Issuu on Google+

I would like to help Children in Crisis You can also donate online at: www.childrenincrisis.org Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms/Other First name Surname

Why I support Children in Crisis ...by one Extreme Mother!

Address

Postcode

A chance to learn, a chance in life

REPORTS

SUMMER 2011

Tel Email

Classrooms beyond conflict

Please send me news and updates by email (you may unsubscribe at any time). Return this form to: FREEPOST RLXH-JJAR-RYSG, Children in Crisis,

206-208 Stewart’s Road, London SW8 4UB I would like to donate

£15

£30

£50

£100

I enclose a cheque / PO / CAF voucher made payable to Children in Crisis

Please debit my

VISA

CAF charity card

Card No.

Start date

Other £...............

Mastercard

Maestro (Switch)

AMEX

Expiry date

How your support reaches the unreachable

When I decided to push myself to my limits by crossing Greenland on skis, pulling my sleds, I came across Children in Crisis and, as we share the same philosophy, I decided to raise money for them. It was an incredibly tough physical and mental expedition but I am so glad I did it. Not only has it has made me more positive, confident and happy, but vulnerable children will be benefitting too - what could be better than that?

Issue No. Signature Date

I strongly believe that every child in this world should have the right to education, as it is the only way to try to take your own future in your hands. If a child can read and write, they can access information, express themselves, become independent and amongst many things, fill in voting papers. I never forget how fortunate I was to be born in country which was peaceful and where the standard of education was excellent. The same happened with my four children who were born and raised in England.

Sabine Please tick if you DO NOT require a receipt

Make your donation worth more! Yes, I am a UK taxpayer and would like Children in Crisis to reclaim the tax on all my donations made this year, in the previous four years and on all future donations. Please note, you must pay an amount of income tax or capital gains tax at least equal to the tax we reclaim on your donations in the appropriate tax year. Tax year is 6 April one year to 5 April the next. Date: In accordance with the 1998 Data Protection Act, Children in Crisis will hold your details to provide you with updates about our work and what you are helping us achieve. If you do not want to receive any further communication from us, including our newsletter, please email info@childrenincrisis.org or write to Children in Crisis, 206 - 208 Stewart’s Road, London SW8 4UB.

After 22 days of ski-ing 550km across the Arctic Circle, Sabine Diederichs aka Extreme Mother, has completed the absolute challenge of a lifetime for Children in Crisis and Right To Play. A huge CONGRATULATIONS goes out to Sabine – she is a real inspiration to us and to all the women in the world putting themselves through extremes to give vulnerable children hope for the future!

Read Sabine’s captivating blog by visiting www.extrememother.blogspot.com You can also support by visiting her fundraising page www.justgiving.com/sabinediederichs Printed on 100% recycled paper

Pupils of Mufariji Primary School, DR Congo Photo: Amy Parker


I would like to help Children in Crisis You can also donate online at: www.childrenincrisis.org Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms/Other First name Surname

Why I support Children in Crisis ...by one Extreme Mother!

Address

Postcode

A chance to learn, a chance in life

REPORTS

SUMMER 2011

Tel Email

Classrooms beyond conflict

Please send me news and updates by email (you may unsubscribe at any time). Return this form to: FREEPOST RLXH-JJAR-RYSG, Children in Crisis,

206-208 Stewart’s Road, London SW8 4UB I would like to donate

£15

£30

£50

£100

I enclose a cheque / PO / CAF voucher made payable to Children in Crisis

Please debit my

VISA

CAF charity card

Card No.

Start date

Other £...............

Mastercard

Maestro (Switch)

AMEX

Expiry date

How your support reaches the unreachable

When I decided to push myself to my limits by crossing Greenland on skis, pulling my sleds, I came across Children in Crisis and, as we share the same philosophy, I decided to raise money for them. It was an incredibly tough physical and mental expedition but I am so glad I did it. Not only has it has made me more positive, confident and happy, but vulnerable children will be benefitting too - what could be better than that?

Issue No. Signature Date

I strongly believe that every child in this world should have the right to education, as it is the only way to try to take your own future in your hands. If a child can read and write, they can access information, express themselves, become independent and amongst many things, fill in voting papers. I never forget how fortunate I was to be born in country which was peaceful and where the standard of education was excellent. The same happened with my four children who were born and raised in England.

Sabine Please tick if you DO NOT require a receipt

Make your donation worth more! Yes, I am a UK taxpayer and would like Children in Crisis to reclaim the tax on all my donations made this year, in the previous four years and on all future donations. Please note, you must pay an amount of income tax or capital gains tax at least equal to the tax we reclaim on your donations in the appropriate tax year. Tax year is 6 April one year to 5 April the next. Date: In accordance with the 1998 Data Protection Act, Children in Crisis will hold your details to provide you with updates about our work and what you are helping us achieve. If you do not want to receive any further communication from us, including our newsletter, please email info@childrenincrisis.org or write to Children in Crisis, 206 - 208 Stewart’s Road, London SW8 4UB.

