturgeon fishing, others as simply canceling their trips to B.C., Clive said. “They’re specifically wanting to do salmon adventures,” he said. “Especially in Europe, there is an appeal or kind of a bragging right to coming and catching a Chinook salmon on the fly on the Fraser River. For the angling community in Europe, that’s a pinnacle.”

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he Chilliwack school board has hired an experienced secretarytreasurer from the Peace River South school district to be its sixth CFO in 10 years. Effective Sept. 3, Gerry Slykhuis will take over from current secretary-treasurer Maureen Carradice, who will step back into her former role as director of human resources after almost three years at the helm of the district’s finances. Slykhuis has spent eight years as the top moneyman in School District No. 59, a district with almost 4,000 students, 22 schools and a $50 million operating budget in 2012-13—compared to Chilliwack’s nearly 13,000 students, 31 schools and

$108 million budget. He also has 14 years of experience in public sector health region accounting, last serving as the regional director of accounting services for the Northern Health Authority “We are excited to have Gerry come to the Chilliwack school district as part of our team as he brings an extensive successful background in finance and administration, but also has an excellent understanding of education issues,” Chilliwack superintendent Evelyn Novak said in a press release posted on the School District No. 33 website last week. “Gerry brings a strong vision for the important role that operations, finance and administrative services can bring to supporting students and student learning. “ Slykhuis is a qualified Certified Manage-

ment Accountant, which should assuage concerns raised by retired Chilliwack secretary-treasurer Don Murray in May. Murray, who retired in 2003 after nine years as secretary-treasurer, blasted the board after a budget presentation for deficit spending and for not requiring its CFO to have an accounting designation. None of the district’s last three secretary-treasurers had an accounting designation. “They’re the chief financial officer,” Murray told the Times in May. “You want the chief financial officer to know some accounting practices and principles and how to balance a budget.” The Chilliwack school district hired a consultant to find its new CFO and part of its criteria for candidates was that they have an accounting designation.

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A8 TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

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Writing on the wall for Wallin Dear Pamela Wallin: Can I call you Pamela? I know you’re a senator now, former diplomat, Order of Canada and all that, but I’m a reporter, you used to be a reporter. You remember what it was like, right? OK, maybe I better stick to Ms. Wallin. Because amnesia appears to have overtaken you, and your Senate colleague Mike Duffy as well. First, no one likes the Senate. There are people who defend it as a necessary institution, who see it as a necessary evil, or those who just see it as too difficult to eliminate given the constitutional challenges. But no one gets the warm fuzzies when they think of the red chamber. We think of senators who spent most of their year in Mexico. We think of political appointees who are accountable to no one. We roll our eyes and shrug and wish we didn’t have to pay for it all when it accomplishes so little. Ms. Wallin, you worked for CBC and CTV for years, including working as an Ottawa bureau chief. One of the bread and butter stories for all reporters is finding out how politicians have spent our money. We write a lot of stories about budgets, but we also really, really like to write stories about politicians who spend public money on themselves. Expensive hotels, big restaurant bills for lobster and champagne, trips abroad. So when the Senate is held in

MATTHEW CLAXTON

Be Our Guest such low regard, and free-spending politicians are the pinatas of the press and public, why are you getting your back up about the investigation into your travel expenses? Ms. Wallin, you spent more than half a million dollars on travel and billed it to the Senate in four years. That’s more money than most Canadians will see in 10 years, to cover all their expenses. The vast majority of Canadians do not have plane tickets paid for by someone else so we can commute from Saskatchewan to Ottawa, much less to and from Toronto. And that seems to be a big part of the problem there. It seems that about $121,000 of your expenses were improper in some way. You say you’ll pay it all back. But you also lashed out and said the investigation into your expenses was “fundamentally flawed and unfair.” That position doesn’t make much sense. You’re a powerful and well-connected person. You have the resources to fight back if you feel you’ve been wrongly accused. You could drag this whole thing into the courts.

