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LIVE PASSIONATELY. DRINK RESPONSIBLY. ©2015. BACARDÍ, BACARDÍ UNTAMEABLE, THE BACARDÍ GRAN RESERVA MAESTRO DE RON TRADE DRESS AND THE BAT DEVICE ARE TRADEMARKS OF BACARDI & COMPANY LIMITED. BACARDI U.S.A., INC., CORAL GABLES, FL. RUMS - EACH 40% ALC. BY VOL.


In Spanish Pura Vida Means Pure Life

Pura Vida Silver

The smooth, warm taste of 100% pure blue agave is so delicate some purists prefer savoring it all on its own. Others, however, call Pura Vida Silver Tequila the perfect ingredient in any cocktail, and every mouth-watering margarita.

Pura Vida Reposado

“Reposado” or “Rested” tequila spends no less than six months in the highest quality American oak bourbon barrels for superb smoothness and superior taste. The rich, complex flavor can be enjoyed solo or in a perfect margarita.

www.PuraVida .mx


In English The Good Life Just Got Better

Pura Vida Añejo

Aged for one year in American oak bourbon barrels, “Añejo” tequila darkens and matures into a far smoother, richer, and more complex flavor. Traditionally savored on its own, Añejo tequila also adds a unique twist to tequila-based cocktails enjoyed today.

Pura Vida Extra Añejo

For the ultimate in sophistication and satisfaction, nothing compares to Extra Añejo. Three years in second generation Cognac barrels creates a unique flavor, exciting the palate in ways you’ve never imagined.

www.PuraVidaTequila .com


CONTENTS

VOLUME 8 - ISSUE 5

features

84

98

104

Haig Club Scotch Whisky Kickin’ It With David Beckham

The Evolution of an Iconic Brand

Ripe Conditions for Growth

Building a History

Stoli Group USA Shines

Latin American Craft Beers

86

100

106

Bacardi’s Maestro and Ocho

Buffalo Trace Distillery

Plant-Based Cocktails

Tradition and Rum Cocktails

A Trace In Time

Recipes

88

102

110

The Most Romantic of Spirits

Holland’s Smallest Distillery has Serious History

Bourbon O New Orleans, Louisiana

American Brandy

90

Crafting The Future Hennessy Cognac Celebrates 250 Years

92

A Sip of Lawless History John E. Fitzgerald Very Special Reserve Bourbon

94

Single Pot Still Irish Whiskey Ready for Exploration

96

A Taste for Sherry

Seducing Bartenders One Drink at a Time

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A Modern Rutte Line

Hot Spot


CONTENTS

VOLUME 8 - ISSUE 5

departments

VOLUME 8 - ISSUE 5

PUBLISHER Jeff Greif ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, EDITOR AT LARGE Thom Meintel

Editor’s Note

10 A Message From Andrew Meltzer

EDITOR IN CHIEF Gina Farrell

Bottoms Up!

SENIOR EDITOR Lesley Jacobs Solmonson

12 Cool Products - Stuff You Need to Know About 14 Cool Bottles - Glass with a Past 16 How to - How To Use Saline in Cocktails

EXECUTIVE EDITOR Vicki Cruz ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Kristen Reed

The Locals

20 Bartender Submission - Alana Zanello 22 Bartender Submission - Tommy Shani 24 Ask Josh - How To Mix With Moonshine 26 Beverage Director Profile - Kevin Hart, Boca Restaurant Group 28 Bar Profile - Harlowe, Hollywood 30 Bar Owner Profile - William Duncan, Punch House 32 Managing Director Profile - Benjamin Melin Jones, Rhum Clément 34 Distillery Profile - Glengoyne Distillery 36 Bar Director Profile - Alec Vlastnik, Spoonbar 38 Distiller Profile - Adirondack Distilling Company 42 Sommelier Profile - David Keck 44 Beverage Director Profile - Stephen Yorsz, Leave Rochelle Out of it 46 Brand Owner Profile - Carrie King and LeeAnn Maxwell, Vixen Vodka

MARKETING COORDINATORS Zachary Lee, Mihi Joshi

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ART DEPARTMENT Daniel Batlle, Rick Jensen, Jessica Bartlett, Jackson Ryan PROMOTION ART ASSISTANT Michael Scarso EDITORIAL STAFF Nicole DiGiose, Christopher Osburn, Monique Farah, Bryen Dunn, Mike Gerrard, Ariana Fekett, Judi Laing, Frankie Corrado, Michael Tulipan, Megan Eileen McDonough, Francine Cohen, Cydnee Murray, Shawn Evertsen, Ruth Tobias, Mathew Powers

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Advanced Mixology

58

50 Drink In History - The Whiskey Sour 52 In The Know - Bodegas Williams & Humbert 54 Food Know How - Apples 56 Mixologist for Hire - Anne Louise Marquis 58 Competition Winners - Bulldog Modern G & T 60 Competition Winners - Bulldog Winning Recipes 62 Competition Winners - Franky Goes To Ibiza 64 Crafting Cocktails - Lesley Ross, Glasgow Kiss 66 That’s The Spirit - Alive and Well, Templeton Rye 68 In The Know - True Cane Spirit, Rhum Barbancourt 70 The Buzz - Go Back In Time, Woodford Reserve Distillery 72 Bartenders Choice - Reyka Vodka, Video Series 74 Mix Well - Mixing With Scorpion Mezcal 76 Mixing Season - Mixing With Whiskey, Teeling 78 Farm To Glass Mixing - Aaron Gordon, 13th Steet Cocktail Catering

Mix It Up

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18 Behind the Irish Whiskey Bar 40 Celebrity Sippers - Generations 48 Buzz Worthy - Fiesty Bier Schnapps 80 Shaking and Stirring - Launches 112 Last Call - Chillin’ With Lyndie Greenwood CHILLED VOLUME 8 ISSUE 5 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2015 IS PUBLISHED BI-MONTHLY BY CHILLED MEDIA, LLC. 321 STEEPLE WAY, ROTTERDAM, NY 12306. APPLICATION TO MAIL AT PERIODICALS POSTAGE PRICES IS PENDING AT ALBANY, NY AND OTHER ADDITIONAL MAILING OFFICES. POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO CHILLED MEDIA, LLC. 321 STEEPLE WAY, ROTTERDAM, NY 12306.

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CONTRIBUTORS Josh Curtis, Lanee Lee, Richard Fri, Andrew Meltzer, Dan Sabo, Franky Marshall, Josh Curtis, Lanee Lee, Anne Louise Marquis, Sara Kay travelsquire.com PHOTOGRAPHY Cover Photo: Tom Bunning Images: Shutterstock.com MARKETING Joy Sinacore SUBSCRIPTIONS Subscribe for our print edition at chilledmagazine.com. Tablet version is fully interactive and available for Apple and Android devices. Search CHILLED in the iTunes Store or Google Play, or visit chilledmagazine.com for more details. CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM HOW TO REACH US INFO@CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM ADVERTISING INQUIRIES FREE AGENT MEDIA 212-213-1155 CHILLED MEDIA, LLC. PRESIDENT Anthony Graziano LEGAL REPRESENTATION Ferro, Kuba, Mangano, Sklyar, P.C. CHILLED MAGAZINE Volume 8 - Issue 5 Copyright ©2015 Chilled Media, LLC. Chilled Magazine® and the Chilled Magazine® logo are registered trademarks owned by Chilled Media, LLC. All rights reserved. www.chilledmagazine.com NEWSSTAND DISTRIBUTION Curtis Circulation Company, LLC.


INTRODUCING

A new whisky from a bygone era. Many moons ago, distilleries cooled their spirit in worm tub condensers. Sitting stubbornly atop a rough rock in Speyside, Craigellachie has stuck by this rare method, which imparts unusually strong sulphury flavors. Try a bottle and taste for yourself. Visit Craigellachie.com.

visit craigellachie.com to find a bottle near you ENJOY RESPONSIBLY. ©2015. CRAIGELLACHIE AND ITS TRADE DRESS ARE TRADEMARKS. IMPORTED BY THE CRAIGELLACHIE COMPANY, CORAL GABLES, FL. SINGLE MALT SCOTCH WHISKY – 46% ALC. BY VOL.


EDITOR’S NOTE

VOLUME 8 - ISSUE 5

If memory serves me, I started bartending at only 10 or 11 years old. I was a wee lad, far away from having my first drink, but my father would often call for an after-dinner Scotch. Oh, how I loved to pour that whisky for him. I’d ask, “Pops, one finger or two? A splash of water? A little ice?” Especially because I’m half Scottish, I dreamt of the day that I could enjoy a dram with the old man. He’d often sneak me a taste, but his preference was for smoky, peaty Scotches which were too strong for my palate. I feared that I’d never enjoy the same drinks as my dad. After years of research and tastings, I started with a Canadian or Irish whiskey. I tried a Canadian blend (Crown Royal) with ice and water; it was light and sweet and surprisingly easy to drink. When my wallet could afford it, I ordered an Irish pot-still whiskey (Redbreast 12 year) and drank it at room temperature with equal parts water. I slowly added less and less water, acclimating to straight spirits, and finally sought out bolder flavors. Bourbon, which has more American heritage than apple pie, is rich and full-bodied. A youthful bargain (Four Roses Yellow Label) was dosed with sweet corn and charred American oak. I learned that the popular new guy (Bulleit Bourbon) had a high-rye content, and so began my love affair with bourbon’s spicier cousin, rye whiskey. I particularly enjoy the crispness of a young rye (Sazerac 6 year) and the Cognac-like potential of older distillates (Pendleton 1910). Coming back full-circle to Scotch, I entered the ring with a floral Speyside (The Glenlivet) and a sherry cask-finished classic (Macallan 12 year). Then I gained a taste for smoke and seaweed, and fell in love with a West Highland original (Oban 14). Later I took the plunge into briny, medicinal seaside offerings. My father’s favorite (Lagavulin 16) balances mature smokiness with intense malt character, and my top choice (Talisker Distillers Edition) combines the best of Island qualities with a sweet, nutty flavor thanks to the Amoroso Sherry casks. It was a long road to develop a palate that could sit in the armchair next to my dad’s. I tried a lot of things that I didn’t like but have now learned to love. The theme of this issue of CHILLED is heritage with a focus on whisk(e)y and how deeply ingrained it is to many cultures. While you peruse the pages I suggest you pour yourself a dram that helps you explore your own heritage. Cheers!

er Andrew Meltz

Andrew Meltzer, 28, is the Assistant Manager of 15 Romolo in San Francisco, California, and the Vice President of the US Bartenders’ Guild, San Francisco Chapter. He is a competitive bartender with a flair for technique and creativity. He has been in the food and beverage industry for seven years and aspires to own a tiki bar on a lost island somewhere far away. His favorite cocktail is an ice-cold Daiquiri.

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Photo courtesy of the USBG

GUEST EDITOR ANDREW MELTZER


JOIN OUR 250 YEAR JOURNEY Enter the Hennessy Academy and experience 250 years of legendary craftsmanship Visit Hennessy.com or text “academy” to 46758

PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY. Imported Cognac Hennessy®, 40%, 43% Alc./Vol. (80˚, 86˚). ©2015 Imported by Moët Hennessy USA, Inc., New York, NY. HENNESSY is a registered trademark.


BOTTOMS UP!

COOL PRODUCTS

STUFF YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT BONNE O

The first carbonation system that makes everything sparkly without using a CO2 tank! Add refreshing bubbles to spirits, wine, water, tea, soda, fruit, herbs, and more. Makes any simple recipe more exciting. Available at Bloomingdale’s and Bed, Bath & Beyond. Bonneo.com

BEER FOAMER

Invented by Norm Architects to separate the foaming process from the pouring process in order to achieve a crisp, bubbly beer with soft dense foam, just like draft beer. Perfect for craft beer enthusiasts. Shophorne.com

OAK BOTTLE

Revolutionizing the way we drink wine, whiskey and other spirits, the Oak Bottle transforms average spirits into expensive, vintage tasting beverages within hours. The vessel works as an oak aging accelerator, adding subtle notes, smoothness and oak traits to the liquid it holds, just as a classic handcrafted, charred American white oak barrel would do. Oakbottle.com

RAW SPICE BAR

A subscription box that delivers three freshly ground, exotic and global flavors from around the world for only $6/month. Each box includes three recipes with an origin and history of the spices from that region. The Spice Bar is awesome for bartenders who are interested in adding innovative ingredients to their recipes. Rawspicebar.com

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BOTTOMS UP!

COOL BOTTLES

GLASS WITH A PAST

KETEL ONE

This is a limited edition bottle which represents the celebration of the 325th anniversary of the Nolet Family Distillery, home to Ketel One Vodka. Dressed in copper matte plating as a nod to the important role copper pot distillation plays in creating the vodka, the bottle draws inspiration from the traditional Dutch spirit bottles and showcases ironwork decorations.

CHAMPAGNE BOLLINGER

Over thirty years ago James Bond film producer Albert R. “Cubby” Broccoli and Christian Bizot, General Manager of Champagne Bollinger met, uncorking an everlasting friendship between the two families. Bond and Bollinger celebrate the release of SPECTRE, the 24th James Bond adventure, with a new, limited edition bottle, encased in a chill box, designed by Carré Basset, which keeps the bottle chilled for two hours after refrigeration.

REILLY’S ROCK & RYE GINGER WHISKEY Reilly’s Mother’s Milk is housed in a custom mold bottle, inspired by glass images retrieved from the Prohibition era. An embossed shamrock was added to pay homage to the Irish heritage of the brand. The unique barrel screw cap is designed to replicate the American oak barrels the whiskey is stored in, and can stand-in for a shot glass. Drink straight from the barrel!

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C’MON

HAVE SOME MOONSHINE. IT’S BOURBON’S HOTTER, WILDER, YOUNGER SISTER.

OLESMOKY.COM ©2015 Ole Smoky Distillery, LLC. All Rights Reserved. OLE SMOKY, OLE SMOKY TENNESSEE MOONSHINE, and SHINE RESPONSIBLY are registered trademarks of Ole Smoky Distillery, LLC.


BOTTOMS UP

HOW TO

HOW TO USE SALINE IN COCKTAILS

THESE DAYS BARTENDERS AND CHEFS HAVE A LOT IN COMMON. ANY CHEF KNOWS HOW TO USE A PINCH OF SALT TO HELP MAKE FLAVORS POP IN A DISH. AND BARTENDERS HAVE BEEN ON THE SAME TRACK FOR A LONG TIME WITH SALTED RIMS FOR TEQUILA DRINKS, BUT PERHAPS WITHOUT REALIZING EXACTLY HOW IT WORKS. Dan Sabo, Beverage Manager at the Ace Hotel in downtown LA, adds a pinch of salt in his cocktails to create a depth of flavor and elevate his drinks to something new and exciting. “As it is in cooking, salt has the ability to create a strong base, which allows other flavors to really sing,” says Sabo. “A pinch of salt in a sour that seems to lay a bit flat will bump it up while the citrus flavors will be highlighted. Likewise, salt can temper a too sweet concoction.” Bartenders everywhere are embracing saline use, not just around the rim, but dashing salt into their drinks, much as they do bitters. Check out these tips and tricks for using salt in your latest creations.

Step 1

Choose Your Salt Avoid iodized table salt and spend a few extra bucks on something good. Sea salt is best with Maldon being a personal favorite. We’ve also used Hawaiian Black Lava salt and Himalayan Pink salt. Try different kinds to find one that creates the desired taste.

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Step 2

Choose Your Solution Combining salt with water creates a saline solution that allows for easier mixing. This is especially useful in a stirred cocktail. When working with salt it’s about control and restraint. Instead of pouring straight into the shaker, add it in small pinches.

Step 3

Choose Your Ingredients The inherent flavors of sugars, orgeat, agave, and maple change with just a pinch of salt. As a rule, if a drink has an ingredient you’d normally pair with salt, go for it. Chances are it will have a positive effect on creating that depth of flavor you’re seeking. Take note, classic stirred cocktails without a fruit element will quickly become salt bombs. Take the Dirty Martini for instance. Even in moderation, the salty olive brine takes over, and is ultimately the only thing you taste.


DAN SABO Over the past seven years, Dan Sabo has helped develop and run the beverage programs at some of New York’s top restaurants. In 2012, he added his talents to the powerhouse lineup at ISA, which was nominated for a James Beard Award for Best New Restaurant. In late 2013, Sabo relocated to Los Angeles, CA, to serve as opening Beverage Manager for Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles, where he currently runs beverage for the  hotel’s restaurant, LA Chapter and  its  attached cocktail bar, the Mezzanine at LA Chapter, as well as its rooftop cocktail lounge, Upstairs. The entire program at Ace Hotel DTLA earned a Top 10 nomination at Tales of the Cocktail 2015.  Sabo’s ability to put unique ingredients in unlikely combinations has gained him major publicity. He has been featured in The  New York Times, New York Post,  GQ, NY Daily News,  and popular F&B  websites Eater, PUNCH, GrubStreet and Serious Eats. 

Photo by Dylan + Jeni

THE NAUTILUS INGREDIENTS

PREPARATION

1 ½ oz. Kappa Pisco ½ oz. Lemon Juice ½ oz. Grapefruit Juice ½ oz. Grand Marnier ½ oz. Giffard Orgeat 2 dashes Angostura 1 pinch Maldon Sea Salt

Add all ingredients to a mixing tin, then add ice and shake vigorously. Strain into a highball over cubed ice. Add a straw, garnish with grapefruit peel and cherry.

SONS OF LIBERTY INGREDIENTS

TIP

A little goes a long way, and you can always add more. Too much salt is difficult to counteract in a drink.

PRO TIP

Place the saline solution in a dropper bottle to have better control over the amount you’re adding to a drink. Using an atomizer to lay a misted layer of saline on top of a drink also works well.

2 oz. No. 209 Gin ¾ oz. Giffard Abricot du Roussillon ½ oz. Alvear PX Sherry 1 drop Scrappy’s Lavender Bitters 1 drop Rosewater 1 drop Maldon Saline Solution (1:5 mixture of Maldon Sea Salt to filtered water) PREPARATION

Add all ingredients to a mixing beaker, add ice and stir until well chilled. Strain into a chilled Nick and Nora glass. Place a few dried chamomile buds on top, then express the oils of a lemon peel over the top of the drink and the stem of the glass. Discard the peel.

CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

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MIX IT UP

BEHIND THE BAR

BEHIND THE

Iris h Whiskey BAR

O’DANAGHER’S SINGLE BARREL WHISKEY

Dry Fly Distilling is launching this ‘Hibernian’ Irish style whiskey in collaboration with local whiskey maker Tim Danaher. “From the moment we met Tim, we saw his enthusiasm and raw talent for distilling,” says Kent Fleischmann, Dry Fly co-owner. “We are thrilled to be launching this labor-of-love after six years of no shortcuts and a farm-to-bottle spirit in the truest sense.”

TEELING SINGLE MALT WHISKEY

The third release in the premium range of Teeling expressions completing their full range to form the Teeling Trinity of non-aged Irish whiskeys. Jack Teeling, founder of the Teeling Whiskey Company, commented, “Our new Teeling Single Malt proves Irish whiskey can have big bold flavors that appeal to single malt drinkers without losing its distinctive Irish identity.”

JAMESON CASKMATES

Born out of a neighborhood bar, this collaboration and experimental edition will excite whiskey and beer lovers alike. Local Irish micro-brewery Franciscan Well and Jameson Original shared casks to create one exceptional whiskey combining Jameson Original with the richness of stout beer. “Jameson Caskmates is a product of shared passion for craft, quality and collaboration,” says Sona Bajaria, Director, Jameson Irish Whiskey, Pernod Ricard USA.