After 22 days of ski-ing 550km across the Arctic Circle, Sabine Diederichs aka Extreme Mother, has completed the absolute challenge of a lifetime for Children in Crisis and Right To Play. A huge CONGRATULATIONS goes out to Sabine – she is a real inspiration to us and to all the women in the world putting themselves through extremes to give vulnerable children hope for the future!

Read Sabine’s captivating blog by visiting www.extrememother.blogspot.com You can also support by visiting her fundraising page www.justgiving.com/sabinediederichs Printed on 100% recycled paper

Pupils of Mufariji Primary School, DR Congo Photo: Amy Parker


Koy Thomson with pupils attending an accelerated learning class in one of our community-based education centres in Kabul, Afghanistan.

Children in Crisis Our new mission Where resources are few, where education is needed to heal the nation, and where it is too remote for others, our aim is to support children to read, write, think, pursue their life goals and contribute positively to their communities.

Photo: Bethan Williams

disabilities. We want to see more healthy mothers because their health, education and wellbeing are inseparable from a child’s health, education and wellbeing, starting at pregnancy and continuing through schooling. We want to see more women being elevated and given the power and voice to change things within their communities. And we see ourselves doing more active advocacy, creative campaigning and outreach work to ensure that children’s voices are heard.

Welcome Welcome to an exciting and busy summer edition of Reports which follows the launch of our new three-year strategy: A chance to learn, a chance in life. So what’s new in our future vision? Rather than reiterate the fundamental reasons why Children in Crisis exists I want to share with you some of the things that are different in our future goals and some things which I believe will inspire the important people – you, the teams we work with and most importantly the children and communities we help.

Our vision could not be clearer. Over the next three years we will continue paying attention to children who are disadvantaged for reasons of ethnicity, gender, income or other factors. Girls face consistent discrimination and they remain one of our top priorities but we also need to help other out-of-school children gain access to education such as children with

Thanks to you, Children in Crisis has amassed a diverse wealth of experience spanning maternal health, health education, street children, adult literacy, working with excluded groups, quality education, school build and rehabilitation, teacher training, vocational training, child protection and working with local partners – all delivered under extremely complex circumstances. This work will continue but we want to bring all of our experience together so that all the areas where we currently work benefit from a holistic approach. We also want to take all of the difficult things that keep children out of school, bring them together and apply new solutions to overcome them.

Where your money goes: Children in Crisis 206-208 Stewart’s Road London SW8 4UB

Telephone +44 (0)20 7627 1040 Fax +44 (0)20 7627 1050

E-mail info@childrenincrisis.org Website www.childrenincrisis.org

Founder and Life President Sarah, Duchess of York

Registered office as address Reg Charity No. 1020488 Company No. 2815817

Underlying this is our choice to continue working in countries affected by conflict, and specifically in remote and difficult areas where few others currently tread. We know how unstable situations can get so we will ensure that our solutions are resilient and adaptable by local communities if things go wrong. Finally, I need to speak about the children and how great they are to work with. We talk so much about ‘vulnerability’ and protection, but children are also resilient, hopeful and seemingly uncrushable in even the toughest of environments. That alone is wonderful inspiration for our work. Thank you – we couldn’t keep doing this valuable work without you.

Koy Thomson Chief Executive, Children in Crisis

Expenditure by activity:

Programmes

73%

Education – Schools

Fundraising

26%

Education – Community 28%

Governance

1%

Education – Health

28% 17%


Koy Thomson with pupils attending an accelerated learning class in one of our community-based education centres in Kabul, Afghanistan.

Children in Crisis Our new mission Where resources are few, where education is needed to heal the nation, and where it is too remote for others, our aim is to support children to read, write, think, pursue their life goals and contribute positively to their communities.

Photo: Bethan Williams

disabilities. We want to see more healthy mothers because their health, education and wellbeing are inseparable from a child’s health, education and wellbeing, starting at pregnancy and continuing through schooling. We want to see more women being elevated and given the power and voice to change things within their communities. And we see ourselves doing more active advocacy, creative campaigning and outreach work to ensure that children’s voices are heard.

Welcome Welcome to an exciting and busy summer edition of Reports which follows the launch of our new three-year strategy: A chance to learn, a chance in life. So what’s new in our future vision? Rather than reiterate the fundamental reasons why Children in Crisis exists I want to share with you some of the things that are different in our future goals and some things which I believe will inspire the important people – you, the teams we work with and most importantly the children and communities we help.

Our vision could not be clearer. Over the next three years we will continue paying attention to children who are disadvantaged for reasons of ethnicity, gender, income or other factors. Girls face consistent discrimination and they remain one of our top priorities but we also need to help other out-of-school children gain access to education such as children with

Thanks to you, Children in Crisis has amassed a diverse wealth of experience spanning maternal health, health education, street children, adult literacy, working with excluded groups, quality education, school build and rehabilitation, teacher training, vocational training, child protection and working with local partners – all delivered under extremely complex circumstances. This work will continue but we want to bring all of our experience together so that all the areas where we currently work benefit from a holistic approach. We also want to take all of the difficult things that keep children out of school, bring them together and apply new solutions to overcome them.