Instead, you’re acting exactly like a politician—throwing around blame, saying you’re not at fault, but backing down rather than actually defending yourself in an official way. Of course, that may yet happen, as the details of the investigation have now been handed over to the RCMP. This story could still find its last chapters written by a judge. The expense issues with the Senate, particularly with Ms. Wallin and Mac Harb and Mike Duffy and Patrick Brazeau, have been an embarrassment for the Conservatives, as well as a reminder of past Liberal misdeeds, thanks to Harb’s inclusion. But if you still had a journalistic bone left in your body, you could have avoided this entirely, Ms. Wallin. Did you really even need a job as a senator? Did you need the money, after your many high-flying jobs? Did you think you’d have influence, in the part of government that does virtually nothing? Did you think you deserved a new title, somehow? You went from being someone whose job was to hold the powerful accountable, to being powerful and largely unaccountable. You then went on a spending spree with public cash. Really, what were you expecting? A hug? ◗ Matthew Claxton is a reporter with the Langley Advance.

veryone knows education is expensive, but an uneducated population is not a productive one. Students go back to school in a few weeks and those heading off to postsecondary carry with them the stress of knowing one day—soon—they will graduate and will need to find a job to pay off those students loans they are accumulating. The provincial government is spending $1.9 billion on educating students in its 25 post-secondary institutions this year— and students and their parents will kick in a whole bunch more. Many parents hope their kids will end up at university studying in prestigious areas like medicine, law, dentistry, and business. But these days, even doctors are graduating from university and not finding jobs (but apparently there are a lot of jobs in gerontology). Skilled trades and technology are expected to be the fastest growing areas of employment. While we like to encourage our children to pursue their dreams and passions, we also have to keep them grounded and ready to do work that will earn them a living and let them be independent. Unromantic as it may sound, we should encourage our youth to attain skills that are marketable—something that has value for society and somebody will pay money for. Students should also understand that if they do a general four-year degree—while it will broaden one’s mind—the job prospects to start might be making venti cappuccinos or the graveyard shift at Home Depot. Their friends who became millwrights, welders, electricians, or plumbers are more likely to secure gainful employment in the long run—though they too will have to retrain to keep their skills up to date. Working in the service sector is nothing to be ashamed of, but detailed knowledge from the History 455 course about the reasons by the First World War broke out won’t help too much—though it will make for great conversation.

◗ Your view This week’s question Are you following the water restriction rules set out by the City of Chilliwack this summer? VOTE NOW: www.chilliwacktimes.com


A9

CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2013

Putin worse than Hitler Editor: Al Kosub’s letter compels me to provide him with a little historical perspective. In 1933, Hitler’s Germany began banning all literature associated with homosexuality. The Nazis burned this literature, but also literature about any sexuality at all. Eventually, lists of homosexuals were compiled and all homosexuals were, by force of law, compelled to conform to what the Nazis insisted was “normal German sexuality”. The next phase of this legislative persecution is one we’re all much too familiar with: incarceration and genocide. Interestingly, Hitler exempted Olympic athletes from Paragraph 175 (Germany’s anti-gay legislation). This is something Russia’s Mr. Putin has not been very forthcoming about concerning the Sochi Games. In essence, I’m telling Mr. Kosub that Hitler was more lenient in this area than Vladimir Putin. Paragraph 175, enacted in 1871 following the unification of the German Empire (under which it was only sporadically enforced) was expanded by Hitler, according to the archives of the Holocaust Museum in Washington, DC, as follows: “In 1935, Nazi jurists undertook an extensive overhaul of the German criminal code. Paragraph 175 was re-written to broaden the law’s scope of ‘indecencies between men’ from a narrow interpretation of an intercourse-like act, to include virtually any contact between men deemed to have sexual intent, even ‘simple looking’ or ‘simple touching.’” Russia’s law and the tim-

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ing of its enactment (directly prior to an Olympic Games event), are eerily similar. On June 11 of this year, the Russian Duma passed a law against “the propagation of homosexuality to minors.” Under the flimsy cover of protecting children, this law bans all public expression which acknowledges even the existence of homosexuals and homosexuality. Perhaps, as Mr. Kosub claims, it really is black and white. From my perspective and that of many around the world who do not wish to be doomed to repeat history, it is very clear that our tolerance of Putin and his scapegoating of homosexuals is a shortcut to the road to hell. Human rights are not mutable, because if they are, then Mr. Kosub’s rights are also so compromised by both popular and personal prejudice. He would do well to remember that, and the words of Pastor Niemoller, who wrote of not speaking out when others are persecuted: “When they came for me, there was no one left to speak.” Jennifer Woodroff Chilliwack

Miracles can and do happen Editor: Pastor Tompke’s column about healing in Faith Today (Times, Aug. 15) is very timely. Even people who believe in God have trouble believing what the Bible clearly teaches about healing being for everyone for all times. Modern science has taught us that miracles are impossible. I guess they are or they would not be miracles. I had the unique privilege of being the only medical doctor to examine a woman who had her heart valves totally restored by prayer. The interesting thing for me was that even though I had not a doubt about what I found before and what I found after prayer, I still had trouble believing what my ears heard. My article was published in the Canadian MedicalAssociation Journal. For those who are honest enough to investigate, there are many well-documented examples of miraculous healings all over the world. W. D. Gutowski Chilliwack

