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[ NIPOMO ARCHITECTS ]

Nipomo Architects is an architecture firm designed to bring in an optimal amount of natural light to the workspace while taking advantage of the unique panoramic view provided by the site. People working in this space can enjoy the feeling of being outside while being protected from the elements. The architecture steps downward with the landscape. The views are treated as a theatre with shifting vantage points. Natural light runs down the concrete structure through clerestory window seams that join the wall and ceiling. Lights are not needed during the daytime as the natural light is reflected off the wall and into the workspace. The firm is isolated from any context of the city and has a inherent serenity to itself. The structure relies primarily on large castin-place concrete shear walls. The clerestory light flows down the vertical board form work walls, emphasizing the wall’s rough texture. Pine girders run through the concrete to form the ceiling and secondary structural system. The entrance is located approximately 200 feet from the parking lot, and therefore must be approached by foot. Because the two tallest walls of the building are facing the entrance, the rest of the firm is not visible until one inhabits it. This creates a certain level privacy for employees while simultaneously provoking a certain level of curiosity in non-employees who are not visiting the firm regularly. Acknowledging the culture of designers, Nipomo Architects is not just a healthy working space, but a healthy living space. The firm is divided into two zones: the production zone and the leisure zone. In between these zones is a large break of outdoor space. While architects do not always have a 9 - 5 routine, it’s important to consider the quality of space for the sake of comfort and enjoyment.

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INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE

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ENTRANCE PERSPECTIVE

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Bathroom1 Office

Lobby Bathroom2

Outdoor Lobby

Work Space

Work Space

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Patio


Locker Room2

Break Room

Conference Room1

Library

Conference Room2

Locker Room1


[ SHANGHAI WORLD EXPO 2010 ]

As the theme of the 2010 World Expo was “Better City - Better Life,� the theme of the proposed U.S. Pavilion was no different. In recent years, architecture in the United States has undergone a renaissance. While much of the world still sees the United States as a nation of consumers, excess, and obesity, the paradigm for architecture in the United States and the world is sustainability. The 2010 World Expo is a chance for the United States to change their world image and reveal to other countries that it is globally minded and a leader in sustainable practice. In order to keep the footprint of the U.S. Pavilion to a minimum it sits mostly on recycled I-beams and steel bracing. Because Shanghai has relatively hot summers, each display space has a shaded cooling pond underneath it. This acts as a natural evaporative cooling system and is activated when wind blows over the ponds and through the site. The structure of the display spaces is made up of steel space frames clad with concrete panels. Behind the colored polycarbonate is an operable window system that allows each display space to be passively cooled. While during the day the polycarbonate serves as a double skin system to minimize heat gain, the polycarbonate glows at night. This is one of the primary iconic features of the U.S. Pavilion and is achieved through an LED system of lights installed into each cell of the polycarbonate. The cubes are designated display spaces that highlight important pieces of American culture. Among them are the Jazz Display, the American Authors Display, the American Scientists Display, the American Art Display, The American Architecture Display, and the Sustainable Methods Display. Each color pertains to a different display room. Visitors enter the lobby where they can find the cafe and the vertical circulation to the display spaces.

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SHANGHAI

U.S. PAVILION

E RIDG SKYB

E RIDG B Y K S


SK YB RID GE

GE SKYBRID


ARCHITECTURE DISPLAY


[ AVILA PIER RESTORATION PROJECT ] Over the last decade, Avila Beach has reclaimed itself as one of California’s premier beaches after nearly loosing it’s serenity to an oil leak in the 1980’s. Still underdeveloped and lacking civic identity, Avila Beach has acquired a new sense of beauty that is still developing and unknown by many. The proposed Maritime Museum would help revive the city with people and give Avila Beach a lasting civic identity. The site for the new Maritime Museum is located in Avila Beach, California, on the Unocal Pier 3,000 feet off the coast. The purpose of the museum is to increase awareness of the maritime history of the Central Coast and Avila beach. Along with the museum is a boat building school, and a port for visiting ships. The museum mimics the aesthetic of a sail boat. The heart of the design lies in the experience of the porthole. Because San Luis Obispo Bay is such a popular spot for sail boats, the large white masonry walls of the museum appear from the shore to be sails. In addition to blending in with sail boats, the white masonry walls act as the primary structure of the museum while simultaneously deflecting offshore winds. The Maritime Museum also explores the idea of the porthole by opening views that constantly change and interact with the visitor. The museum is sensitive in the way it brings in natural light. Guests are encouraged to use the flow of natural light as a guide through the galleries. On the north and south facing sides of the museum, the stairwell opens up to the ocean, letting the visitor ascend to the horizon. The glass elevator hangs over the sea giving the visitor no relativity but himself and the ocean.

