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INSIDE: Flight Fest takes to the skies Pg. 13 T U E S D A Y August 13, 2013

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Limited fishery angers natives

Urged to vaccinate against measles

T

he Fraser Health Authority is urging residents of the eastern Fraser Valley to get vaccinated against measles after about 60 women and newborns were exposed to the highly contagious disease at the Abbotsford Regional Hospital and Cancer Centre. “The exposure of newborn children to this virus is a very concerning situation,” Fraser Health chief medical officer Paul Van Buynder stated in a press release Thursday. “They are too young to respond to the vaccine and some will not have received protection in utero from their mothers . . . It is a timely reminder that not vaccinating children can have consequences for EB IRST other vulnerable First reported on infants.” Relatively low chilliwacktimes.com immunization ra t e s i n s o m e parts of Abbotsford, Mission, Chilliwack, Agassiz, Harrison Hot Springs and Hope have led to several “clusters” of the virus in those communities in previous years, according to Fraser Health, the most recent being in April 2010 shortly after the Olympic Games. The most effective protection against the disease is two doses of vaccine, health officials said. The vaccination is free to all those born after 1957, People who suspect they have been exposed to measles or have developed symptoms, should see their medical practitioner but should notify the medical practitioner’s office before arriving in order to prevent the spread of the disease to other patients. The families exposed to measles at the Abbotsford hospital, meanwhile, will be contacted by health officials directly.

W

F

BY CORNELIA NAYLOR cnaylor@chilliwacktimes.com

T

Let’r buck!

Cornelia Naylor/TIMES

A bronc rider is launched off his mount during the bareback competition at the Chilliwack Rodeo held during the Chilliwack Fair on Saturday.

Attendance up at this year’s Chilliwack Fair BY CORNELIA NAYLOR cnaylor@chilliwacktimes.com

A

ttendance at the Chilliwack Fair was up 15 per cent last weekend despite the absence of a midway again this year. “Overall we had a really positive response from everyone,” fair coordinator Brett McCarthy told the Times. New additions to the three-day event were a big hit. The “moo-ternity” pen, which featured cows in labour, witnessed the birth of six calves over the weekend.

SEE MORE PHOTOS layar “Everyone loved it. Every time there was one giving birth, we had big crowds,” McCarthy said A new—and surprisingly handson—reptile display by the Reptile Guy (Abbotsford’s Mike Hopcraft) also drew crowds, as did Future West Promotions’ first motocross at the fair. “They had a couple race days and they all really enjoyed it, and spectators liked it too,” McCarthy said.

The absence of big, flashy rides was the only hitch. Securing a midway provider has been an ongoing struggle, McCarthy said, because there are only two such companies in B.C., and companies coming from outside the province have to pay $2,000 to get each of their rides certified. “That adds $20,000 onto their bill,” McCarthy said. With cities competing over only two providers, Chilliwack usually loses out to the B.C. Northern Exhibition in Prince George when the two events fall on the same weekend as they did this year.

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empers among local First Nations fishers flared Friday when they were told there would be no sockeye opening on their stretch of the Fraser River over the weekend and only an abbreviated 12-hour opening for Chinook. “We’re pretty pissed off,” Lower Fraser Fishers’ Alliance co-chair Ken Malloway told the Times after a heated conference call with fisheries managers Friday. “Normally this time of the year we fish three times a week, from Thursday to Sunday. But now we’re being cut back and cut back. We haven’t had a regular fishery yet this year.” The Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) has allowed no commercial or sport harvest of sockeye from the Fraser so far this season, and First Nations in the area have had only limited openings for food and ceremonial purposes: one for 24 hours, another for 48 hours and a limited-participation dry-rack fishery in July. Malloway and other local First Nations fishers were angry at being denied a sockeye opening this weekend because openings for aboriginal fishers above and below their stretch of the river (above the Port Mann Bridge and below Sawmill Creek) haven’t been shut down, and they say local sport fishers are going after sockeye illegally close to home.

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Missing woman found

C

What’s Layared in today’s paper

hilliwack police say they have located a missing woman about whom they had serious concerns. Police say Tracey Yeomans was found safe and sound last week, several days after she was reported missing. Chilliwack RCMP had said they were concerned for Yeomans’ well-being. No other details about her disappearance were released.

Page 1 -

Attendance was up at this year’s Chilliwack Fair and we’ve got plenty of photographs of the weekend’s memorable events and displays.

Page 7 -

- Staff

Lovers of craft beer can take great pride that one of the best hops is actually grown in Columbia Valley.

Low returns SALMON, from page 1

Layar uses your iPhone, iPad or Android smartphone or tablet to recognize images in the Times that have been enabled for augmented reality. It translates these images into buttons and notifications on your device’s screen, allowing you to instantly view related videos, share articles on social networks, click on websites mentioned in stories and much, much more. To join the more than 28 million people who have downloaded Layar, visit layar.com or your app store today.

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Cornelia Naylor/TIMES

Kai Manning was serving up lemonade and cookies on Henley Street to raise money for B.C. Children’s Hospital last week.

He’s taking a lemonade stand against cancer & raising funds BY CORNELIA NAYLOR cnaylor@chilliwacktimes.com

K

ai Manning’s dad didn’t come to his first day of school or his first football practice, and he’s not going to be there next time the family goes on a trip. If it wasn’t for cancer, none of that would be true, so this week the local nine-year-old set up a lemonade stand in front of his house to raise money for a cure. ”I just want them to find something, mix stuff up and find the cure for it,” he told the Times. It’s too late to change what happened to his dad, who died of cancer four years ago, but he doesn’t want other families to go through what his family did, he said, so all the money he earns will go to B.C. Children’s Hospital in Vancouver. “Basically finding the cure would help the kids because then they wouldn’t have it any more and then they could live a nice happy life,” he said.

“It’s so refreshing to know that there is so much good out there, between my co-workers pitching in a few dollars and this young man taking time out of his summer on a bright sunny day, when other kids were running through sprinklers, to do what he thought was right .”

Const. Kevin Morris After modest sales on his first day Tuesday, donations spiked when a local RCMP officer posted Kai’s story on Facebook. Const. Kevin Morris was in the neighbourhood in his squad car when Kai’s stand at the corner of Henley Avenue

and Harrison Street caught his eye. “It immediately took me back to when I was a young boy, trying to save up a few bucks for something I wanted,” Morris said in his online post. His heart broke, he said, when he heard Kai’s story. The Mountie scrounged up all the change he could find on the spot, and then returned again later with donations from co-workers as well. “It’s so refreshing to know that there is so much good out there, between my co-workers pitching in a few dollars and this young man taking time out of his summer on a bright sunny day, when other kids were running through sprinklers, to do what he thought was right,” Morris said. With Morris’s Facebook post, Kai’s stand really took off, putting total donations past $700 by Friday morning. “I figured he’d get 20 bucks or something and we’d drive it out to Vancouver, make a day of it,” Kai’s mom Amanda said. “It’s a lot more than 20 bucks now.”

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“They’re fishing for sockeye above us, they’re fishing for sockeye in front of us, they’re fishing for sockeye amongst us,” Malloway said. Fisheries managers and local First Nations had discussed a possible opening for sockeye over the weekend on Wednesday, but updates in technical information forced a last-minute change, according to DFO acting area chief of resource management Brigid Payne. “Intheinterim,andthisoften happens with Fraser sockeye management unfortunately, there was a fairly significant change in the outlook for the stocks and the assessment of how many fish there were available for harvest,” she said. The main problems are low returns and a spike in water temperature, which has been shown to cause severe stress and early mortality for sockeye. “We had to alter management plans to allow more fish to go through the system,” Payne said. As for allowing First Nations above the Port Mann and below Sawmill Creek to continue to fish for sockeye, Payne said those openings have been ramped down.. Payne declined to speculate on future openings until after the Fraser River panel meets again today (Tuesday).


A4 TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

News

Contact Centre a place for positive change BY TYLER OLSEN tolsen@chilliwacktimes.com

L

ee Anne Hanson’s goal is ambitious: zero people in Chilliwack at risk of homelessness and no more than a handful of chronically homeless people living on the streets. But as Chilliwack’s new Health Contact Centre looks to take in its first residents later this month, Hanson—who as addiction services manager for the Pacific Community Resources Society (PCRS) has spent eight years bringing the project to fruition—is confident the battle against homelessness will be won. The contact centre, she told the Times, “is the realization of the dreams of the community and a realization of gaps in services actually fulfilled in one location. This centre has the great opportunity to be able to fulfill those gaps in services for that target population.” To understand the scale of that goal—and the achievement if it’s achieved—one just needs to look at the 2011 homeless count, when 111 people were found living without a home. Even that triple-digit figure likely underestimated the size of the local homeless population. Hanson said the shelter at Ruth and Naomi’s, which opened last year, has “taken the edge off” the scale

Tyler Olsen/TIMES

Pacific Community Resource Society’s Lee Anne Hanson and Sam Mohan are getting set to admit the first residents to the Chilliwack Health and Housing Contact Centre. “With this centre, we hope that homeless people. Now we’re actually of the problem, as have other local services. But getting to single digits within a year, if we don’t have 100 going to take a nosedive, hopefully, in terms of the chronically homeless per cent success of the at-risk-of- in the other direction.” The centre includes 22 relatively homelessness, we should have conwould still be a feat to be proud of. Nevertheless, Hanson has con- tact with all those people because spacious individual rooms, each fidence the centre can make a real we offer them such a broad array of with its own kitchenette, bathroom, difference to Chilliwack’s most vul- services,” she said. “Chilliwack was and desk. (The contact centre buildon the upward trajectory of gaining ing used to house a Days Inn.) nerable people.