Where your money goes: Children in Crisis 206-208 Stewart’s Road London SW8 4UB

Telephone +44 (0)20 7627 1040 Fax +44 (0)20 7627 1050

E-mail info@childrenincrisis.org Website www.childrenincrisis.org

Founder and Life President Sarah, Duchess of York

Registered office as address Reg Charity No. 1020488 Company No. 2815817

Underlying this is our choice to continue working in countries affected by conflict, and specifically in remote and difficult areas where few others currently tread. We know how unstable situations can get so we will ensure that our solutions are resilient and adaptable by local communities if things go wrong. Finally, I need to speak about the children and how great they are to work with. We talk so much about ‘vulnerability’ and protection, but children are also resilient, hopeful and seemingly uncrushable in even the toughest of environments. That alone is wonderful inspiration for our work. Thank you – we couldn’t keep doing this valuable work without you.

Koy Thomson Chief Executive, Children in Crisis

Expenditure by activity:

Programmes

73%

Education – Schools

Fundraising

26%

Education – Community 28%

Governance

1%

Education – Health

28% 17%


How are we doing?

Liberia: Learning ladies leap to liberation!

Sierra Leone: A reason to celebrate “HIV and AIDS is a global problem and as such, Sierra Leone is not immune!” These were the words from one of the teachers who had completed our HIV/AIDS training last year. Following the completion of this project in Sierra Leone, an evaluation was carried out which found that students, parents and teachers were much more informed about the risks and causes of HIV and AIDS. We have received some excellent feedback, one teacher said: “This is not just a programme about HIV and AIDS. This is a programme that has helped teachers teach children about important life skills.” Another teacher commented: “The training that teachers have received has changed their behaviour and practices. I stay with one partner; I always use a condom.” We are especially pleased because for the past 7 years Children in Crisis, along with our local partners FAWE (Forum for African Women Educationalists), has been working to raise awareness of HIV/AIDS in remote parts of Sierra Leone. We are now assessing our next steps in line with our new threeyear strategy.

Afghanistan: Child Rights

DR Congo: Did you send the cow back? We send another huge thanks to everyone who responded with gifts and messages in response to our “Send the cow back” appeal in Easter. It told the story of Mugilanesa, a brave 14-year old girl who refused to get married in exchange for cows, a common practice on the plateau in Eastern DR Congo. Our community workshops teach about the importance of girls’ rights and their right to education. But they are also a vital forum for girls like Mugilanesa who from attending one of our workshops found the power to say ‘no’ to marriage just days before her wedding. This story is a must-read, if you missed it you can read it on our website www.childrenincrisis.org/our-work/ democratic-republic-congo You can also donate by returning the form at the back of Reports.

A new project is successfully underway in Afghanistan. Through this work we promote the rights of children, especially girls, to have access to a quality education free from violence. Despite the ongoing challenges preventing millions of children from attending school this project has been a huge success: around 1,000 teachers and parents have attended either awareness-raising workshops or have received training on positive discipline as well as child rights in the context of Islam. We have also ensured that local police officers have received important information on child rights. As a result of this work, over 20,000 children will benefit from better practices and attitudes towards them.

What has been particularly striking about this project is its impact on the wider community... Local Mullahs have spread positive messages about child rights in Friday prayers and a policeman proudly told me that children now say hello to him in the street rather than being afraid of him. Bethan Williams, Programme Manager for Afghanistan

River Cess County, Liberia was a place of joyful celebration last month at the graduation ceremony for women who finished their very first course at our Vocational Training Centre. Ambitious participants have been learning a variety of useful, practical skills such as tailoring, pastry-making and hairdressing. The Centre also runs literacy classes for women who have missed out on a primary education. I can now write my own name, I can go to the hospital without asking the nurses to write or spell my name for me. Our parents never sent us to school to learn this when we were young girls, but the FAWE-CIC adult literacy programme has given me a new start. A woman attending our Vocational Training Centre in River Cess County, Liberia


How are we doing?

Liberia: Learning ladies leap to liberation!

Sierra Leone: A reason to celebrate “HIV and AIDS is a global problem and as such, Sierra Leone is not immune!” These were the words from one of the teachers who had completed our HIV/AIDS training last year. Following the completion of this project in Sierra Leone, an evaluation was carried out which found that students, parents and teachers were much more informed about the risks and causes of HIV and AIDS. We have received some excellent feedback, one teacher said: “This is not just a programme about HIV and AIDS. This is a programme that has helped teachers teach children about important life skills.” Another teacher commented: “The training that teachers have received has changed their behaviour and practices. I stay with one partner; I always use a condom.” We are especially pleased because for the past 7 years Children in Crisis, along with our local partners FAWE (Forum for African Women Educationalists), has been working to raise awareness of HIV/AIDS in remote parts of Sierra Leone. We are now assessing our next steps in line with our new threeyear strategy.

