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Education for the world’s most vulnerable children

ReportS

SPRING 2010

The right to learn The girls missing out on an education


Left: Sarah Rowse visits members of the community in Eastern DRC Photo: Mark McKeown Right: A young woman concentrating during a Social Studies lesson in Sierra Leone. Here, around 61% of girls remain out of school.

Welcome

Photo: Sophie Spring

Statistics can often be bewildering, and too huge to assimilate. Take just one that, in absolute terms, 41 million girls worldwide remain out of school(1). What this means in reality is vast numbers of girls embarking on adulthood without even the most basic of ‘safety nets’ behind them: literacy. Having received a good, solid state education myself, I can not imagine being unable to write my name; read the instructions on a medicine bottle; count my change; tick the box on my ballot paper. Yet for so many girls and women within the countries in which Children in Crisis works, this will be their reality if their right to an education continues to be denied. Through our educational projects in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia, Children in Crisis is making a real and significant difference to the life chances of women and girls, but the bewildering ‘41 million’ statistic can not be ignored. I remain ever grateful for your continued support and backing, to help us help even more girls grow up with a decent ‘safety net’.

Expenditure by activity: Education Community Education  Health Education  Schools

27% 29% 44%

Thank you. Where your money goes: Programmes 68% Sarah Rowse, Head of Programmes

Children in Crisis Telephone: 206-208 Stewart’s Road, +44(0)20 7627 1040 London SW8 4UB Fax: +44(0)20 7627 1050

(1) DFID Factsheet, Girls Education, June 2009

E-mail: info@childrenincrisis.org Website: www.childrenincrisis.org

Founder and Life President: Sarah, Duchess of York.

Fundraising

31%

Governance

1%

Registered office as address. Reg Charity No. 1020488. Company No. 2815817.


Left: Sarah Rowse visits members of the community in Eastern DRC Photo: Mark McKeown Right: A young woman concentrating during a Social Studies lesson in Sierra Leone. Here, around 61% of girls remain out of school.

Welcome

Photo: Sophie Spring

Statistics can often be bewildering, and too huge to assimilate. Take just one that, in absolute terms, 41 million girls worldwide remain out of school(1). What this means in reality is vast numbers of girls embarking on adulthood without even the most basic of ‘safety nets’ behind them: literacy. Having received a good, solid state education myself, I can not imagine being unable to write my name; read the instructions on a medicine bottle; count my change; tick the box on my ballot paper. Yet for so many girls and women within the countries in which Children in Crisis works, this will be their reality if their right to an education continues to be denied. Through our educational projects in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia, Children in Crisis is making a real and significant difference to the life chances of women and girls, but the bewildering ‘41 million’ statistic can not be ignored. I remain ever grateful for your continued support and backing, to help us help even more girls grow up with a decent ‘safety net’.

Expenditure by activity: Education Community Education  Health Education  Schools

27% 29% 44%

Thank you. Where your money goes: Programmes 68% Sarah Rowse, Head of Programmes

Children in Crisis Telephone: 206-208 Stewart’s Road, +44(0)20 7627 1040 London SW8 4UB Fax: +44(0)20 7627 1050

(1) DFID Factsheet, Girls Education, June 2009

E-mail: info@childrenincrisis.org Website: www.childrenincrisis.org

Founder and Life President: Sarah, Duchess of York.

Fundraising

31%

Governance

1%

Registered office as address. Reg Charity No. 1020488. Company No. 2815817.


Country Updates Sierra Leone So far this year, 720 parents from 13 schools have completed Children in Crisis’ HIV/AIDS sensitization programme. This programme introduces the parents to the tools and techniques they can use to engage their children in the issues surrounding HIV and AIDS. One of the important aspects of this programme is an emphasis on the rights of girls and women. Training

Afghanistan on gender equality and women’s empowerment is vital if girls and women are to have the power to use their knowledge to make positive choices about their own lives. We aim to provide a further 500 parents, and 135 teachers with this training next year.