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The centre will serve more than residents; it features an in-patient medical clinic, counselling and addictions programs and employment services. Behind the building, a communal garden is planned. Some of those programs are already being offered and stakeholders hope to admit the first slate of residents by the end of August, Hanson said. When the location of the centre was first announced in 2011, it met some opposition from local residents. But as the centre ramps up to full operation and prepares for its first residents, Hanson is confident the community will embrace it. “I’m not worried about backlash because I think we’re working diligently to have the community involvement,” she said. “We’re collaborative, we’re inclusive.” As evidence, Hanson and site supervisor Sam Mohan pointed to an advisory committee that includes various stakeholders from around Chilliwack. “I see that already from just the responses of people who have called me,” said Hanson, who noted one local group had volunteered to hand knit quilts for the centre’s residents. “It’s not going to be a place where negative things happen, but where positive change becomes very well known.”

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A6 TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

News

First Nations band together to study power projects BY TYLER OLSEN tolsen@chilliwacktimes.com

A

First Nations tribe is looking to develop a plan that could have a major impact on the future of run-of-river power projects in the Chilliwack River Valley. There are active claims to four different creeks in the valley, but before they proceed, the proponents must consult with the Ts’elxwéyeqw Tribe, a society that includes seven different local bands.

Wi t h t h e f i r s t p r o j e c t — o n Tamihi Creek—in the works, the Ts’elxwéyeqw (which used to be known as the Ch-ihl-kway-uhk) is now developing a comprehensive plan that will look at the impact of power projects on the river valley as a whole rather than on a case-bycase basis. “Pretty much every creek in the Chilliwack RiverValley has some sort of claim to it,” Ts’elxwéyeqw chief operations officer Matt Wealick told the Times. “We are looking at how

they all work together” The four creeks with active claims are Nesakwatch, Centre, Frosst, and Tamihi creeks. Proponents of run-ofriver projects usually focus on issues surrounding their own projects. But Wealick notes that such projects do not exist within a vacuum. (Individually, power projects may have a minor impact on the valley. But multiple projects can have larger, cumulative effects). Although the creeks do not lie within a reserve, legislation requires

any resource development on Crown land to include consultation and accommodation of First Nations. “We want to know how it’s going impact on cultural values, how it will impact the recreation in the Chilliwack River Valley, how it will impact our forestry businesses, how it will impact any other particular use,” Wealick said. “Is the infrastructure there to handle all of them?” Earlier this year, local kayakers expressed their concerns about power development on the Tamihi.

Wealick said First Nations groups share many of the same concerns of recreation users; he said the tool being developed by the Ts’elxwéyeqw would also look at how the power projects impact other users of the river. The Ts’elxwéyeqw has received $30,000 from the provincial government towards completing the plan. “I think it’s going to be a good tool to help assess these things,” he said. “For us, we just get tired of doing one project at a time.”

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Chris Sartori checks on the hops plants growing on his Chilliwack-area farm. Sartori grows a few different varieties and has found local micro breweries like his hops.

Bitter hop a sweet treat for craft beer drinkers BY GLENDA LUYMES The Province

O

n the hillside above Chris Sartori’s farmhouse is a strange sight. Rows of leafy vines rise from the rolling ranchland, stretching 18 feet high to the top of a cable system that holds them in a V shape. A soft breeze sets the vines swaying, as warm sunlight flickers on the grass below. This morning, Sartori is checking his crop at the Sartori Cedar Ranch. While some of the vines are still in flower, others already bear the small cones that will be harvested in early September. He crushes the green fruit in his hands and inhales. It doesn’t smell like beer. Sartori is one of a handful of B.C. hop farmers producing the prized cones that give beer its bitterness, as well as aroma and flavour. With several thousand plants and a guaranteed buyer in Molson Coors, Sartori is at the forefront of what could be a resur-

operations south, and the last hop gence of local hops. “Look at this,” says Sartori, sweep- fields were uprooted and sold in 1997. Sartori, a German immigrant, planting his arm to indicate his hop fields, set against a forested mountainside in ed his first hops about six years ago, hoping there might be a market for Columbia Valley. “If people could see this they would local cones. His timing proved inspired. be inspired.” While the hops were maturing, Steve Sartori’s hops are nothing if not Stradiotto, the direcinspired. tor of brewing at MolThe venture is influson Coors, was digging enced by more than SEE MORE PHOTOS layar through the Molson a century of history: family archives in OttaWhile an unfamiliar wa searching for the sight in today’s agricultural landscape, hops were once a original Molson Export recipe with a plan to recreate the iconic brew. dominant crop in the Fraser Valley. In an old recipe book from 1908, he In the 1940s, B.C. was home to the largest hop-growing area in the Brit- found what he was looking for. But ish Commonwealth, according to Ron instead of listing hop varietals, the Denman, director of the Chilliwack recipe named growing regions. “I was surprised. The recipe calls for Museum and Archives. “The harvest was a ritual for thou- ‘B.C. hops,’” Stradiotto said. There were a few small ventures in sands of people,” he said. Families would come to Chilliwack B.C. at the time, but it wasn’t until he at the end of August and pick through met Sartori that he knew he’d found September, sleeping in the fields. EvenSee HOPS, Page 20 tually, lower costs in the U.S. drove

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A8 TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

Opinion

◗ Our view

Who we are

Let us all thank civil engineers

The Chilliwack Times is a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership.We’re published Tuesdays and Thursdays from 45951 Trethewey Ave., Chilliwack, B.C. ◗ Publisher

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◗ Administration Shannon Armes ◗ Classifieds Arlene Wood ◗ Advertising Jeff Warren Brian Rumsey Marni de Boer ◗ Editorial Paul J. Henderson Tyler Olsen Cornelia Naylor ◗ Distribution Lisa Ellis Brian Moffat Anja Kim ◗ Contact us Switchboard 604-792-9117 Classified 604-795-4417 Delivery (24hrs) 604-702-5147 Fax 604-792-9300 Visit our website www.chilliwacktimes.com Twitter @ChilliwackTimes Facebook www.facebook.com/pages/ chilliwack-times Email us editorial@chilliwacktimes.com Send us a letter 45951 Trethewey Ave. Chilliwack, B.C. V2P 1K4

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◗ Opinion

An opportunity to complain

T

he weather is a lot like politics—what you want most is mostly what we don’t have . . . right now. We just went through several weeks of some of the hottest, driest weather on record. In fact, depending on how you measure it (and precisely where you take your measurements), we may just have had the driest July ever in the Lower Mainland. Indeed, not a drop of rain was recorded throughout the entire month in any official recording station in Vancouver. And Vancouver also broke its previous record for hours of sunshine in July—which I would expect translates to a similar record for the rest of us in the outlying hinterlands. And let’s be clear about this: the record broken was for the most hours of sunshine in a single July—410 hours of sun peeking from behind previously ubiquitous clouds, veritably smashing the old 409.3-hour mark set in 1985. Imagine that! Sunny Vancouver! (David Duchovny, eat your heart out!) You’d think such a record would make people happy—ecstatic, even—especially considering that, like Mr. Duchovny (he’s the fellow who had the entire X-Files show transported south to escape our supposedly dreary climes, remember?), com-

BOB GROENEVELD

Be Our Guest plaining about the incessant rain, rain, rain is one of our favourite pastimes. In fact, I heard a lot of people were complaining about the hot, hot, hot with no respite—way too hot. Admittedly, I rarely heard a single complaint about it having been too dry (except from those unfortunates among us—myself included—who depend on groundwater and a dug well for our sustenance and to feed the gardening monkey we carry on our backs). But the heat? Way too darned hot! Until recently. When I woke up one recent morning, the first thing that I noticed was that the fan blowing air into my bedroom window was blowing cool air—almost wintery, by recent standards. And when I looked out, I rejoiced! There was water falling from the sky—only a little bit, at first, but it picked up momentum, and soon there was a veritable deluge. The plants in my garden heaved a collective sigh

of relief. The lawn began turning green again, almost immediately. But when I made my way from the nether reaches of my backyard and into the clutches of civilized company, the story was suddenly different. Complaints of “way too darned hot” had already reverted to: “Way too darned cold, way too darned wet—why don’t we ever get a real summer around here?” The very people who had only days earlier vociferously complained of hot, sticky, sweatstained T-shirts and having no way to escape from the sun’s harsh ultra-violet rays assaulting us with threats of deadly cancers were now bemoaning the fickle—dreary-again—climate that routinely drenches our landscapes and drowns our dreams of natural tans . . . which we all avoid when the sun does make its occasional appearance. There’s no pleasing us. We are a species of complainers. I said the weather is like politics? Actually, it’s our perception of the weather that is like our perception of politics. Whatever we have right now isn’t good enough—we want it to be something better, by tomorrow. And if tomorrow comes with any kind of change, it’s never as good as it was. ◗ Bob Groeneveld is editor of the Langley Advance.