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A NEW LOOK WITH OVER A CENTURY AND A HALF OF BARBANCOURT HERITAGE


ADVANCED THE LOCALSMIXOLOGY BARTENDER DRINK SUBMISSION IN HISTORY

1• 00• er memb

Photos by Natalie Seeboth

Alana Zanello

Jacoby’s Restaurant and Mercantile Austin, Texas Alana knew at an early age that she belonged behind the bar. And now, years later, as bartenders are starting to really hone in on their craft, she is proud to be a part of the industry during this era. “I love the way bartenders are really getting creative,” she says. “I am enjoying the increase in respect for the craft and the recognition. I think the experience for the guest will also continue to become more sophisticated. It’s an exciting time in this industry for sure.” For Alana, it’s important for her to be able to recall her regulars’, and even her co-workers’, drinks of choice. “It’s a good way to exercise your memory and people really start to trust and listen to you when you remember them.”

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MIDNIGHT TRAIN INGREDIENTS

1 ½ oz. Dickel 8 year 1 oz. Averna Amaro 1 oz. Lemon Juice 1 oz. Simple Syrup PREPARATION

Combine ingredients into shaker tin over ice and shake. Strain into coupe and garnish with lemon swath.


BARTENDER SUBMISSION Photo courtesy of Melissa Geramita

THE LOCALS

Tommy Shani Upstairs at the Kimberly Hotel, NYC Tommy Shani has only been bartending for four years, but two years were in Israel where he received his training and license. Like many in his profession, bartending began as a hobby. “I got started at home actually, making cocktails for my family, then private parties and then NYC,” he says. Shani is currently a bartender at Upstairs at the Kimberly Hotel in New York.

WINTER’S EVE

Shani says that the best advice he can give to people interested in bartending as a profession is to travel as much as possible. “That’s the only way to truly understand the spirits that are sitting in your bar.” He also says that a good bartender needs to be accustomed to many tools, but that doesn’t stop him from having a favorite. “It changes every so often. These days I have a romance with the Jigger.”

1 ¼ oz. Red Label Scotch Shake and strain in a rocks ½ oz. Amaretto glass. Garnish with a bourbon ¼ oz. Lemon juice soaked cinnamon stick.  2 oz. Apple cider Dash of Angostura bitters  Big pinch of spice mix 

He doesn’t like to settle for the usual and prefers to showcase the less popular spirits. “I like to slip them into delicious cocktails and introduce people to them,” he says. “Spirits such as Benedictine, Campari, Fernet Branca, Sambuca, Pernod, Cynar etc.” Shani also makes it a goal to stay up to date with the current trends in the world of mixology. “I think that infusing really opens doors to new combinations that you never thought possible.” What’s his favorite part about being a bartender? “I enjoy working with unusual ingredients that my guests will never encounter anywhere else.”

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Here is the drink you’ve been waiting for! Unfiltered apple cider with six different freshly ground spices and blended scotch as the base. Complement with a soft sweetness of Amaretto and a touch of bitters. Now the only question is: A hot eve or on the rocks? INGREDIENTS

PREPARATION


THE LOCALS

ASK JOSH

with HOW TO MIX MOONSHINE tasty. It wasn’t until I realized that it mixed much like pisco that I had some success. I think of moonshine in a similar light to grape distillates like pisco or the malt wine distillate genever perhaps because it’s clear and the viscosity ripples a certain way in the light.

Josh Curtis is one of L.A.’s premier bartenders. Check out his weekly creative cocktail posts @mixingcocktails on Instagram and Twitter.

By Josh Curtis. Photo by Rod Dyer

M

oonshine is distilled from corn; think frosting from a birthday cake. The nose is like the flavor of that frosting - crisp, clean, and sweet - but the taste is not as sweet. The flavor is a bit like jicama, often referred to as Mexican potatoes, and it goes down smooth. Real moonshine like the stuff they make out in the Ozarks in Arkansas is often referred to as White Lightnin’ and years ago when I took my first sip I swear that lightning struck the sky. But unless you head to the Appalachian Mountains on a quest yourself, you’ll most likely be sipping a distilled product hydrated to bring the ABV down to the U.S. standard 80 proof. Bourbon, like moonshine, is distilled from corn then aged in oak. The big difference with moonshine is that it’s not aged in oak hence, the clear liquid or shine. Every mixologist has learned that certain ingredients are happy together. When I first tried to mix up a drink with genever for example, I couldn’t arrive at anything

Use this philosophy on your journey with clear whiskey. Moonshine, with its bright notes, can mix almost exactly like a pisco. Citrus fruit like grapefruit plays strongly with it and an infusion of a white peppercorn herbal tincture will temper the liquid. Simple Rickeys and Collins cocktails easily complement the cornhusk freshness. But if you wanted to make vanilla syrup balanced with lemon bitters to enhance any sour notes, I’m sure it would be to great result. A little bit of caramel sweetness added to a DIY cola soda spiked with some Sarsaparilla bitters would be an excellent aromatic combination of flavors. And there are infinite possibilities for aromatic Manhattan style cocktails, too. Follow your instincts when mixing with moonshine, listening to your inner voice that leads you in one direction or another. Either way is fine as long as you’re on track with your guest’s preference and the drink you serve exhibits the fundamentals of mixing, including balance of flavors, visual style, and excellent taste. And when you reveal the secret ingredient get ready for the reaction. Moonshine has that kind of effect on people.

State of Mine

FINE TIME LUCILLE

INGREDIENTS

INGREDIENTS

1 oz. Ole Smoky Moonshine 1 oz. Wild Turkey 101 Rye  ½ oz. Cynar ½ oz. Campari 4 dashes Angostura bitters

2 oz. Ole Smoky Moonshine 2 oz. Fever Tree Tonic Water 4 dashes Bitter Truth Celery Bitters 5 Celery Pieces (pressed) PREPARATION

PREPARATION

Build in tall glass, stir to emulsify ingredients. Ice to the top. Garnish with celery frond.

Build over ice in a lowball glass. Bitters first. Base spirit last. Stir. Orange peel zest.

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So, how do you mix with it? I go in one of two directions – citrus or aromatic. Between the two, how do you know which drink to make? A simple question determines the outcome when a guest can’t be pinned down. “Have you ever had a Manhattan or are you more of a Margarita drinker?” Those two cocktails are at such opposite ends of the scale that the answer will tell you exactly which direction to choose.

CHILLED MAGAZINE


THE LOCALS

BEVERAGE DIRECTOR PROFILE

KEVIN HART The Best Things Come in Threes

By Sara Kay | Photos courtesy of Boco Group Being the beverage director at a quality craft cocktail bar or restaurant is not an easy task. Essentially your job is to be a little bit of everything when it comes to being behind the bar; you’re the bartender, the bar back, the cocktail waitress, the cocktail consultant…just to name a few of the essential roles. Now, imagine having the weight of this responsibility at three different bars, each with entirely different concepts. Not so easy just became a whole lot harder. Kevin Hart, Beverage Director for Boca Restaurant Group, has the incredible responsibility of not just running the cocktail program at one of Boca’s restaurants, but all three properties: Boca, Sotto and Nada. His entry into the hospitality business started like many in the industry, bussing tables and washing dishes as a college student to pay his way through school. As a design student, he began to hone his passion for the ‘craft’ movement, bringing him to Boca Restaurant Group under the watchful eye of Chef/ Owner David Falk. The beverage program at each property differs from one to the next, as the overall concept and theme of each restaurant has a different focus. While Boca, the flagship, is influenced by European dining and artisanal products with a wine-centric beverage program, Sotto is more of an Italian trattoria concept, focusing on bitter and savory cocktails as well as, as Hart puts it, ‘Italian grandmother cuisine.’ Nada strays from the European concept all together with contemporary Mexican cuisine and a more energetic vibe, with lots of color and bold flavors and a beverage program focused on freshness and liveliness.

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“Each cocktail program is inspired by the cuisine and the overall brand,” says Hart. “Sotto offers twists on classics with an Italian fare. Boca’s program is a bit more focused and elegant. The drinks have a timeless air, and in many cases, are takes on classic cocktails. At its heart, Nada is a Margarita concept. We also serve some twists on the classic Margarita, and in the winter, Nada’s beverage program makes me dream of sitting around a fire on a cold winter day. Drinks that warm the soul.” Finding inspiration for three entirely different beverage programs is hardly an easy feat, however Hart never stops searching for new ways to enhance the drinking experience at each property. From reading books and articles and checking out local markets to experimenting with different flavor combinations in his kitchen, Hart works tirelessly to ensure that each restaurant is thriving. “I taste constantly and fiddle with flavor combinations, helping to hone my pallet and taste through the impossibly huge world of flavors. I work individually with each bar team at each restaurant. Our team is very lucky to have such talented bar teams – everyone shows up with their A-game,” he says. As the bar scene in Cincinnati continues to grow, it is people like Hart and places like Boca, Sotto and Nada that are leading the way. With creative and unique concepts inhabiting each place, it won’t be long before Cincinnati takes a place on the where-to-go-now cocktail map.


Welcome to an exclusive world. A world of possibilities... Rediscover it. The great diversity of flavors and styles in Sherry wines offers a world of possibilities to bartenders and mixologists. Many of them have already been using Sherry in their recipes while others have only recently joined the trend.

SHARE YOUR LOVE FOR LUSTAU WITH #SHERRYLOVERS @emilio_lustau

@LustauSherry

@BodegasLustau


THE LOCALS

BAR PROFILE “I took this image and said let’s take the feel the painting is giving us, and put it into a space that people can enter into and enjoy. Every little detail from there on out was hand chosen from this image, and I’m really proud of what it has become.”

A Modern Toast to Classic

Hollywood

Hollywood can be a difficult place to open a bar that exudes elegance. However, with Green’s artistic background, he and his business partners found a way to include the glamour of early Hollywood with some French and Italian influence, making it more modern and approachable, and less thematic and Disney-esque. That classic, timeless décor is also ever-present in the cocktail program at Harlowe, headed up by Zaric. Pulling inspiration from the location and demographic of the neighborhood, Zaric was able to design a cocktail menu that is unique, and yet, familiar. “We wanted to make a departure from what is currently trendy in LA,” he said. “LA has a really strong cocktail scene, but it’s buried in whiskey. It’s easy to work with whiskey or tequila or aged rums, but harder to work with spirits that don’t give you much to work with like vodka or pisco. They require a different approach. We wanted to bring that back.”

By Sara Kay | Photos by William Bradford Chilled asked bar manager Dushan Zaric at Harlowe Bar in West Hollywood, “If you could describe Harlowe in one word, what word would you use?” He instantly replied, “Sassy. I think people will get laid here a lot.” After hearing this, one may automatically assume that Harlowe is for the TMZ types; movie stars and socialites being dragged out in the wee hours of the morning, covering their faces in drunken shame. Before my mind could go there, however, Zaric continued. “The bar is created in such a way that it feels like there’s something going on even if there’s only 15 people here. The energy is maintained, and I think people will feel relaxed and comfortable.” Relaxed? Comfortable? Perhaps TMZ won’t be here after all.

Fitting in with the modern decadence of Harlowe is the West Hollywood cocktail, an aperitif-style drink reminiscent of a Manhattan, made with Laird’s Bonded apple brandy, Noilly Prat Ambre, Vermouth, Curacao, Angostura, and Calvados-soaked apple. “It’s so classic in a way, it has that familiar flavor and taste, but once you really taste it, it takes you on a journey,” said Zaric. “We wanted to give Harlowe something that is a bit of a throwback; apple brandy was huge in Hollywood in the 40s and 50s.”

Harlowe has no doorman controlling a velvet-roped line. It isn’t boasting celebrity club status, and the bartenders aren’t trying to be cocktail kings. Harlowe is bringing something else to the West LA scene that the young, stylish population here has been craving without even knowing it. Delicious food and classic cocktails, designed around the beauty and elegance of early 20th century Hollywood, with a twist of European modernity. Bobby Green, co-owner of Harlowe Bar, found his inspiration from two places: the space’s reputation as a celebrity hangout in the 1970s, and a painting of a woman by the name of Virginia Van Sandt. This woman, according to Green, lived a life laden with love affairs with actors and millionaires in 1930s Hollywood, and it was her story that inspired Green to make Harlowe what it is: elegant and beautiful, with a hint of classic Hollywood tragedy. Bar Owners Dimitri Komarov, Bobby Green, Dmitry Liberman.

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RARE, EXPENSIVE, HANDMADE. AND THAT’S JUST THE CASKS.

THAT’S THE GLENGOYNE WAY. glengoyne.com Take your time, enjoy your drink responsibly. Imported by Shaw-Ross International. SHAW-ROSS.com


THE LOCALS

BAR OWNER PROFILE

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William Duncan, PUNCH HOUSE

‘PUNCHING’ UP

C HICAGO

By Sara Kay, Photos courtesy of Punch House

ocktail and spirits trends are unlike any other in this cultured world we live in. Unlike a fashion trend, which will be on the runway one minute and a memory the next, cocktails and spirits don’t ever disappear after they’ve had their 15 minutes of fame. They continue to be recycled; bartenders are always finding ways to add some flare. A twist here, tincture there, and there you have it; something entirely different and yet, a constant homage to a classic. William Duncan, partner/founder at Punch House in Chicago, was able to resurrect one of the most classic cocktails in history and revitalize it for the modern day drinker in the process. For anyone familiar with ordering a bowl of punch at a bar and sharing it with a group, you know that there’s some thought that goes into it. As a shared cocktail, there needs to be some agreement on what to order. With so many to choose from, how can a group of 15 people easily decide on just one punch bowl? At Punch House, Duncan solved that problem by getting rid of the group vote all together; singleserve punch for all. “Our goal was to always offer punches by the glass so you don’t have to commit to a bowl. The menu would offer 8-10 different kinds of punch, contemporary and classics, and we thought that if the menu could

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be offered with pricing by the glass, carafe or bowl, that would be pretty cool,” said Duncan. “They could have so many choices.” Coming from a musical background, Duncan found himself working in restaurants to supplement his music career because, as he puts it, “many aspiring rock and roll stars do it to keep the bill collectors at bay.” After being invited to be a partner in a new endeavor by his boss, he pitched the Punch House concept and turned his love for punch into a brick and mortar operation.

I get a lot of inspiration from classic drink making, I don’t think you can be a great beverage innovator without referencing what came before.

Inspired by the history as well as cocktail historian David Wondrich, known for his book ‘Punch,’ Duncan found a way to introduce punch as a full cocktail concept, while adding in his own single-serve concept as well. The décor has a nautical theme, for those maritime origins of punch making. The focal point of the décor lies in the salt water fish tank that is centered on the back bar, emitting a beautiful blue glow with several different types of fish swimming around. Duncan also found inspiration for the interior from their location; as a basement-level bar, they were able to embrace the cool ‘basement’ vibe, emitting a sort of 1960s grandma and grandpa feel, fully stocked with trophy fish on the wall, a padded bar rail, and antique collectibles of the late 60s early 70s. Just like the bar itself, Duncan has a variety of inspirational spaces where he draws from for his cocktail menu. “I get a lot of inspiration from classic drink making, I don’t think you can be a great beverage innovator without referencing what came before.” In order to keep his creative mind and cocktail menu fresh, Duncan gives himself ‘challenges,’ in which he takes two seemingly disparate cultures and finds a way to combine them into a punch. One challenge required him to come up with a recipe that combined his friend’s multicultural background, Chilean and Indian, in one bowl. His final product had Chilean Pisco, pineapple and lime, as well as Indian curry spices and Darjeeling tea. So how does single-serve punch actually work at Punch House? Duncan and his team make batches of punch each day for the following day of service, with each batch containing about 100 portions that are then poured into kegerators and dispensed like a draft beer. “We really felt this strategy, this technique of service would suit the punch making, because punch by design is a batched product. It’s meant to be made in large batches, and I’ve found through practice that punch always tastes better the next day. There’s a continued infusion of flavors that happens, just like a soup or a sauce. This allows us to serve a craft, quality product, using all the same premium spirits, juices and spices, but we’ve done the hard work already.” Practice makes perfect.

DU SE K’S #3 PU N C H Home Recipe INGREDIENTS

1 oz. Brugal Extra Dry White Rum 1 oz. Jamaican Rum 5 oz. Ed Hamilton Gold Pot Still 3 oz. Fresh Squeezed Lime 1 ½ cups Hibiscus Tea 2 cups Saison Ale 2 oz. Passion Fruit Puree Oleo Saccharum * PREPARATION

Prepare Oleo Saccharum in a punch bowl. While the lemon peel and sugar are macerating, squeeze and fine strain juice (set aside). Once juice is prepared, make your tea. When water reaches a simmer, take off heat and add 5 bags (or equivalent loose amount) of your favorite Hibiscus tea. Let tea infuse for 10 minutes. Remove tea bags and add the hot tea to the punch bowl, melting saccharum into syrup. Add rums, passion fruit puree, and lime juice. Add ice and stir briefly to chill. Add saison and scatter lime wheels to garnish. Whenever possible, prepare a day in advance (omitting ice, saison, and lime wheels until the moment of service). Like soup or sauce, Punch always tastes better the second day. If preparing in advance, strain out the swaths of lemon peel, as they will begin to impart undesirable bitterness over time. * Oleo Saccharum: 3 oz. white sugar and the peel of 4 lemons (use a vegetable peeler for this task; try not to get too much pith), pounded with a muddler or other blunt implement every 15 minutes for 45 minutes. CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

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THE LOCALS

MANAGING DIRECTOR PROFILE

R H U M C L E´ M E N T

benjamin melin jones By Michael Tulipan

Rhum barrels at distillery, Clément, one of the premium rhum producers of the island, Martinique, Caribbean Sea

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|

Photos courtesy of Rhum Clément


T

he story of Rhum Clément stretches back to the 19th century and the great sugar crisis that shook the Caribbean. The colonial powers that controlled the region, England, France, the Netherlands and Spain, had invested for decades in sugarcane production with the French colony of Martinique held in particular esteem for its sugarproducing terroir. But with sugar suddenly being exported from Brazil and the introduction of the sugar beet in Europe, cheaper sweeteners were suddenly available. On Martinique, the results were devastating, with sugar mills pushed into insolvency. One man, Homère Clément, saw an opportunity. Clément is a near mythic figure on the island, having received a scholarship to study in France and becoming that country’s first non-white doctor. He returned to his native Martinique and became the mayor of a small town. Inspired by cognac and armagnac production methods in France, he purchased bankrupt distillery Domaine de l’Acajou and set about making rhum agricole from sugarcane under his own label. Today, the face of the brand in the U.S. is Clément’s great nephew Benjamin Mélin-Jones, who introduced Rhum Clément to the U.S. market in 2005 and serves as Managing Director of Clément USA. Born in Brunswick, Maine, Jones first tasted rhum on the family estate when he was very young and the memory stayed with him throughout his youth, even to college where he was surprised to find everyone drinking syrupy, cheap rums. After stints as a bartender, brewer for Allagash Brewing Company and manager for an Italian wine import company, the thought of re-introducing the brand to the U.S. market took hold. Jones believes that rhum agricole is spearheading a resurgence in appreciation for rum as a category.