Above: A young girl taking part in a HIV/AIDS class at Goderich School Photo: Sophie Spring

Read more: www.childrenincrisis.org/sierra_leone

China Thank you to everyone who responded to our midwife training Christmas appeal. The funds raised will enable Children in Crisis to deliver a Basic Health and Midwifery training course to a further 22 young women in Nangchen County in Western China over the next two years. The value of a trained midwife to the semi nomadic communities in Nangchen County is undeniable,

where the absence of knowledge of germs, basic sanitary practices, pregnancy or childbirth is a real threat to life, both young and old. This training gives young women a sense of fulfilment, they are able to work with their communities to improve and save lives. Read more: www.childrenincrisis.org/china

We are excited to announce that we will be opening our fourth Community Education Centre in Afghanistan. Since these centres opened last year we have reached hundreds of children and young women who, thanks to your support, are gaining a basic education. Of those we have reached, 175 children have successfully graduated from the centre, 102 young

pupils attended English classes, 145 attended art classes and a further 359 children received coaching support for their school classes. Through our programmes, 218 women attending these Centres have gained vital life skills such as literacy and tailoring.

Above: Girls attend accelerated learning classes in Kabul Photo: Bethan Williams

Read more: www.childrenincrisis.org/afghanistan

Democratic Republic of Congo Above: A group of young women who have just completed their midwifery training in Nangchen County Photo: Mark McKeown

This year Children in Crisis is building two new schools in rural locations on the mid and high Plateau of South Kivu in the Democratic Republic of Congo. This will create permanent school structures and secure learning spaces, providing up to 600 children a year with the opportunity of a primary education. Alongside building these new schools we will continue with our

teacher training programme, enabling teachers to develop the skills and knowledge needed to ensure that children receive a quality education that responds to the needs of both girls and boys. Read more: www.childrenincrisis.org/ Democratic-Republic-of-Congo

Above: Mothers and grandmothers help to build their children a new school in DRC Photo: Sarah Rowse


Country Updates Sierra Leone So far this year, 720 parents from 13 schools have completed Children in Crisis’ HIV/AIDS sensitization programme. This programme introduces the parents to the tools and techniques they can use to engage their children in the issues surrounding HIV and AIDS. One of the important aspects of this programme is an emphasis on the rights of girls and women. Training

Afghanistan on gender equality and women’s empowerment is vital if girls and women are to have the power to use their knowledge to make positive choices about their own lives. We aim to provide a further 500 parents, and 135 teachers with this training next year.

Above: A young girl taking part in a HIV/AIDS class at Goderich School Photo: Sophie Spring

Read more: www.childrenincrisis.org/sierra_leone

China Thank you to everyone who responded to our midwife training Christmas appeal. The funds raised will enable Children in Crisis to deliver a Basic Health and Midwifery training course to a further 22 young women in Nangchen County in Western China over the next two years. The value of a trained midwife to the semi nomadic communities in Nangchen County is undeniable,

where the absence of knowledge of germs, basic sanitary practices, pregnancy or childbirth is a real threat to life, both young and old. This training gives young women a sense of fulfilment, they are able to work with their communities to improve and save lives. Read more: www.childrenincrisis.org/china

We are excited to announce that we will be opening our fourth Community Education Centre in Afghanistan. Since these centres opened last year we have reached hundreds of children and young women who, thanks to your support, are gaining a basic education. Of those we have reached, 175 children have successfully graduated from the centre, 102 young

pupils attended English classes, 145 attended art classes and a further 359 children received coaching support for their school classes. Through our programmes, 218 women attending these Centres have gained vital life skills such as literacy and tailoring.