t’s the silly season in news, so it’s no surprise that everyone on the planet heard about the Great Fatberg of London about five minutes after it was discovered. The fatberg, so named by Thames Water, is the largest single lump of congealed lard ever found in the London sewer system. It was so big, it was preventing nearby residents from flushing their toilets. Things could have turned much worse than a few backed up toilets, however. “If we hadn’t discovered it in time, raw sewage could have started spurting out of manholes across the whole of Kingston,” said Gordon Hailwood, a waste contracts supervisor for Thames Water. The sizeable pipe is now being repaired, and this will no doubt cause some inconvenience and grumbling. No one likes navigating around ripped up roads, and it’s not exactly cheap to replace major pieces of public infrastructure like this. That said, we should take this as an opportunity to give thanks to those who keep our sewer and water pipes blessedly far from our minds most of the time. It is a miracle of modern life in the affluent west that we flush toilets and turn on taps, and expect everything to flow. We flip light switches and expect light, we go into buildings and don’t worry that they might collapse and crush us. Of course, there are exceptions, but when a bridge or shopping mall collapses, or when water is poisoned by bacteria, or when fatbergs form in the sewers, these things make the news because they are exceptions. Building cities and making them run is a pretty thankless task most of the time. So let us now thank the labourers and contractors and engineers who do that work. We promise we will stop pouring grease down the drain, and cutting holes in loadbearing walls, and ignoring the fire safety codes. At least for now.

◗ Your view This week’s question Would you vote “yes” or “no” in a marijuana legalization referendum? VOTE NOW: www.chilliwacktimes.com


CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013 A9

Letters

Bottom line for caregivers needs to be considered Editor: I wanted to share my experience as a supervisor for a health care agency in the 90s. in provinding care for at home clients. Supplying consistent workers was a constant challenge for a few basic reasons. Firstly, workers were assigned to blocks of time at a client’s house. E.g. 8 to 10 a.m. then 2 to 4 p.m. at another house. They seldom were given full eight hour shifts because of the nature of the services needed. Occasionally they were assigned to live-in assignments in which they would stay 24 hours a day—and sleep in the client’s home—an obstacle for caregivers with kids. The wage home support workers received was close to minimum. The bus services to and from assignments were limited. Their wages rarely covered the expense of a car. Needless to say, many were recruited, but many found it hard to make a living wage with the limitations of the assignments. They moved on to group homes or facilities. As the liason to the clients, I sincerely sympathized with their desire to have a consistent caregiver that they could get to know and trust. I occasionally provided care myself when workers called in sick to help minimize the disruption of service. I don’t know what the answer is. Providing a shuttle service would be logisitcally impossible as service is provided by so many workers over such a wide area. I think if workers had backto-back assignments (as close together as possible) to construct a full work day,

Send us a letter TO INCLUDE YOUR LETTER, use our online form at www.chilliwacktimes.com, contact us by e-mail at editorial@chilliwacktimes.com, fax 604-792-9300 or mail us at 45951 Trethewey Ave, Chilliwack, B.C. V2P 1K4. Letters must include first and last names and your hometown and should be fewer than 200 words. To view our letters/privacy policy visit our website at www. chilliwacktimes.com. with homes in close proximity or worked a maximum of 12 hours on live-ins it might help. The bottom line would be the workers’ ability to afford to own and maintain a car. This requires a higher wage. The government saves a lot of money keeping people in their homes. They need to support these clients by providing a real solution to retaining consistent care-givers—pay them more. S. Burchart Chilliwack

Where’s the compassion? Editor: Re: Aug. 6 Times story “The strain of relying on others.” I am a family member to a Home Support client. I have on many different occasions received phone calls from Fraser Health schedulers telling me that they have no one to go to my sister’s house to care for her. Because I’m her emergency contact, they tell me it’s up to me to deal with the situation. I have received these calls when I’m at work

H S F Ifor R E E F

ENTER

and even out of town on holidays. It’s not a very nice feeling when you can’t be there or get there. You know what the consequences can be, and it’s not good. They make you feel responsible, and it’s all from them not doing their job. Emergency numbers are there in an emergency, not for a back up for their incompetence. I’ve received these calls five minutes before they should be arriving at her house. I was once told she would have to stay up in her wheel chair until the next morning at 7 a.m. Home Support of all people should understand the consequences of this. It makes me want to put the schedulers in a chair, tie their hands and feet to the chair and say, “Good night!” at 5 p.m. and “We’ll see you at 7 a.m.” Our 78-year-old mother has had these same calls. You would think that as a mother of a disabled child that she has suffered enough, let alone being told she is now responsible to give the care she needs. I’m quite sure that a 78-year-old cannot do a transfer from

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bed to chair or vice versa. Home Support, give your head a shake and show some compassion for what families and clients go through. In my opinion, Home Support has gone downhill severely over the years. First they take away cooking, cleaning and odd jobs, so now clients get less time and most can’t afford to get house cleaners in as well. I know a few clients that, while support workers are there, they could easily do a bit of cleaning or odd jobs, like changing a light bulb. Home Support, can you tell me how a quadriplegic is supposed to change a light bulb? No—I didn’t think so. Personal care is called personal care because it’s personal. When you have 20 different workers coming in and you don’t know who it will be, it’s very stressful. I’m sure every client has their preference to which ones do

a good job for their needs and which ones don’t. The client should have a say in this as well. I know, on occasion, when I’ve been told they had no one to come, that there were girls that could have and would have. My suggestion to address some of these problems would be that the scheduling should be done days in advance and that they do their job with some dignity and respect and they will get the same in return. Maggie Van Esch Chilliwack

Mind our own business

rights is not set in stone. The Russian people, through their leader, declare that Hollywood morality is to be discourage, punished if necessary. Hey, this is a mighty modern nation. So their laws are different. In many states of the USA same-sex marriage is illegal. Also in many countries, especially the Muslim nations. Could we mind our own affairs, like native treaties, child poverty, homelessness, etc. For some people it is black and white, not rainbow. Al Kosub Chilliwack

Editor: I strongly disagree with your opinion in Our View (Chilliwack Times, Aug.8). The hypocrisy is glaring. Our version of human

HAVE YOUR SAY ◗ We want to hear your comments. Fax them to 604-792-9300 or e-mail us at editorial@chilliwacktimes.com.

Facebook fanfare

O

ur Facebook page stirs much banter among readers, regardless of the topic. Have your say on all articles by posting on our page, at www.facebook.com/ChilliwackTimes.

Your comments could appear in a future print issue of the Times. Here are some of our favourite comments posted onto our Facebook page in response to recently published articles.

THREAD: Cougar shot on Teapot Hill Responses Cheryl Mount

I don’t get why relocation for the cougar wasn’t an option? Why kill it when it did nothing wrong? Seems really cruel.

Kevin Schroeder

I think the problem was that it was not scared of people at all making it very unpredictable and with it being in camp sites where little kids are playing do you really want to chance it?

Tony Thurston

If that cat meant any harm to these people they would be dead, conservation officer did not manage to conserve anything here.


A10 TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

Sports

Tyler Olsen

Phone: 604-792-9117 • Email: tolsen@chilliwacktimes.com • Fax: 604-792-9300

Huskers buck losing ways

On deck Huskers in Nanaimo

Huskers Broncos

The Valley Huskers hit the road this weekend to take on the Vancouver Island Raiders. Game time is Saturday at 4 p.m. The game can be watched online by visiting www.chilliwackhuskers. com and following the links.

33 30

BY TYLER OLSEN tolsen@chilliwacktimes.com

T

he Valley Huskers are no longer the worst team in the British Columbia Football Conference. Indeed, after hanging on in the fourth quarter to beat the Kamloops Broncos 33-30 Saturday, the Huskers now find themselves in third place in the British Columbia Football Conference. The Huskers and Broncos had battled to a tie the previous week. But whereas the Huskers had continually found themselves settling for three points during the two teams’ first meeting, on Saturday, Valley made their chances count. Receiver Dylan Boykowich scored two touchdowns and registered his second-consecutive 100-yard game for the Huskers. Ty DeRayos scored the Huskers’ other touchdown and rushed for 50 yards on 14 carries. Quarterback Cody Parray completed 13 of 26 passes for 167 yards. Huskers coach Tyson St. James said his team’s work made the difference. “Our guys really worked hard for that,” he said. “At the end of the day, you teach them what you can but it comes down to them wanting it.” While the Broncos finished with more yards offensively,

Ladies soccer seeks players Ladies Over-30 fall soccer is looking for players to fill teams. Games are Sunday afternoon at Fairfield Island. All levels welcome for fun, friendly fitness. Contact Ladies30FallSoccer@shaw.ca for more information.