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A10 TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

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CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2013

HEARING AIDS

News

Mother ‘was odd, before she died’

many household chores. ited the couple in Canada. But Susan When David stepped out to smoke learned that David’s mother had shown a cigarette, Susan would grow worried signs of an unknown illness before she that he wouldn’t remember to return passed away in England. inside. “The word in the village was that During this time, Susan—who, over the mother was odd, before she died,” the preceding years had climbed Anderson said. “Nobody in the village, the corporate ladder to become the even the doctor could not determine manager of wealth [why].” management at The trail of clues “If something was Coast Capital Saveventually led Susan ings—appeared her and David to the going to break, it “usual bubbly self” world-renowned was going to happen to her family. University of British But as David’s Columbia’s Centre when David had it in condition detefor Huntington his hands. We always riorated—and as he Disease, where clinithought he was clumsy became a different cians positively diagperson—Susan spent nosed David with and a little bit off more and more time Huntington’s. balance, physically.” outside the house. It was not good And although she news. Debbie Milne was being looked at While David’s to carry an increased diagnosis gave him access to medication load for her family, that could effectively treat his sympSusan’s own brain was in turmoil: only toms, it was also an unambiguous much later, when they cleaned out her death sentence. car, would Milne and Anderson learn Huntington’s disease is a brain disthat Susan had been prescribed mediorder that causes the brain to degenercation for bipolar disorder. ate, robbing a person of their mental and physical faculties. There is no cure: Allowed to leave hospital eventually and inevitably, the brain In December of 2009, David was decay causes medical problems that hospitalized after he reported feelkill the afflicted person. ing unwell “in his head,” according to “It was devastating,” Milne said of Milne, who visited him there. She said the diagnosis. “Life as everybody knew David asked hospital staff to hold him it stopped suddenly.” until they could adjust his medicaDavid—or the person he was becom- tions. ing—would eventually become unable See FATE, Page 12 to work, unable to drive, unable to do

FATE, from page 5 Ryder Lake. Susan began working as a clerk at a local credit union, while David quickly found that his stonemason skills were just as in demand here as in the United Kingdom. And despite his mother-in-law’s concerns that he wouldn’t adapt to a moreurban environment, David—funny and jovial—melted into his new extended family and community with ease. “It was just a really happy time,” Susan’s sister, Debbie Milne, remembered. At Christmas time, David could be found in the backyard, playing soccer with a clan of children. He would wear silly hats and back up his mother-inlaw when she declared that, to the protests of her children, sprouts really were quite delicious. “It sounds a bit Norman Rockwell to families today,” Anderson said. “It wasn’t remarkable in any way.” David’s personality changed At first, the symptoms were subtle. “If something was going to break, it was going to happen when David had it in his hand,” Milne said. “We always thought he was clumsy and a little bit off balance, physically.” But as the calendar ticked over to a new millennium, David’s clumsiness grew worse and was joined by changes to his once-ebullient personality. Probing for a cause, the symptoms led Susan to begin exploring her husband’s family history. David’s father had died at a rich old age and had vis-

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Medication made David withdrawn $

FATE, from page 11

While he remained at Chilliwack General Hospital in the week leading up to Dec. 25, David was allowed to leave for Christmas Day. Jean said David was “very, very withdrawn and obviously medicated” at Christmas dinner. But other than David’s diminished presence, the evening proceeded as normal. Fourteen years later, Jean remembers a discussion with her daughter about facials and spas. That night, David returned to the hospital, while Susan and Lee returned to their home. Within 24 hours, the couples’ Ryder Lake home would be a crime scene. The broad strokes of what happened the following day, Boxing Day of 2009, are not in dispute. David was permitted to leave CGH and join Susan and Lee at their Ryder Lake home. Around dinner, David picked up a

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As Huntington’s took its toll on her husband, Susan Miller was battling her own mental issues. Submitted photo

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Putting the pieces back together That night, an unmarked car pulled up in front of Anderson’s home and everything changed, again. In the weeks, months and years after Susan’s death, her family would find themselves trying to reassemble their lives. For Milne and Anderson, that meant caring for Lee and mourning their deceased sister and daughter. It also meant—to the consternation of some—paying for the legal defence of Susan’s killer. That story in part two, in Thursday’s Chilliwack Times.