Above: Girls attend accelerated learning classes in Kabul Photo: Bethan Williams

Read more: www.childrenincrisis.org/afghanistan

Democratic Republic of Congo Above: A group of young women who have just completed their midwifery training in Nangchen County Photo: Mark McKeown

This year Children in Crisis is building two new schools in rural locations on the mid and high Plateau of South Kivu in the Democratic Republic of Congo. This will create permanent school structures and secure learning spaces, providing up to 600 children a year with the opportunity of a primary education. Alongside building these new schools we will continue with our

teacher training programme, enabling teachers to develop the skills and knowledge needed to ensure that children receive a quality education that responds to the needs of both girls and boys. Read more: www.childrenincrisis.org/ Democratic-Republic-of-Congo

Above: Mothers and grandmothers help to build their children a new school in DRC Photo: Sarah Rowse


There are estimated to be nearly twice as many girls out of school compared with boys in the Democratic Republic of Congo

One such girl is Nabinda.

Nabinda is 10 years old. Her family live in the village of Rugabano, high up in the mountains of Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Nabinda considers herself very lucky as her parents have allowed her, unlike many other girls from her village to attend the Primary School in Minembwe, a three hour hike from her home. She is exceptionally bright. Her teacher even believes that she could be top of the class. However, every day Nabinda will bring to school her three year old brother and six month old baby sister, for whom she is solely responsible. Her mother and father must work to cultivate the family’s fields. Nabinda sits near the classroom door so that she can keep an eye on her three year old brother who plays in the dust outside. During the dry season, Nabinda’s baby sister sleeps under her feet on the ground of the classroom. During the wet season, when the classroom is often flooded, the child is strapped to her back. If the little girl cries during lesson times, Nabinda must take her outside so as not to interrupt her classmates from their studies. Twenty-two children in Nabinda’s school also bring younger brothers and sisters to class. The overwhelming majority of these ‘child carers’ are girls. Disruption is inevitable for all the students, but for those who are the full time carers of younger siblings, learning anything is an uphill struggle.

“We don’t like our children to be like us. With thanks to Children in Crisis we are helping our girls to be educated. Uneducated widows have struggled to survive in the war. It is for this reason that we want our girls to be educated, so that we are able to better survive.” (Mugendererwa Ezekiel, Marungu village, DRC)

Children in Crisis is working to improve the lives of children like Nabinda. In January 2007 we launched a programme in the South Kivu High Plateau, not only training primary school teachers, but also working with families to encourage them to

take girls’ education more seriously and to raise awareness about child rights and the importance of education to allow children like Nabinda to fulfil their potential. This series of community gatherings aims to raise awareness– on a range of themes including the importance of educating girls and the need to prevent discrimination against them. The programme has made a major contribution to an increase in the enrolment of girls in school within the district.

Far left: Many children like Nabinda walk three hours with their younger siblings to attend school in Minembwe This page: A community meeting in Minembwe aiming to raise awareness of the need for girls’ education Photo: Sarah Rowse

Read More www.childrenincrisis.org/ Democratic-Republic-of-Congo Donate www.childrenincrisis.org/donate-now Get Involved www.childrenincrisis.org/get-involved (2) DFID Factsheet, Girls Education, June 2009


There are estimated to be nearly twice as many girls out of school compared with boys in the Democratic Republic of Congo

One such girl is Nabinda.

Nabinda is 10 years old. Her family live in the village of Rugabano, high up in the mountains of Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Nabinda considers herself very lucky as her parents have allowed her, unlike many other girls from her village to attend the Primary School in Minembwe, a three hour hike from her home. She is exceptionally bright. Her teacher even believes that she could be top of the class. However, every day Nabinda will bring to school her three year old brother and six month old baby sister, for whom she is solely responsible. Her mother and father must work to cultivate the family’s fields. Nabinda sits near the classroom door so that she can keep an eye on her three year old brother who plays in the dust outside. During the dry season, Nabinda’s baby sister sleeps under her feet on the ground of the classroom. During the wet season, when the classroom is often flooded, the child is strapped to her back. If the little girl cries during lesson times, Nabinda must take her outside so as not to interrupt her classmates from their studies. Twenty-two children in Nabinda’s school also bring younger brothers and sisters to class. The overwhelming majority of these ‘child carers’ are girls. Disruption is inevitable for all the students, but for those who are the full time carers of younger siblings, learning anything is an uphill struggle.