Rep prep camps at Twin Rinks Register now for the 2013 Chilliwack Minor Hockey Association rep prep camps. Camps run Aug. 19 to 23 at Twin Rinks and are limited to 24 players and four goalies per group. Open to atoms, peewees, bantams and midgets. Register Tuesday or Wednesday between noon and 4 p.m. at the CMHA office, or drop off a cheque in the drop box. Visit http://cmha.goalline.ca.

Junior dragon boaters The Optimist Eagles Youth Dragon Boat Team is a mixed team with boys and girls aged 12 to 18. The club holds a short fall learn-topaddle program starting in the middle of September. Check the team’s Facebook page—Optimist Eagles Youth Dragonboat Team— for more info on the start dates and times of the fall program.

Briggs wins jr. tourney

Hugo Yuen/THE DAILY NEWS

Kamloops Broncos running back Jacob Palmarin, gets caught up with Chilliwack Huskers Hayden Jeffries Saturday evening at Hillside Stadium in Kamloops. the Huskers won the field position game. Kicker Dan Erickson, who had been named the BCFC’s special teams player of the preceding week, averaged more than 50 yards on nine punts, forcing the Broncos’ erratic offence to march the ball down field. By comparison, the punts of the Broncos’ kicker averaged less than 40 yards. The Huskers also blocked a punt, which led to a key Valley touchdown late in the third quarter. Erickson, who was named the player of the game, also kicked three

field goals, the longest from 45 yards. “Dan Erickson has been playing well,” St. James said. “His protection’s good. He’s been able to punt the ball well, and field goals he’s been doing great.” Returner Josh Hayden racked up the return yards, finishing with 176 yards on 10 kickoff and punt returns. St. James was also pleased with his team’s ability to score when they found themselves close to the end zone. “Our goal was to be hungry in the red zone,” he said.

C

ole Briggs shot a two-over-par 74 Friday at Royalwood Golf Course to claim top prize in the 2013 Fraser Valley Junior Golf Tournament. Briggs finished the four-round tournament with an even-par score of 276, two shots better than Jake Scarrow, who shot a 70 at Royalwood.

“We got the field position we needed and we capitalized.” The Huskers still had a little bit of a scare late; Valley led 30-16 late in the fourth quarter before the Broncos scored two touchdowns in quick succession. Only an Erickson field goal guaranteed the Huskers their first victory of the year and moved them into a playoff spot. Admittedly, the BCFC season is only three games old and the Huskers have played two of those games against the Broncos, who aren’t all that great. But three points

Chilliwack’s Connor McLennan, who had entered the final day of the tourney tied with Briggs, shot a 77 to finish third. The tournament included stops at Cultus Lake, Chilliwack and Meadowlands golf clubs. McLennan, 17, and Briggs, 16, each won their respective age categories.

from three games is something to be celebrated, especially since the Huskers had only claimed two points from their previous three seasons entering 2013. St. James said the early success of this year’s squad is a tribute not only to the players on the field, but also to the support from the sidelines, where a renewed group of boosters has given the club a base on which to build. “I really like the fact that we were able to do this for them, and show them their hard work is paying off in some

Nathan Bahnmann, who finished the tournament 11 shots back of Briggs, was the top 15-year-old, while 14-year-old Josh Banford won his age category. Christopher Dale was the top 13-yearold, Ryan Alexander won the 12-yearold crown, while Brian Dale was the top 11-year-old.

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A12 TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

Sports

Bronze medal for shot putter

C

h i l l i w a c k t h r ow e r Tasha Willing pulled out a personal-best performance at the Legion National Youth Track and Field Championships in Langley last weekend to win bronze in midget girls shot put. Ranked fifth going into the event Friday, Willing threw 11.72 metres, just 46 centimetres shy of the gold-medal throw by Ontario’s Grace Tennant. In discus and hammer Willing lived up to her pre-

meet rankings, taking sixth in discus with a throw of 32.87 metres Saturday and fourth in hammer with a throw of 44.66 metres Sunday. “She is a little disappointed but does not realize the magnitude of being third, fourth and sixth in Canada,” Willing’s mom Marcy said. “All the provinces best were here and had to qualify by being first or second in their own provincial championships and also meet the Canadian standards.”

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CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013

22ND ANNUAL

CHILLIWACK

2013

Flight Fest www.chilliwackairshow.ca

Sunday, August 18

Pancake Breakfast 8-10am

Sponsored by the Mt. Cheam Lions at the Firkus Hangar. Breakfast is $5.00/person

Gates open at 10am Pre-Show 11am Show Start 1pm

New this year to Flight Fest the B25 & Spitfire

• NO ATM • NO Balloons • NO Rollerblades/Skateboards • NO Pets SERVICE ANIMALS ONLY • NO Bikes

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A14 TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013

22ND ANNUAL

Flight Fest

GRANLEY FAMILY AIRSHOWS

www.chilliwackairshow.ca PETE MCLEOD RACING

The Father / Son Duo of Bud & Ross Granley have been entertaining the residents of Chilliwack and surrounding communities for the past 10 years consecutively, Bud flying his T-6 and Yak 55, then joined by son Ross in 2003 flying the Yak 18 in the dueling Yak show. Who’s the better pilot? (they’ve both answered that question at one time or another) come join them at the 2013 Chilliwack Airshow and ask them yourselves, while they sign autographs in the signing tent Sunday August 18th, 2013. Bud is returning to the airshow for his 14th consecutive year, while Ross is returning for his 10th. Come on out and watch them.

New to the Chilliwack Airshow this year but not new to the aviation circuit. In 2009, Pete McLeod of Red Lake, Ontario made history by becoming the youngest pilot and first Canadian to compete in the elite Red Bull Air Race World Championship. Over two decades younger than the average pilot in the world championship, Pete turned heads and quickly earned the respect of his rivals with his impressively smooth and precise flying. His personality quickly made him a favorite with fans. Pete’s 2009 rookie campaign was a development year as the Canadian built his team for long-term success. Entering the season with the heaviest and slowest plane in the field, Pete still managed to get the most out of his Edge 540 and gain valuable experience.

MRAZEK AIRSHOWS

TEAM ROCKET AEROBATICS

Veteran airshow pilot and performer John Mrazek along with his Harvard Mark IV, “Pussycat II,” will dazzle audiences, spectators, or anyone watching with a spectacular aerial ballet. With lots of noise, smoke, and skill, John’s aerobatic performance will bring the entire airshow crowd to a standstill.John is a well known aerobatic airshow performer with over twenty five years experience flying the airshow circuit. When John is not flying airshows, he is instructing in the art of aerobatics, formation flying, and float flying. John also acts as an ICAS approved Airshow Certificate Evaluator.

SUPERDAVE & the SHEYDEN MX2

A two ship combination with Eric Hansen in the F1 Rocket, and Ken Fowler in the Harmon Rocket II. Precision, speed, and high performance aerobatics at it’s best….a spectacular show that will bring the crowd to their feet. Ken and Eric have been performing together in formation for 6 years. As a team they are dynamic and fast. They are the only team of this aircraft type, in the Air Show industry. Flight Fest is fortunate to have Team Rocket Perform their Night Show on Saturday August 17th.. Truly an awesome spectacle! Ken and Eric combine their high speed capabilities with an aerobatic routine and outstanding fireworks display. All of this, set to music. ‘Stars in the Sky’ will dazzle onlookers and provide a night show to remember.

SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE

Chilliwack’s own Dave Mathieson and the Scheyden MX2, better known as “Super Dave” in the airshow community, was voted the #1 aerobatic pilot in Canada… by his mom. (It’s on the side of his airplane, so it has to be true!) Mathieson currently flies the world’s most advanced aerobatic aircraft called the MX2. The aircraft is designed for plus or minus 16Gs, and has an incredible roll rate of 500 degrees per second and is powered by a 380HP motor giving the aircraft a top speed of 300 MPH.

One of the most important fighters ever built, the Supermarine Spitfire catches our memory for helping win the Battle of Britain in 1940, but this elegant and agile plane played a host of roles worldwide from 1936–1957. Its fragile, almost dainty appearance belied a superior performance and hard-hitting firepower that made it a formidable opponent in aerial combat. The Spitfire was a pilot’s dream to fly, a lethal fighter, and a delight to watch. It could take off and land on an airstrip or a patch of cornfield. It flew in turn for dogfights, escort missions, aerial performances, front-line defense, and combat training. This aircraft is now owned by the Historic Flight Foundation located at Payne Field in WA State.