Afghanistan: Child Rights

DR Congo: Did you send the cow back? We send another huge thanks to everyone who responded with gifts and messages in response to our “Send the cow back” appeal in Easter. It told the story of Mugilanesa, a brave 14-year old girl who refused to get married in exchange for cows, a common practice on the plateau in Eastern DR Congo. Our community workshops teach about the importance of girls’ rights and their right to education. But they are also a vital forum for girls like Mugilanesa who from attending one of our workshops found the power to say ‘no’ to marriage just days before her wedding. This story is a must-read, if you missed it you can read it on our website www.childrenincrisis.org/our-work/ democratic-republic-congo You can also donate by returning the form at the back of Reports.

A new project is successfully underway in Afghanistan. Through this work we promote the rights of children, especially girls, to have access to a quality education free from violence. Despite the ongoing challenges preventing millions of children from attending school this project has been a huge success: around 1,000 teachers and parents have attended either awareness-raising workshops or have received training on positive discipline as well as child rights in the context of Islam. We have also ensured that local police officers have received important information on child rights. As a result of this work, over 20,000 children will benefit from better practices and attitudes towards them.

What has been particularly striking about this project is its impact on the wider community... Local Mullahs have spread positive messages about child rights in Friday prayers and a policeman proudly told me that children now say hello to him in the street rather than being afraid of him. Bethan Williams, Programme Manager for Afghanistan

River Cess County, Liberia was a place of joyful celebration last month at the graduation ceremony for women who finished their very first course at our Vocational Training Centre. Ambitious participants have been learning a variety of useful, practical skills such as tailoring, pastry-making and hairdressing. The Centre also runs literacy classes for women who have missed out on a primary education. I can now write my own name, I can go to the hospital without asking the nurses to write or spell my name for me. Our parents never sent us to school to learn this when we were young girls, but the FAWE-CIC adult literacy programme has given me a new start. A woman attending our Vocational Training Centre in River Cess County, Liberia


Amy Parker, Programme Manager for DR Congo and newest member of the Children in Crisis team!

Last year, we trained all teachers and head teachers from

Photo: Sarah Rowse

18

primary schools

85%

of teachers are now using active and participatory teaching methods

The two new schools we built in DRC last year will benefit over

700 children

Inspiring teachers, good schools, star pupils! Children in Crisis has been doing some fantastic work with our partners Eben-Ezer Ministries International. During my very first trip to South Kivu in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, I saw some of the excellent progress we’ve made in our teacher training and school building programmes thanks to your wonderful support! Minembwe is a vast region with isolated villages that stand miles apart and take hours to reach, yet last year we managed to train all teachers and head teachers from 18 of the primary schools in this region. During my

visit, I saw many differences in the standards and achievements between each school, however one thing stood out for them all – quality teaching and sheer commitment. The teachers I spoke to were all eager to report the improvements made in their schools since they completed our training course last August. And it really showed. A prime example is in Mufariji Primary School which is led by a trained and very passionate, competent head teacher who happens to be a head of the community. All of the teachers here now use an interesting mix of teaching aids and methods, as well as getting the children up and active in class through group work, games and singing.

My next stop was Bipimo where we are rebuilding a primary school. Over the years, the local climate has not always been the only hurdle in the way of our school building and teacher training programme on the Plateau. Sporadic outbreaks of conflict have blighted community efforts to rebuild their lives and it has caused widespread devastation to schools, preventing hundreds of children from attending school. However, with the integration of the FRF (Federalist Republican Forces) into the Congolese Defence Force on 25th January 2011, hopes are high. Throughout our stay people recounted the story, stating that it was now time for peace. Bipimo was one of the schools severely damaged by the fighting. Now, in its place, stands rather excitingly a newly constructed school. During the wet season heavy rains had made roads impassable and slowed down our progress – at one point our team had to abandon the truck and walk for two hours over marshland the rest of the way. However when we arrived it was an impressive sight, partly because the

community rejected a decision to wait until the wet season was over to finish the build what determination! With the programme in DR Congo now at a crucial stage of development and expansion, exciting times are ahead. Our teacher training team has doubled in size and by 2014 we want to ensure all of the children across the Plateau of Eastern DR Congo are attending school.

None of this would be possible without the kindness and generosity of our fantastic Children in Crisis supporters, so thank you!

You can support our programmes and read more about our work by visiting our website www.childrenincrisis.org


Amy Parker, Programme Manager for DR Congo and newest member of the Children in Crisis team!

Last year, we trained all teachers and head teachers from

Photo: Sarah Rowse

18

primary schools

85%

of teachers are now using active and participatory teaching methods

The two new schools we built in DRC last year will benefit over

700 children

Inspiring teachers, good schools, star pupils! Children in Crisis has been doing some fantastic work with our partners Eben-Ezer Ministries International. During my very first trip to South Kivu in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, I saw some of the excellent progress we’ve made in our teacher training and school building programmes thanks to your wonderful support! Minembwe is a vast region with isolated villages that stand miles apart and take hours to reach, yet last year we managed to train all teachers and head teachers from 18 of the primary schools in this region. During my

visit, I saw many differences in the standards and achievements between each school, however one thing stood out for them all – quality teaching and sheer commitment. The teachers I spoke to were all eager to report the improvements made in their schools since they completed our training course last August. And it really showed. A prime example is in Mufariji Primary School which is led by a trained and very passionate, competent head teacher who happens to be a head of the community. All of the teachers here now use an interesting mix of teaching aids and methods, as well as getting the children up and active in class through group work, games and singing.