“Rhum agricole has a very distinctive flavor profile,” he says, “much different than what most people are used to, rum from molasses, sugary and syrupy and sticky. Agricole is very earthy, floral, caney and beany.” Consumers, he says, “appreciate naturally made spirits where the flavor profile directly comes from the raw ingredients.” However, the distinctions among rums can be confusing for even those in the industry and Jones is working to educate retailers and bartenders with a system that differentiates the three types of rum; spicy British style and Spanish ron, both from molasses, and rhum agricole from sugarcane. His model mirrors the whiskey category, which long ago helped consumers distinguish among single malts, Irish, Japanese and American. The comparison with whiskey extends to his own portfolio. “I think on the whole our aged rums have a much more whiskey-like profile because they are drier, and because we start with such a vegetal white rum that they can extract a lot of the same wood sugars and the oak tannins.” The company produces seven rhums, from a V.S.O.P. aged for a minimum of four years, to two Grande Reserves aged a minimum of six and ten years respectively. For its 125th birthday, Clément even collaborated with Caribbean street artist JonOne on a limited edition. Jones says, “We are very strong with the rum connoisseur, the top single digit percentage of the rum drinkers who are used to sipping cognac, bourbon and tequila.” And with today’s cocktail culture flourishing, Jones believes that rhum agricole is perfect for bartenders. “Rhum agricole fits in perfectly with its distinct flavor profile, being so dry and earthy – full of character. People are making their own cocktails having a truly unique character of how the rhum is produced.” CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

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THE LOCALS

DISTILLERY PROFILE

AFTER 200 YEARS,

CHANGED HERE By Mike Gerrard Photos courtesy of Glengoyne

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Is there anything new to discover about a whisky that’s been made for about 200 years? Well, Stuart Hendry, Distillery Heritage Manager for the Glengoyne Distillery in Scotland, thinks there is... and there isn’t. “In all the years we’ve been making whisky we haven’t changed anything,” he says, pointing out that what has changed is the world. “The world is coming round to our way of thinking, that small-batch, slowdistilled, hand-made whisky is the way to go. I think our moment in the sun is coming up.” Glengoyne is unusual in many ways, not least for its location 14 miles north of Glasgow. The distillery lies on the fault line that divides the Scottish Highlands from the Lowlands. The stills are in the Highlands but their maturing whisky casks are over the road in the Lowlands. And those casks are vital, as Stuart Hendry explains. “We use sherry casks and work with another family company based in Spain. The family has been producing casks for six generations. They dry the oak in the sun for three years to get the moisture level down as low as they can. When the sherry houses fill the casks with sherry they soak it up like a sponge, and it sits there maturing for another three years. When we talk about our 12-year old, it’s


actually 18 years in the making because it first starts when those casks are put out in the sun to dry.” As Glengoyne’s 12-year old won Gold in the 2014 San Francisco World Spirits Competition, it’s clearly a process that works for them. Another factor setting Glengoyne apart is their slow distillation process, which ties in with the lack of peat in their whiskies. “There’s no peat in the area,” Hendry says, “so we dry our barley using only warm air. We also distill more slowly than any of the other 100 or so single malts in Scotland. We want the liquid to touch the copper in the stills and stay in the stills as long as possible.” There’s a scientific reason for that. “Hot copper acts as a catalyst, attracting the sugars and amino acids that were created during fermentation. When they come together sweet ester flavors are born and the longer you leave the spirit in the still the more intense fruitiness and really rich flavors develop. The Islay distillers already have the principle flavor of smokiness in the barley from the very start, so they want to do the opposite for the still. They want it in and out quickly. It’s not that there’s a right or wrong way to do it, but for the character of Glengoyne what we do is perfect: no smoke and maximum flavor!”

Hendry admits that bartenders will be unaware of the brand, partly due to its small capacity of 1000,000 liters, but also due to the company strategy. “We decided to concentrate our efforts in the off-premise simply because of our small capacity however due to the change in the on-premise sector, changing consumer demands in seeking out the lesser known crafted spirits, we believe now is the time to concentrate efforts toward bars and restaurants alike in getting our message across.” “Getting in touch with the bartenders is a plan we’ll be following most vigorously,” continues Hendry. “We need to spend more time listening and learning from bartenders and restaurateurs as to what their needs are, be it through education, mixology, food pairing and/or generally exciting their consumers in all things Glengoyne. Our message is simple and is easily communicated to all. We are a small-scale hand crafted malt using the very best sherry casks, with the slowest distillation, and consequently packed full of flavor. Is that not what every bartender worth their salt strives to introduce to their loyal customer base?” It’s the Glengoyne way.

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THE LOCALS

BAR DIRECTOR PROFILE

alec Vlastnik SONOMA COUNTY’S SPOONBAR

Craft Cocktails, Creative Expressions By Ruth Tobias | Photos courtesy of Spoonbar

Natives of California’s wine country may have vines for veins, but a love of the grape isn’t all that runs in their blood: so does a passion for hospitality. Take Alec Vlastnik. Born in Santa Rosa, he got his foot in the industry door as a busser while still in his teens; as he paid his way through college, he found that he was more interested in what he was learning on the floor than in the classroom. And by the ripe old age of 21, he’d begun bartending full-time at The Hotel Yountville, a gig he parlayed into stints at The Meritage Resort and Spa in Napa and Charlie Palmer’s Dry Creek Kitchen in Healdsburg, among others, before arriving at Spoonbar to manage the beverage program in 2015. The acclaimed signature eatery of Healdsburg’s h2hotel, Spoonbar takes what can by now be called a traditional approach to contemporary cuisine: market-driven yet globally inspired and big on small plates. From braised-duck sopes with feta and salsa verde to a savory tomato tart with apple and prosciutto, the resulting menu, courtesy of chef Louis Maldonado, lays a multi-tiered foundation on which to build a seasonal cocktail list with its roots in the garden but the sky as its creative limit.

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Not that the farm-to-bar philosophy is anything new to Vlastnik, who started his career in what he describes as “a nice, slower-paced environment where it was about crafting each cocktail carefully, using fresh ingredients.” A detour through the nightclub circuit exposed him “to the other side of the coin: flavored rums, candy shots, energy drinks as mixers,” an experience that only strengthened his commitment to the idea of garden-to-glass craft. “If I can find the ingredients and make each element, whether it’s bitters, tinctures, or shrubs, in a responsible and quality manner, why would I get them from somewhere else?” The answer to that rhetorical question, he adds, is a “no-brainer” in Sonoma County, given the bounty of “produce, herbs, and flowers at our fingertips.” Much of it is even grown in house, including mint, basil, rosemary, and a couple of different types of sage and violets. “We’re working on creating a hanging garden at the restaurant as well,” says Vlastnik. “A project I’m really excited about. And of course, there’s also no shortage of great distillers using organic, natural methods that we’re lucky to work with.”

From those raw materials, Vlastnik and his team develop recipes that push the envelope in all kinds of ways. For instance, one section of the list serves to showcase the versatility of a single, seasonally changing spirit—say tequila, which Vlastnik says “works ridiculously well with fall spices” to yield such drinks as the Chai Guevara laced with macadamia syrup. They’re also fond of incorporating unexpected ingredients from the kitchen, be it olive oil, balsamic vinegar, or roasted or dehydrated fruit. Yet they’re happy to put their fingerprints on the classics too. After all, Vlastnik himself deems the Vieux Carre his all-time favorite cocktail, “In my opinion, Bénédictine and rye are a match made in heaven.” Either way, “creating drinks you can be proud to present and that customers appreciate” is what it’s all about for Spoonbar’s crackerjack crew.

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DISTILLERY PROFILE The company launched in 2012 with ADK Vodka, which is chill filtered through Herkimer diamonds from a nearby town for maximum clarity. With ADK Gin, Karp wanted a gin that was complex and versatile, while offering a taste of the Adirondacks. Handcrafted in small batches of 250 liters, ADK Gin adds ten botanicals and essential oils to a corn base. Most unique are the alpine bilberries, a wild berry related to the blueberry and native to the region.

2014 brought the first whiskey, 1,000 Stills White Whisky, which hearkens back to Prohibition when bootleggers flooded the Adirondacks and the region earned the moniker “the land of the 1,000 stills.” Customer demand led to the production of a small By Michael Tulipan | Photos courtesy of Adirondack Distilling Co. batch bourbon, released in June 2014, which quickly sold out its first run.

601 VARICK STREET stood vacant for years on an intersection in the middle of Utica, New York until three entrepreneurs teamed up to give it an unlikely second life as the Adirondack Distilling Company. Master Distiller Jordan Karp spent years as a sought after political consultant in the high pressure world of Washington DC, and after one more campaign, this time in Utica, he was ready to give up the rat race. “I reached for a top shelf bottle of vodka one day and thought to myself, I can do better than that,” he says. Karp pitched the idea of a distillery to his friend Steve Cox even though it was the middle of the recession. Cox brought the idea to Bruce Elwell, a doctor and gin enthusiast, and soon Adirondack was formed. The trio set about rebuilding the building’s dilapidated interior, including reinforcing the concrete floor to hold the still custom built for them in Germany. Little proved usable, though one of the remaining bank vaults was repurposed to store locally grown corn. Early on, the partners decided that all their spirits would be 100% corn, and therefore gluten free. Karp says of the decision, “We use corn for a few reasons. One, we have some of the best corn in the world in Upstate New York. Two, we wanted to distinguish ourselves in the marketplace and corn is still a rare base ingredient for vodka.” In a mash tank, corn is mixed with water and then yeast is selected on the basis of the alcohol desired. Then the mash is transferred to fermentation tanks for four to five days. The entire process is completely done by hand, even the washing and filling of bottles.

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Adirondack’s spirits have already won several prestigious awards including double gold medals for ADK Vodka from the American Wine & Spirits Society at the New York State Fair, a platinum medal at the Spirits International Prestige Awards, and a silver at the World Vodka Awards in London beating out thousands of other vodkas. After just a few months on the market, 1,000 Stills White Whiskey won a silver at the 2014 World Spirits Competition in San Francisco and gold at the 2014 Spirits International Prestige Awards. Today, the renovated distillery hums with life and the partners are looking towards expanding their product line. This year, Adirondack plans to release a barrel aged gin and possibly a single-malt whiskey. Not to mention more of that sold out bourbon.


MIX IT UP

CELEB SIPS

THESE CELEBS HAVE ACTING IN THEIR BLOOD. GENERATION AFTER GENERATION THESE STARS CONTINUE TO STAY IN THE SPOTLIGHT. THE FAMILY THAT DRINKS TOGETHER STAYS TOGETHER.

DREW BARRYMORE Actress Drew descends from a renowned acting family, with Jaid and John as parents, John the son of actors John Barrymore and Dolores Costello. She is also the grand-niece of actors Ethel and Lionel Barrymore. Her godparents are Sophia Loren and Steven Spielberg. Drew created her own wine, Barrymore by Carmel Road Pinot Grigio, in honor of her famous family.

COLIN HANKS Spitting image of his father Tom Hanks, Colin is son of Tom and first wife actress Samantha Lewes. Colin is an Old Fashioned type of guy, just like his dad.

JEFF BRIDGES Jeff and his brother Beau are the sons of actor Lloyd Bridges and actress Dorothy. Of course, Jeff is known for drinking White Russians for his role as the Dude in The Big Lebowski, “I will have a White Russian when I feel like drinking dessert, it’s very sweet,” he recently admitted on Jimmy Kimmel Live.

ZOE KRAVITZ Zoe is the daughter of musician Lenny Kravitz and his first wife. Her grandparents were filmmakers Sy Kravitz and actress Roxie Roker. Zoe’s drink of choice? Jameson Irish Whiskey, of course. KATE HUDSON Kate is the daughter of actress Goldie Hawn and her first husband Bill Hudson. Goldie and her longtime partner, actor Kurt Russell, alongside with daughter Kate, all have their hands, or shall we say feet, in wine barrels. Kurt has his label, Gogi Wines and Kate has Hudson-Bellamy Wines.

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EMMA ROBERTS Emma’s father, Eric Roberts is brother to actresses Julia and LIsa Roberts. Emma’s latest show Scream Queens has sparked several scary drinking games, including one that the cast came up with themselves.

JOSH BROLIN Josh is son of actor James Brolin who is husband of singer/actress Barbra Streisand. Brolin swore off drinking after a night out ended in a bouncer-fighting debauchery. Barbra on the other hand says, “I’ve never been drunk.”


Steeped with the spirit of the land, from bright citrus fruit to smoky wo o d . A g av e a r o m a s a n d the earth’s purest spice.

THE SPIRIT OF THE HIGHL A NDS EL ESPÌR ITU DE LOS A LTOS

M A D E W I T H C H A R A C T E R, S T R E N G T H AND 100% AGAVE LOS CAZADORES TOMAN CON RESPONSABILIDAD. DRINK RESPONSIBLY. ©2015. CAZADORES, ITS TRADE DRESS AND THE DEER LOGO ARE TRADEMARKS. IMPORTED BY TEQUILA CAZADORES U.S.A., SEAL BEACH, CA. TEQUILA – 40% ALC. BY VOL.


THE LOCALS

SOMMELIER PROFILE

By Melissa Molloy | Photos courtesy of Camerata David began working with wine in his home state of Vermont at the age of 18, but didn’t really build a passion for it until he came to New York, where at first he was studying music. “A coach and friend from Julliard is a connoisseur,​collector, and just all around oenophile and he really opened my eyes with regards to the complexity of the wine world.” When David decided to leave singing behind he really became a cellar rat, starting at Stella Sola and soon after buying wine for a little wine bar. At the same time, he was working hard to achieve certifications with the Court of Master Sommeliers. Now, owner of Camerata at Paulie’s, Eater’s 2014 pick for one of the hottest wine bars in the country, David is not only one of the founders of the Houston Sommelier Association, he spends his time focusing on pushing education and helping the industry move forward in any way he can. “We want to provide a comfortable place for our guests to enjoy wines made by people we respect and want to support! Being the home of the Houston Sommelier Association has been a huge part of what we do. The other element of which I am most proud is that the staff is constantly learning, pushing each other, and sharing ​that knowledge with our guests in a non-pretentious way. I think wine should be delicious as well as interesting.​  Everyone who comes in the door should have as much or as little information as they want. If someone just wants a great glass of wine and some quiet, then the bartender should be able to knock that out quickly, without boring the guest. If they want to discuss lees contact and sub-regions of the Loire, then we should be able to do that as well! All in the name of providing them with the ​experience they came to have. Some of our wines may be unfamiliar to the guests, so our job is to translate what’s in the bottle as easily and painlessly as possible.” When asked his wine of choice, David replies, “Right now I’m really excited to pour Roland Velich’s wines from Burgenland. Under the Moric label, they are some of the most amazing wines I’ve had recently. The reds are all old-vine Blaufrankisch, a grape that he equates to a Pinot Noir/Syrah/Nebbiolo mix and I’d agree. They are structured while also having beautiful fruit and floral notes. Everything from their straight 2012 Blaufrankisch to the 2006 single vineyard Neckenmarkt, they are truly exceptional wines.

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SERVE A SHOT OF RUMCHATA WITH ANY PUMPKIN ALE — IT’S THE PERFECT BOMB SHOT FOR THE FALL!

Visit RumChata.com for recipes PLEASE ENJOY RESPONSIBLY.

RumChata®, Caribbean Rum with Real Dairy Cream, Natural and Artificial Flavors, 13.75% alc./vol. Produced and Bottled by Agave Loco Brands, Pewaukee, WI 53072. Please Enjoy Responsibly. RUMCHATA and CHATA are Registered Trademarks of Agave Loco, LLC.


THE LOCALS

BEVERAGE DIRECTOR PROFILE

STEPHEN YORSZ

Whiskey Man By Sara Kay | Photos courtesy of LROI

S

tephen Yorsz, creative director at Leave Rochelle Out of It and whiskey expert, is more than aware of the growing fascination with whiskey that the U.S. has seen over the past several years. His affinity for brown spirits and interest in learning more about them landed him a coveted position working for Maker’s Mark, and from there he has continued to have the utmost respect and admiration for all things whiskey. So why has whiskey gained such notoriety and more importantly, how did it manage to become the top grossing spirit in the U.S. market? Yorsz bases it on the uniqueness of the spirit as well as people’s thirst for knowledge. “In my opinion, whiskey has a lot more depth than other spirits. When you compare it to say, vodka, there is just a lot more going on. It allows distillers to create a greater degree of variety in taste from brand to brand while still being in the same category.” As people continue to educate themselves on brown spirits, Yorsz predicts that they’re going to get involved with the more complex, heavy-hitting whiskies, expanding their minds as well as their palates.

“It’s exactly the same thing we have seen with the food culture. As people become more educated and more interested, they move away from the generic and move into the more esoteric, demanding a higher quality product.” Whiskey continues to blow people’s minds and introduce them to incredible flavors as a result of hard work and creativity during the production process at the hands of master distillers. So what does Yorsz predict for the future of whiskey in the states? Three letters: U-S-A.

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“Any American distiller would tell you that American whiskey is on fire right now, marking a significant shift in tastes. Six years ago, Pappy Van Winkle was great whiskey that you could easily find at a fair price at any quality whiskey bar or store. Now it’s $1,500 on eBay and practically as rare as a unicorn.” At the end of the day, people will continue to drink whiskey because it’s excellent, and Yorsz, who considers himself ‘old fashioned’ because of his affinity for whiskey mixed with absolutely nothing else, will continue to drink it too. “It’s the history, the culture and the people,” says Yorsz.


1.25 oz Galliano 2 oz Pineapple Juice Top up with Prosecco


THE LOCALS

BRAND OWNER PROFILE

By Christopher Osburn Photos by Sara Hanna Photography Vixen Vodka was conceived during a vacation in the summer of 2010. “While drinking, a conversation ensued about why we drink the brands we drink, and how did those brands target us as women?” says cofounder Carrie King. “We realized that they didn’t.” She continues, “At the time there were not too many brands out there that spoke to us as women in a language that was not condescending or treated us as arm candy or sex objects.” After further research, they realized that most men order by brand while most women order by the drink itself. They wondered why this was. “Women don’t have a call brand, a brand that’s made just for them. So we embarked on a two-year journey to create a brand that women could call their own. We officially launched Vixen Vodka in November 2012.”

Vixen Vodka founders Carrie King and LeeAnn Maxwell. Vixen was recently awarded a Gold Medal from The Fifty Best’s, Best Domestic Vodka. Vixen Vodka is different from other vodkas on the market because of two reasons. The first reason, King says, is that the language separates Vixen from the rest of the vodka pack.  “We strive to inspire women to be confident, not just in their approach to cocktails, but in all areas of their life.  We talk to women in a way that celebrates who they are at this particular moment in their lives, not ten pounds less from now, not shiny hair from now, not skinny jeans from now.” The second reason is the vodka itself. “We knew that women liked to drink, but were put off by the after burn of most vodkas on the market today.  Vixen does not have that after burn as it is formulated from GMOfree sweet corn which gives it a very smooth finish, very creamy, with slight vanilla notes.”

Prior to founding Vixen, King and co-founder LeeAnn Maxwell’s experience in the spirits industry didn’t go much further than just enjoying a cocktail every now and then. “With that said, our expertise lies in marketing, advertising, sales and finance, which, when building a brand, is an excellent background.” The spirits side of the industry has been their biggest learning curve. “We have asked a lot of questions, done our research, hit the streets with distributors, surrounded ourselves with experts in the industry and have become well-versed.” When King and Maxwell decided to follow their dream and leave corporate America, the pair couldn’t believe the name Vixen Vodka did not already exist. “It was just too good, so here we are.”  According to King, the word Vixen translates to strength, confidence, risky, flirty, sassy and fun. “Every woman is a Vixen and we are just that gentle reminder to keep your stilettos high and your head even higher.  But more importantly, taking that leap has had a profound effect on each of us and made us each realize that if you have a dream, you can achieve it once you put action behind that dream.”

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Apple Cinnamon Vixen INGREDIENTS

2 oz. Vixen Vodka 1 oz. Apple Cinnamon Moonshine 1 oz. Apple Juice PREPARATION

Combine ingredients in Martini glass. Garnish with a cinnamon stick and a graham cracker rim.