CANADIAN MUSEUM OF FLIGHT

NORTH AMERICAN B-25 MITCHELL The B-25 Mitchell fought in every theatre of the Second World War and operated in many roles, including tactical bombing, tank busting and anti shipping strikes. B-25s served with the RCAF between 1944 and 1962 - most of them after WW II. The aircraft that you will see at Flight Fest is named “Grumpy” and it’s flight path began in 1943, training US Army Air Force pilots. In 1944, she was transferred to the Royal Air Force as part of the Lend\Lease program and worked for the Royal Canadian Air Force. Though her work was quiet, she trained crews to fly B-24 Liberators for the critical aerial offensive in Southeast Asia. Post-war, it’s probable that she spent time in storage, but also joined auxiliary bombing units responsible for defending western Canada. This aircraft is now owned by the Historic Flight Foundation located at Payne Field in WA State

The Canadian Museum of Flight located at the Langley Airport is home to both flying and static aircraft ranging from WWI with a replica SE5A, a WWII Westland Lysander and the CT-114 Tutor flown by the Canadian Forces Snowbirds. In the Hangar you will find displays on early British Columbian aviation pioneers and outside a vast collection of Aircraft engines. Plan a day of it and visit the Museum which is open daily from 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 pm

The Canadian Force s Sno wbir d

Thank You to our Sponso rs

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The Optimist Club of Chilliwack

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A16 TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

THANK YOU TO OUR ADDITIONAL SPONSORS

BBQ & HANGAR DANCE

Airport Coffee Shop City of Chilliwack Garrison Bistro Joe Martin Little Mountain Greenhouses & Garden Centre Magnum Management Mediast Norich Electric Norma’s Bakery Safeway Shoker’s Farms Tim Hortons Western Explosives

SATURDAY AUGUST 17 Enjoy the Twilight Show, Steak BBQ & Dance. Get your tickets at the Airport Coffee Shop

SHUTTLE SCHEDULE

Kid’s Landing Zone

OLD UCFV Campus on Yale Road (AT END OF AIRPORT ROAD)

Stop by the landing zone for face painting, crafts, Ident-a-Kid and our paper airplane contest.

Drop off your donations at the Envision Tent Non-perishable food items will be accepted at Chilliwack Flight Fest in partnership with Envision Financial’s The Full Cupboard program. The Full Cupboard is an innovative community program designed to raise food, funds and awareness for food banks in the communities where Envision Financial operates. Last year over 95,000 British Columbian’s accessed their local food bank, 30% of whom were children.

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CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013 A17

Sports

1 888 836-9786

UFV - Darren McDonald

G.W. Graham Grizzlies football team member Von Richardson participates in the University of the Fraser Valley’s football concussion study.

UFV’s football concussion study a no-brainer for G.W.

A

“It immediately put us in the spotlight in rainbow of wires streams across the table as UFV kinesiology instructor the province, and now all high school teams Dr. Michael Gaetz whispers, “Breathe . are trying to find a way to follow us,” says G.W. . . perfect” and the bulky teen stares ahead, Graham athletic director Jake Mouritzen. In addition to eliminating the peer pressure unblinking. The test, taking place in a small room at of playing through an often invisible injury, the University of the Fraser Valley’s Chilliwack Gaetz’s testing alleviates the strain on parents campus at Canada Education Park, is more and coaches alike when it comes to deciding than an exercise in meditation — it’s part of an when a student is ready to play again. ongoing study placing local athletes head and “We’ve taken all the guessing out of it, and shoulders above the rest when dealing with we’re relying on science,” Mouritzen says, addthe increasingly troublesome world of concus- ing that 90 of his 100 athletes were already testsions. ed by early July ahead of fall’s football season. “We’ve been really blessed and very grateful Led by Gaetz, and involving football players at Chilliwack’s G.W. Graham middle/second- to UFV and Dr. Gaetz for involving us in this ary school, the study is built on baseline test- program . . . it’s absolutely world class.” ing—measuring students’ physical and mental Gaetz’s involvement began shortly after local capacities before they suffer concussions, not family and emergency room doctor Josh Greggain started looking into how concussions just after. “It’s the only way to get a sense of where the plague young athletes in the spring of 2012. Greggain, who served as student is starting from,” the Grizzlies’ medical direcGaetz says. tor alongside former minor Memory, attention, reacfootball volunteer and curtion and processing time are in the spotlight in the rent Grizzlies head coach all recorded using delicate Laurie Smith, needed a partsensors inserted through province abd now all ner for concussion research. cloth skull caps before and high school teams are Combing through UFV’s after vigorous stationary trying to find a way to website for student assisbike sessions. tance, he dug through Balance is also tested, as follow us.” kinesiology’s page, and subare cognitive abilities using a standardized computer test Jake Mouritzen sequently contacted program head Chris Bertram. with ties to Harvard Univer“He said, ‘not me, but I’ve sity and used by NHL teams during “quiet room” consultations following got your guy,’” Dr. Greggain recalls. And along came Gaetz, who made concuspotential on-ice concussions. Armed with that information, G.W. Gra- sions the subject of his doctoral thesis while ham Grizzlies staff can immediately deter- studying at Simon Fraser University. With UFV’s new Chilliwack campus openmine if a player suffers a concussion during a game or practice by issuing a series of side- ing so close to G.W. Graham, the partnership line tests and measuring the results against was a no-brainer. “This is what community partnerships are the player’s baseline information gathered at UFV—potentially eliminating the chance of a all about,” Greggain says, who called Gaetz’s research “absolutely phenomenal work.” secondary (and often more severe) injury. While his role with the team involves lookAs time passes, tests also determine where a player is in terms of recovery, and what level ing after the clinical side of concussions, Greggain says the relatively short period of of physical exercise is appropriate—if any. “It allows us to say ‘you have a concussion, collection means data are not yet conclusive now let’s manage that concussion,’” explains when understanding whether or not concusGaetz, who is currently assisted by five UFV sions are more damaging to younger people. That said, he adds, “We think (youth constudent volunteers. “We’re doing this as a service to the com- cussion prevention and treatment) is more munity,” he says. “It doesn’t cost G.W. Graham important than with adults. Cognitive ability needs to be at its highest during high school school anything.” It’s a program the Grizzlies have embraced and college. “We believe this is of paramount imporwith open arms. Entering only their second season, G.W. tance . . . We want to protect (student–athGraham’s football teams (Grade 8, junior var- letes’) brains and livelihood—more than their sity, and varsity) are rushing past programs in chance to get back out there and play more football.” existence for decades.

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A18 TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

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CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013

A19

Community Parkinson’s support

A Parkinson’s support group meets the second Tuesday of every month (Aug. 13) at 2 p.m. at Evergreen Hall. The group is for anyone with Parkinson’s and their care givers or anyone interested in learning about the disease. For more information email Judi0328@gmail.com or call 604-798-9653.

Music and More

Community events To include your event, contact Tyler Olsen at tolsen@ chilliwacktimes.com. Put your event on our digital calendar by visiting www.chilliwacktimes.com.

Aug. 16 at the Best Western Rainbow Country Inn. Half of ticket sales will be donated to the march. Tickets are $10 for a roast beef dinner and can be purchased at Hofstede’s Country Barn or by calling 604-799-0688. There will also be a 50/50 draw, silent auction and toonie toss.

The Chilliwack Library’s Music and More events take place every Wednesday until Aug. 21 at Salish Park behind the Chilliwack Library. The series features weekly children’s activities and evening concerts. Admission is free. On Aug. 14 join Museum and Archives staff to construct a maple leaf bird. At 7 p.m., enjoy a fusion of jazz, roots and blues music from Rockland Moran.

The UN/NATO Veterans Group holds a car/truck/bike wash and barbecue Aug. 17 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Buff Tech Auto Detailing, at A45868 Railway Ave.

MS Support

Concert

The Multiple Sclerosis Support Group will meet at Minter Gardens Aug. 15 at 10 a.m. for a tour. A bus will be available at Prospera Centre at 9:15 a.m. For more info, call Michele at 604-824-1878.

Kidney fundraiser

A fundraiser for the Kidney Foundation of Canada’s Kidney March takes place

rison Art Expo Aug. 18 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. in Harrison Hot Springs. Local artists have created the event to share the beauty of their backyard with artists from all communities. Those who participate are invited to set up to sell artwork and/or to paint, photograph and even just to network with fellow artists. This is not a crafting event, however. Available painting areas are from the Harrison Hotel entrance, along the beach, to and including Rendall Park (by the boat launch). Artists are asked to set up on grassed areas only, not on walkways. There is no registration for this event. There is no admission fee.

Veterans car wash

Frankie Bones will perform contemporary and classic music Aug. 18 at 7 p.m. at Sardis Community Church. Free admission; free-will offering.

Cadets Wanted

The 1725 Canadian Military Engineers Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps will host a recruitment event Aug. 24 from 10 a.m to 2 p.m., in the Sears parking lot of the Cottonwood Mall. The Chilliwack museum will bring in an army

On the beach

Artists are invited to take a day away from the studio and bring their brushes to the beach for the second Har-

tank, and the Cadets cook trailer will be on site to provide hamburgers, hot dogs and Red Leaf water by donation. This is a great opportunity to see what the Army Cadet program, a non-profit organization, has to offer.

Dart league

The Fraser Valley East Dart League is looking for teams and individual players to sign up for the 2013/2014 season. The league hosts a team registration day Aug. 24 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Vedder Legion. League fees are $20 per person and each team must register a minimum of five players. This is a fun and competitive league for all ages and abilities. Make Thursday nights dart nights. Visit www.fvedl.com for more information.