“We don’t like our children to be like us. With thanks to Children in Crisis we are helping our girls to be educated. Uneducated widows have struggled to survive in the war. It is for this reason that we want our girls to be educated, so that we are able to better survive.” (Mugendererwa Ezekiel, Marungu village, DRC)

Children in Crisis is working to improve the lives of children like Nabinda. In January 2007 we launched a programme in the South Kivu High Plateau, not only training primary school teachers, but also working with families to encourage them to

take girls’ education more seriously and to raise awareness about child rights and the importance of education to allow children like Nabinda to fulfil their potential. This series of community gatherings aims to raise awareness– on a range of themes including the importance of educating girls and the need to prevent discrimination against them. The programme has made a major contribution to an increase in the enrolment of girls in school within the district.

Far left: Many children like Nabinda walk three hours with their younger siblings to attend school in Minembwe This page: A community meeting in Minembwe aiming to raise awareness of the need for girls’ education Photo: Sarah Rowse

Read More www.childrenincrisis.org/ Democratic-Republic-of-Congo Donate www.childrenincrisis.org/donate-now Get Involved www.childrenincrisis.org/get-involved (2) DFID Factsheet, Girls Education, June 2009


Women speak out about education

‘I was the eldest of my house. At 9 years, my father used to send me to Bijombo which was 2-days walk away to buy salt for the cows. When my mother was in the field, I was caring for my younger brothers and sisters. At 14 years, I got married. I had no education. After giving birth to three of my children my husband died. The care for my children was then all on my head. I struggled.’ Zarah, Minembwe Village

More girls in school

‘I want to talk about women and the difficulties we face. Because of early marriage many of us haven’t completed our education and we are illiterate. I’d like so much to be taught.’ Rachael, Mishashu Village

They are first to be taken out of school to care for sick family members, the ones who suffer at the hands of inequality, and the ones who fall behind due to adverse cultural beliefs and limited access to schools. Girls miss out on education the most. When we educate girls, they gain the learning and confidence which is so vital

‘Telling the truth, girls don’t have equal rights. Out of my 7 children, the boys have been given priority. The girls have to stay here and get early marriage. We are trying to persuade our husbands to change, but it’s difficult for us.’ Oriya, Mishashu Village

to their well-being and power of choice. Educated women are more likely to delay marriage and have fewer, healthier babies. They earn more money and are far more likely to send their own children to school. When you educate a girl, you educate families, villages and societies.

‘90% of the women in this room don’t know how to read or write. We got married at 13, 14 and 15 years old. We don’t want our girls to stay at home with us suffering and working the fields.’ Sifa, Minembwe Village

In Africa, the child of an educated mother more is likely to live beyond age five(3) (3) DFID Factsheet, Girls Education, June 2009


Women speak out about education

‘I was the eldest of my house. At 9 years, my father used to send me to Bijombo which was 2-days walk away to buy salt for the cows. When my mother was in the field, I was caring for my younger brothers and sisters. At 14 years, I got married. I had no education. After giving birth to three of my children my husband died. The care for my children was then all on my head. I struggled.’ Zarah, Minembwe Village

More girls in school

‘I want to talk about women and the difficulties we face. Because of early marriage many of us haven’t completed our education and we are illiterate. I’d like so much to be taught.’ Rachael, Mishashu Village

They are first to be taken out of school to care for sick family members, the ones who suffer at the hands of inequality, and the ones who fall behind due to adverse cultural beliefs and limited access to schools. Girls miss out on education the most. When we educate girls, they gain the learning and confidence which is so vital

‘Telling the truth, girls don’t have equal rights. Out of my 7 children, the boys have been given priority. The girls have to stay here and get early marriage. We are trying to persuade our husbands to change, but it’s difficult for us.’ Oriya, Mishashu Village

to their well-being and power of choice. Educated women are more likely to delay marriage and have fewer, healthier babies. They earn more money and are far more likely to send their own children to school. When you educate a girl, you educate families, villages and societies.