My next stop was Bipimo where we are rebuilding a primary school. Over the years, the local climate has not always been the only hurdle in the way of our school building and teacher training programme on the Plateau. Sporadic outbreaks of conflict have blighted community efforts to rebuild their lives and it has caused widespread devastation to schools, preventing hundreds of children from attending school. However, with the integration of the FRF (Federalist Republican Forces) into the Congolese Defence Force on 25th January 2011, hopes are high. Throughout our stay people recounted the story, stating that it was now time for peace. Bipimo was one of the schools severely damaged by the fighting. Now, in its place, stands rather excitingly a newly constructed school. During the wet season heavy rains had made roads impassable and slowed down our progress – at one point our team had to abandon the truck and walk for two hours over marshland the rest of the way. However when we arrived it was an impressive sight, partly because the

community rejected a decision to wait until the wet season was over to finish the build what determination! With the programme in DR Congo now at a crucial stage of development and expansion, exciting times are ahead. Our teacher training team has doubled in size and by 2014 we want to ensure all of the children across the Plateau of Eastern DR Congo are attending school.

None of this would be possible without the kindness and generosity of our fantastic Children in Crisis supporters, so thank you!

You can support our programmes and read more about our work by visiting our website www.childrenincrisis.org


One of Mufariji’s bright stars! A year 3 student proudly showing off her writing skills! Her teacher was especially noteworthy, with a good learning environment prevalent in his classroom.

The boys and girls of Mufariji who will graduate from primary school this year.

The class of 2011!

The hard-working community and labourers put the finishing touches to Bipimo School

Following a teacher training course, teachers are keeping their students interested and active in class through group work, games and singing.

All photos: Amy Parker


One of Mufariji’s bright stars! A year 3 student proudly showing off her writing skills! Her teacher was especially noteworthy, with a good learning environment prevalent in his classroom.

The boys and girls of Mufariji who will graduate from primary school this year.

The class of 2011!

The hard-working community and labourers put the finishing touches to Bipimo School

Following a teacher training course, teachers are keeping their students interested and active in class through group work, games and singing.

All photos: Amy Parker


What’s new? Projects in the pipeline

Sierra Leone’s hidden children

80% of the

disabled children we interviewed did not go to school

40% of

children said they were shut inside the house all day

30%

of children said they went to work on farms with their parents

In Sierra Leone, a significant number of disabled children have been excluded from schooling and other learning opportunities. Photo: Caroline Barnes

This year, we launched a survey to explore and document the truth about children with disabilities in Sierra Leone. Instances of children being hidden away, abused and denied their basic human rights have been reported although the full extent is not known. What we do know is that there are a significant number of children with disabilities and access to education for them is a big problem. The early results from our survey make a powerful case for something more to be done. While some local organisations do provide services for children with disabilities, limited resources means that they can only do what they can for those they can reach. We began our research in the extremely remote region of Kambia where Children in Crisis currently works. Stigma and discrimination is widespread and statistics are extremely hard to come by. There is simply not enough documented evidence so it comes as no surprise that disabled children have been missed in the design and implementation of development projects despite the efforts of aid and policy organisations.

Our new study has targeted 200 villages, we are running focus groups and talking to parents and guardians, schools directors, community leaders, village chiefs, health centres and traditional birth attendants. We have partnered up with three reputable organisations - Powerful Information, Vision for the Blind (Sierra Leone) and the Welfare Society for the Disabled. Throughout this project a key aspect is ensuring that survey teams have received training in data collection and recording methods so that the findings are documented in the right way.

In Kambia, this will be the first time a comprehensive survey like this has been carried out to reach vulnerable children with disabilities. The full report will be complete by the summer however early findings are alarming, proving that there is a real need and urgency to address this shocking situation. More importantly, it means we can do something about it and put the same energy and focus on disabled children that we do with other excluded groups. On a positive note, a Disability Act is being passed by the government of Sierra Leone though it could take years before it actually becomes law and the effects are felt by the community.

We will promote the findings of our report through active advocacy, creative campaigning and community outreach. It is time that disabled children’s voices are heard and brought to attention at community and government level. We will share our findings with other local organisations and raise awareness of the issues through local radio. We will also be running seminars and workshops in Kambia and Freetown, Sierra Leone’s capital. Initiatives like this have given us highly convincing reasons to continue reaching out to the most vulnerable and marginalised children. It helps us to find those who have fallen through the gap.