The Perfect Martini -1 oz. Cinzano Extra Dry Vermouth - 4 oz. Darnley’s View London Dry Gin - Olives or a twist of lemon, for garnish

The Perfect Negroni Equal Parts: - Cinzano Rosso Vermouth - Campari - Darnley’s View London Dry Gin

ENJOY RESPONSIBLY. ©2015 Palm Bay International, Boca Raton, FL

250-YEAR TRADITION

OF

EXCELLENCE

Once regarded as just an ingredient, the right vermouth can make or break your cocktail. Reach for the brand that has been raising the bar since before the cocktail was born – Cinzano Vermouth.

www.cinzano.com

PalmBay.com


MIX IT UP

BUZZ WORTHY

Feisty

Bier Schnapps

CRAFTING AGAINST THE GRAIN

Photos courtesy of Feisty Spirits Feisty began from a desire to produce high quality spirits in Fort Collins, Colorado. David Monahan and Jamie Gulden had previously worked together on a handful of start up companies, but they wanted to start a company where they could utilize local, organic ingredients to create high quality spirits. “The name came to represent the non-traditional ingredients we use, wanting to keep a playful tone to our company as well,” says co-founder Monahan. Their main focus is on whiskeys, although they also make four brandies. “Within the whiskey realm, we have several bourbons, some based on the more traditional yellow corn, but a majority use corns like blue, red or white,” says Monahan. “Secondary grains in the bourbons include rye, spelt, wheat, and oats.”   They also make two rye whiskeys and a series of whiskeys using alternative grains such as triticale, quinoa, kamut, oats and millet.   Additionally, they work with local breweries to distill a variety of beers, producing a whiskey like product we call Schnapps. “We have distilled IPAs called Hop Schnapps and a catch all category called Bier Schnapps for which we’ve distilled wheat beer, sour beer and saison to name a few.”   Feisty is on a mission to follow the non-traditional path when making whiskey. They refer to themselves as Still Rebels. “We respect the traditions of whiskey making while also using alternative organic grains and maintaining a passion for our products, as well as keeping things fun.”   Their whiskey is made in small batches. Monahan believes that this gives each its own unique character. They are also willing to try new things while incorporating new grains and flavors into their products. “Being in Fort Collins brings such a unique craft culture, particularly in the brewing industry, which we are carrying into the distilled spirits realm,” says Monahan. “The proximity to these innovative breweries and their openness to collaborations has been very stimulating.” Monahan believes that Colorado is a great place to have a craft business because the people are open and accepting of new products.  “It’s been wonderful to see people, new and experienced whiskey folks, enjoying the new flavors and new blends we bring to the market.”

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ADVANCED MIXOLOGY

FRESH WHISKEY SOUR INGREDIENTS

1 ½ oz. Jack Daniel’s Single Barrel 1 oz. Simple Syrup ¾ oz. Fresh Lemon Juice PREPARATION

Combine in a shaker with ice, shake well, strain into a rocks glass. Garnish with a slice of lemon, top with Maraschino cherry.

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DRINK IN HISTORY


THE SIMPLE STALWART:

WHISKEY SOUR By Lanee Lee

I

’m perfectly capable of fixing my own breakfast. As a matter of fact, I had a peanut butter sandwich and two Whiskey Sours,” says Richard Sherman to his secretary in the 1955 movie, The Seven Year Itch. Lucky for Sherman, his liquid breakfast of champions is easy to make with only three elements: whiskey, lemon juice and sugar. Historically this popular classic has been in and out of fashion; in, because it’s not too fancy and out, because it’s usually poorly made with inferior ingredients and is often associated with dive bars and casinos. But, wait. Perhaps its heyday is coming again. Although the first record of the cocktail was in Jerry Thomas’ 1862 book The Bartender’s Guide, its peak was in the first half of the 20th century. Hemingway and Fitzgerald loved to throw them back together in Paris in the 1920s. However, the origins actually date back much further, thanks to the British Royal Navy. In the 16th century, scurvy was crippling ship crews until it was discovered that a daily dose of Vitamin C, via citrus fruit, kept sailors from falling ill. As they were sometimes wont to do, the men added beer or rum and eventually whiskey to make their medicine palatable. The booze plus lemon or lime combo became known as a sour of two parts liquor to one

part citrus and sweetener. And hundreds of variations have since been spawned worldwide such as the Pisco Sour, the Daiquiri and the hugely popular Margarita. A World of Whiskey Sours It’s no surprise that the Whiskey Sour has evolved over the years; when made properly with quality ingredients, its riffs can be downright elegant. The New York Sour, a 19th century favorite, floats a little red wine on top. Mix in apricot brandy for a Baltimore Bang. Add a raw egg for a creamy delight, as Dale DeGroff’s recipe instructs in The Essential Cocktail recipe book. Jeffrey Morganthaler, of Clyde Common in Portland, Oregon, offers a potent twist on both the Whiskey and Amaretto Sour by using cask-proof whiskey. Whether you agree with UK comedian Dorian Crook’s prescription for a perfect night consisting of “a Whiskey Sour, a meteor shower and a cab that arrives before you put your hand out” or not, a Whiskey Sour (even if it’s shabbily made) has been a stalwart sipper through the ages. And to boot, the centuries old drink has its own holiday: August 25th is National Whiskey Sour day. But, if you can’t wait until then to dust off an old classic and give it a whirl, try this recipe provided by Jack Daniels.

CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

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IN THE KNOW

Bodegas Williams & Humbert Winemaker, Paola Medina

PURVEYORS OF THE WORLD’S FINEST SHERRIES

By Bryen Dunn | Photos courtesy of Williams & Humbert Bodegas Williams & Humbert are true pioneers in sherry production, and have been using the traditional solera method to age their world-renowned brands deep in the heart of Andalusia, Spain for well over a century. Founded in 1877 by British brothers-inlaw Sir Alexander Williams, a connoisseur of sherry products, and Arthur Humbert, a specialist in international relations, Bodegas Williams & Humbert was instrumental in the creation of the Jerez-XeresBrandy Quality Demarcation, as well as the criteria used for evaluating sherry. Quality and tradition make their products stand out, and they are fortunate to have generations of winemaking expertise, as well as a sizable reserve of original wines (soleras) preserved in high quality oak casks. These soleras are the base of the development and aging of every sherry produced, resulting in extremely high quality sherry that is representative of both Jerez and the company’s original style.

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The family-owned business produces a diverse range of sherry in a variety of styles, most imported by Palm Bay International here in the U.S. Most notable is their Dry Sack Medium, which was created in 1906 and quickly became a staple in restaurants and bars around the world. Today, with over 1,200 acres of vineyards and the largest wine cellar in Europe, they now produce three lines of sherries - The Heritage Series (Dry Sack, Pando Fino and Canasta Cream Sherry), Don Zoilo, and the Rare Aged Sherries. The company also boasts one of the largest and most diverse collections of 20 and 30 year-old VOS and VORS Sherries. Second generation family member Paola Medina has been working at the winery since 2001, and started full-time as technical director and winemaker in 2010. She tirelessly continues to protect the authenticity of the wines that have been entrusted to her for future generations. Chilled had an opportunity to chat with Medina about her passion for sherry.


“IT IS IMPORTANT TO KN OW TH E TE R RO I R, C LI M ATE AN D GRAP E. WORK I NG WI TH PALO M I N O GR A P E S I S AM A ZI N G, GIVEN T HAT FROM T HIS SI N GLE VAR I E TY I T I S P O SSI B LE TO P RODUCE D I FFERENT W I N E S, E AC H SP EC I A L I N I TS OWN UN I Q UE STYLE .” She says, “It is important to know the terroir, climate and grape. Working with Palomino grapes is amazing, given that from this single variety it is possible to produce different wines, each special in its own unique style.” Medina and her team are responsible for producing the top-selling sherry wine in the United States - Dry Sack, a full bodied, lightly sweet sherry. They recently introduced Canasta Cream and Pando Fino to add a sweet and dry style sherry in the same price segment as Dry Sack. The Don Zoilo 12 year-old range and the very special and limited 20 and 30 year-olds Sherries, Don Guido, Jalifa, and Dos Cortados offer a full range of styles from very sweet to bone dry wines. Some of the earliest cocktail recipes dating back to the 1880-90’s highlight sherry’s broad and versatile flavor profile. The recent resurgence in classic cocktails has helped put a spotlight on sherry once again. It has a distinctive flavor profile that stands out in a cocktail, but at the same time it integrates well with other spirits. Many spirits, including rum and brandies, are aged in old sherry casks and already show the nutty characteristics and hints of dried fruit found in sherry. The addition of sherry only enhances the cocktail’s complexity, leaving the imbiber to contemplate the origin of the many flavors and aromas in the glass. Medina mentions the Sherry Cobbler as a classic cocktail that was a precursor of modern sherry

mixology. Created in the mid-nineteenth century, it has deep roots in Anglo-Saxon culture. As Harry Johnson, one of America’s best barmen in the late 19th century and author of the Bartender’s Manual (1882), put it, “this was the most popular cocktail in the U.S., acclaimed by the ladies and gentlemen.” Nearly two centuries later, its popularity still endures. A version of the Sherry Cobbler, called a Rebujito, remains a staple in Andalucía and is the drink of choice during the annual Feria celebration. Made with sherry, sugar soda, lots of ice and a slice of orange, it’s light and refreshing. The perfect cocktail for any occasion! Today Medina cites her favorite cocktail as the Dry Sack Desire. It was created by Chris Hannah, mixologist at Arnaud’s New Orleans, and combines sherry wine with an exceptional Brandy de Jerez to produce a delightful, authentic sherry cocktail. When asked what ingredient makes for a perfect complement to sherry, Medina says “It is difficult, if not impossible, to choose the wrong ingredient to combine with sherry. The variety and versatility of these wines allows for hundreds of combinations. Manzanilla, Fino, Amontillado, Oloroso, Palo Cortado and Pedro Ximenez all bring different notes to the many cocktails that can be made with these unique wines. Sherry wines are so varied that it’s possible to find a style that works with any ingredient.” CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

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FOOD KNOW HOW

TIPS AND TRICKS FOR EVERYONE WHO LOVES TO MIX

APPLES

A beautifully crisp fall afternoon visit to the orchard will yield full baskets of ripe and juicy apples. After all the pies have been baked, what to do with the rest of these apples? Drink them of course. Luckily there are many mixing options for adding apples to cocktails, including ingredients like apple brandy, apple cider, apple liqueurs and bitters. Or why not just use the actual fruit and its juice in the cocktail for a perfect seasonal sipper?

Photo courtesy of The Kitchy Kitchen

CHECK OUT THIS RECIPE FROM CELEBRITY CHEF CLAIR THOMAS OF THE KITCHY KITCHEN:

APPLE MINT SANGRIA INGREDIENTS

3 bottles Light Fruity Red Wine (Gamay, Beaujolais, or Pinot Noir work well) 2 Pink Lady Apples (cored and sliced thinly) 1 Large Asian Pear (cored and sliced thinly) 1 bunch Fresh Mint (leaves removed and roughly torn) Dark Brown Sugar Syrup*

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PREPARATION

*Brown Sugar Syrup: combine ½ cup of dark brown sugar with ½ a cup of water in a small pot. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, cook until the sugar has melted (about 5 minutes), and remove the pot from the heat.  Let it cool to room temperature. Combine the apples, Asian pear, mint, and wine in two pitchers. Add the sugar syrup a little at a time until it’s at the desired sweetness. Pop the pitchers in the fridge for 2 hours (up to 2 days) to let the flavors mingle.  Fill the pitchers with ice and serve.


©2015 Palm Bay International, Boca Raton, FL

Founder Bernard Walsh at Royal Oak, the home of Walsh Whiskey Distillery.

At Royal Oak, the home of Walsh Whiskey Distillery, centuries of history are about to align with the hope of a new era. An era born of the creation of our premium craft Irish whiskey, The Irishman, through the nature and nurture of our community. Walsh Whiskey Distillery, Royal Oak, Carlow, Ireland. Producers of premium craft Irish whiskies.

PalmBay.com

ENJOY RESPONSIBLY.


ADVANCED MIXOLOGY

MIXOLOGIST FOR HIRE

Bottles behind the Bar: SWEET VERMOUTH GRAND MARNIER CORDON ROUGE ISLAY SCOTCH CREAM SHERRY

By Anne-Louise Marquis | Photos by Greg Buda

During my senior year in college a friend returned after the holidays with her aunt’s old bar collection. “It’s all old, weird bottles,” she said as she showed us her dorm room bar, “We don’t know what any of it is or what to do with them.” I can still recall that moment when I saw those dusty bottles. I didn’t know what to do with them either, but little did I know those first moments of curiosity would lead me down the path of my career. Inspired by this issue’s theme of heritage I wanted to work with a selection of “classic” products that are often overlooked. Perhaps you’ve inherited these bottles like my friend, or they’ve been stashed in the cabinet of your weekend rental. If you’re a bartender, they could be the unused ones sitting on your back shelf because every bar should have them. These brands, the old man spirits I’ve heard them called, have a lot to offer, more than we sometimes give credit for, especially when mixed together. Anne Louise Marquis has worked in every type of establishment from dive bars to boutique hotels and in every role from front of the house to busser to head bartender. She is currently a National Brand Ambassador for Marnier Lapostolle.

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For first timers or mixers on the fly, here are some helpful tips:

1

2 3

If you don’t have bar tools, an ounce is about two tablespoons and you can use a chopstick or two to stir and then hold back the ice when you strain. You can use a vegetable peeler to get a professional looking lemon zest. Use silicone ice molds or small muffin trays to make large ice cubes that will melt slower and keep your drinks better longer.


Fireside Chat

This drink is a variation on the classic Rob Roy, a sibling of the more famous Manhattan. In this variation the smokiness of the Islay scotch blends well with the sweetness of the Grand Marnier and the weight of the vermouth to produce something unexpected and delicious. INGREDIENTS

PREPARATION

1 ½ oz. Islay Scotch 1 oz. Grand Marnier Cordon Rouge ½ oz. Sweet Vermouth 2 dashes of Angostura Bitters

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass with ice, stir and strain up or over a large ice cube. Garnish with an expressed lemon peel and a cherry.

A note about storing vermouth: We used to drink a lot more vermouth before prohibition. The reason it began to disappear from drinks (all those tiresome, “I like a Martini with the vermouth bottle just waived over it” jokes) is that it probably didn’t taste good. Since it’s mostly wine, it goes bad fast. The danger is air, which causes oxidation. Two weeks is about what you can expect once you open a bottle, even less, so better to buy it in smaller bottles. The best way to preserve vermouth is the same way you’d preserve wine: cork it tight, store in the fridge, perhaps use an inert gas spray and (ideally) drink it as soon as you open it. If you find an old bottle with a broken seal, toss it, and buy a fresh one.

Grand Be

This sour is named for my grandmother (a piece of my own heritage) who changed her name to “Be” at some point in the 70’s. It’s easy to make and takes advantage of the oils in the lemon skins as well as the juice. The honey plays nicely with the smoke and the orange, and the result is a darling little ditty of a drink. INGREDIENTS

PREPARATION

1 oz. Islay Scotch 1 oz. Grand Marnier 3 bar spoons Honey Syrup* 4 lemon wedges

Add all ingredients to a mixing tin, squeezing the lemons and adding the whole pieces. Add ice and shake thoroughly. Pour all contents into a glass and serve. *Combine 1 part honey to 1 part water and heat lightly until they are combined, remove from heat and store until use.

A note about Grand Marnier: Having both sweet and bitter notes, Grand Marnier is great in cocktails because it’s Cognac based, and at 40% ABV, it’s solid enough for a base spirit. I bet you have a bottle on your shelf.

Isabella

This is a long drink inspired by the sherry cobbler, one of the more fascinating and historically rich mixed drinks out there. It’s arguably one of the first drinks women were permitted to consume in public and it’s the reason the straw was created. While sherry is undeniably on the rise, the cream or sweet varieties seem to be taking a back seat to the drier ones like Fino and Amontillado. It’s often seen as an after dinner drink, but incorporating it into a cocktail turns it into a lovely aperitif. Here, the sweetness of the berries plays well with the earthiness of the sherry, and the vermouth adds a layer of spice while the orange adds a hint of citrus. As with vermouth, sherry is a fortified wine, so don’t let it sit around too long. INGREDIENTS

PREPARATION

1 ½ oz. Cream Sherry ½ oz. Sweet Vermouth ½ oz. Fresh Lemon Juice ½ oz. Simple Syrup Soda Water Fresh Strawberries

In a tin, muddle berries into the liquid ingredients. Add ice and shake. Strain over fresh crushed ice and top with soda water. Garnish with a fresh strawberry and a lemon wedge. CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

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COMPETITION WINNERS

THOROUGHLY MODERN

BULLDOG By Thom Meintel

HOW MANY WAYS CAN YOU MAKE A GIN & TONIC? IF YOU ASK ANYONE AT BULLDOG GIN BE PREPARED FOR MORE THAN A ONE WORD ANSWER. IN FACT, IF YOU’RE A BARTENDER, BE PREPARED TO LEARN ALL ABOUT SOMETHING CALLED THE MODERN GIN & TONIC CHALLENGE, WHICH CULMINATED IN SEPTEMBER AFTER A SIX-MONTH SEARCH ACROSS THE U.S. YOU SEE, BULLDOG IS NO ORDINARY GIN AND THIS WAS NO ORDINARY CONTEST. IT WAS THE FIRST CHANCE FOR THE BRAND TO SHOW ITS PERSONALITY TO THE BARTENDING COMMUNITY ON A NATIONAL SCALE SO IT WAS ALL STOPS OUT.

WHAT DID THEY DO DIFFERENTLY?

How about for starters dangling a carrot in the form of a trip to the jet set party island of Ibiza as the prize? Preceded by a night on the town in trendy Barcelona, of course, to learn all about the famous “Spanish Serve,” the flashy mixing craze formulated around a standard G&T. Having already gained formidable momentum all over Europe, the out of the box method unleashes extravagant garnishes, exotic tonics and unusual liqueurs upon the perennial favorite.

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To start, Bulldog knew they had an ace up their sleeve with their less juniper heavy gin which has a smoother citrus forward profile and unique botanical mix that includes Dragon Eye, White Poppy seeds and Lotus Leaves from China. They set out to show how their liquid makes for the ultimate Gin & Tonic. Having tasted a few samples at the private VIP dinners the brand organized during the campaign to familiarize local mixologists with their juice and the unprecedented mixing method, I couldn’t agree more.


T

heir dinner series staged in ten U.S. cities was a fantastic brand experience, part education and psyching session. Led by Bulldog’s National Brand Ambassador Rosie Lee, herself a powerhouse, the events were invite only cocktail parties where mixologists experimented at Gin & Tonic “recreation stations” then kicked back with the Bulldog team over dinner. How many bartenders ever get a chance to mingle with the brand elite? Bulldog wanted to prove that their differentiated approach to trade activations was a winning ticket and the once in a lifetime trip the feather in its cap. The challenge kicked off in March in Las Vegas and segued to Dallas and L.A., then San Diego, Scottsdale and Denver, picking up speed in N.Y and moving on to Boston, Milwaukee and finally Chicago in midMay. The Chilled 100 members were also in attendance and all the pros took time to get a head start on the competition, unveiled by Rosie at each event. The essence of The Bulldog Modern Gin & Tonic was about creating the ultimate Gin & Tonic experience. The judging criteria shaped up like this: 50% for taste as the drink is all about flavor; 25% for presentation because showmanship made a huge difference; and 25% for creativity with innovative ingredients garnering big points. Entrants were required to create an original recipe with consideration given to Bulldog infusions with teas or fruit as well as ice variations, like sorbet and liquor infused ice. As it’s served in Spain, the cocktail had to be mixed in a Copa-style glass, a large stemmed goblet with ample room for all manner of garnishes and then beautifully photographed. Twenty-five semi-finalists would be whittled down to ten finalists, then three grand prize winners would be chosen and awarded the trip, a uniquely Bulldog experience.