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[ STANLEY THEATRE ] The goal of Stanley Theatre is to build a theatre in the context of Old Town Alexandria using movie stills and aesthetic from the films of Stanley Kubrick. As a total designer, Kubrick often had control of every aspect of his films, including the set. Many of Kubrick’s scenes take place in front of scenery that suggests a strong vanishing point, like hallways, and places with obvious symmetry and horizontal lines. With this in mind, the theatre’s circulation depends on long view tubes that stretch from the entrance to the outdoor theatre on the Potomac. The theatre relies on reinforced brick shear walls to support the concrete that fits between them. There are two theatres: the indoor theater which is visible from the street, and the outdoor theatre which is suspended over the Potomac. When there are no movies being shown, the space is accessible as a public deck that meets the water. Films inside Stanley Theatre are not viewed on a screen, they are displayed on the raw structural concrete of the theatre. Strips of elongated horizontal acoustic panels enhance the performance of the movie as well as contribute to drawing the human eye to the screen, just as Stanley Kubrick used vanishing points to enhance the drama of his movies. The indoor theatre also consists of six balcony spaces and a general viewing space. There are twelve balcony seats that are available upon reservation and there are eighty-eight general viewing spaces - giving the indoor theatre one-hundred available seats. The outdoor theatre is made up of a series of four viewing pods that are suspended over a portion of the Potomac River. Each pod has 28 seats available and is protected from the elements. Films in the outdoor theatre are projected onto a docked ferry with a large temporary viewing screen. There is one showing per night.

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CONCRETE VIEW TUBE

OUTDOOR THEATRE BRICK SHEAR WALL

POTOMAC RIVER OUTDOOR THEATRE CIRCULATION


INDOOR THEATRE THEATRE BALCONY

THEATRE BALCONY


INDOOR THEATRE


[ 1928 ]

1928 is a fashion center located one quarter mile west of The White House. It’s adjacent to Pennsylvania Ave. and faces James Monroe Park. Because of the heavy pedestrian traffic in this area and the unique open space created by the park, the fashion center will be seen by all as a local icon of D.C. The fashion center is conceptualized after one of the most iconic elements of fashion: the zipper. In addition to it’s iconic image, the zipper aesthetic also creates a seam that runs the length of the fashion center and allows natural light and air to move through every floor. People can be seen walking up the transparent staircase and enjoying views of the city from a wide array of balcony spaces. The structure of the building is made up of digitally fabricated steel bracing and fibreC cladding. The steel acts as the skeleton of the fashion center and is pieced together seamlessly on site to creating what appears to be a monolithic structure. All of the building loads can be traced to the steel. The fashion center is also relatively transparent. Because much of the building is made up of glass, plexi, and polycarbonate, people can be seen climbing the stairs and enjoying the balcony spaces from the street. This transparency gives the fashion center a kinetic quality, along with the gestural form of the architecture. The architecture caters itself to the seasons of fashion. There are four major shows a year for the winter, spring, summer and fall collections. Although seating is limited for the shows inside, the runway on the third floor protrudes out into the street, extending the show to the public. The runway stops at the window allowing models to pose for guests both inside and outside the fashion center. This makes it possible for spectators to enjoy the show from James Monroe Park free of charge, and allows the fashion center to extend it’s usership to a much broader audience.

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WASHINGTON D.C.

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PEN NSY LVA NIA

MEXICAN EMBASSY


MEXI CAN EMBASSY


FLOOR PLANS

ENTRY LEVEL W/ CAFE [ 1 ]

RETAIL [ 2 ]

PHOTO LAB W/ OFFICE [ 5 ]

STUDIO W/ CONFERENCE ROOM [ 6 ]


RUNWAY W/ OFFICE [ 3 ]

RETAIL W/ CONFERENCE ROOM [ 4 ]

STUDIO [ 7 ]

LARGE CONFERENCE ROOM [ 8 ]


FURNITURE >>>


[ WAAC COUGHIE BAR ]


SITE

THICKNESS OF WALL


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[ Q _ TABLE ]


[ TABLE FOR FLOWERS ]


[ DINNER TABLE ]


EXPLODED AXON


[ SPACE ORGANIZER ]


[ FM SERVICE BAR ]


HOW TO OPERATE


[ IPE TABLE ]

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