‘90% of the women in this room don’t know how to read or write. We got married at 13, 14 and 15 years old. We don’t want our girls to stay at home with us suffering and working the fields.’ Sifa, Minembwe Village

In Africa, the child of an educated mother more is likely to live beyond age five(3) (3) DFID Factsheet, Girls Education, June 2009


Liberia

Becky’s update

Six months ago, a vocational training centre (VTC) was opened in Cestos City in Liberia; it was the first of its kind built by Children in Crisis. It was also the first time the women of Cestos City had been given the opportunity to learn valuable life lessons and to better their lives. This is a significant move away from the traditional routine whereby girls stay at home to care for their younger siblings and support their family.

Read more: www.childrenincrisis.org/Liberia Donate: www.childrenincrisis.org/donate-now Get involved: www.childrenincrisis.org/get-involved

My visit six months after the opening of the Vocational Training Centre was inspiring; the centre has become the social and educational heart of Cestos City for many of the towns’ women. The commitment of the women attending tailoring, pastry or hairdressing classes, and their sense of focus and pride in their achievements has created a vibrant and positive atmosphere throughout the centre. It has never been easy for these women. Rivercess County was

seriously hit by the 1990-2005 civil crisis in Liberia. As well as mass killing, raping and looting in the area, there was large scale displacement of people and vast destruction of the education and social services infrastructure. For most of these women, the Vocational Training Centre is their first experience of a learning environment. However, over the last six months, the centre has become not only a place of learning, but one where the 140 women who are presently

attending classes are provided with guidance, support and friendship. A critical part of this development has been the opening of a crèche, which provides a secure environment for children under five, whilst their mothers attend lessons. As the first courses draw to a close, the women at the Vocational Training Centre now speak a lot of ambitions for their future. They also speak of their hopes and aspirations for the development of

the centre: a library for their older children to study in after school whilst they continue with their classes, a night school for those who have completed their adult literacy class and an increase in enrolment to 300 students. The optimism and courage of these women provides Children in Crisis with the hope that this Vocational Training Centre will continue to develop and improve the lives of more women and their families in Rivercess County.

Above: Becky Midlane, CIC programme manager for Liberia, with children outside the Vocational Training Centre in Rivercess, Liberia Photo: Eleanor Cozens


Liberia

Becky’s update

Six months ago, a vocational training centre (VTC) was opened in Cestos City in Liberia; it was the first of its kind built by Children in Crisis. It was also the first time the women of Cestos City had been given the opportunity to learn valuable life lessons and to better their lives. This is a significant move away from the traditional routine whereby girls stay at home to care for their younger siblings and support their family.

Read more: www.childrenincrisis.org/Liberia Donate: www.childrenincrisis.org/donate-now Get involved: www.childrenincrisis.org/get-involved

My visit six months after the opening of the Vocational Training Centre was inspiring; the centre has become the social and educational heart of Cestos City for many of the towns’ women. The commitment of the women attending tailoring, pastry or hairdressing classes, and their sense of focus and pride in their achievements has created a vibrant and positive atmosphere throughout the centre. It has never been easy for these women. Rivercess County was

seriously hit by the 1990-2005 civil crisis in Liberia. As well as mass killing, raping and looting in the area, there was large scale displacement of people and vast destruction of the education and social services infrastructure. For most of these women, the Vocational Training Centre is their first experience of a learning environment. However, over the last six months, the centre has become not only a place of learning, but one where the 140 women who are presently

attending classes are provided with guidance, support and friendship. A critical part of this development has been the opening of a crèche, which provides a secure environment for children under five, whilst their mothers attend lessons. As the first courses draw to a close, the women at the Vocational Training Centre now speak a lot of ambitions for their future. They also speak of their hopes and aspirations for the development of

the centre: a library for their older children to study in after school whilst they continue with their classes, a night school for those who have completed their adult literacy class and an increase in enrolment to 300 students. The optimism and courage of these women provides Children in Crisis with the hope that this Vocational Training Centre will continue to develop and improve the lives of more women and their families in Rivercess County.