Bulldog received hundreds of submissions from all across the country and at last it came time to discover whether the proof was in the pudding. At a live tasting held at Ward III in NYC and judged by a panel of industry experts including Liquid Lab’s Parker Boase and Greg Lucas, Kenneth McCoy of Rum House and Chilled Magazine’s own Jeff Greif, twenty-five incredible entries were narrowed to ten. Observing the mound of exotic ingredients on the bar prior to the mixing session, I couldn’t help but think this was going to blow other cocktail competitions out of the water. The ten talented finalists had wisely included out of the ordinary elements in their recipes like chili oil, Tahitian vanilla beans, fresh clementine juice, ginger syrup and sprigs of lavender and thyme ripe from the garden. Inspiration ranged from the flavors, sights and sounds of Spain to Shakespeare’s 5th Sonnet (no kidding). Each drink created tasted better than the one prior and before long both the judges and Rosie’s eyes were sparkling with animation thanks to the immense wave of talent on display. OK, I admit I was in awe too, especially after tasting the ten finished masterpieces lined up on the bar. The judges never seemed to waiver in their scoring as the cocktails were tasted one by one and it became clear after a short deliberation which three were really and truly outstanding. L.A.’s Justin Roberts won for his Vermont Side Cocktail, a nod to the woods featuring an unusual pine needle syrup; New York City’s Sarah Theilkuhl was selected for her Oliver Reade Street with a heady hops-infused dry vermouth; and the final winner with her All Fresco was none other than noted mixing maven Franky Marshall, also from New York, who had exhibited a real flair for The Modern Gin & Tonic concept. Using lemon sorbet, chili oil and a wealth of flowers and herbs for garnishing, her drink tasted divinely decadent and her presentation hands down bedazzled everyone.

Rosie Lee, Bulldog National Brand Ambassador

CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

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COMPETITION WINNERS

Then it was off on a whirlwind to Spain. What more could a bartender want? How about a day in the mecca of gin with a visit to Barcelona’s own Bobby Gin – the birthplace of The Modern Gin & Tonic – where an elaborate cocktail menu of G&T’s keeps the place on the cutting edge? Then three days and nights of nonstop partying courtesy of the best DJ’s in the world and a cruise on a private yacht to the Mediterranean island of Formentera. Did we hear there was no time for sleeping?

I decided to ask my friend Corey Galotta, Bulldog’s North American Marketing Manager, how everything panned out. He keenly recounted a few of the memorable aspects of the contest while trying to remain unbiased. What started as a more premium, yet still simple way to serve gin and tonic has now taken off at various establishments. And following the competition the brand is already seeing a lot of experimentation from bartenders who are using Bulldog to create classic gin cocktails in new ways. Hey Bulldog, think you’re on to something!

AFTER RECEIVING HUNDREDS OF SUBMISSIONS FROM ALL OVER THE U.S. THE BULLDOG MODERN GIN & TONIC CHALLENGE JUDGES NARROWED THEIR CHOICES DOWN TO THREE WINNING COCKTAILS. GIVE THESE OUTSTANDING COCKTAILS A MIX. VISIT CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM/BULLDOG FOR FULL RECIPES.

ALL FRESCO

OLIVER READE STREET

Ms. Franky Marshall

Sarah Theilkuhl

(The Roof at Park - NYC)

(Ward III - NYC)

VERMONT SIDE Justin Roberts

(La Descarga, Los Angeles, CA)

INGREDIENTS

INGREDIENTS

INGREDIENTS

2 oz. BULLDOG GIN Infused with Lemongrass Mate Tea* 1 Small Scoop Lemon Sorbet 2 oz. Chilled Fever Tree Tonic Water 1-2 Small Drops Chili Oil ** Scored Lemon Wheel Sprig Fresh Thyme Fresh Sprig of English Lavender Hibiscus Flower

1 ½ oz. BULLDOG GIN ½ oz. Cascade Hops infused Perucchi Spanish Dry Vermouth* ¼ oz. Pamplemousse Rose Grapefruit Liqueur Half of a Lime 4 dashes of Bittermen Hopped Grapefruit Bitters 2 oz. Q Tonic Garnish with Grapefruit Zest, Lime Wheel, Hop Leaf

1 ½ oz. BULLDOG GIN ½ oz. Foraged Pine Needle Syrup ¼ oz. Clear Creek Eau De Vie of Douglas Fir ¼ oz. Fresh Pineapple Juice ¼ oz. Fresh Lime ¼ oz. Honey 1 ½ oz. Fever Tree Tonic Pine Needle and Brush Flower for garnish

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Winning countless awards over the past decade, the energy within these exclusive avors showcase an aura all their own. Spirit Journal: Five Stars Espresso: Top 75 Spirits, 2014

vangoghvodka.com


ADVANCED MIXOLOGY

COMPETITION WINNERS

FRANKY GOES TO IBIZA A FEW DAYS IN THE LIFE OF A CONTEST WINNING MIXOLOGIST By Franky Marshall

CHILLED’S EDITOR-AT-LARGE, THOM MEINTEL, CAUGHT UP WITH NEW YORK CITY’S OWN FRANKY MARSHALL ON THE FLY AND BEGGED HER FOR A TINY RECOUNT OF BULLDOG GIN’S AWARD WINNING TICKET TO IBIZA. SHE GRACIOUSLY OBLIGED. DAY

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1

e arrive in Barcelona and check into our hotel where I meet our charming host Joanne Birkitt, Bulldog’s VP Global Marketing and her team, along with the other two contest winners - Justin Roberts and Sarah Theilkuhl. My very comfortable room has an expansive view of the L’Eixample neighborhood – wow! After a little free time we meet in the lounge for an official welcome with Bulldog Gin & Tonics - our first, but certainly not our last of the evening. Then it’s time for a bar crawl. First stop: Bobby Gin, a bar specializing in Gin & Tonics. We learn a little about the bar (named after an actual person), then how to pour a G&T, Spanish style. It must be served in a Copa (balloon) glass with 1 part Gin to 4 parts quality Tonic Water poured down the side of a coiled barspoon or over an ice cube to preserve the effervescence. The garnish is meant to enhance the flavor of the gin, and in our case, we had a choice of an apple slice or black licorice. (NB: If you ask for a straw, as I did, you might get told that’s a no-no. Whoops!) Next, we couple up and get into rickshaws which take us to our other destinations, leisurely absorbing the sights and sounds of Barcelona along the way. Very nice! Our next stops are Bar Bonavida, Guzzo, and Amarre 69. Finally, time for dinner around 11PM. (That’s the way you do it in Spain, dahling.) Then, it’s off to hit club BlingBling for Bulldog bottle service. What a first night!

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We board a morning flight to Ibiza; everyone’s in pretty good shape. Thoughtful goodie bags await us in our rooms at our hotel on Platja d’en Bossa, containing locally harvested sea salt and Hierbas, an anise flavored liqueur made from indigenous plants like thyme, lavender,

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juniper and fennel. First a snack then it’s off to the port where we have a private boat waiting. It’s an absolutely gorgeous day. There are plenty of refreshments onboard, as well as two female DJ’s who provide a fantastic soundtrack for our cruise. We anchor at the island of Formentera for a tasty lunch and a lounge on the beach, then swimming by sunset on the way back. Afterwards, it’s off to the infamous Pacha nightclub ‘til the wee hours.

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Thankfully we get to sleep in! After a late lunch at Experimental Beach, we’re off to Ushuaia’s day party - Ants. There’s a sea of shiny, happy, people, two stages, palpable energy, non-stop music - it’s really impressive. We have a private area to dance, enjoy cocktails and take in the frenetic vibe. We even FaceTime Anshuman Vohra, Bulldog’s founder, to show him what he’s missing. Dinner at midnight then it’s right back out to the clubs!

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And just like that, sadly, it’s time to go. I had an absolutely fabulous time, met wonderful people, ate great food, luxuriated in Ibiza’s nightlife and even learned some things... A huge thank you to Bulldog Gin and Chilled Magazine for this unforgettable experience!


ADVANCED MIXOLOGY

CRAFTING COCKTAILS

Glasgow Kiss! G I M M E

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WHAT IS A GLASGOW KISS YOU ASK? IT’S A HEAD BUTT.

Lesley Ross of Hunky Dory, an elevated British-American restaurant just recently opened in the Houston Heights neighborhood, thought the whimsical name The Glasgow Kiss would perfectly fit her latest cocktail creation. “The Glasgow Kiss, technically a head butt, usually occurs when someone (usually English or from Edinburgh) annoys someone from Glasgow,” explains Bar Director Ross. “I thought it would be a great name for this cocktail because it packs a serious punch. It’s also a great mash up of Scottish and Irish components.” The Glasgow Kiss is made with hot Scottish breakfast tea, Scottish heather honey and lemon, topped with Atholl Brose-infused whipped cream. Atholl Brose is a Scottish drink obtained by mixing oatmeal brose, heather honey, whisky, and cream (used particularly on festive occasions which mimics an Irish Cream). “I tried to use as many things that were authentically Scottish, but even with all the Scottish components, the drink still manages to stay true to the identity of what we recognize as an Irish Coffee. To be honest, it was my way of packing a little more whisky into this drink!” admits Ross.

Glasgow Kiss INGREDIENTS

½ oz. Monkey Shoulder Whisky ½ oz. The King’s Ginger Liqueur ½ oz. Scottish Heather Honey 2-3 oz. Scottish Breakfast Tea (brewed and hot) Lemon Peel Atholl Brose Whipped Cream (optional)*

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PREPARATION

Add whisky, liqueur, honey, and lemon peel in a tempered glass and top with hot Breakfast Tea. Top with Atholl Brose whipped cream (or substitute regular whipped cream) and a crushed Scottish Tablet candy (blonde sugar fudge). *Atholl Brose Whipped Cream: Soak 2 oz. of steel cut oats in 4 oz. of Drambuie for 24-48 hours. Strain the liquid through a cheese cloth and combine liquid with 2 tbsp. heavy cream in a whipped cream dispenser (like an iSi cream whipper) charged with N2O.


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BEST SERVED COLD! #GO_VERTICAL Mig Fuel donates a portion of its proots to The Raider Project and The Green Beret Foundation. Helping in the efforts to support our US Military Veterans in their road to recovery. Phenix Brands is an American Company that supports its US Military and its Personnel.

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SHOOTER LIKE YOU’VE NEVER TASTED BEFORE WITH A 90 PROOF KICK. TAKE A SHOT TODAY THE ORIGINAL LIQUID COURAGE.


ADVANCED MIXOLOGY

THAT’S THE SPIRIT

SMALL TOWN AMERIC AN SPIRIT

Alive &Well By Michael Tulipan Photos courtesy of Templeton Rye Whiskey

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he small town of Templeton, Iowa has existed since only 1882, then a scrappy place full of farmers and merchants, today the home of a recently resurrected American spirit. When Prohibition was instituted, the townsfolk were forced to band together to create a bootlegged spirit that came to simply be called The Good Stuff. The most prolific of these distillers was Alphonse Kerkhoff, whose grandson Keith would someday help bring the legal hooch to market. As the dark years of Prohibition dragged on and the illegal spirits trade ran rampant, the reputation of Templeton grew. It eventually reached legendary gangster Al Capone, who mostly ran Canadian whiskey but preferred Templeton for his own consumption. When the sales of alcohol once again became legal, a few families found they preferred the good stuff and kept on producing their version on the sly. In 2001, some of these whiskey lovers set out to produce a legal Templeton Rye based on the original recipe of the Kerkhoff family. The recipe was formulated, within federal guidelines, to match the taste profile of the original Prohibition era Good Stuff.  Today in Iowa, the bottling line is full of Templeton residents who share stories of the old Bootlegging days. In a little over a decade, Templeton Rye has won numerous awards and reached national distribution, while giving back to its own community and helping to revitalize the town. With preliminary plans for expansion of the facility in the pipeline, the company is doubling down on its heritage and proving that small town America is still a vibrant place to do business.

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Manhattan INGREDIENTS

2 oz. Templeton Rye Whiskey ½ oz. Carpano Antica Formula 2 dashes Bitters PREPARATION

Combine ingredients and stir with ice. Strain into a Martini glass. Garnish with cherry. May also be served on the rocks.


WITH THIS HANDCRAFTED, ALL-NATURAL BEAUTY It’s okay! In fact, it’s perfectly appropriate. Introducing your new love: the all-new, more versatile, 70 proof VEEV ®. It’s handcrafted. It’s all-natural. And its smooth, amazing taste will make all your favorite cocktails better. So go ahead, #CheatOnVodka

now 70 proof

DISCOVER MORE AT VEEVLIFE.COM DRINK BETTER, DRINK RESPONSIBLY. ©2015 VEEV®. 35% ALC/VOL (70 PROOF). PRODUCED AND BOTTLED FOR VEEV SPIRITS, LOS ANGELES, CA.


ADVANCED MIXOLOGY

IN THE KNOW

True

Cane Spirit By Lesley Jacobs Solmonson

“AUTHENTIC CARIBBEAN RUM” IS NOT JUST A SHALLOW PHRASE; IT IS THE MARQUEE OF THE WEST INDIAN RUM AND SPIRITS PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION, WHICH COUNTS AMONG ITS MEMBERS RHUM BARBANCOURT FROM HAITI. THE ACR MONIKER HAS UNIQUE REQUIREMENTS THAT GUARANTEE QUALITY. AMONG THEM IS THE ESSENTIAL RULING THAT THE SPIRIT MUST BE MADE FROM A PRODUCT OF SUGAR CANE ORIGIN. WHILE MOST RUMS ARE MADE FROM MOLASSES, A SUGAR BYPRODUCT, BARBANCOURT USES PURE CANE JUICE, SETTING IT APART FROM THE MAJORITY OF OTHER RUMS.

The most well-known style of sugar cane rum is agricole, a clearly defined, legal term that applies to those rhums (the French term for rum) made primarily on the French islands of Martinique and Guadeloupe. Interestingly, while Haiti is a French-speaking country, Rhum Barbancourt doesn’t call itself agricole. Indeed, it is its own distinctive spirit, the terroir of the Haitian soil defining the cane and, in turn, the company’s various rhums. The vivid cane juice character comes out in the entire Barbancourt line, creating a foundation of funk and earthiness. The young, white rhums have a clean cane juice taste, while the older rhums, aged in un-charred French limousine barrels, are often likened to fine Cognac. Emblematic of a tradition that traces its roots back several centuries and many generations, Rhum Barbancourt has survived the rule of a dictator and the destruction of an earthquake. Barbancourt sugar cane is a local product that produces a truly local rhum, which captures the spirit of the people who grow it and the terroir of the island itself.

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The word is out! www.TalesoftheCocktail.com Learn, Share and Connect with the industry 24/7/365. Read about the latest cocktail news, insights and ideas, bartender profiles, recipes, product launches, tools, techniques, spirits history and an inside look at unique cocktail cultures around the world.

Save the date!

Tales on Tour: Mexico City April 10-12, 2016

Tales of the Cocktail: New Orleans July 20 - 24, 2016

Daiquiri month Coming 2016!

www.TalesOfTheCocktail.com


ADVANCED MIXOLOGY

THE BUZZ

GO BACK IN TIME Photos courtesy of Woodford Reserve

CREATING CENTURIES-OLD INSPIRED WHISKEY TODAY

“With every batch of whiskey we produce, the Woodford Reserve Distillery site, created as early as the mid-1800’s, inspires visionary distilling practices, an attitude that Oscar Pepper and Master Distiller James Crow, the first people to distill at this location, fully embraced,” says Chris Morris, Woodford Reserve’s Master Distiller. “It gives us a great sense of pride to still be using an original building dating back to its founding, and to be using these 19th century equipment and processes to create modern products.”   Chris Morris is the 7th Master Distiller in BrownForman’s 145 years of continuous operation. He’s also the third generation to work for the company since 1946. Consequently, his distilling career was more fate than planning. “My mother, my father and all of their friends worked at Brown-Forman in Louisville so I was brought up in a world that revolved around Kentucky Bourbon,” says Morris. When he turned eighteen, he enrolled in Brown-Forman’s intern program, and rotated around different departments and worked where he was needed, including the R & D lab, the glass lab and both the Old Forester and Early Times distilleries. “I developed a good relationship with the master distiller and would often work with him.”

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Morris was a part of the official distillery team and attended the grand opening of what we now know as the Woodford Reserve Distillery (at the time was Labrot & Graham Distillery). “On that historic day, Brown-Forman’s Chairman, the late Owsley Brown II filled the very first barrel of Woodford Reserve, which I then had the honor to bottle on the 10th anniversary of the distillery’s opening.” The latest release created by Morris demonstrates his continued commitment to innovation with his Distillery Series. The three new expressions are small batch offerings ranging from finished whiskies to straight bourbons and other unique spirits. The brand also recently released the Woodford Reserve Master Collection 1838 Style White Corn representing a convergence of the brand’s historic roots, with Morris drawing from the original production records to develop the recipe. Woodford Reserve, which was launched in 1996 as true small-batch bourbon, continues to honor the distillers that came before them, whose techniques have been widely recognized. Celebrated by historians, these production methods have been noted as key in advancing the modern bourbon industry. Their work also helped earn the distillery its National Historic Landmark status.


DU TC H SMAL L BATC H B OTANIC AL D IST IL L AT EUR S S IN C E 1872

MY R I A M H EN D RI CK X Master Distiller

C O N T I N U I N G O U R T R A D I T I O N O F E XC E L L E N C E AWA R D E D B E S T I N S H O W, D O U B L E G O L D, A N D G O L D B Y TA S T I N G PA N E L M A G A Z I N E R U T T E D I S T I L L E RY. C O M

D R I N K R E S P O N S I B LY © 2 0 1 5 ROYA L D U T C H D I S T I L L E R S , M I A M I , F L .


ADVANCED MIXOLOGY

TRICKS OF THE

VODKA TRADE By Mike Gerrard

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Photos by Phillip Van Nostrand

BARTENDERS CHOICE Anyone who’s been to Iceland knows that the country’s Game of Thrones landscape is breathtaking, its air and water pure and its people possessed of a quirky sense of humor. The country’s premium vodka, Reyka, plays up that humor in a recent set of promotional videos, Tricks of the Trade, which have viewers asking: ‘How did they do that?’ From flicking lime wedges across a bar that land perfectly on the edge of a glass to slicing a lime in mid-air, the series of visual tricks are performed with panache by real bartenders chosen by Reyka. “I helped organize the selection of bartenders and had some creative input with the tricks we captured,” says Rekya Brand Ambassador Trevor Schneider, otherwise known as the Cocktail Ninja. Schneider also appeared in one of the videos, tapping a block of ice with a swizzle stick and shattering it into dozens of perfect cubes. “The idea behind the Tricks of the Trade video campaign was to have bartenders perform amazing bar tricks,” he adds. “We handpicked each one of them to show-off what they do best - entertain! The videos play into our charmingly offbeat nature at Reyka.” And what is Schneider’s own favorite bar trick? “My favorite trick is the one that works! At the end of the day, it’s all about making the customer happy. The goal is to serve great tasting cocktails and if you can add an entertaining element that’s a bonus. A good bartender wears many hats; they have to be servers, innovators … and entertainers.” As well as entertaining the audience, part of the purpose of Reyka’s video campaign is to alert bartenders to the vodka’s potential in cocktails.“Reyka is the first and only Icelandic Vodka in the United States,” explains Schneider. “We use the best that Iceland has to offer in its creation and we produce preciously small batches to ensure quality. Arctic spring water, lava rock filtration, and geothermal energy are all examples of the Icelandic resources we pull to create our unique liquid.”Reyka is also unusual in that it’s made in a rare Carter Head Still, typically used for making gins. Reyka specifically commissioned one to make vodka, the first of its kind. Reyka believes it gives an unrivalled purity to the vodka, allowing that Icelandic water to shine through. “Besides Reyka’s unique production story,” Schneider adds, “it truly is an adaptable spirit. When it comes to mixing it’s versatile; its flavor profile including citrus notes which makes it a great base for cocktails. It’s strong in a simple cocktail, or complements untraditional, complex concoctions too. The Arctic spring water and lava rock filtration process makes Reyka exceptionally smooth. Naturally, it makes an incredible Martini.”