Senior crib

The Senior Resources Society Society will begin a social crib day Thursdays from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Evergreen Hall in September. For more info, call the Senior Resource Office at 604-793-9979.

Mental health programs

The Creative Centre Society, which provide rehabilitation and recovery based programs and services to support people who live

with a severe and persistent mental illness, hosts various programs throughout the week and a barbecue lunch every Tuesday and Thursday. Sign up by calling 604-7927803 or learn more at www. creativecentresociety.org

OAPO open to members

ship study and healthy living cooking sessions as well as basic and intermediate computer instruction. For more information, contact Lynn at 604-393-3251 or gibsonl@ comserv.bc.ca or stop into the office at 9214 Mary St.

Pagans meet

The Old Age Pensioners Organization (OAPO) Branch 173, at 5725 Tyson Rd. (by Twin Rinks) is inviting residents 50 years and older to come and join their club, which hosts activities, along with monthly potluck suppers and special functions. Call Ann at 604-858-0066 for more information.

The Fraser Valley/Chilliwack Pagan and Spiritual Paths Group meets every Thursday at 7 pm. at the Dragon Dynasty Restaurant, at 46171 Yale Rd. The group welcomes all pagan, wiccan, First Nations and other spiritual paths, including those of mainstream faiths.

Acoustic jams

The Dorjechang Buddhist Centre hosts relaxing meditation classes Thursdays from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Sardis Family Resource Centre, 7112 Vedder Rd. There is a $10 suggested donation. For more info visit www.dorjechang.ca or call 604-8533738. Inner Vision Yoga hosts a guided group meditation Sundays from 9 to 10 a.m. By donation. Call 604-703-8604 or visit www.innervisionyoga. ca. Sahaja Yoga hosts free spiritual meditation classes run every Saturday at Central community school from 1 to 2:30 p.m. The entrance is on the west side of the building.

Country acoustic jam sessions are held every Saturday at the Chilliwack Seniors Recreation Centre, at 9400 College St., from 7 to 11 p.m. All musicians and friends are welcome. Bring your own instrument. Members $3 and non-members $5. For more information contact Rod or Marnie 604-792-1168.

Immigrant programs

Chilliwack Community Services Immigrant Services Program offers short programs such as “Kids in Canada” (for newcomer parents), Canadian citizen-

Yoga and meditation

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BY TYLER OLSEN times.com tolsen@chilliwack ed ter dismiss former firefighage says a lack his because of makes it wer often ack Fire of manpo to for the Chilliw impossible (CFD) to adhere to Department guidelines meant T H U R S D A Y operational and safety risks. the BC reduce health has asked that February 21, 2013 Russell Shellard l to rule Tribuna mandatory Human Rights is Chilliwack’s firefighters the City of BY TYLER OLSEN age of 60 for the triburetirement On Friday, tolsen@chilliwacktimes.com Shellard’s discriminatory. to throw out become Hospice Society bids nal declined amihi Creek has -call nt. British for paid-on complai a a “poster child” farewell to McGrath formerly endanout of the Shellard, Columbia waterways projwas forced BY CORNELIA NAYLOR power firefighter, at the start of 2012. cktimes.com gered by independent a provincial l, cnaylor@chilliwa ent to departm to the tribunaon ects (IPP), according submission willTrally elders  N E W S , S P O R T S In, hisW  at chilliwacktimes.com E Ait isTnot Huncomm E R be& E N T E R T boriginal AINM EN recreation group. creek— grounds scenes to Shellard argued“ The popular kayaking the Sto:lo Nation fire ground er in order Chilliwack River protest a with CFD t manpow Wednesday to which feeds into the set Rapids—has lacking sufficien nal guidelines they say the y just below the Tamihi “moral injustice” operatio safety risks of two “rivers to hands of the to follow health and been named one have suffered at the Education perRecreation out to reduce . . . The older watch” by the Outdoor ters. ces, Coqualeetza Cultural directors. British Columfor firefigh of life experien Council (ORC) of ofBazso/PNG staff photo Centre (CCEC) board of the riskLes its annual Most sonnel, because Elders Group help reduce bia, which released The Coqualeetza ncy List Monday. all emerge are vital and at their home in Chillia part of CCEC onhere seen Ediger Endangered Rivers safety (CEG) has been Carolynand forceps also on the with her motherhealth but in Janufor a botched Ediger’s The Fraser River was almost 40 years, ent of NUMBER of for Cassidy NUMBER of family NUMBER restored NUMBER of awardrequirem $3.2-million for a fight secondlong the a been scenes.” of Canada the CCEC board the age l list, having been named in the prov- It has medical marijuana the Supreme medical marijuanaCourt medical marijuana medical marijuana ary, members say city says job’s physica consultaweek. Last Thursday river 15 years ago.The wack lastproduction brain damage most endangered because licences with possession licences production licences needed possession licencesthe suddenly and without dissolvmore permanent left Cassidy is firefighters it was delivery that ince, behind the Peace. in Chilliwack in in Chilliwack in in Chilliwack in in Chilliwack in put older tion announced job heart location of a demands further, that Tamihi Creek is the January 2012 January 2012 February 2013 February 2013 on-thedeadly ing the program and, power projwould at risk of proposed 15-megawatt any group that remained l’s ruling, a subsidiary of attacks. use the name to the tribuna ect by KMC Energy, be forbidden to Last month According Ryall suggested “the WindRiver Power Corp. local kayRick ers is “Coqualeetza.” that Fire Chief group, which -call firefight G.eJohnston for the Times reported Members of the paid-on William for full-tim found pink for gynecologist work recently and luncheons and than Frey for 1998. in us obstetrician dangero birth aker Adam they meets weekly duringeher of care in the the entire run, becaus more the standardters” breaching flagging tape along he had failed to engages in cultural activities tried firefigh and must decision found trial career2009 that work on the at any timewas readily available to community, said they have The initial leading to worries paged staff be with the BY CORNELIA NAYLOR surgical can begin. meet soon a for- unsuccessfully to ensure a backup project would cnaylor@chilliwacktimes.com Page 3 when caesarean TER,section told the Times child byFIREFIGH issue and now photo deliver the help A WindRiver official See board to resolve the Ryan Bayes their “pre-consultaceps procedure failed. appealed that decision in 2011, have no choice but to make the project is in the ore local students are in Can- grievance public. Johnston successfully tion planning stages.” graduating within six Jeremy to have the case heard is totally disbefore the family pushed ORC executive directora stand“What they’re doing years of starting Grade 8, is Creek. Vehicles and just completely over- respectful,” CEG president Virginia ada’s top court. McCall said the Tamihi and IP on Tamihi but the Chilliwack school district overjoyed “and in our large rapidrivers BY STEPHANIE of creeks Pre-Owned hundreds “We’re really g in for runs the court action Joe said of the board, Zig-Zag, a that are threat- The Province still lags almost seven per cent Premium Mark et Pricin of the biggest said Ediger, who launched had even begun A kayaker around the province behind the provincial grad-rate and culture respect is one Live whelmed,” Chilliwack in herat about.” behalf of her daughter, only bedroom on talk was we 2008 in Ediger’s that ened by such projects. average, according to 2011-12 stathings and assidy when Cassidy projannouncing flower-shaped lights, discussing legal action “They’re called run-of-river tistics released last week. The Jan. 30 letter home is filled with a total misgroup prothree. ects [but] that is almost off our shoulders the dissolution of the walls are painted blue. The district saw a 3.3 per cent Instead, he BY PAUL J. Hthe board’s ing for nearly half of the 28,076 across huge burden lifted the a said. ENDERSON colour as a Tiffany box,” for “It’s McCall nomer,” “Same peace of mind, knowing vides no rationale only that the increase in its six-year completion 5952 off much head DL complete and it’s just Ediger. “When we Canada. says the projects siphonit through phenderson@chilliwacktimes.com (financially) for decision, stating rate overall last year, with a 5.1 per for her60¢ said her mom, Carolyn to provide It’s like The number of those growing Price able [its] mandate r.com we’ll bemariof the water and divert fish down- home, she starts to laugh and giggle. chrysle cent gain among girls and a 1.4 per board had “reviewed and life.” rdodge be.” juana increased even more. her to of year after reporting that ChilloconnoDECISION the rest program funding labour early pipes, thereby affecting who use heaven to her—it’s where she wants cent bump among boys. FOR there wereIn513 WITH As of last indi-1998, Johnston induced was high regarding SCANweek, fight for jusiwack residents were was dissolvJanuary NOWthree 12-year-long stream and the humans family’sINVENTORY pregnancy service delivery” and purThe Ediger with in Chilliwack who holdafter CCEC Since grad rates in the province personal times likelyCassidy than averwas leftviduals determining Ediger’s ENTIRE PREOWNED OURmore way through ing the group “following the at 38 weeks daughter SHOP wack the waterways for recreational has final- licences of as a whole tice after use production (PUPL) andinto 77 complications part agetheir British Columbians to be delivery proce- mandate and policies, the voices i m p r ov e d risk. After running Street, Chilli poses. damage due to a botched is becom- severe brain person produc- to switch to a caesarean medical marijuana growers, who hold designated elders, along b y l e s s 8645 Young 92-5151 the delivery, he decided room to make arrangements. “To many, Tamihi Creek empha- licensed close. [its] supporting Sto:lo and to a learned come has tion licences (DPPL). Assuming the 193the 604-7 thelyTimes the number has quadriplegia of sorts, with spastic dure instead, and left ing a poster child $3.2a year See ELDERS, Page 6t h a n o n e ndsons.com Cassidy, now 15, lives awarded number from ago included both better regional tripled. will be per cent, sizing the need for She and her family www.jadama See CASSIDY, Page 4 Canada ofand cerebral palsy. PUPLs DPPLs (Health Canada was to IPP devel- According to figures obtained through Court 2011-12 planning when it comes has been million in damages after the Supreme unable against that an Access to Informationa request decisioninthis month to confirm this by press time) saw Chilliopment; something unanimously restored that’s a three-fold, or 206 d Vehicles See TAMIHI, Page 6January 2012, 238 Chilliwack wack make SCAN FOR WEBSITE Premium Pre-Owne per cent, increase in growresidents were licensed to the biggest ers in the city in one year. possess marijuana for mediat Live Market Pricing gains against the provincial averProvincewide, the numcal reasons and 193 were age in more than 10 years. ber of growers rose from licensed to produce marijuaOne important area where this 3,831 a year ago to 11,601 na for medical purposes. didn’t apply, however, was among (9,369 PUPLs and 2,232 There were 4,608 licensed aboriginal students. DL 5952 users and 3,831 licensed SCAN FOR WEBSITE DPPLs) today. That comWhile the provincial average pares to a total of 9,846 growers in all of British m there went up by 2.7 per cent, ChillPrice 60¢ oconnordodgechrysler.co and NOW WITH Columbia 13 months ago. That trans- growers in the nine other provinces iwack saw a 2.7 per cent decline, 8645 Young Street, Chilliwack ENTIRE PREOWNED INVENTORY SHOP OUR combined. lated to about 85 growers and 102 users three territories putting its aboriginal rate 3.5 per 604-792-5151per 100,000 people. But Chilliwack had In the past decade, Health Canada m cent below the provincial average. about 280 growers and 344 users per says the medical marijuana program www.jadamandsons.co Before last year, grad rates in has grown exponentially across the 100,000 residents. Chilliwack had consistently come Health Canada has told the Times country, from under 500 authorized in about 10 per cent below the there are now 666 persons in Chilliwack persons in 2002 to more than 28,000 provincial average for more than a who hold a licence to possess marijua- today. decade. Mayor Sharon Gaetz and several city na for medical purposes. But local officials now say those That’s a 180 per cent increase in one councillors have made no secret of their figures haven’t accurately reflectyear and mirrors provincial increases. health and safety concerns regarding ed the real picture in Chilliwack As of Feb. 18, there were 13,362 people medical marijuana licences. because the traditional six-year in B.C. authorized to possess, up 190 per cent from a year ago, and accountSee MARIJUANA, Page 4 See GRAD RATE, Page 4