Above: Becky Midlane, CIC programme manager for Liberia, with children outside the Vocational Training Centre in Rivercess, Liberia Photo: Eleanor Cozens


Yasmine

At 19 years old, Yasmine struggles to write her own name. She also has two young children whom she is supporting on her own. The ‘babyfather’ left soon after the birth of Yasmine’s second child. Yasmine was born into war, and has only known a few years of peace in Liberia. Her schooling was limited during the war years, and stopped entirely as soon as she became pregnant with her first child. Every morning, Yasmine is always the first to arrive at the centre. She is presently attending both an

Martha

adult literacy and tailoring class. Yasmine is determined to learn and improve both her life and the lives of her young children. In a recent maths test, she was marked 9 out of 10, and was positively overflowing with pride with her achievement: ‘I can write good now. I want to learn more. When I finish here, I will be a good tailor. This will make me a better mother.’ In this statement Yasmine means better at being able to provide for her children, as from what has been observed it seemed clear that she is a very loving mother.

Above: Yasmine proudly showing the stitches she had learnt on the machine since starting at the VTC Photo: Sarah Rowse Right: Martha enjoys her tailoring class at the Rivercess Vocational Training Centre. She and several classmates hope to set up their own tailoring shop in Cestos City in the future. Photo: Eleanor Cozens

Martha lives in Cestos City with her husband, who works as a fisherman, and their six children. Although Martha was enrolled in school, she dropped out before she was eight years old due to the cost of schooling being too great for her parents to afford. At the opening of the Vocational Training Centre, Martha was the first in line to sign up for tailoring classes. The last six months training have given Martha confidence and determination for the future: “Now I am able to make something presentable for myself and my children and other people. Now I can

sew my own clothes. When I have the materials I can put it together for my little daughter. I’m here to help my family. Before I was at home doing nothing, I knew nothing, but now I am proud because I can make my clothes for me and others” After her tailoring course finishes Martha hopes to share a sewing machine with several other women from her class. She hopes they will be able to earn enough money to buy their own machines and set up a tailoring shop in Cestos City: “We want to continue because we haven’t learnt it all yet”.


Yasmine

At 19 years old, Yasmine struggles to write her own name. She also has two young children whom she is supporting on her own. The ‘babyfather’ left soon after the birth of Yasmine’s second child. Yasmine was born into war, and has only known a few years of peace in Liberia. Her schooling was limited during the war years, and stopped entirely as soon as she became pregnant with her first child. Every morning, Yasmine is always the first to arrive at the centre. She is presently attending both an

Martha

adult literacy and tailoring class. Yasmine is determined to learn and improve both her life and the lives of her young children. In a recent maths test, she was marked 9 out of 10, and was positively overflowing with pride with her achievement: ‘I can write good now. I want to learn more. When I finish here, I will be a good tailor. This will make me a better mother.’ In this statement Yasmine means better at being able to provide for her children, as from what has been observed it seemed clear that she is a very loving mother.

Above: Yasmine proudly showing the stitches she had learnt on the machine since starting at the VTC Photo: Sarah Rowse Right: Martha enjoys her tailoring class at the Rivercess Vocational Training Centre. She and several classmates hope to set up their own tailoring shop in Cestos City in the future. Photo: Eleanor Cozens

Martha lives in Cestos City with her husband, who works as a fisherman, and their six children. Although Martha was enrolled in school, she dropped out before she was eight years old due to the cost of schooling being too great for her parents to afford. At the opening of the Vocational Training Centre, Martha was the first in line to sign up for tailoring classes. The last six months training have given Martha confidence and determination for the future: “Now I am able to make something presentable for myself and my children and other people. Now I can

sew my own clothes. When I have the materials I can put it together for my little daughter. I’m here to help my family. Before I was at home doing nothing, I knew nothing, but now I am proud because I can make my clothes for me and others” After her tailoring course finishes Martha hopes to share a sewing machine with several other women from her class. She hopes they will be able to earn enough money to buy their own machines and set up a tailoring shop in Cestos City: “We want to continue because we haven’t learnt it all yet”.