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If you haven’t seen the videos check them out on YouTube. Just search “Rekya Tricks of the Trade.” You’re guaranteed to be saying: ‘How did they do that?’


FALL MULE INGREDIENTS

2 parts Reyka Vodka 1 part Ginger Beer 1 part Apple Cider ½ part Simple Syrup PREPARATION

In a Mule cup, combine ingredients. Garnish with cinnamon stick and apple slice.

MULLED WINE COCKTAIL INGREDIENTS

2 parts Reyka Vodka ¾ part Mulled Wine Syrup ¾ part Fresh Lemon Juice PREPARATION

Combine ingredients in a Martini glass. Garnish with star anise.

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ADVANCED MIXOLOGY

MIX WELL

Mixing Scorpions

with

Mezcal

By Bryen Dunn | Photo by Jason Walsh For years, mezcal has always been looked upon as the everyday person’s drink of choice in Mexico, traditionally used for celebrations, fiestas, and general good times with friends. Today, there seems to be a newfound love for this elixir making its rounds in some of the trendiest bars of North America, solidified by the many mixologists who are creating drinks that rival any other spirited affairs on their cocktail menu. Manufacturer and Master Distiller Douglas French started making mezcal back in 1995, after moving to Oaxaca from San Francisco. He established the Scorpion Mezcal SA de CV distillery working directly with the indigenous Zapotec Mezcaleros to make mezcal that was significantly comparable in quality to the finer tequilas, cognacs and scotch, which are the other international Denomination of Origin spirits. After realizing the amount of local competition that existed in Oaxaca, he also decided to set up his own import and distribution company in the United States with cofounder Barbara Sweetman.

for several years now. “For me cocktails are about the relationship between flavors and if you strike the right balance it’s like a symphony of pure cocktail bliss. I try to combine ingredients that people are all familiar with on their own, however using all of them together will make for one extraordinary little tipple,” he explains. Check out this sophisticated concoction created by Walsh that any cocktail lover will appreciate.

MUST MIX

Scorpion Mezcal makes traditional all-natural mezcal, which unlike most commercial tequila, is prepared using only 100% agave, water, and firewood. French wanted to stand out from the other distillers, so he decided to brand himself by inserting a real scorpion in each bottle, hence the names Scorpion Mezcal and Scorpion Reposado Mezcal. “Although they are approved by the FDA as safe to eat, we don’t recommend eating the scorpion, but if you do we suggest you chew it good before swallowing,” he explains. French also started ageing the excess quantities to enhance the product, and he began offering reposado and añejo mezcals to compliment the basic silver. Caballeros’ oldest bottled aging is Scorpion Mezcal Añejo 7 year, which is a triple distilled Gran Reserva and has won 97 points (platinum award) from BTI. The brand also has a double distilled 96 point platinum award winning Scorpion Mezcal Añejo 5 year, which are both blends from two of the finest types of agave Espadin and Barril. In 2012 French started introducing the Tobala varietals in silver and añejo. Tobala, long considered the King of Agaves, is now presented in these estate grown exclusive varietals under his trademark Scorpion and soon will be available under the Escorpion label. To date, French has exported 14 mezcal brands in 16 countries globally, and in 2015 he celebrated his 20-year anniversary as a mezcal distiller. Well-known New York City mixologist Jason Walsh has been using Scorpion Mezcal in a variety of cocktails

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Gold Canary INGREDIENTS

2 oz. Scorpion Silver Espadin Mezcal ¼ oz. Saffron Tincture ½ oz. Agave Syrup ½ oz. Fresh Lime Juice 2 inch piece Yellow Banana Orange Oils PREPARATION

Muddle the banana, then add the Mezcal, saffron tincture, agave and fresh lime juice to tin. Add a ½ cup of ice and shake moderately. Strain into Martini or coupe glass, add orange oils and apply orange twist. (Fine straining is not necessary, as you want a little pulp involved from the banana to add to the texture and to also enhance the flavor).


ADVANCED MIXOLOGY

MIXING WITH

WHISKEY Teeling Tipples and Tales

MIXING SEASON By Mike Gerrard | Photos courtesy of Teeling Irish Whiskey Few people know that the heart of the world whiskey industry was once in Dublin. But it was, in the historic area southwest of the center called The Liberties. In the late 18th century there were almost 40 whiskey distilleries, one of them run by Walter Teeling, who began distilling on Marrowbone Lane in 1782. Back then Dublin was producing the finest premium whiskeys in the world, though the industry declined slowly and the last Dublin still was switched off in 1976. But with the craft spirits revival now in full swing in the British Isles distilling is coming back to Dublin thanks to Jack Teeling, a descendant of Walter Teeling and Founder and Master Distiller of the new Teeling Whiskey Company. When the Teeling Distillery opened to the public this year, it was the first new distillery to open in Dublin for over 125 years, and is just a 10-minute walk from where Walter Teeling began his distilling dynasty. The company was founded in 2012 and since then has won over 40 International Awards, including one to Jack Teeling, who was named Global Whiskey Brand Ambassador by Whisky Magazine. Teeling is determined to make versatile whiskeys that are suited to the modern cocktail scene. Their new expression, Teeling Single Malt, has been matured in five different wine casks: Sherry, Port, Madeira, White Burgundy and Cabernet Sauvignon. “Our new Teeling Single Malt,” says Jack Teeling, “proves Irish whiskey can have big bold flavors that appeal to Single Malt drinkers without losing its distinctive Irish identity.” Their main Teeling Irish Whiskey is finished in rum casks for those spice hints while their Teeling Small Batch goes well in a drink they call The Old Fashioned Irishman. But there’s nothing old-fashioned about these whiskeys, even if the Teeling family has been making whiskey now for over 230 years.

THE OLD FASHIONED IRISHMAN INGREDIENTS

2 oz. Teeling Small Batch ½ oz. Cynar ½ oz. Bittermens Hiver Amer ¼ oz. Luxardo 

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PREPARATION

Stir and strain into a coupe. Garnish with flamed orange peel.


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ADVANCED MIXOLOGY

Crafting with Cocktails

FARM TO GLASS MIXING

Aaron Gordon and 13th Street Cocktail Catering

Ever find yourself at a wedding, the music thumping, the toasts flying, and the drinks… awful? We’ve all been there, and thankfully 13th Street Cocktail Catering owner Aaron Gordon decided there had to be a better way. Stints at the Morgans Hotel Group and with The Tippling Brothers gave Gordon a solid foundation to launch an event bartending company focused on top notch drinks. With 13th Street, Gordon emphasizes that the company’s mission is two-fold. “While our focus is on the quality of our beverage service, we also aim to provide a superior experience for our clients,” he says. “Everything must taste good and look good too.” Gordon’s approach is very hands on and tailored to each event. “Once an event is booked, we always

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Photos courtesy of thehemponair.com invite guests to our Philly hub or to the farm to select their beverage menu,” he says. “We break bread and talk about some of their favorite drinks and flavors.” Gordon looks at the menu and designs drinks that will pair well with the food. For small dinners, Gordon’s team leans more esoteric, while for large events and weddings, they aim for approachable, easily executed but still delicious cocktails. Guests love Gordon’s cocktails but the true star may be his repurposed horse trailer, which sat in disuse on his parent’s farm until he restored it. Now he tows it to events to use as a mobile bar and guests can’t get enough of it. “It makes for beautiful pictures and is a really interesting design element,” he says. “It seems to become a makeshift photo booth more frequently than not.” For more information visit 13thstreetcocktails.com.


SHAKING AND STIRRING

PIKESVILLE RYE

Heaven Hill Brands, the nation’s largest independent family-owned spirits producers launch super-premium Pikesville Rye. At six years old and 110-proof, this latest expression is produced at the historic Bernheim Distillery in Louisville and aged in its premier rickhouses in Bardstown, KY. “Heaven Hill has a tradition of keeping storied brands alive,” says Max L. Shapira, President, Heaven Hill brands, and second-generation family member.

PIKESVILLE BOULEVARDIER INGREDIENTS

1 ½ oz. Pikesville Rye Whiskey 1 oz. Campari 1 oz. Carpano Antica Formula Vermouth PREPARATION

Add all the ingredients to a mixing glass and fill with ice. Stir, and strain into an Old Fashioned glass filled with a large ice cube. Garnish with an orange twist.

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LAUNCHES

SERPENT’S BITE APPLE CIDER FLAVORED WHISKY

Serpent’s Bite Apple Cider flavored whisky launches this fall as an innovative kick to the flavored whiskey category. Ideal as a shot, straight up with a slice of apple or mixed in a cocktail, Serpent’s Bite is a balance of crisp apple cider flavors paired with smooth whisky.

KEEP THE SERPENT SIMPLE INGREDIENTS

1 part Serpent’s Bite Slice of Apple PREPARATION

Pour Serpent’s Bite whisky into a shot glass. Ritual: Take your shot, bite the apple.

SKYY INFUSIONS

The newest addition to the Skyy Infusions lineup is Coastal Cranberry capturing the sweet tart essence of cranberry, giving any cocktail a festive twinkle. “A vodka cranberry or a vodka cranberry with a splash of soda are two of the most popular cocktails ordered by consumers in the U.S. today. Skyy Infusions Coastal Cranberry easily recreates that same experience at the bar without the calories of cranberry juice,” says Umberto Luchini, Vice President of Marketing at Campari America.

CRANBERRY FIZZ INGREDIENTS

1 part Skyy Infusions Coastal Cranberry 2 parts Lemon-Lime Soda PREPARATION

Build ingredients in a glass over ice. Garnish with cranberries.


BLUECOAT

Philadelphia Distilling announces the return of Bluecoat Barrel Finished Gin, which is curated by aging award-winning Bluecoat American Dry Gin in new American oak barrels for a minimum of three months. Distiller Bill Tambussi’s longtime appreciation for bourbon inspired him to age Bluecoat American Dry Gin in the same historical fashion. He ages the gin in new American oak barrels, the same way bourbon is produced.

AUTUMN APPLE INGREDIENTS

2 oz. Bluecoat Barrel Finished Gin 2 oz. Apple Cider ½ oz. Fresh Pressed Lemon Juice  ½ oz. Honey Syrup Pinch of Cinnamon  Dash of Bitters PREPARATION

Add ingredients into an ice-filled shaker and shake vigorously. Double strain into a 5 ½ oz. coupe or Martini glass and garnish with an expressed lemon twist.

BOODLES GIN

The first-ever mulberry gin is coming stateside for a limited time. Boodles Gin pays homage to the popular mulberry tree that is seen throughout the English countryside with Boodles Mulberry. Great if you enjoy hints of raspberries and currants in your holiday punch.

PROPER PUNCH INGREDIENTS

3 parts Boodles Mulberry Gin 3 parts Apple Cider 1 part Fresh Orange Juice Splash of Lemon Juice Cloves Cinnamon Stick PREPARATION

Combine ingredients in a punch bowl and serve warm or cold.

THE GLENLIVET NÀDURRA PEATED WHISKEY CASK FINISH

The Glenlivet reveals its latest innovation and first peated flavor in over one hundred years: The Glenlivet Nàdurra Peated Whiskey Cask Finish. To inspire this latest release, The Glenlivet looked to its past. In the early 1800’s The Glenlivet distillers used peat smoke to dry the malted barley giving the whisky a rich, smoky flavor. “We continue our proud heritage of setting standards within the Single Malt category and with this new addition bring new depth of flavor to our drinkers,” says Laurent Cutier, Director of Scotch Portfolio at Pernod Ricard USA.

NEAT OR ON THE ROCKS INGREDIENTS

2 parts The Glenlivet Nàdurra Peated Whiskey Cask Finish Ice PREPARATION

Combine ingredients in a rocks glass.

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BOLDLY

CITRUS. SUBTLY

SMOOTH. RETHINK GIN. WE DID.

BULLDOG® London Dry Gin, 40% alc./vol. (80 Proof). © 2015 Imported by Campari America, San Francisco, CA. live defiantly. DRINK RESPONSIBLY.


If there’s one thing certain about our ancestors it’s that they were drinkers. Continuous imbibing is clearly intertwined with human history almost as much as food consumption. From generation to generation, the cultural exchange of drinking often mirrored the time at hand in ways deeper than just tastes. Why, it was possible to even get a sense of the socioeconomic status of someone just by learning his drink preference. In days gone by quality drinking was of the upmost importance and as sometimes happens, the past resonates with the present. As much as our predecessors touted themselves craftsmen dedicated to making quality products, so today we find that same emphasis. From employing archetypal techniques and small batch practices to making whiskey in an old fashioned pot still, we seem to have come full circle.

This issue of Chilled takes a flying leap into yesteryear to shed some light on the practices of our elders. We explore brandy, whiskey, rum, gin and other spirited gems found behind those notorious bars of a bygone era. Brands are celebrated that have stood the test of time with stories that we still share as part of our spirited folklore. The legends are endless, many of them fascinating in their timelessness. With our sexy cover guy David Beckham, who is currently building on a whole-lot-of history with Haig Club Whisky, as one of our favorites, we take a sip back and a gulp forward.

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- Join the -

HAIG CLUB By Michael Tulipan | Photos by Tom Bunning

T

racing its roots back to the 17th century, when Robert Haig became the first distiller in his family, the

House of Haig has long been at the center of Scotch whisky production. Indeed, a marriage between the Haigs and another local family, the Steins, in the 18th century would lead to the eventual formation of the Jameson distillery in Ireland as well as the founding of the modern Haig Whisky.

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In 1824, John Haig, the sixth generation of family distillers, established the Cameronbridge distillery in Leven in the county of Fife. The world was then on the cusp of the Age of Industrialization, a time of technological advancement with the first photograph taken and the invention of the typewriter. Many innovations had also occurred in the production of stills, starting in 1801 with the patent for the first still to produce alcohol in one operation. In 1828, Haig family relation Robert Stein gained a patent for the first commercially successful column still. Still in his twenties, Haig pioneered the use of his uncle’s Stein Still as well as the Coffey Still in his production, thus laying the foundation for the modern Scotch whisky industry. In 1893, Haig’s sons introduced the renowned Dimple bottle, an instantly recognizable vessel that helped the brand stand out in the marketplace.


While today the House of Haig may be best known for Haig Blended Scotch Whisky and Dimple Scotch Whisky rather than innovations from centuries past, a new partnership with soccer legend David Beckham is changing that. In 2014, the House of Haig launched Haig Club, a single grain whisky in partnership with Beckham and television producer and entrepreneur Simon Fuller, a former manager of the Spice Girls and creator of American Idol and So You Think You Can Dance. David Gates, Diageo’s Global Head of Premium Core Spirits, says of the partnership that “David Beckham and Simon Fuller are renowned for breaking boundaries and shaking up markets in every sector in which they work. We are immensely proud to partner with them on our first large scale grain whisky innovation.” Beckham wasn’t content to sit on the sidelines, however, and threw himself into the process, working with Master Distiller Chris Clark on the whisky. “Interestingly enough,” Beckham says, “Haig was my grandfather’s whisky of choice, so I also have a deeply personal connection to the brand, which made for great inspiration throughout the process.” The first new offering from Haig Whisky in over thirty years, Haig Club incorporates grain whisky from three different cask types, yielding an ultra-smooth, accessible whisky that can be sipped neat or incorporated into a cocktail. While single grain whisky is usually incorporated into blended whiskey, the company hopes the launch of Haig Club will attract gin and vodka drinkers. In keeping with its history of innovative bottlings, Haig Club comes in a distinctive bottle design made of blue glass inspired by the tradition of the company’s blenders using blue tasting glasses. “From start to finish, this has been an incredibly interesting and exciting project to work on,” Beckham says, “I look forward to seeing where we will go with Haig Club in the years to come.”

Side Bar

Legendary soccer player, David Beckham is not on the sidelines for his new partnership with Haig Club. David chatted with Chilled Magazine about his goals while working with the historic whisky brand. Tell us about your partnership with Diageo and the recently launched Haig Club Scotch Whisky. I am incredibly proud to have been a part of the creation of Haig Club and think we’ve made something really special. For me, this venture has involved an in-depth education on the world of whisky and how it is made. I have truly enjoyed working with some incredible people to write a new chapter for Haig. You have held many sponsorship deals including a portfolio of Beckham-branded cologne.   What inspired your decision to join the spirits industry? When the idea to produce a new Scotch whisky brand at Scotland’s oldest grain whisky distillery was brought up, Simon Fuller and I were extremely intrigued. The opportunity to restyle a centuries-old whisky brand and reframe it for the modern world is both rare and exciting, which is why we jumped at the chance. You are said to be fully involved in the development and strategy of the brand.  Can you share with us what that entails? I am a business partner on Haig Club, working closely alongside Diageo and Simon Fuller. Through the venture, I was able to learn the process of grain whisky production first-hand by visiting the Cameronbridge Distillery and Cambus Cooperage, where our casks are prepared for filling. This is a project that I have truly invested a lot of time and effort in and I’m extremely happy with the final result. To introduce Haig Club to the world, we started with a week of launches in Scotland, across Asia and the U.S., and just last week we launched Spain and Portugal. What is your favorite way to enjoy scotch? Haig Club is great served neat or on the rocks, but I really appreciate a wellmade drink, my favorite being the Haig Clubman. It’s the drink I make for my friends who are new to scotch and it amazes them every time.

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TRADITION A N D RU M COCKTA I L S By Mathew Powers

A century and a half of distilling rum leads to recipes that have been tried and tested, refined and perfected – and that is how Bacardí is “setting the standard for making the most awarded rum for 153 years,” according to Senior Brand Master, Willie Ramos. Ramos explains that Bacardí founder, Don Facundo, revolutionized the process of making rum, changing it from a beverage that was “harsh and unsophisticated” to one with a rich heritage that has stood the test of time. Still family owned, Bacardí enjoys its traditions, but has continued to find more ways to be innovative, notably in today’s market where savvy consumers and mixologists demand spirits of the highest quality.

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Two examples of Bacardí’s inventive creativity include the Maestro de Ron and Gran Reserva Ocho Años. Maestro is a light-bodied Cuban style white rum blend that’s aged for three years in white oak casks that impart soft notes of oak. The Gran Reserva involves a blend of “Redestilado” and the more prominent “Aguardiente,” which provides for “more robust flavor notes of vanilla, walnuts, oak and citrus,” according to Ramos. Meanwhile, the superior Maestro’s flavor profile is lighter with “soft notes of vanilla citrus.” Both are good for sipping or mixing into cocktails.


Gran Reserva Ocho Años originally started as a family reserve in 1862, remaining that way for 130 years until it was finally released to the public in 1992. This exquisite golden rum blend evolves from various forms of aged rums, some aged for as long as 16 years. Ocho offers a true symphony of notes that include stone-fruit, caramelized banana, apricot, walnut, and a pleasant kiss of bitter orange zest. A mixture of nutmeg and oaky vanilla accompanies the fruits. Although best as sipping rum, Ramos assures it works well in cocktails, too.

Reserva Ocho Años and adds Carrot Eau di Vie to cut through the sweetness and a little micro-planed coffee garnish. However, it wasn’t the chill of New England that inspired this cocktail, but rather a trip to the Midwest. “It’s a heartier drink that holds up to cold Chicago winters,” noted the chef.

In fact, critically acclaimed Chef Ari Taymor, based in Los Angeles, collaborated with Bacardí to concoct a cocktail known as the Headless Horseman. If you love the whiskey cocktail, “Nor’easter,” which combines bourbon, ginger beer, and maple syrup, you’ll love this. Instead of whiskey, the Headless Horseman uses the Gran

Bacardí’s Ocho also works well as a substitute for whiskey or brandy in a classic Old Fashioned. Then again, sometimes there is nothing better than a classic daiquiri, such as Chef Taymor’s Siam Daiquiri that incorporates Maestro, lime juice, and simple syrup. After 153 years, it’s easy to understand why these rums work so well in a plethora of cocktails. Explains Ramos, “The bartender is our greatest advocate.” He adds, “Our brands will not overpower their cocktails. On the other hand, they will not be lost in the mix.”