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A12 TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

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CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2013

Sports

A13

Tyler Olsen

Phone: 604-792-9117 • Email: tolsen@chilliwacktimes.com • Fax: 604-792-9300

Raiders demolish Huskers

On deck

Chiefs camp

Ferry follies play havoc with mental prep

The Chilliwack Chiefs training camp inter-squad games will take place Tuesday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Wednesday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. On Thursday the Crimson-Gold game takes place from 6 to 9 p.m. Spectators are welcome to watch camp throughout the week.

BY TYLER OLSEN, tolsen@chilliwacktimes.com

T

he Valley Huskers will be pleased to not have to return to Nanaimo this year—and not just because the Vancouver Island Raiders are a formidable football term. The Huskers had a tough Saturday: after missing their ferry, waiting for two hours and arriving in Nanaimo less than an hour before g a m e t i m e, t h e Hu s k e r s we re thumped 56-3 by the Raiders. The Huskers entered the game technically undefeated and in second place in the BCFC after the Okanagan Sun’s season opening victory over Valley was overturned by the league last week. But it quickly became apparent Saturday that Valley hadn’t quite graduated to the level of the league’s best teams. The Raiders took a 21-0 lead after the first quarter and led by six converted touchdowns at the half. After a solid start to the season, Huskers receiver-turned-quarterback Cody Parray faced his first Ben Ingram/NANAIMO DAILY NEWS major speed bump, completing just Valley Huskers receiver Duncan Finch is tackled by Vancouver Island Raiders defender Arthur Fabbro Saturday in Nanaimo. five of 20 passes for 59 yards. But despite the heavy loss, St. The Huskers had more success on Exhibition turf installation continues Sidelined by the ground, with Ty DeRayos amass- James said he could find some The Huskers will play their next spleen injury ing 88 yards on 16 carries, and Par- bright spots, notably the running B u t o n e couple games at Townsend Park as attack and the continued solid play ray scrambling for 48 more yards. p l a y e r t h e work continues on the installation Huskers head coach Tyson St. of the special teams unit. H u s k e r s of turf at Exhibition Field. After a The Huskers don’t James said the ferry don’t expect week off, the Huskers host the Westplay next weekend, situation—the team b a c k s o o n shore Rebels Aug. 31. and St. James hopes had a reservation, SEE STANDINGS layar is running Huskers president Geoff Sache the break will give his but arrived two back/receiv- told the Times the city is hoping to bruised team a chance minutes too late— e r J o s h have the Exhibition turf ready by to get healthier. seemed to throw off H a y d e n , mid-September. If they manage to “We’re a bit of a MASH unit right his players, who struggled mightily who is out beat their Sept. 15 goal, Sache hopes now,” he said. “We’ve still got a long Josh Hayden early on. indefinitely the club could hit the field Sept. 14 “We need to deal with the adverse season ahead of us. We’ve played a f t e r s u s - for a home game against the Sun. travel situations better as a team,” four games, we have six left and this taining an internal injury against “I’m hoping that we’ll be able he said. “I think that’s what defines team is kind of finding its way,” he the Kamloops Broncos. to get on there a day early,” Sache a good team. We didn’t do well with said. “As much as this team had a After experiencing pain on the said. that and kind of woke up at half tough one on the weekend, I think return from Kamloops, Hayden If not, they’ll have to wait until the players still believe and the was taken to hospital where he was their final home game of the seatime.” Looking at the game tape, St. coaches still believe that there is diagnosed with a ruptured blood son, on Oct. 5, to game test the new James said mental breakdowns and something special we can do this vessel in his spleen. The day after surface. year.” poor positioning was rampant. the game, he had surgery. -Files from the Nanaimo Daily News.

Bye week The Valley Huskers are off this week. Their next game is Aug. 31, when they host the Westshore Rebels at Townsend Park.

Ladies soccer Ladies Over-30 Fall Soccer is looking for players to fill teams. Games are Sunday afternoon at Fairfield Island. All levels welcome for fun, friendly fitness. Contact Ladies30FallSoccer@shaw.ca.

Jr. dragons The Optimist Eagles Youth Dragon Boat Team is a mixed team with boys and girls aged 12 to 18. The club holds a short fall learn to paddle program starting in the middle of September to give everyone a chance to try this amazing sport. Check the team’s Facebook page—Optimist Eagles Youth Dragonboat Team—for more information on the start dates and times.