What’s new? Projects in the pipeline

Sierra Leone’s hidden children

80% of the

disabled children we interviewed did not go to school

40% of

children said they were shut inside the house all day

30%

of children said they went to work on farms with their parents

In Sierra Leone, a significant number of disabled children have been excluded from schooling and other learning opportunities. Photo: Caroline Barnes

This year, we launched a survey to explore and document the truth about children with disabilities in Sierra Leone. Instances of children being hidden away, abused and denied their basic human rights have been reported although the full extent is not known. What we do know is that there are a significant number of children with disabilities and access to education for them is a big problem. The early results from our survey make a powerful case for something more to be done. While some local organisations do provide services for children with disabilities, limited resources means that they can only do what they can for those they can reach. We began our research in the extremely remote region of Kambia where Children in Crisis currently works. Stigma and discrimination is widespread and statistics are extremely hard to come by. There is simply not enough documented evidence so it comes as no surprise that disabled children have been missed in the design and implementation of development projects despite the efforts of aid and policy organisations.

Our new study has targeted 200 villages, we are running focus groups and talking to parents and guardians, schools directors, community leaders, village chiefs, health centres and traditional birth attendants. We have partnered up with three reputable organisations - Powerful Information, Vision for the Blind (Sierra Leone) and the Welfare Society for the Disabled. Throughout this project a key aspect is ensuring that survey teams have received training in data collection and recording methods so that the findings are documented in the right way.

In Kambia, this will be the first time a comprehensive survey like this has been carried out to reach vulnerable children with disabilities. The full report will be complete by the summer however early findings are alarming, proving that there is a real need and urgency to address this shocking situation. More importantly, it means we can do something about it and put the same energy and focus on disabled children that we do with other excluded groups. On a positive note, a Disability Act is being passed by the government of Sierra Leone though it could take years before it actually becomes law and the effects are felt by the community.

We will promote the findings of our report through active advocacy, creative campaigning and community outreach. It is time that disabled children’s voices are heard and brought to attention at community and government level. We will share our findings with other local organisations and raise awareness of the issues through local radio. We will also be running seminars and workshops in Kambia and Freetown, Sierra Leone’s capital. Initiatives like this have given us highly convincing reasons to continue reaching out to the most vulnerable and marginalised children. It helps us to find those who have fallen through the gap.


Children can face outrageously tough penalties when they come into conflict with the law. In Afghanistan, heavy-handed punishments and beating children to force out confessions are common and need to be stopped. The validity of the crimes themselves is sometimes questionable. In Kabul, a 16 year old girl was forced into marriage to an old man but fell in love with a local boy. She ran away and was then caught. Her punishment? A sentence of seven years in detention.

Protecting children in conflict with the law

Hundreds of children young people are suffering the consequences of Afghanistan’s harsh criminal justice system. Whatever the situation, they should be protected, given a fair trial, and if in the wrong be given a chance to change. Children are far more vulnerable to victimisation and do not have the maturity of adults, but in Afghanistan they have been judged under a system designed for adults. In 2005, the Afghan government laid out a new law – a juvenile code – to ensure that children be detained only for very serious offences. This is not being allowed. Girls are particularly vulnerable with a staggering 56% of them being held in detention for ‘moral offences’ whilst 38% are there because they are lost or have nowhere else to go.* For children who have offended, more often it is the political instability, conflict and poverty that have driven them to commit petty crimes to support their families, such as mobile phone theft or selling drugs.

In Afghanistan, most of the children who come into conflict with the law are victims of neglect, exploitation and social and economic hardship. For the past two years Children in Crisis has been working with social workers and the police force to stop children from being sent into this system in the first place. Our approach - prevention, rehabilitation

80% of children Young people are often kept in detention centres without having had the opportunity to a fair trial, intervention or rehabilitation. Photo: Koy Thomson

will commit only ONE offence in their lifetime

and reintegration – supports children to recognise right from wrong, to be accountable for their actions and to help them reintegrate back into society. Social workers are an intrinsic part of this process, we provide training and help them to work within existing structures for resolving conflict within the Afghan community. Their jobs are not to decide whether the child is guilty or not, but to work with families, prosecutors, and relevant parties to mediate a way forward. They encourage others to follow the juvenile code and promote detention only as a last resort.

A majority of these children are bright, intelligent individuals who already attend school but who are the main income earners for their family. Before any child is sent to detention we attempt to reach and consult with families, we also recommend cautions, parental supervision, an apology to the victim, ‘putting the bad act right’ and community service, to name a few. If a child has committed an offence, we strongly recommend that they serve their punishment in the community where they belong. Education plays a vital role in all of this, so Children in Crisis is making sure it remains at the forefront to prevent children from taking the high-risk route in the first place.

56% of girls

found in prisons were there for ‘moral offences’

93-97%

of children in trouble with the law are first-time or minor offenders

(*an independent research report carried out by Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission)


Children can face outrageously tough penalties when they come into conflict with the law. In Afghanistan, heavy-handed punishments and beating children to force out confessions are common and need to be stopped. The validity of the crimes themselves is sometimes questionable. In Kabul, a 16 year old girl was forced into marriage to an old man but fell in love with a local boy. She ran away and was then caught. Her punishment? A sentence of seven years in detention.