What you can do...

Raising funds for Children in Crisis does not have to get you in a sweat, unless you are interested in running a marathon or climbing Mount Kilimanjaro… ‘Fun-raisin’ is a really great way to get involved with our charity, have some fun and make a real contribution to the lives of some of the world’s most vulnerable children. We know that whatever you do to raise vital funds for Children in Crisis, you will be changing the world for a child whose life has been devastated by conflict. You will be giving that child hope for the future. Read More www.childrenincrisis.org/get-involved

Photo: Two supporters embrace as they take on the ultimate challenge to climb Mount Kilimanjaro Photo: Mark McKeown

We know that you will be full of ideas for how YOU can support and fundraise for Children in Crisis, but here is just a few our team came up with: Paul’s idea: Organise a ‘Dads v Lads’ football game (or cricket game in the summer) in your local park and get each player to put in £5 to join the game.

Joe’s idea: Make your own charitable pint glass and enjoy a week of detoxing whilst donating the cost of your daily pint to charity.

Esther’s idea: For all you frugal fashionistas out there, why not organise a ‘swishing’ shindig. Charge entry to all your friends to swap gorgeous clothes and party at the same time.

Lucy’s idea: Is Facebook part of your essential daily routine? Why don’t you persuade ten friends to join our FB group and then donate £10 each through our website?

And from one of our supporters, Ben’s idea: Be a true philanthropist and ask your friends and family to give to charity instead of to you at your next birthday bash!

Got your own fundraising ideas… Why not pitch them to us on Twitter or Facebook? If you have any questions about fundraising for Children in Crisis, please get in touch. By email to:events@childrenincrisis.org or by phone on 020 7627 1040.

Anna’s idea: With only two months until the World Cup, take a gamble and Facebook organise a sweep stake www.facebook.com/childrenincrisis in your office. Split the Twitter winnings between the www.twitter.com/childrencrisis final man standing and Get Involved Children in Crisis! www.childrenincrisis.org/get-involved

Challenge yourself Left: Laura Roth and Katie Pinnes passing the 22 mile mark of the London Marathon 2009. Photo: James Hickman

Children in Crisis have a number of places in one London’s hottest new running events, the Royal Parks Half  Marathon. This unique and memorable 13.1 mile challenge will take the runner on a whirlwind sightseeing tour of some of London’s most famous landmarks. Or why not go for the full whammy – sign up for next years London Marathon on 4th May 2010... Or why not just get in touch with the team at Children in Crisis straight off, and you could take part in the world’s most famous marathon with one of our charity places.

Ready? Right then, to sign up for the ultimate test of stamina, or to find out how YOU can get involved with Children in Crisis, visit our website or contact Lucy in our Challenge and Events team on 020 7627 1040. Tick here if you would like more information on: Running the Royal Parks Half Marathon Running the London Marathon Fundraising for Children in Crisis How your company can support us How to hold your own event for Children in Crisis

INCLUDES 3mm BLEED. WHITE AREA AND MAGENTA INSTRUCTIONS DO NOT PRINT.


What you can do...

Raising funds for Children in Crisis does not have to get you in a sweat, unless you are interested in running a marathon or climbing Mount Kilimanjaro… ‘Fun-raisin’ is a really great way to get involved with our charity, have some fun and make a real contribution to the lives of some of the world’s most vulnerable children. We know that whatever you do to raise vital funds for Children in Crisis, you will be changing the world for a child whose life has been devastated by conflict. You will be giving that child hope for the future. Read More www.childrenincrisis.org/get-involved

Photo: Two supporters embrace as they take on the ultimate challenge to climb Mount Kilimanjaro Photo: Mark McKeown

We know that you will be full of ideas for how YOU can support and fundraise for Children in Crisis, but here is just a few our team came up with: Paul’s idea: Organise a ‘Dads v Lads’ football game (or cricket game in the summer) in your local park and get each player to put in £5 to join the game.