Tamihi added to river list

BY TYLER OLSEN times.com tolsen@chilliwack d to are oppose s say they river power ocal kayaker install a run-of-River Valley ack a plan to a Chilliw project on the Chillicreek. which enters Rapids, Tamihi Creek,west of the Tamihi eightan just s, who say wack River of with kayaker s a diverse range is popular stretch provide from around kilometre that attracts users whitewaters to use won’t be able prothe world. s fear they project But kayaker iver power if a run-of-r ahead. the creek for the creek goes call for tenders posed for power Hydro’s 2006 During BC indepe ndent Energy, projects, KMC of Winary a subsidi Corp., Power dRiver bid for the successfully a runright to install on the project PHOTOS of-river SCAN TO SEE creek. loped, remains undeve he when Tamihi spooked While the Frey was flagging tape kayaker Adam and found pink recently visited run. ver entire Times, WindRiconlining the ed by the When contact officer Greg Trainor sultation ment the pre-con chief develop project is “in firmed the y is not the compan planning stages.” that while project at the Trainor said publicly about opportunity saying much be ample con“there will the public this time, inforproject during the better to discuss at which time e.” sultation process point, be availabl gets to that their mation will the project to If and when face opposition will WindRiver ver Kaythe Vancou plans. represents r Recreation Frey, who on the Outdoo is a local ak Club (VKC) of BC, said the creekic benefit Council (ORC)provides an econom treasure that ck area. to the Chilliwa Page 4 See POWER,

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A20 TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

News

Molson Coors now one of Sartori’s biggest customers

HOPS, from page 7

right farmer. Several seasons later, “the hops are fantastic,” said Stradiotto. Sartori’s hops are also having a big impact on B.C.’s booming craft beer industry. The world’s oldest beverage has proven itself remarkably adaptable, and brewmasters have tapped into the local food movement to create buzz. “There’s more craft brewers in B.C. now than there has been at

any other time,” beer educator Ken Beattie said. The executive director of the B.C. craft brewers guild estimates the number of brewers and brew pubs in the province has more than doubled in five years, from about 35 in 2007 to more than 60 by the end of 2013. According to Province beer blogger Jan Zeschky, beer made from fresh Sartori hops has become one of B.C.’s most anticipated smallbatch beers.

E a c h f a l l , V i c t o r i a’s Dr i f t wood Brewery produces a limited amount of “wet-hopped” beer using fresh hops from Sartori’s farm. Hops are usually dried and frozen to ensure a yearlong supply between harvests, but to make his beer, Driftwood brewer Jason Meyer travels to Chilliwack to buy them fresh, then races back to Vancouver Island to brew his Sartori Harvest IPA. Consumers line up outside stores to buy the beer, which in the

“There’s more craft brewers in B.C. now than there has been at any other time.”

Ken Beattie words of the brewer, “tastes like the Columbia Valley.” More than anything, Sartori’s hops are themselves inspired—by the earth, the water and the air. Terroir—a familiar concept in

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the wine world that is used to denote the place that gives wine its distinct flavour—can also apply to beer, said Beattie. The world’s best hops—in the U.S. and Europe—are all grown near the 49th parallel. Sartori’s farm, which sits a stone’s throw from the U.S. border, may not boast the flat, square fields that characterize most of Chilliwack’s farmland, but it has something that may be better. It inspires.

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A22 TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

SceneintheCity

Stuff the Bus

Karin Massar (Chilliwack Community Services), Marie Lashley (Chartwell), Jillian Poole (Chartwell), Crystal Collins (Chartwell), James Challman (CCS) and Steve Dove (CCS).

M

Hampton House resident Charlie Young provided music for the event.

ore than $500 in school supplies and over $300 cash was donated at the inaugural “Stuff the Bus” with school supplies drive by the three Chilliwack Chartwell retirement residences—Lynnwood, Hampton House and Birchwood. The Chartwell residences teamed up outside of Walmart on Aug. 6 with the goal of collecting as many school supplies as they could in a four-hour time span. All donations will go to

help Chilliwack Community Services’ Early Years and Family Services programs. Volunteers from the Chartwell residences and Community Services also had a barbecue set up and Hampton House resident Charlie Young entertained the crowd by playing his saxophone. Chartwell has done “Stuff the Bus” fundraisers for Chilliwack Community Services in the past, but this is the first time they have done one collecting school supplies.

Kim Jackson from Driving Miss Daisy.

Submit photos from your Scene in the City event to editorial@chilliwacktimes.com

So nice to come home to.

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CHILLIWACK TIMES TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013

Spend $175 and receive

FREE

u

A23

Ziploc Limited Edition Value Pack 28 piece set

$15.97 value

u Spend $175 or more before applicable taxes at any Real Canadian Superstore location and receive a Ziploc Limited Edition Value Pack (28 piece set). Excludes purchase of tobacco, alcohol products, prescriptions, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets, all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and any other products which are provincially regulated. The retail value of up to $15.97 will be deducted from the total amount of your purchase before sales taxes are applied. Limit one coupon per family and/ or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. Valid from Friday, August 9th until closing Thursday, August 15th, 2013. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. No substitutions, refunds or exchanges on free item. 241747