Softball tryouts

Chilliwack Mayhem U14 peewee A girls softball team holds tryouts Sept. 14 and 15 at 4 p.m. at Promontory elementary at 4 p.m. for girls born in 2001 who want to compete at the highest level on a fun, competitive team. Contact Steve Henrotte at 604-798-3146 for more information.

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A14 TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

Sports

Chiefs camp opens with hope, new faces BY TYLER OLSEN tolsen@chilliwacktimes.com

L

et the chemistry experiment begin. There will be plenty of new faces vying for head coach Harvey Smyl’s attention as the Chilliwack Chiefs begin training camp this week at Prospera Centre. After bidding adieu to half his roster at the end of last season, Smyl spent the summer trying to restock

his cupboard with new talent. The Chiefs’ official roster now boasts no fewer than 11 new names—including goaltender Lyndon Stanwood and former Langley Riverman Ben Butcher. Those and other additions mean Smyl will be watching carefully this week to not only evaluate new talent, but also to see how the various pieces of the puzzle fit together. “Right now, because we’re replacing so many guys—and guys in key

roles—it’s going to be more about getting some chemistry, seeing who works well together and trying to figure out who can do what well for our club,” Smyl told the Times. “It’s not a matter of just putting a piece here and trying to make it work. We’ve got so many pieces that we’re replacing; we have a ton of work to do.” Despite all that work ahead and the uncertainties that come with a rebuilt roster, Smyl sounds con-

fident that the Chiefs will be competitive this year. “I like what we have going on. I like the group of kids returning. I like the group of kids coming to try out,” he said. “From what I see we should have a very competitive camp. I think in the long run our team will be OK.” But while he has added a couple handfuls of new players to the team’s roster, Smyl stressed that what he sees at training camp and

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Returning Chief Austin Plevy practices Monday morning during the first day of training camp.

Plevy asked to lead CHIEFS, from page 14 hopefuls have plenty of reason to want to put their best foot forward. Smyl said he will also be looking to his returnees to assume key roles on the ice and in the dressing room. With three full years of BCHL hockey under his belt, Austin Plevy is no longer one of the youngest players on the team. He led the Chiefs in scoring last year; this year, Smyl said he will be asked to take a key leadership role. Smyl said he’ll also be looking for Mathieu Tibbet to show that he’s ready to take a major step forward. Tibbet scored nine goals in 34 games for the Chiefs last year but showed

more potential, particularly in the post-season. The ability of Tibbet and Jaret Babych to step into top-six forward roles—and, crucially, avoid injury—will also be a key factor in determining how successful this year’s Chiefs will be. Training camp opened Saturday, with some 80 players on four different teams competing for spots. Inter-squad games take place Tuesday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Wednesday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. The climax of camp takes place on Thursday with the CrimsonGold game from 6 to 9 p.m. Spectators are welcome to watch. The Chiefs play their first exhibition games this weekend. After visiting Surrey Friday evening, the Chiefs host the Eagles Saturday at 7 p.m. at Prospera Centre.

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A16 TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

Community

Chilliwack Transit

Music and More

The 1725 Canadian Military Engineers Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps will host a recruitment event Aug. 24 from 10 a.m to 2 p.m, in the Sears parking lot of the Cottonwood Mall. The Chilliwack museum will bring in an army tank and the cadets cook trailer will be on site to provide hamburgers, hot dogs and Red Leaf water by donation. This is a great opportunity to see what the Army Cadet program, a non-profit organization, has to offer.

Dart league

The Fraser Valley East Dart League is looking for teams and individual players to sign up for the 2013/2014 season. The league hosts a team registration day Aug. 24 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Vedder Legion. League fees are $20 per person and each team must register a minimum of five players. This is a fun and competitive league for all ages and abilities. Make Thursday night dart night. Visit www.fvedl.com for more information.

Video games

The Chilliwack Library hosts the Rated T for Teen video game group the fourth Saturday of each month (Aug. 24) from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. With Mario Kart, Super Smash Bros

Brawl, Rock Band, Wii Sports, and many more, bring your A game and the library will supply the rest. Bring your Nintendo DS for portable multiplayer mayhem. For more information, email Raymond at raynichols@telus. net.

Hobby hill fundraiser

The parents who run Hobby Hill Preschool host a Community Family Fun Day Aug. 25 at Promontory elementary school, featuring bouncy castles, dunk tanks, carnival games, vendors, a 50/50 draw, raffles, a used-book sale and more. Admission is free, but proceeds from food sales, book sales, raffles, etc. will go to the preschool.