“These artisanal brands represent mixability, consistency, complexity, versatility, quality, heritage and care made by the most awarded rum brand in the world with 153 years of experience,” - Senior Brand Master, Willie Ramos.

RUM OLD FASHIONED Created in New York in the early 1900s, the iconic Old Fashioned is deemed the original cocktail. But even the most established classics can do with a refresh every now and then. Try it with BACARDÍ 8 Años rum instead of whisky and call yourself a visionary. INGREDIENTS

2 parts BACARDÍ 8 Años 2 dashes Angostura Bitters 1 splash Water 1-2 tsp. Sugar 1 Orange Zest PREPARATION

In an Old-Fashioned glass, pour in the sugar, water and Angostura Bitters. Then combine everything

with a bar spoon (or muddler) and add half the BACARDÍ 8 Años. Next drop two or three large ice cubes into the glass and stir repeatedly. Pour in the second half of the rum and two or three more ice cubes and continue to stir. Now cut a piece of orange peel (about 5 cm long) and squeeze it over the drink (to release the zest) before dropping it into the drink.

HUDSON ORCHARD SOUR Created by Lana Gailani of Seamstress INGREDIENTS

PREPARATION

1 ½ parts Bacardi Gran Reserva Maestro de Ron 1 part Five Spice Honey ¾ part Lemon Juice ½ part Green Apple Puree ½ part Laird’s Applejack Riesling

Shake all ingredients in a shaker and serve on the rocks with a Riesling float. Garnish with an apple chip dusted with Five Spice.

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A Spirit Worth Sipping By Lesley Jacobs Solmonson

When most people discuss brandy, America rarely comes into the equation. Folks think of the spirit as a French product, the poor man’s version of Cognac. Think again. Not only does brandy have a respectable place in the sipping spirits world, it is also essential for numerous classic cocktails, among them the Sidecar and the Alexander. American brandy has grown in availability over the last ten years with quality shooting up and prices remaining comfortably affordable. It’s a win-win for cocktail lovers. For Joe Heron, founder of year-old Copper & Kings Distillery, “Brandy is an incredibly romantic spirit. The most romantic of spirits. It calls out for valor, it calls out for intimacy. People fall in love with brandy.” This philosophy led Heron to start his company with brandy as the primary product. Why brandy? Because Heron, who possesses a deep-seated entrepreneurial spirit, saw a gap in the market in terms of quality and gravitas.

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Historically, brandy has been made in the U.S. since settlers first stepped onto our shores, bringing with them knowledge of distilling from the “old country.” The first American brandies were made by the Spanish whose missionaries not only created a vast network of missions up and down the state, but also distilled the grapes that grew so vigorously in the rich soil. Other American brandies were made from fruits ranging from apples (Applejack is one of America’s earliest spirits) to pears to berries and beyond.

Producers like Heron and other independent thinkers are helping change the landscape of American brandy. In defining American brandy’s appeal, Heron notes that Robert Léauté, Maitre de Chai (Master Cognac Maker) for Rémy Martin champions California brandy because it is defined by the varietal character of the grapes without need for long aging; conversely, Cognac uses neutral grape varieties and thus needs aging to give it complexity. With American brandy, the complexity is there from the start.

Given its joie de vive and variety, it’s odd that brandy hasn’t captured the imagination more. The truth is that there have only been a handful of distillers, like Copper & Kings, exploring its myriad possibilities. That is changing, gradually, as is the general consumption of the spirit.

“It is the spirit that defined America in 1640,” enthuses Heron, “provided the finesse to the original pre-prohibition cocktails, and formed the genesis of the current craft distilling movement that started in the 80s. It paints with an American palette. And it boogies.” This is where American brandy stands now, on the threshold of redefining itself with gusto.

Historically, Heron observes, “It is important to note that 76% of all brandy drunk in the USA is drunk from the central region east, not west.” Indeed, in Wisconsin, if you order an Old Fashioned, it will be

American brandy is not defined by dogma, but by an independent spirit. It is about the people who drink it more than the people who make it. It is restless, it is enthusiastic and it is rebellious. It is sexy. It has the heft and structure of feisty brown spirits, but has a signature “cheat.” American Brandy finishes long and smooth.

made with brandy, not whiskey. This isn’t as big a stretch as it might seem; brandy and whiskey have a good deal in common in terms of depth and complexity, allowing them to be swapped out with one another in cocktails. More than that, however, brandy has a sort of inherent mystique, perhaps because it hasn’t permeated modern drinks culture as much as other spirits like gin and whiskey. Heron was attracted to the spirit because “American brandy is not defined by dogma, but by an independent spirit. It is about the people who drink it more than the people who make it. It is restless, it is enthusiastic and it is rebellious. It is sexy. It has the heft and structure of feisty brown spirits, but has a signature “cheat.” American Brandy finishes long and smooth.”

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H E N N E S S Y C O G N A C C E L E B R AT E S 2 5 0 Y E A R S

Cr afting the future

By Michael Tulipan | Photos courtesy of Hennessy

T

he year is 1765. The first stirrings of liberty appear in America as colonists protest against the British Stamp Act. In Paris, the world’s first true restaurant opens. Further south, in the town of Cognac, a retired Irish soldier named Richard Hennessy settles and begins exporting brandies to his native Ireland and England. Maison Hennessy, the world’s premier cognac producer, is born. Fifteen years later, the Marquis de Lafayette travels on the ship Hermione from nearby Rochefort to lend support to the American revolutionaries, barrels of cognac safely tucked in the hull. The journey forever seals the bond between the two countries. Two and a half centuries after its founding, the eighth generation of the Hennessy family guides the company in a unique partnership with the Fillioux family, its seven generations of Master Blenders safeguarding Hennessy’s commitment to excellence. Unique among cognac producers, Hennessy controls every aspect of production, from their own vineyards and oak forests to a cooperage where handcrafted barrels are made without glue or a single nail. Every September, ugni

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blanc grapes are harvested, fermented and double distilled into eaux-de-vie. The spirit is then aged in oak barrels sourced from the nearby Limousin and Tronçais forests, their low resin content perfect for aging. The true artistry comes when the spirits are blended. Seventh generation Master Blender Yann Fillioux trained under his uncle Maurice starting at the age of 19. Fillioux oversees a tasting committee with six Master Tasters gathering every day at 11 am to evaluate eaux de vie from the world’s largest reserves of aged cognac. Rodney Williams, Executive Vice President, Spirits, Moët Hennessy USA, says of the group, “These men, spanning four generations, determine the future of Hennessy, its continuity and legacy.” Hennessy has long been an innovator, creating the V.S.O.P. and X.O. categories. It’s also a leader in super premium cognacs with Richard Hennessy, one of the world’s most exclusive marks with cognac aged from 40 to nearly 200 years, and Paradis Impérial, inspired by a blend ordered by Tsar Alexander I of Russia.


For the company’s 250th anniversary, two hundred fifty barrels of Hennessy 250 Collector Blend were bottled in limited edition one liter bottles retailing for $600. Hennessy also organized the H250 Tour, a traveling exhibition showcasing the work of contemporary artists along with the company’s history. The company has maintained a strong connection with the African American community over the years, laying the groundwork for what became the National Urban League and forging a marketing partnership with rapper Nas. Williams says, “Part of Hennessy’s heritage is supporting social equality and something special we did this year was create a documentary about the brand’s history. The film chronicles the important relationship the brand has nurtured with African Americans over the last hundred years.”

The heritage of the Cognac region was also on display this year through a partnership with Lafayette’s Hermione Voyage 2015, a historic journey commemorating centuries of friendship between France and the United States. L’Hermione, a replica of Lafayette’s original ship, crossed the Atlantic with two barrels of Hennessy 250 Collector Blend before docking at Yorktown, Virginia and sailing to George Washington’s historic home in Mount Vernon. While proud of its history, the company is also looking forward. “Hennessy has been crafting the future since 1765 with a bold vision to create the finest cognacs,” Williams says. “It’s really a unique legacy anchored on an eight generation family heritage, craftsmanship and entrepreneurial vision that drives our success today and serves as inspiration for the future. “ CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

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A Sip of

LAWLESS HISTORY HEAVEN HILL RELEASES JOHN E. FITZGERALD VERY SPECIAL RESERVE BOURBON By Lesley Jacobs Solmonson | Photos courtesy of Heaven Hill Distillery

One of the most alluring aspects of a limited release bottling is the idea of holding and tasting history in a glass. Heaven Hill Distillery has made that very idea come to life with the release of John E. Fitzgerald Very Special Reserve. Only 3,000 bottles of this wheated bourbon are available; the square shaped decanter bottle holds 375ml and is presented in a handmade box. Beyond the unique wheated flavor, John E. Fitzgerald Very Special Reserve will offer a glimpse into the history of Heaven Hill’s Larceny Bourbon (the bottle even sports a gold platinum key much like the Larceny logo), as well as the Old Fitzgerald line, which inspired the creation of the former. Back in 1999, Heaven Hill acquired the Old Fitzgerald brand of wheated bourbon, which had been made famous by Pappy Van Winkle at the original StitzelWeller Distillery. The wheated style is unique in that it replaces the rye usually present in bourbon, giving the spirit a lighter profile. As part of aging stocks transferred from Stitzel-Weller to Heaven Hill for the ongoing bottling of the brand, twelve barrels were transferred to the Heaven Hill Bardstown campus where they were allowed to age on the first floor, resulting in a long, balanced maturation. In 2013, the bourbon was transferred to tanks to stop the aging process. Intentionally non-chilled filtered, it retains a richer mouthfeel than typical bourbon. The wheated mashbill creates a softer profile which complements the cocoa and vanilla notes inherent in the bottling.

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Heaven Hill is rightfully proud of this offering. As Co-Master Distiller Denny Potter commented in the company’s press release, “These 12 barrels represent a golden age in Bourbon history, but also tie the past into our current Larceny brand and its Old Fitzgerald lineages. The bourbon is the renowned wheated mashbill that Pappy Van Winkle developed for Old Fitz at Stitzel-Weller. Its aging has been carefully managed to ensure it will be at its best, with two different aging regimens and locations so that it will not be over-aged or tannic.” Seen in the name, the historic provenance of these bottles links them to treasury agent John E. Fitzgerald, who helped himself to tastings from the best barrels in the warehouses. This, combined with exclusivity and distinctive flavor, make John E. Fitzgerald Very Special Reserve Wheated Bourbon a bottling worth seeking out and savoring.


Who Was JOHN E. FITZGERALD?

According to Heaven Hill North American Brand Ambassador Bernie Lubbers, “The legend goes that John E. Fitzgerald was a distiller who made the Old Fitzgerald brand on the banks of the Kentucky river, selling his goods only on rail lines, steamships, and private clubs. The truth was that he was a Treasury Agent allowed free access to the bonded bourbon warehouses, and helped himself from only barrels containing the finest bourbon. The agent’s selections became known around the distillery as ‘Fitzgerald barrels’ and were used to create softly wheated bourbon known as Old Fitzgerald. The agent’s larcenous behavior was kept secret until the unveiling of the Larceny line, which revealed his story in full.”

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SINGLE POT STILL

IRISH

WHISKEY READY FOR EXPLORATION By Michael Tulipan | Photos courtesy of Pernod Ricard Once the quintessential process of producing Irish whiskey, Single Pot Still brands languished for decades as blended whiskey came to dominate the category. Originating from a single distillery, this style of whiskey was once the norm in Ireland, but by the turn of the twenty-first century, only two brands still remained. A new generation of Irish whiskeys had claimed the market, blending the distinctive pot still varieties with other lighter grain whiskeys for a more accessible flavor. However, like the entire Irish whiskey category, this unique style of distillation has been making a strong comeback in recent years.

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BARS EVERYWHERE ARE GOING TO BE SPOILED WITH CHOICES OF NEW BRANDS AND INNOVATIONS, AND I WANT THEM TO KNOW THAT WE HAVE BEEN HERE PRODUCING WITH THE HIGHEST STANDARDS FUELED BY A PASSION THAT HAS WITHSTOOD THE MOST CHALLENGING CONDITIONS THROUGHOUT HISTORY.

Jessamine McLellan, National Brand Ambassador for Single Pot Still Irish Whiskey at Pernod Ricard, sees opportunity for Single Pot Still brands thanks to the tremendous resurgence of interest in whiskey due to today’s cocktail culture. “The spontaneity of trying new things, even unknown things, can be really exciting for someone when they walk into a bar or a shop,” she says. “This explorative nature has fueled the desire to know more, ask questions, even actively seek out information.”

For Pernod Ricard, this entails resurrecting a style of Irish whiskey that was once very much the norm. McLellan says, “We are steadfast on the traditions of Single Pot Still whiskeys, using malted and unmalted Irish barley which has been distilled three times in copper pot stills. The maturation in exbourbon casks and Spanish oloroso sherry casks contributes to the robust pot still distillates adding layers of flavor and intensity. Whiskey experts, history purists, and even the least experienced novice will enjoy the line as there is a whiskey suited for every preference.” One of the few single pot still brands to be produced continuously, Redbreast is a 100% pure pot still whiskey that has been aged for at least twelve years in oloroso casks and American bourbon barrels. The resulting whiskey, distinctly assertive but still smooth, demands to be savored slowly. The Redbreast 15 Year Old, created in 2010 to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of La Maison du Whisky in Paris, has since become one of the most sought after Irish whiskeys. Another 100% single pot still Irish whiskey, Midleton Barry Crockett Legacy, named for the second generation Master Distiller who spent years producing it, is made from mash of malted and unmalted barley, triple-distilled and aged exclusively in American bourbon barrels. Created to commemorate his career that spanned almost 50 years, the prized whiskey represents Barry’s personal selection of old and elegant pot still whiskeys. The Distilled Spirits Council reported early this year that sales in the category rose 9.1% in 2014 and Irish whiskey exports are expected to double by 2020. Craft whiskey is projected to be the next frontier for Ireland and Midleton is ready for the competition. “With the huge resurgence of Irish whiskey, we are on the cusp of a massive Irish craft whiskey boom,” McLellan says. “Bars everywhere are going to be spoiled with choices of new brands and innovations, and I want them to know that we have been here producing with the highest standards fueled by a passion that has withstood the most challenging conditions throughout history.”

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a for taste

Sherry Seducing Bartenders One Drink at a Time By Michael Tulipan, Photos courtesy of Lustau

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I

n Jersey Boys, when Frankie Valli crooned “Sherrrrry, baby,” was he really singing about a girl? We’ve been wondering. From coast to coast, sherry cocktails have suddenly become all the rage as bartenders turn to this fortified wine to complement a cocktail’s ingredients or provide a low alcohol base for a mixed aperitif. Chilled 100 member Rachel Kling, from The Quill in the Jefferson Hotel, Washington, D.C., says “Today’s burgeoning craft cocktail movement has led to a renewed experimentation with sherry. The variety of styles allows it to complement an infinite number of flavor profiles and its versatility lets it be the star of a drink or provide structure and balance.” Once relegated to the after dinner drinks menu, most sherries are, in fact, not sweet and serve as a solid foundation for both classic cocktails and those improvised on the fly. Leading the charge is Lustau with more than two dozen offerings in every category from Fino and Manzanilla to Amontillado and Oloroso to Pedro Ximenez, a range that makes the company’s products a great option for bartenders.


Side Bar

Mixing with the chilled 100

Troy Bayless of Holy Mountain and Hawker Fare in San Francisco first discovered sherry in 2007 while bartending in Oakland. For him, Lustau offers numerous opportunities for building a cocktail. “The breadth of styles, starting with the saline, yeasty fino and manzanillas to the oxidative, nutty oloroso, to syrupy sweet Pedro Ximenez, are the reason sherry makes a great cocktail.” He also enjoys the flexibility sherry offers bartenders building a cocktail. “I haven't met a spirit sherry doesn't work well with. It’s easy to find liqueurs and cordials to balance sweetness,” Bayless says. “However, it’s difficult to find low ABV, dry, saline, nutty complex adjuncts to balance acidity.”

Known for his adventurous style of mixing while taking advantage of whatever is growing in the garden at Lucey's Lounge in Gowanus, Brooklyn, Chilled 100 member Steven Dragun took the time to show us how to mix with a couple of Lustau’s offerings. Here are two recipes that show the versatility of sherry in cocktails.

Sultry Woman

I created this cocktail to show that sherry has enough character to be used as the base of a cocktail. The Sultry Woman is rich, complex, and will seduce you the second you pick up the glass. INGREDIENTS

1 ½ oz. Lustau Amontillado Sherry ½ oz. Angels Envy Bourbon ½ oz. Amaro CioCiaro ½ oz. Tempus Fugit Gran Classico 2 dashes Bittercube Cherry Bark Vanilla Bitters

Lustau Brand Ambassador Paul Sanguinettei adds, “These elements carry flavor on the palate and add more complexity to your cocktail.” According to him, sherry can also enhance a classic. “Adding a half ounce of amontillado to a daiquiri can add a nice nutty character and dry out the sweetness on the finish, making for a more balanced cocktail.” His No Scruples Daiquiri, for example, features Blanc Rhum Agricole, Lustau Los Arcos Amontillado Sherry, sugar and fresh lime juice. For Jessica Lambert, Bartender at Sable Kitchen & Bar, her first taste of sherry in an Artist’s Special was a “wow” moment. This cocktail, discovered in Harry McElhone's 1927 book Barflies and Cocktails, features an oxidative sherry, either amontillado or oloroso, scotch, lemon and red currant syrup. Lambert offers bartenders a few tips for pairing sherry with spirits. “Fino and manzanilla work well with lighter more delicate spirits like pisco, gin, vermouth and other fortified wines. Amontillado also does well with gin, but also provides some dryness when paired with a spirit like bourbon or rum. I love using oloroso with bourbon and rye whiskeys.” She also suggests using the Lustau pairing guide. “I reference the Lustau guide often when I’m creating cocktails with sherry. My creative process employs building a drink around complementary flavors. The guide shows a variety of foods that pair with specific sherries which helps keep misfires to a minimum.”

PREPARATION

Combine ingredients in a Coupe glass. Garnish with an orange twist.

Apple Annie

The Apple Annie is a perfect cocktail for establishments that do not carry a liquor license. If you're looking for a low proof cocktail that is light, refreshing, and full of flavor, this is for you. INGREDIENTS

1 ½ oz. Lustau Oloroso Sherry 4 oz. Dry Apple Cider 1 dash Angostura Bitters Muddled Granny Smith Apple and Rosemary PREPARATION

Serve over rocks in a Collins glass. Garnish with rosemary sprig and apple slice.

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SHINES STOLI G ROUP USA

From left to right: Stoli Group USA President and CEO Patrick Piana, CMO Lori Tieszen and Brand Director Russ Pareti pose with the Stolichnaya range of products in their New York City headquarters.