Protecting children in conflict with the law

Hundreds of children young people are suffering the consequences of Afghanistan’s harsh criminal justice system. Whatever the situation, they should be protected, given a fair trial, and if in the wrong be given a chance to change. Children are far more vulnerable to victimisation and do not have the maturity of adults, but in Afghanistan they have been judged under a system designed for adults. In 2005, the Afghan government laid out a new law – a juvenile code – to ensure that children be detained only for very serious offences. This is not being allowed. Girls are particularly vulnerable with a staggering 56% of them being held in detention for ‘moral offences’ whilst 38% are there because they are lost or have nowhere else to go.* For children who have offended, more often it is the political instability, conflict and poverty that have driven them to commit petty crimes to support their families, such as mobile phone theft or selling drugs.

In Afghanistan, most of the children who come into conflict with the law are victims of neglect, exploitation and social and economic hardship. For the past two years Children in Crisis has been working with social workers and the police force to stop children from being sent into this system in the first place. Our approach - prevention, rehabilitation

80% of children Young people are often kept in detention centres without having had the opportunity to a fair trial, intervention or rehabilitation. Photo: Koy Thomson

will commit only ONE offence in their lifetime

and reintegration – supports children to recognise right from wrong, to be accountable for their actions and to help them reintegrate back into society. Social workers are an intrinsic part of this process, we provide training and help them to work within existing structures for resolving conflict within the Afghan community. Their jobs are not to decide whether the child is guilty or not, but to work with families, prosecutors, and relevant parties to mediate a way forward. They encourage others to follow the juvenile code and promote detention only as a last resort.

A majority of these children are bright, intelligent individuals who already attend school but who are the main income earners for their family. Before any child is sent to detention we attempt to reach and consult with families, we also recommend cautions, parental supervision, an apology to the victim, ‘putting the bad act right’ and community service, to name a few. If a child has committed an offence, we strongly recommend that they serve their punishment in the community where they belong. Education plays a vital role in all of this, so Children in Crisis is making sure it remains at the forefront to prevent children from taking the high-risk route in the first place.

56% of girls

found in prisons were there for ‘moral offences’

93-97%

of children in trouble with the law are first-time or minor offenders

(*an independent research report carried out by Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission)


Events and news Princess Beatrice’s Hat Who knew that a hat would cause such a stir? You may have heard that the famous piece of apparel worn by The Princess to the wedding of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge fetched an amazing £81,000 when she put it up for auction on eBay in May. The proceeds were shared between Children in Crisis and Unicef. Princess Beatrice commented: “I cannot believe the amazing response to the hat, it has its own personality, and I am so happy that we have raised the most incredible amount of money and can make an even bigger change for the lives of some of the most vulnerable children across the world.”

A warm welcome to everyone who has just started supporting Children in Crisis with a monthly direct debit. And thank you so much for taking the time to talk to one of our fundraisers. Through this door to door campaign we find that we reach many more people than would otherwise know about our work and we are hoping that many more will join you in supporting some of the most forgotten children in the world.

New ‘virtual’ gifts store... coming soon! In October, Children in Crisis will be opening an online store on our website where you can buy ‘virtual’ gifts for your friends and loved ones. Gifts available will include desks, chairs, stationery, school kits, school building materials, teacher training workshops plus many more. This development of the site has been very kindly donated by our website company New Digital Partnership.

Children in Crisis Week! To commemorate Universal Children’s Day on 20th November we will be launching our very first Children in Crisis Week commencing on Monday 14th November and running throughout the week in the run up to Universal Children’s Day. We will be running a series of campaigns and events to raise awareness and muchneeded funds for our Children in Crisis’ work. Universal Children’s Day marks the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) established by the UN General Assembly on 20th November 1989.

An Evening with Mrs Moneypenny On 30th June 2011, two brilliant and original comediennes – businesswoman Julia Streets and FT columnist Mrs Moneypenny - took to the stage for one night only as part of the Sevenoaks festival, giving all profits to Children in Crisis.

Challenges What’s fun, adrenalin-filled and keeps you fit at the same time? Sign up, sign up! Here’s a list of challenging events that you, your friends or family can all get involved in. Royal Parks Half Marathon runners needed! This takes place on 9th October 2011. This unique 13.1 mile run will start in Hyde Park and continue through the glorious greens of Kensington Gardens, Green Park and St James Park.

5k Santa Run - new! Get into the Christmas Spirit early with other jolly Santas and take to the streets (yes, in a Santa suit) on Sunday 4th December 2011. You will be running around London’s picturesque Greenwich Park. The great thing about this event is that children as young as eight can take part with a parent or guardian so you could enter as a family!

You can register for any one of our events now. You will receive a pack full of fundraising tips and original ideas to help people support you. You will also get: sponsorship and pledge forms

The Death Valley Cycle Challenge - new! Death Valley National Park, Southern California Desert in Nevada, is not only the largest in the USA but arguably one of the most striking specimens of Mother Earth. This increasingly popular challenge includes five days of cycling plus one day in Las Vegas. Between 5th - 12th November 2011 you will cycle over 260 miles through a stunning landscape of canyons, creeks, valleys and over some steep climbs before finishing in style in Las Vegas. You only need to be of average fitness, bikes will be provided but you will need your own bike helmet. Perhaps this is the challenge you’ve been psyching yourself up for?