Tea and dance

Wanda’s Tea Dance, sponsored by the Seniors Resources Society, takes place the last Monday of each month (Aug. 26) from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Lions’ Hall, at 45580 Spadina Ave. Music by Sweetwater. Refreshments and door prizes. Tickets are $6.

Photographers meet

The Chilliwack Camera Club meets on the second and fourth Wednesday of each month (Aug. 28). The location has moved to the Slesse Room at Evergreen Hall, 9291 Corbould St. All levels of photographers are welcome. For more info visit www.chilliwackcameraclub.com.

H S FI for

F

Effective September 1, 2013

To include your event, contact Tyler Olsen at tolsen@ chilliwacktimes.com. Put your event on our digital calendar by visiting www.chilliwacktimes.com.

E E R

ENTER

• Holiday service

Chilliwack Library Book Club

• Later service for six nights

The Chilliwack Library Book Club meets the fourth Wednesday of each month (Aug. 28) at 7 p.m. New members are welcome at any time. Contact the Chilliwack Library at 604-792-1941.

• New Route – 7 Broadway, connects eastern portion of downtown to the Cottonwood and Chilliwack Malls • New Route – 8 Tyson, connects Watson Glen, Vedder and Garrison Crossing neighbourhoods to the Chilliwack and Cottonwood Malls

Fibromyalgia meetings

Fibromyalgia Well Spring Foundation meets the fourth Wednesday of every month (Aug. 28) from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Lynnwood Retirement Residence, at 9168 Corbould St. Call 1-800-567-8998.

• 1 Vedder, extension of route to better serve the UFV and Middle and Senior Secondary schools

Senior crib

"

The Senior Resources Society will begin a social crib day Thursdays from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Evergreen Hall in September. For more info, call the Senior Resource Office at 604-793-9979.

You can now purchase tickets and passes online at www.chilliwack.com/transit

City of Chilliwack Fraser Valley Regional District

Help for immigrants

Chilliwack Community Services, Immigrant Services is offering educational workshops on driver education, Canadian citizenship study, healthy living and basic computer instruction. There are also short orientations on banking, English options, transportation, Canadian culture, health care, employment and more. Contact Lynn Gibson at 604393-3251, gibsonl@comserv. bc.ca or stop into the office at 9214 Mary St. Monday to Friday between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. (closed between 12:30 and 1:30 p.m.).