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By Michael Tulipan | Photos courtesy of Jen Chanyi for Stoli Group USA

L

ong a leader in the premium vodka category, Stolichnaya Vodka continues to expand its presence in the U.S. market through the growth of its subsidiary Stoli Group USA. Formed in 2014 with the purpose of expanding Stoli’s profile here, Stoli Group USA is leading the way with creative marketing and branding initiatives including its popular “Stoli: THE Vodka” campaign. “The history of constantly innovating in the category led us to create our own company so we could be in full control of Stoli’s future from grain to glass to consumer,” says Lori Tieszen, Stoli Group USA founding member and its Chief Marketing Officer. Stoli’s innovation in the category is indeed legendary, from being the first company to introduce flavored vodka to the first premium vodka brand to be imported into the U.S. Since Stoli Group USA’s inception in 2014, the brand has continued to grow its profile. The company evaluated everything from how bartenders used Stoli to shelf placement to its distribution network in order to jumpstart growth and ensure top of mind awareness among consumers and bartenders. In just the first two years, Stoli sales have outpaced growth in the category as a whole.  In the process, Stoli Group USA evolved from a scrappy start-up to a dynamic team of eighty. This August, industry veteran Patrick Piana, formerly CEO of Remy Martin, was brought in as the new company CEO. “Our Stoli: THE Vodka campaign boldly celebrates Stoli’s authenticity and heritage as THE Vodka in an often superficial category,” Tieszen says. New Brand Director Russ Pareti was drawn to the company in part due to this dynamic campaign, which launched in 2014. “In 2016, we will continue to develop the ‘Stoli: THE Vodka’ campaign,” he says, “And reinforce our position as the pioneer within the category by being brave in how we speak to both our millennial audience and our trade partners.” The company has also refocused on the “core four” flavored vodkas of Razberri, Blueberi, Ohranj and Vanil, which will be featured in upcoming campaigns.

SIDE BAR STOLI GROUP USA HAS PARTNERED WITH LOUISIANA SPIRITS, LLC, PRODUCERS OF BAYOU RUM, AS THE EXCLUSIVE NATIONAL DISTRIBUTOR FOR THE BRAND. PRODUCED IN LACASSINE, LOUISIANA, BAYOU RUMS ARE HANDCRAFTED FROM UNREFINED LOUISIANA SUGARCANE AND MOLASSES. JUST TWO YEARS OLD, BAYOU RUM HAS ALREADY WON MORE THAN 65 AWARDS AND ACCOLADES. BAYOU RUM IS THE FIRST SPIRITS ADDITION TO THE STOLI GROUP USA PORTFOLIO, WHICH INCLUDES FLAGSHIP STOLI VODKA AND THE ULTRAPREMIUM ELIT BY STOLICHNAYA.

In 2015, for the first time in its history, Stoli Vodka has updated the packaging for its premium vodkas. Bartenders and industry experts were consulted on the design of a taller, sleeker bottle that serves as an evolution of the iconic Stoli branding. Just as importantly, the new bottle shape provides a more practical vessel for bartenders with antislip embossing on the neck of the bottle. The updated Stoli logo and focus on the company’s heritage on the labels are designed to help the brand stand out on the shelf. Flavored products also are now coded on the neck for easy identification with colors to match the flavor. Stoli Group USA is primed for substantial growth in the U.S. Already, the distributors of two premium wine brands, Achaval Ferrer and Arinzano, the company has begun introducing products that complement its vodkas, such as Stoli Ginger Beer. This is the first ginger beer on the market specifically formulated to complement Stoli vodka cocktails such as the signature Stoli Mule. CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

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Trace Time a

In

By Mike Gerrard Photos courtesy of Buffalo Trace Distillery

I

n Reid Mitenbuler's excellent book, Bourbon Empire, he shows how the history of bourbon and the history of the USA are intertwined. In that case, the story of Buffalo Trace is of special interest as distilling began on this distillery's site in 1775, the year of Paul Revere's famous ride and the start of the American Revolution. Buffalo Trace is the oldest continuously-operating distillery in the United States, its name harking back to those frontier days when herds of buffalo crossed the Kentucky River at the spot where brothers Hancock and Willis Lee decided to start distilling whiskey. Indeed, Daniel Boone himself is known to have passed through the Buffalo Trace just a few years earlier, in 1771.

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Sadly Willis Lee died in 1776 but his brother continued the business and in 1792, the same year Kentucky became the 15th state in the Union, put up a single-story stone house that still exists today. More buildings went up over the years as the distillery expanded, and although it changed hands several times distilling never ceased. It even continued when lightning strikes caused what they call the Great Fire in 1882, destroying the wooden buildings. The replacement Dickel Building of 1883 also still stands today. Buffalo Trace survived Prohibition, too, being one of the few distilleries to be granted a medicinal license giving them permission to keep distilling. Four years after Prohibition ended the distillery then suffered a flood: in 1937 the waters of the Kentucky River rose to be four feet higher than one of the warehouses, but still distilling continued.


Four believe

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Our people, Our

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architecture KRIS Comstock

Although the distillery has survived everything nature and the law could throw at it, it was only in 1999 that it was given the name Buffalo Trace and the flagship Buffalo Trace brand was launched. The following year Buffalo Trace became the first U.S. distillery to win Whiskey Advocate's Distillery of the Year award.

Comstock isn't just paying lip service to the future, either. Buffalo Trace has an experimental warehouse they call Warehouse X, which they claim is the most advanced whiskey warehouse ever built. "Currently we have more than 4,000 experimental whiskeys aging right now in our warehouses," says Comstock, "so we always have something in the pipeline!"

No business survives just on its history, though, something Buffalo Trace's Bourbon Marketing Director Kris Comstock well understands.

Even with over 200 years of whiskey-making experience behind them, it isn't always possible to predict the future, like the recent resurgence of American whiskies. Did that come as a surprise?

"There are four things we believe are key to the distillery," Comstock says, "our people, our products, our history, and our architecture. By recognizing and paying homage to these four areas, we are preserving our past and maintaining our future legacy."

"Yes and no," says Comstock. "We always knew consumers would turn towards American whiskey again, but we didn’t anticipate how popular it would become. If we would have, we would have made more whiskey 8, 10, 12, 20 years ago!"

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Rutte

Holland's Smallest Distillery has Serious History

IN 1872, SIMON RUTTE STARTED DISTILLING GENEVER IN HIS BACK ROOM. AT ABOUT 200 SQUARE FEET, IT WAS A REMARKABLY SMALL SPACE FOR A DISTILLERY. WHEN ROYAL DUTCH DISTILLERS ACQUIRED THE COMPANY BACK IN 2011, THEY DIDN’T CHANGE A THING. TODAY, MASTER DISTILLER MYRIAM HENDRICKX, WHO STARTED WITH THE COMPANY TWELVE YEARS AGO, CONTINUES TO PRODUCE A MODERN RUTTE LINE – A DRY GIN, A CELERY GIN, OLD SIMON GENEVER, AND A VODKA – IN THAT MINIATURE SPACE.

By Lesley Jacobs Solmonson. Photos courtesy of Royal Dutch Distillers.

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Does working in the smallest distillery in Holland hinder the company’s production? Not at all. Because just as Rutte was a seventh-generation family business, DeKuyper, which owns Royal Dutch Distillers, has been flourishing for 11 generations. For them, heritage and tradition are a major part of their company and they know quite well that sometimes the best craft blossoms by leaving things as they are. For instance, when the last surviving member of the Rutte family passed away, he left behind copious recipes, written on the backs of envelopes and scribbled on notes paper. Hendrickx digitized everything, lest it be lost and then set about translating the often cryptic writings. From these came the recipes for Rutte’s gins and genever, which use the same distinctive ingredients used by the Rutte family historically.

The dry gin is a classic style, using traditional botanicals. Juniper is sourced from Tuscany where the finest juniper grows. It is then balanced with coriander, angelica, orris root, cassia, bitter and sweet orange peel, and fennel. Starting with pure grain spirit, the gin is passed through an extra tall column still, which results in a very clean spirit. Rutte’s celery gin was inspired by bartenders asking for a celery spirit. Hendrickx recalls with amusement that, upon hearing this question, she said, “Celery? Of course we can do something with celery!” Rutte had been distilling with celery, a rather unorthodox botanical, since its inception. The celery gin uses young celery stalks sourced from Poland, which produces the most aromatic variety. The result is a gin

that has a subtle hint of celery that never dominates, but rather meshes with the other five botanicals. The Old Simon genever combines three distillates, one of which is moultwijn (a grain distillate that smells and tastes like bread.) Moultwijn is what separates genever from gin and Hendrickx uses a gentle touch with it, believing that too much moultwijn can make the spirit overly heavy. Along with the key botanical of juniper, Old Simon blends the savory quality of celery again with the floral notes of cardamom and orris root. The most unorthodox botanicals in the genever are whole roasted walnuts and hazelnuts, ingredients that are in no other genever on the market, but have been used by Rutte since the start. The nuts give the spirit an intensely creamy mouthfeel with the whiskey-like richness of the moultwijn balanced by the botanicals. The standards set forth by Rutte & Son and passed

down from father to son still flourish at the hands of distiller Myriam Hendrickx, who clearly feels like a caretaker of the past as well as a custodian of the brand’s future. Now, 143 years after Simon Rutte began making juniper-based spirits, his recipes are reaching a new audience in the United States, thanks to an aggressive importing campaign and the support from the Bon Vivants as Rutte’s brand ambassadors. Bartenders have been clamoring for the products, so much so that months of new shipments are already spoken for. Simon Rutte would indeed be proud. His family name and his spirits’ heritage have been beautifully preserved by Royal Dutch Distillers, but will also see a reinvention so that they flourish in the modern cocktail world.

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Latin American C R A F T

B E E R S

By Mathew Powers Photos by Michael Kiser, Good Beer Hunting Irish Ales, Belgian Witbiers, and German Lagers populate the craft-beer world, but a new brew has arrived on the scene, and it’s Latin American.

2011 as one of the first Latin-inspired craft brews in the U.S. and the response has been overwhelmingly positive.

Latin-styled beers blend craft-brewing innovation with the rich, vibrant culture of Latin America. Andrés Araya, CEO and founder of 5 Rabbit Brewery in Chicago declares, “We may be many things in Latin America, but we are not boring,” 5 Rabbit opened in

When you think of Latin-styled beers, images of Corona or Pacifico, may come to mind. However, Araya insists, “We are counter current to the macro beer culture. It’s not about the marketing…we would rather stick to the beer.”

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This brewing style transports you to every farm in the Americas by incorporating the amazing flavors found in the varieties of coffee, cacao, fruits and vegetables grown on farms everywhere from the Andes Mountains to the Caribbean isles. Tampa Florida’s Cigar City Brewing for example, produces a multiaward winning beer named Cubano-Style Espresso, which they explain is “brewed with a heaping amount of Cuban-style espresso beans, vanilla, and cacao nibs.” Only Hemingway himself could properly describe the magnificent, rich Cuban taste within this highly acclaimed beer. Meanwhile, 5 Rabbit’s gold medal winning 5 Lizard Latin-Style Witbier injects traditional Belgian brewing with vivacity thanks to the Latin American ingredients. Along with the usual oat and wheat, one can taste coriander, fresh lime peel, and a little passionfruit purée. And, for a little flare, they recommend it be served in a champagne flute. Latin-styled craft brewing often diverges from the classic categories like IPA or stout. Araya notes, “They need a little bit more of a description.” The explanations are as colorful as a Latin American tile mural. For example, 5 Rabbit Huitzi Midwinter Ale:

A Belgian Strong Golden Ale, brewed with hibiscus flowers, ginger, Thai palm sugar and local Chicago honey. Huitzi is a winter beer that doesn´t wallow in the dark, cold days of this season. Like its namesake, the Aztec hummingbird god Huitzilopochtli who smashed the winter to allow the sun to return, Huitzi looks forward to the brighter promise of spring. We think of it as a winter cooler.

Of course, if you prefer a more Tex-Mex beer, you can grab a Twisted X Fuego Jalapeño Pilsner. It has all the lightness of a traditional German pilsner, but the addition of jalapeño peppers provides a little heat. Even breweries far removed from Latin America, such as Clown Shoes Beer in Massachusetts, are brewing Latin-inspired beers. Clown Shoes offers Chocolate Sombrero, a Mexican-style chocolate stout, that includes ancho chili, cinnamon, and vanilla extract. The familiar name sombrero may resonate with many drinkers, but Araya prefers his Latin-American brews exemplify “the richness of Latin American culture.” He added, “The way we try to connect with people is with subtleties. It’s not just about superficial messages. Latin American cities today are bursting with energy, and it’s urban and contemporary. It’s really cool, and things are really happening now.” Araya may not have to worry. The influx of Latin American immigrants into the U.S. combined with the explosion of craft breweries (approaching 4,000 in the U.S.) means conditions are ripe for Latin-style beers to permeate the craft-beer world. The plethora of ingredients and brewing styles from Latin America provides brewers with an immense amount of opportunity to be creative and innovative, which is one of the staples of craft brewing. CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

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PLANT-BASED COCKTAILS GET INTO THE JUICE WITH THE LATEST COCKTAIL CREATIONS MIXED STRAIGHT FROM THE FARM.

RUBY QUEEN

Created by Rob Krueger, Extra Fancy, NYC Photo courtesy of Cutty Sark INGREDIENTS 1 ½ oz. Cutty Sark Blended Scotch Whisky 1 oz. Fresh Red Beet Juice ¾ oz. Honey Syrup* ¾ oz. Fresh Lemon Juice Sprig of Fresh Tarragon for garnish   PREPARATION Combine the liquid ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake until cold. Finestrain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a sprig of fresh Tarragon.  *Honey Syrup: Combine 3 parts clover honey and 1 part water in a saucepan and heat until honey is smoothly incorporated. Allow to cool before using. Refrigerate to preserve.

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BUGS CUTTY

Created by Rob Krueger, Extra Fancy, NYC Photo courtesy of Cutty Sark INGREDIENTS 1 ½ oz. Cutty Sark Prohibition Edition
 ½ oz. Amaro Meletti
 ½ oz. Yellow Chartreuse
 ½ oz. Fresh Lemon Juice
 1 ½ oz. Fresh Pressed Carrot Juice
 Fresh Ground Black Pepper (for garnish)

 PREPARATION Shake all ingredients together with ice and strain into a Collins glass filled with ice. Grind the black pepper on top to garnish.

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REYKA DAISY Photo courtesy of Reyka Vodka

INGREDIENTS 2 parts Reyka Vodka 4 large slices Sweet Red Pepper 1 part agave Nectar ¾ part Lime Juice PREPARATION Muddle ingredients except Reyka. Shake all over ice and strain into an ice filled tumbler. Top with dash soda water. Garnish with a red pepper slice.

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MORNING MARY

Photo courtesy of Reyka Vodka INGREDIENTS 2 parts Reyka Vodka 4 parts Yellow Tomato Juice 4 Basil Leaves 1 Dill Sprig 4 dashes Chili Sauce Salt and Pepper ½ part Lemon Juice PREPARATION Fill lava salt-rimmed highball glass with ice and stir ingredients to chill. Garnish with an olive, red tomato and feta cube on a cocktail stick

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HOTSPOT

SPOTLIGHT

Bourbon O

This Joint’s Jumping B RIN G IN G JAZZ B AC K TO B O URB O N

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By Francine Cohen Photos by Bourbon Orleans of the New Orleans Hotel Collection Bourbon Street. Iconic Bourbon Street. It’s a lot of things to a lot of people and has evolved since New Orleans was first settled. What was once the city’s destination for live jazz and dancing girls is now the epicenter of Mardi Gras and a rollicking wave of humanity on a Saturday night. It’s also home to New Orleans’ most approachable bars; lined up with their doors flung open beckoning you inside. But one stands out in a more sophisticated way—it’s called Bourbon O. Situated on a corner of the Bourbon Orleans Hotel on both Bourbon and Orleans Streets, well-known bar manager Cheryl Charming describes it as, “the only nice bar on Bourbon Street”, (though she qualifies The Royal Sonesta Hotel as, “having Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse but they do not have a Bourbon St. entrance and Galatoire’s, which does have a Bourbon St. entrance but the bar is in the back of the restaurant and not frequented by the Bourbon Street crowd).” Charming and her team are proud of their spot on the notable avenue and even more pleased to be the first Bourbon Street bar to go non-smoking and introduce fresh craft cocktails. Add to that being named New Orleans Magazine’s Mixologist of the Year (twice) and you’re apt to understand why Cheryl’s passion today is centered on that most emblematic of all New Orleans institutions, jazz.

Inspiration for the drink menu is one part marketing genius and a nod to the town’s “go-cup” culture. Charming designed a menu that a local distributor would print (that’s the genius) and guests would take as a souvenir. She says, “Republic National Distributing prints 1000 menus a month for me (80% of their spirits are featured on the menu) which may sound like a lot but I expect them to be stolen. When guests take one home they may be inspired to recreate one of the seasonal favorites like the Winter Wedding Cupcake with Stoli Vanilla, Disaronno, and Godiva White Chocolate Liqueur. A sense of whimsy and creativity carries throughout the entire drinks program. And they are serious about serving the freshest cocktails, down to their Bloody Mary, prepared with house made mix. Charming concludes, “Even though we are classified as a “craft” bar, the team has a fun attitude towards cocktails because uh ... cocktails should be fun. We truly cater to our clientele and don’t judge what they order. If they want a 1999 Cosmopolitan then we’ll make them the best one they’ve ever had.”

Charming explains, “We want to bring jazz back to Bourbon and our goal is to be the #1 Bourbon Street destination for live jazz and blues. We plan to feature the best New Orleans has to offer.” To accomplish this she recently placed ads for auditions and the response was phenomenal. Truly, the joint was jumping! The local jazz and blues community responded enthusiastically, excited about helping Bourbon O fulfill its mission. By the end of September, 42 different acts had taken the stage to win a spot in the lineup. The cool sounds of jazz will be enjoyed in this venue, which features a seasonal menu. Of course it wouldn’t be a Bourbon Street bar without featuring New Orleans’ most historic cocktails like the Sazerac, the Ramos Fizz and more, all of which are top sellers. But Charming notes, “We always feature the New Orleans classics then change the seasonal menu. We make our own ginger beer, apple cider, grenadine, and syrups.” CHILLEDMAGAZINE.COM

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LAST CALL

CHILLIN’ WITH

Lyndie Greenwood Photo by Gilles Toucas STARS AS JENNY MILLS ON THE HIT FOX SHOW SLEEPY HOLLOW, WHICH RETURNS THIS FALL, THURSDAY NIGHTS AT 9PM AFTER BONES. LYNDIE IS NOT JUST A PRETTY FACE IN HOT CLOTHES (SHE WAS NAMED BEST DRESSED AT COMIC CON THIS YEAR). SHE ALSO STUDIED WINE MAKING AND SOMEDAY HOPES TO FINISH HER TRAINING AS A SOMMELIER.

DownTime

Running, reading, and going out for nice long dinners with friends and maybe a bar or two afterwards.

DINING OUT

DRINK

I love wine, and if I’m at a place with a nice list, I’ll order to pair with the food. I love a nice cocktail too, and I’ll often start with one, usually something with tequila. Or sometimes I’ll just have a good old domestic beer.

ON BARTENDING

Oh yeah. I have been a bartender. Tons. And I miss it!

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I’m new to Atlanta, I’m always up for a restaurant recommendation. So far my favorite spots are Bartaco and Barcelona.

Home Bar

I’d love to have a bar someday. My cupboard, where I put my booze at the moment, has lots of stuff like Hendrick’s, Templeton Rye, Espolón Tequila, sweet and dry vermouth, cider, etc. I made my friends some pretty stellar Margaritas the other day.


MAYBE WE SHOULD TALK ABOUT THE 4000-POUND VOLCANIC ROCK IN THE ROOM.

The perfect way to enjoy Patrón is responsibly. Handcrafted and Imported exclusively from Mexico by The Patrón Spirits Company, Las Vegas, NV. 42-45% abv.

PATRÓN IS ONE OF ONLY A HANDFUL OF ARTISANAL TEQUILA MAKERS STILL USING A TAHONA STONE WHEEL TO CRUSH THE FINEST COOKED WEBER BLUE AGAVE—AN ANCIENT, LABOR-INTENSIVE PROCESS. THIS METHOD UNLOCKS AN EARTHY, COMPLEX TASTE TRULY WORTH TALKING ABOUT.

Chilled Magazine - Volume 8 Issue 5  

David Beckham and Haig Club Scotch Whisky.

Chilled Magazine - Volume 8 Issue 5  

David Beckham and Haig Club Scotch Whisky.