Joe’s idea: Make your own charitable pint glass and enjoy a week of detoxing whilst donating the cost of your daily pint to charity.

Esther’s idea: For all you frugal fashionistas out there, why not organise a ‘swishing’ shindig. Charge entry to all your friends to swap gorgeous clothes and party at the same time.

Lucy’s idea: Is Facebook part of your essential daily routine? Why don’t you persuade ten friends to join our FB group and then donate £10 each through our website?

And from one of our supporters, Ben’s idea: Be a true philanthropist and ask your friends and family to give to charity instead of to you at your next birthday bash!

Got your own fundraising ideas… Why not pitch them to us on Twitter or Facebook? If you have any questions about fundraising for Children in Crisis, please get in touch. By email to:events@childrenincrisis.org or by phone on 020 7627 1040.

Anna’s idea: With only two months until the World Cup, take a gamble and Facebook organise a sweep stake www.facebook.com/childrenincrisis in your office. Split the Twitter winnings between the www.twitter.com/childrencrisis final man standing and Get Involved Children in Crisis! www.childrenincrisis.org/get-involved

Challenge yourself Left: Laura Roth and Katie Pinnes passing the 22 mile mark of the London Marathon 2009. Photo: James Hickman

Children in Crisis have a number of places in one London’s hottest new running events, the Royal Parks Half  Marathon. This unique and memorable 13.1 mile challenge will take the runner on a whirlwind sightseeing tour of some of London’s most famous landmarks. Or why not go for the full whammy – sign up for next years London Marathon on 4th May 2010... Or why not just get in touch with the team at Children in Crisis straight off, and you could take part in the world’s most famous marathon with one of our charity places.

Ready? Right then, to sign up for the ultimate test of stamina, or to find out how YOU can get involved with Children in Crisis, visit our website or contact Lucy in our Challenge and Events team on 020 7627 1040. Tick here if you would like more information on: Running the Royal Parks Half Marathon Running the London Marathon Fundraising for Children in Crisis How your company can support us How to hold your own event for Children in Crisis

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I would like to help Children in Crisis Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms/Other:

Paris dash and more for Children in Crisis

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A fearless team from Barclays Capital chose to support Children in Crisis in the ultimate challenge of physical and mental strength – The Enduro Challenge.  The challenge held over the August Bank Holiday weekend in 2009 saw six teams from the city battle it out in a triathlon relay race from London to Paris. The race itself consisted of relay teams of six people running 150km to Dover, swimming 40km from Dover to Calais and then cycling 300km from Calais to the Eiffel Tower and the quickest team won. The Barclays Capital team came a close second behind Credit Suisse,

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This form can be returned to the FREEPOST address: FREEPOST RLXH-JJAR-RYSG, Children in Crisis, 206-208 Stewart’s Road, London SW8 4UB You can also donate online at: www.childrenincrisis.org I would like to donate

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Thank you Barclays Capital for your support! Get Involved www.childrenincrisis.org/companies

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The Barclays Capital team complete the Enduro Challenge in front of the famous Eiffel Tower

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Since the challenge, Barclays Capital decided to top-up the amount raised so that we can build a new school in Liberia. Construction will begin in River Cess County in autumn this year and will start accepting pupils in September 2011. 300 more children in River Cess will soon have a fully functional school to go to with properly trained teachers.

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Photo: Caroline Barnes

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Make your donation worth more! Please tick here if you want Children in Crisis to claim the tax* on all donations you have

made for the four years prior to this year, (but no earlier than 6/4/2006) and on any donation you make in the future until you notify us otherwise. You must also provide name and address details above for your declaration to be valid. *You must pay an amount of income tax and/or capital gains tax equal to the amount Children in Crisis will reclaim on your donation, 25p for every £1 you donate).

Education for the world’s most vulnerable children

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but were winners in our eyes. The team raised an amazing £16,600 for our work through a variety of different fundraising activities.

Spring 2010 Report  

Our Spring 2010 report.

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