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British for paid-on complai a a “poster child” farewell to McGrath formerly endanout of the Shellard, Columbia waterways projwas forced BY CORNELIA NAYLOR power firefighter, at the start of 2012. cktimes.com gered by independent a provincial l, cnaylor@chilliwa ent to departm to the tribunaon ects (IPP), according submission willTrally elders  N E W S , S P O R T S In, hisW  at chilliwacktimes.com E Ait isTnot Huncomm E R be& E N T E R T boriginal AINM EN recreation group. creek— grounds scenes to Shellard argued“ The popular kayaking the Sto:lo Nation fire ground er in order Chilliwack River protest a with CFD t manpow Wednesday to which feeds into the set Rapids—has lacking sufficien nal guidelines they say the y just below the Tamihi “moral injustice” operatio safety risks of two “rivers to hands of the to follow health and been named one have suffered at the Education perRecreation out to reduce . . . The older watch” by the Outdoor ters. ces, Coqualeetza Cultural directors. British Columfor firefigh of life experien Council (ORC) of ofBazso/PNG staff photo Centre (CCEC) board of the riskLes its annual Most sonnel, because Elders Group help reduce bia, which released The Coqualeetza ncy List Monday. all emerge are vital and at their home in Chillia part of CCEC onhere seen Ediger Endangered Rivers safety (CEG) has been Carolynand forceps also on the with her motherhealth but in Janufor a botched Ediger’s The Fraser River was almost 40 years, ent of NUMBER of for Cassidy NUMBER of family NUMBER restored NUMBER of awardrequirem $3.2-million for a fight secondlong the a been scenes.” of Canada the CCEC board the age l list, having been named in the prov- It has medical marijuana the Supreme medical marijuanaCourt medical marijuana medical marijuana ary, members say city says job’s physica consultaweek. Last Thursday river 15 years ago.The wack lastproduction brain damage most endangered because licences with possession licences production licences needed possession licencesthe suddenly and without dissolvmore permanent left Cassidy is firefighters it was delivery that ince, behind the Peace. in Chilliwack in in Chilliwack in in Chilliwack in in Chilliwack in put older tion announced job heart location of a demands further, that Tamihi Creek is the January 2012 January 2012 February 2013 February 2013 on-thedeadly ing the program and, power projwould at risk of proposed 15-megawatt any group that remained l’s ruling, a subsidiary of attacks. use the name to the tribuna ect by KMC Energy, be forbidden to Last month According Ryall suggested “the WindRiver Power Corp. local kayRick ers is “Coqualeetza.” that Fire Chief group, which -call firefight G.eJohnston for the Times reported Members of the paid-on William for full-tim found pink for gynecologist work recently and luncheons and than Frey for 1998. in us obstetrician dangero birth aker Adam they meets weekly duringeher of care in the the entire run, becaus more the standardters” breaching flagging tape along he had failed to engages in cultural activities tried firefigh and must decision found trial career2009 that work on the at any timewas readily available to community, said they have The initial leading to worries paged staff be with the BY CORNELIA NAYLOR surgical can begin. meet a for- unsuccessfully to ensure a backup project would soon cnaylor@chilliwacktimes.com Page 3 when caesarean TER,section told the Times child byFIREFIGH issue and now photo deliver the A WindRiver official help See board to resolve the Ryan Bayes their “pre-consultaceps procedure failed. appealed that decision in 2011, have no choice but to make the project is in the ore local students are in Can- grievance public. Johnston successfully tion planning stages.” graduating within six Jeremy to have the case heard is totally disORC executive directora standbefore the family pushed “What they’re doing years of starting Grade 8, is Creek. Vehicles and just completely over- respectful,” CEG president Virginia ada’s top court. McCall said the Tamihi and IP on Tamihi but the Chilliwack school district overjoyed “and in our large rapidrivers BY STEPHANIE of creeks Pre-Owned hundreds “We’re really g in for runs the court action Joe said of the board, Zig-Zag, a that are threat- The Province still lags almost seven per cent Premium Mark et Pricin of the biggest said Ediger, who launched had even begun A kayaker around the province behind the provincial grad-rate and culture respect is one Live whelmed,” Chilliwack in herat about.” behalf of her daughter, only bedroom on talk was we 2008 in Ediger’s that ened by such projects. average, according to 2011-12 stathings and assidy when Cassidy projannouncing flower-shaped lights, discussing legal action “They’re called run-of-river tistics released last week. The Jan. 30 letter home is filled with a total misgroup prothree. ects [but] that is almost off our shoulders the dissolution of the walls are painted blue. The district saw a 3.3 per cent Instead, he BY PAUL J. Hthe board’s ing for nearly half of the 28,076 across huge burden lifted the a said. ENDERSON colour as a Tiffany box,” for “It’s McCall nomer,” “Same peace of mind, knowing vides no rationale only that the increase in its six-year completion 5952 off much head DL complete and it’s just Ediger. “When we Canada. says the projects siphonit through phenderson@chilliwacktimes.com (financially) for decision, stating rate overall last year, with a 5.1 per for her60¢ said her mom, Carolyn to provide It’s like The number of those growing Price able [its] mandate r.com we’ll bemariof the water and divert fish down- home, she starts to laugh and giggle. chrysle cent gain among girls and a 1.4 per board had “reviewed and life.” rdodge be.” juana increased even more. her to of year after reporting that ChilloconnoDECISION the rest program funding labour early pipes, thereby affecting who use heaven to her—it’s where she wants cent bump among boys. FOR there wereIn513 WITH As of last indi-1998, Johnston induced was high regarding SCANweek, fight for jusiwack residents were was dissolvJanuary NOWthree 12-year-long stream and the humans family’sINVENTORY pregnancy service delivery” and purThe Ediger with in Chilliwack who holdafter CCEC Since grad rates in the province personal times likelyCassidy than averwas leftviduals determining Ediger’s ENTIRE PREOWNED OURmore way through ing the group “following the at 38 weeks daughter SHOP wack the waterways for recreational has final- licences of as a whole tice after use production (PUPL) andinto 77 complications part agetheir British Columbians to be delivery proce- mandate and policies, the voices i m p r ov e d risk. After running Street, Chilli poses. damage due to a botched is becom- severe brain person produc- to switch to a caesarean medical marijuana growers, who hold designated elders, along b y l e s s 8645 Young 92-5151 “To many, Tamihi Creek empha- licensed the delivery, he decided room to make arrangements. close. [its] supporting Sto:lo and to a learned come has tion licences (DPPL). Assuming the 193the 604-7 thelyTimes the number has quadriplegia of sorts, with spastic dure instead, and left ing a poster child $3.2a year See ELDERS, Page 6t h a n o n e ndsons.com Cassidy, now 15, lives awarded number from ago included both better regional tripled. will be per cent, sizing the need for She and her family www.jadama See CASSIDY, Page 4 Canada ofand cerebral palsy. PUPLs DPPLs (Health Canada was to IPP devel- According to figures obtained through Court 2011-12 planning when it comes has been million in damages after the Supreme unable against that an Access to Informationa request decisioninthis month to confirm this by press time) saw Chilliopment; something unanimously restored that’s a three-fold, or 206 d Vehicles See TAMIHI, Page 6January 2012, 238 Chilliwack wack make SCAN FOR WEBSITE Premium Pre-Owne per cent, increase in growresidents were licensed to the biggest ers in the city in one year. possess marijuana for mediat Live Market Pricing gains against the provincial averProvincewide, the numcal reasons and 193 were age in more than 10 years. ber of growers rose from licensed to produce marijuaOne important area where this 3,831 a year ago to 11,601 na for medical purposes. didn’t apply, however, was among (9,369 PUPLs and 2,232 There were 4,608 licensed aboriginal students. DL 5952 users and 3,831 licensed SCAN FOR WEBSITE DPPLs) today. That comWhile the provincial average pares to a total of 9,846 growers in all of British m there went up by 2.7 per cent, ChillPrice 60¢ oconnordodgechrysler.co and NOW WITH Columbia 13 months ago. That trans- growers in the nine other provinces iwack saw a 2.7 per cent decline, 8645 Young Street, Chilliwack ENTIRE PREOWNED INVENTORY SHOP OUR combined. lated to about 85 growers and 102 users three territories putting its aboriginal rate 3.5 per 604-792-5151per 100,000 people. But Chilliwack had In the past decade, Health Canada m cent below the provincial average. about 280 growers and 344 users per says the medical marijuana program www.jadamandsons.co Before last year, grad rates in has grown exponentially across the 100,000 residents. Chilliwack had consistently come Health Canada has told the Times country, from under 500 authorized in about 10 per cent below the there are now 666 persons in Chilliwack persons in 2002 to more than 28,000 provincial average for more than a who hold a licence to possess marijua- today. decade. Mayor Sharon Gaetz and several city na for medical purposes. But local officials now say those That’s a 180 per cent increase in one councillors have made no secret of their figures haven’t accurately reflectyear and mirrors provincial increases. health and safety concerns regarding ed the real picture in Chilliwack As of Feb. 18, there were 13,362 people medical marijuana licences. because the traditional six-year in B.C. authorized to possess, up 190 per cent from a year ago, and accountSee GRAD RATE, Page 4 See MARIJUANA, Page 4