4

J +- coil book

80 pages

206308 5870316022

LIMIT 6

AFTER LIMIT

1.00

J +- exercise book 32 pages

823810 5870316023

LIMIT 6

AFTER LIMIT

1.00

.10 .10

ea

12 burgers, frozen, 1.36 kg 214870 60383373337

ea

baked in-store Bakeshop crusty French bread unsliced, 450 g 227060 46038347442

Papermate Canadiana HB pencils 24 ct. 208147 7364022424

reg. price $2.59

Crayola crayons 64 pk. 310336 6365200640

2

00

3

4

no name® beef burgers

ea

6

98

farmed 960215 8295300000

.96

1

PC® The Decadent cookies selected varieties, 300 g

ea

342315 6038304964

2 lb clamshell

/lb

15.39 /kg

fresh blueberries

product of Western provinces, Canada no. 1 grade 725896 39583

87

ea

selected varieties, frozen, 283-306 g

2.99

600602 / 156326 7265540460 / 5874416051

AFTER LIMIT

6

825 g or Corn Pops, 730 g

ea

LIMIT 3

AFTER LIMIT

3.97

715356 6410059570

88

ea

127460 6810089235

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

8.98

Fuel up at our

6

Kraft Cheez Whiz selected varieties, 900 g

Sharpie Markers 693224 7164130665

3

00

96

2

99

ea

ea

LIMIT 6

AFTER LIMIT

3.97

7

gas bar and earn

¢ per

litre**

97

10

ea

LIMIT 2

AFTER LIMIT

8.87

in Superbucks® value when you pay with your

337081 3600031818

97

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

16.87

3

Tresemme hair care or styling

Huggies natural care wipes 504’s

selected varieties and sizes 414622 / 676300 5545178710 / 5545178832

62

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

5.26

in Superbucks value using Or, get 3.5¢per litre** any other purchase method ®

®

**Redeem your earned Superbucks® value towards the purchase of Merchandise at participating stores (excluding tobacco, alcohol, lottery tickets, gas and prescriptions). With each fuel purchase when you use your President’s Choice Financial® MasterCard® or President’s Choice Financial® debit card as payment, you will receive 7 cents per litre in Superbucks® value. When you use any other method of payment, you will receive 3.5 cents per litre in Superbucks® value. Superbucks® value expires 60 days after date of issue. Superbucks® value are not redeemable at third party businesses within participating stores, the gas bar, or on the purchase of tobacco, alcohol, lottery tickets and prescriptions. Superbucks® value has no cash value and no cash will be returned for any unused portion. Identification may be required at the time of redemption. See Superbucks® receipt for more details. ® Trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. ©2013. † MasterCard is a registered trademark of MasterCard International Incorporated. President’s Choice Bank a licensee of the mark. President’s Choice Financial MasterCard is provided by President’s Choice Bank. President’s Choice Financial personal banking products are provided by the direct banking division of CIBC.

5 pk.

3

Healthy Choice or VH Steamer entrees

LIMIT 4

7

ea

Kellogg’s Froot Loops jumbo cereal

00

98

fresh coho salmon fillet

10000 03702

Redeem Superbucks towards purchases made in-store.**

Prices are in effect until Thursday, August 15, 2013 or while stock lasts. ea

LIMIT 3

AFTER LIMIT

4.99

Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. No rainchecks. No substitutions on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/™ The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this flyer are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2013 Loblaws Inc. * we match prices! Applies only to our major supermarket competitors’ flyer items. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We will match the competitor’s advertised price only during the effective date of the competitor’s flyer advertisement. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match identical items (defined as same brand, size, and attributes) and in the case of fresh produce, meat, seafood and bakery, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us). We will not match competitors’ “multi-buys” (eg. 2 for $4), “spend x get x”, “Free”, “clearance”, discounts obtained through loyalty programs, or offers related to our third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners etc.). We reserve the right to cancel or change the terms of this program at any time. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

superstore.ca


A24 TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Tuesday, August 20, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. Council Chambers 8550 Young Road, Chilliwack, B.C. V2P 8A4 www.chilliwack.com TAKE NOTICE that the Council of the City of Chilliwack will hold a Public Hearing, as noted above, on the following items: 1. ZONING BYLAW AMENDMENT BYLAW 2013, No. 3944 (RZ000806) Location: 5971 Wilkins Drive (a portion of) Owners: Alfred Sawatzky and Jenny Lynn Sawatzky Purpose: To rezone a 634m2 portion of the subject property, as shown on the map below, from an R1-A (One Family Residential) Zone to an R1-C (One Family Residential – Accessory) Zone to facilitate a 2 lot subdivision and the construction of a single family home with a legal secondary suite. Location Map

2. ZONING BYLAW AMENDMENT BYLAW 2013, No. 3945 (RZ000804) Location: 47340 Sylvan Drive (a portion of) Owner: 0945651 BC Ltd. (Nick Westeringh) Purpose: To rezone a 1.30 hectare portion of the subject property, as shown on the map below, from an R3 (Small Lot One Family Residential) Zone to an R4 (Low Density Multi-Family Residential) Zone to facilitate a boundary adjustment with the property located at 6026 Lindeman Street and the construction of a townhouse development. Location Map

3. ZONING BYLAW AMENDMENT BYLAW 2013, No. 3947 (RZ000810) Applicant: City of Chilliwack Purpose: A number of amendments to Zoning Bylaw 2001, No. 2800 are proposed to provide for and regulate federally licensed commercial medicinal marihuana grow operations within the City of Chilliwack. Persons who deem that their interest in the properties is affected by these proposed amendment bylaws will have an opportunity to be heard at the Public Hearing or, if you are unable to attend, you may provide a written submission, including your full name and address, to the City Clerk’s Office no later than 4:00 p.m. on the date of the Public Hearing. All submissions will be recorded and form part of the official record of the Hearing. These proposed bylaws may be inspected between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding holidays, from Wednesday, August 7, 2013 to Tuesday, August 20, 2013, both inclusive, in the Office of the City Clerk at City Hall, 8550 Young Road, Chilliwack, BC. Please direct your enquiries to our Planning & Strategic Initiatives Department at 604-793-2906. Please note that no further information or submissions can be considered by Council after the conclusion of the Public Hearing. Delcy Wells, CMC City Clerk


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Tuesday, August 20, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. Council Chambers 8550 Young Road, Chilliwack, B.C. V2P 8A4 www.chilliwack.com TAKE NOTICE that the Council of the City of Chilliwack will hold a Public Hearing, as noted above, on the following items: 1. TEMPORARY USE PERMIT (TUP00043) Location: 5048 Teskey Road Applicants: Leonard Jones and Kelly Jones Purpose: To allow for a supportive recovery home for up to 10 clients to operate out of the existing single family dwelling, on the subject property, as shown on the map below. The subject property is currently the site of an existing facility operating under the provisions of a Group Home in accordance with the R3 (Small Lot One Family Residential) Zone. A Temporary Use Permit is required to expand the existing service to provide for up to 10 clients. Location Map

2. TEMPORARY USE PERMIT (TUP00044) Location: 44870 Yale Road Applicant: John O’Connor Purpose: To permit the operation of Creative Outlet dance and drama studio, on the subject property, as shown on the map below. Assembly Uses are not permitted within the M2 (Service Industrial) Zone; therefore, a Temporary Use Permit is required. Location Map

These notices are sent to property owners and occupants, where appropriate, of lots within 30 metres of the property subject to the permit. Persons who deem that their interest in the properties is affected by these proposed Temporary Use Permits will have an opportunity to be heard at the Public Hearing or, if you are unable to attend, you may provide a written submission, including your full name and address, to the City Clerk’s Office no later than 4:00 p.m. on the date of the Public Hearing. All submissions will be recorded and form part of the official record of the Hearing. These proposed Temporary Use Permits may be inspected between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding holidays, from Wednesday, August 7, 2013 to Tuesday, August 20, 2013, both inclusive, in the Office of the City Clerk at City Hall, 8550 Young Road, Chilliwack, BC. Please direct your enquiries to our Planning & Strategic Initiatives Department at 604-793-2906. Please note that no further information or submissions can be considered by Council after the conclusion of the Public Hearing. Delcy Wells, CMC City Clerk


A28 TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013 CHILLIWACK TIMES

SUMMER CLEARANCE!

30-50% OFF

ALL NEW!! CCM RBZ

MEN’S AND WOMEN’S CLOTHING AND SANDALS

GET A FREE CCM RBZ STAGE 2 STICK WHEN YOU PURCHASE THE RBZ SKATE

New Fall Clothing and Footwear has Arrived

(A $250 VALUE)

CCM RBZ Control Was $ 449 99 SALE

$

NEW CCM RBZ Stage 2 Sticks IN NOW NEW Reebok Ribcore Sticks Launch Date Aug 16

399

CCM RBZ Shock

CCM RBZ Vibe Was $ 299 99 SALE

99

$

269

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99

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Football

Wilson NFL Ultimate ball

Nike Super Bad Strike D

WAS $ 109 95 SALE 95 $

Nike Alpha Speed Shark

Nike Land Shark Legacy Mid

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79

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29 99 Cutter’s Receiver & Linesman Gloves

59

starting at

Soccer

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Umbro Neo 2 Trainer ball ........ $24.99 Nike Pitch PL ball.................... $25.00 Nike England Prestige ball......... $40.00

Umbro GT II Shield $

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Umbro Turbine $

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Adidas Wms $ Predito TRX

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Nike Premier III $ JR

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1349 & UP

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Locally owned and operated for 38 years!

9077 Young Road • 604-792-1130 Hours: Monday to Thursday 9:00 am - 6:00 pm, Friday 9:00 am - 8:00 pm, Saturday 9:00 am - 5:30 pm, Sunday 12:00 noon - 4:00 pm

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Chilliwack Times August 13 2013  

Chilliwack Times August 13 2013

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