Virgin London Marathon 2012 As always the ever popular 26.2 mile marathon is the ultimate challenge you can take on for charity. Run for Children in Crisis and help us raise much-needed income for our education programmes. The next London Marathon will be held on 22nd April 2012.

your very own Children in Crisis running vest a dedicated fundraiser to provide help and advice materials such as balloons, posters or collection boxes to use in your fundraising a congratulatory certificate from Children in Crisis

For more information on the events above, call Lucy Porter on 020 7627 1040 or email lucyp@childrenincrisis.org

What kind of challenge do YOU like? We don’t always expect you to take it to the extreme, we appreciate any way you can fundraise for Children in Crisis whether it be a smaller community event, coffee mornings or getting your school or company involved. However, if you are thinking of doing something a bit more daring, read Sabine’s blog – aka Extreme Mother - on the back page for some inspiration!


Events and news Princess Beatrice’s Hat Who knew that a hat would cause such a stir? You may have heard that the famous piece of apparel worn by The Princess to the wedding of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge fetched an amazing £81,000 when she put it up for auction on eBay in May. The proceeds were shared between Children in Crisis and Unicef. Princess Beatrice commented: “I cannot believe the amazing response to the hat, it has its own personality, and I am so happy that we have raised the most incredible amount of money and can make an even bigger change for the lives of some of the most vulnerable children across the world.”

A warm welcome to everyone who has just started supporting Children in Crisis with a monthly direct debit. And thank you so much for taking the time to talk to one of our fundraisers. Through this door to door campaign we find that we reach many more people than would otherwise know about our work and we are hoping that many more will join you in supporting some of the most forgotten children in the world.

New ‘virtual’ gifts store... coming soon! In October, Children in Crisis will be opening an online store on our website where you can buy ‘virtual’ gifts for your friends and loved ones. Gifts available will include desks, chairs, stationery, school kits, school building materials, teacher training workshops plus many more. This development of the site has been very kindly donated by our website company New Digital Partnership.

Children in Crisis Week! To commemorate Universal Children’s Day on 20th November we will be launching our very first Children in Crisis Week commencing on Monday 14th November and running throughout the week in the run up to Universal Children’s Day. We will be running a series of campaigns and events to raise awareness and muchneeded funds for our Children in Crisis’ work. Universal Children’s Day marks the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) established by the UN General Assembly on 20th November 1989.

An Evening with Mrs Moneypenny On 30th June 2011, two brilliant and original comediennes – businesswoman Julia Streets and FT columnist Mrs Moneypenny - took to the stage for one night only as part of the Sevenoaks festival, giving all profits to Children in Crisis.

Challenges What’s fun, adrenalin-filled and keeps you fit at the same time? Sign up, sign up! Here’s a list of challenging events that you, your friends or family can all get involved in. Royal Parks Half Marathon runners needed! This takes place on 9th October 2011. This unique 13.1 mile run will start in Hyde Park and continue through the glorious greens of Kensington Gardens, Green Park and St James Park.

5k Santa Run - new! Get into the Christmas Spirit early with other jolly Santas and take to the streets (yes, in a Santa suit) on Sunday 4th December 2011. You will be running around London’s picturesque Greenwich Park. The great thing about this event is that children as young as eight can take part with a parent or guardian so you could enter as a family!

You can register for any one of our events now. You will receive a pack full of fundraising tips and original ideas to help people support you. You will also get: sponsorship and pledge forms

The Death Valley Cycle Challenge - new! Death Valley National Park, Southern California Desert in Nevada, is not only the largest in the USA but arguably one of the most striking specimens of Mother Earth. This increasingly popular challenge includes five days of cycling plus one day in Las Vegas. Between 5th - 12th November 2011 you will cycle over 260 miles through a stunning landscape of canyons, creeks, valleys and over some steep climbs before finishing in style in Las Vegas. You only need to be of average fitness, bikes will be provided but you will need your own bike helmet. Perhaps this is the challenge you’ve been psyching yourself up for?

Virgin London Marathon 2012 As always the ever popular 26.2 mile marathon is the ultimate challenge you can take on for charity. Run for Children in Crisis and help us raise much-needed income for our education programmes. The next London Marathon will be held on 22nd April 2012.

your very own Children in Crisis running vest a dedicated fundraiser to provide help and advice materials such as balloons, posters or collection boxes to use in your fundraising a congratulatory certificate from Children in Crisis

For more information on the events above, call Lucy Porter on 020 7627 1040 or email lucyp@childrenincrisis.org

What kind of challenge do YOU like? We don’t always expect you to take it to the extreme, we appreciate any way you can fundraise for Children in Crisis whether it be a smaller community event, coffee mornings or getting your school or company involved. However, if you are thinking of doing something a bit more daring, read Sabine’s blog – aka Extreme Mother - on the back page for some inspiration!


Summer 2011 Report