Tamihi added to river list

BY TYLER OLSEN times.com tolsen@chilliwack d to are oppose s say they river power ocal kayaker install a run-of-River Valley ack a plan to a Chilliw project on the Chillicreek. which enters Rapids, Tamihi Creek,west of the Tamihi eightan just s, who say wack River of with kayaker s a diverse range is popular stretch provide from around kilometre that attracts users whitewaters to use won’t be able prothe world. s fear they project But kayaker iver power if a run-of-r ahead. the creek for the creek goes call for tenders posed for power Hydro’s 2006 During BC indepe ndent Energy, projects, KMC of Winary a subsidi Corp., Power dRiver bid for the successfully a runright to install on the project PHOTOS of-river SCAN TO SEE creek. loped, remains undeve he when Tamihi spooked While the Frey was flagging tape kayaker Adam and found pink recently visited run. ver entire Times, WindRiconlining the ed by the When contact officer Greg Trainor sultation ment the pre-con chief develop project is “in firmed the y is not the compan planning stages.” that while project at the Trainor said publicly about opportunity saying much be ample con“there will the public this time, inforproject during the better to discuss at which time e.” sultation process point, be availabl gets to that their mation will the project to If and when face opposition will WindRiver ver Kaythe Vancou plans. represents r Recreation Frey, who on the Outdoo is a local ak Club (VKC) of BC, said the creekic benefit Council (ORC)provides an econom treasure that ck area. to the Chilliwa Page 4 See POWER,

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Program closure has CEG elders going public

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Chilliwack Times August 20 2013