Page 1

A chance to learn, a chance in life

REPORTS

AUTUMN 2012

It’s International Literacy Day! 8th September 2012

Kambia, Sierra Leone


Welcome

I am humbled and filled with admiration for our volunteers, and those putting themselves forward to volunteer. For example, in Maseba, a village in Kambia, Sierra Leone, I watched a young man, Foday taking part in one of our training sessions. Foday was being trained as a village facilitator. He cared deeply about the future of the village and its children – you could tell from his engaged style. I had noticed Foday earlier in the week. He was helping out another volunteer who was managing two young twins as well as the training and all her chores at home. He was supporting her by tenderly cradling the twins so they would be quiet and not disturb the training. Foday would shortly be leading the whole village in mapping levels of poverty and well-being to identify the most pressing problems needing to be solved. Even trickier,

he would be trying to persuade people to put their time and resources into solving problems themselves, as a village. Foday already played an indispensable role in the village, gathering children to walk to school and keeping them safe on their journey there. However, there is a sad footnote to the tale about Foday. A few days before I left, he was taken ill and despite our efforts and those of his family he died within days. I can hardly imagine what the loss to his family and village must be – his life merely brushed against us, and yet we feel the hole. I thought how unrecognised people like Foday are, and how many Fodays there must be keeping the world together.

Koy Thomson Chief Executive, Children in Crisis

A message from Sarah, Duchess of York This July I was very sad to miss out on a visit to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) to see some of the excellent work being done by Children in Crisis and organisations at the forefront of tackling violence against women. I am humbled by all the work being done in such hostile environments, especially around girls’ and women’s education. Images of women in the DRC carrying heavy stones precariously balanced on their heads to serve as school foundations have been a continual inspiration for me. I’m sure you too will find the efforts of these women inspiring and join me in commending the hard work being

Children in Crisis 206-208 Stewart’s Road London SW8 4UB 2

Telephone +44 (0)20 7627 1040 Fax +44 (0)20 7627 1050

done by Children in Crisis and their local partners in DRC, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Afghanistan.

September 8th is the International Literacy Day! Please make a donation today to support the work we do to improve children’s literacy. Thank you!

Thank you so much for your continued support of Children in Crisis, it means so much to the people in the countries we help.

E-mail info@childrenincrisis.org Website www.childrenincrisis.org

Sarah, Duchess of York Founder and Life President of Children in Crisis

Founder and Life President Sarah, Duchess of York

Registered office as address UK Reg Charity No. 1020488 Company No. 2815817

Children in Crisis Our mission Where resources are few, where education is needed to heal the nation, and where it is too remote for others, our aim is to support children to read, write, think, pursue their life goals and contribute positively to their communities.

Where your money goes: Programmes

75%

Fundraising

24%

Governance

1% 3


Welcome

I am humbled and filled with admiration for our volunteers, and those putting themselves forward to volunteer. For example, in Maseba, a village in Kambia, Sierra Leone, I watched a young man, Foday taking part in one of our training sessions. Foday was being trained as a village facilitator. He cared deeply about the future of the village and its children – you could tell from his engaged style. I had noticed Foday earlier in the week. He was helping out another volunteer who was managing two young twins as well as the training and all her chores at home. He was supporting her by tenderly cradling the twins so they would be quiet and not disturb the training. Foday would shortly be leading the whole village in mapping levels of poverty and well-being to identify the most pressing problems needing to be solved. Even trickier,

he would be trying to persuade people to put their time and resources into solving problems themselves, as a village. Foday already played an indispensable role in the village, gathering children to walk to school and keeping them safe on their journey there. However, there is a sad footnote to the tale about Foday. A few days before I left, he was taken ill and despite our efforts and those of his family he died within days. I can hardly imagine what the loss to his family and village must be – his life merely brushed against us, and yet we feel the hole. I thought how unrecognised people like Foday are, and how many Fodays there must be keeping the world together.

Koy Thomson Chief Executive, Children in Crisis

A message from Sarah, Duchess of York This July I was very sad to miss out on a visit to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) to see some of the excellent work being done by Children in Crisis and organisations at the forefront of tackling violence against women. I am humbled by all the work being done in such hostile environments, especially around girls’ and women’s education. Images of women in the DRC carrying heavy stones precariously balanced on their heads to serve as school foundations have been a continual inspiration for me. I’m sure you too will find the efforts of these women inspiring and join me in commending the hard work being

Children in Crisis 206-208 Stewart’s Road London SW8 4UB 2

Telephone +44 (0)20 7627 1040 Fax +44 (0)20 7627 1050

done by Children in Crisis and their local partners in DRC, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Afghanistan.

September 8th is the International Literacy Day! Please make a donation today to support the work we do to improve children’s literacy. Thank you!

Thank you so much for your continued support of Children in Crisis, it means so much to the people in the countries we help.

E-mail info@childrenincrisis.org Website www.childrenincrisis.org

Sarah, Duchess of York Founder and Life President of Children in Crisis

Founder and Life President Sarah, Duchess of York

Registered office as address UK Reg Charity No. 1020488 Company No. 2815817

Children in Crisis Our mission Where resources are few, where education is needed to heal the nation, and where it is too remote for others, our aim is to support children to read, write, think, pursue their life goals and contribute positively to their communities.

Where your money goes: Programmes

75%

Fundraising

24%

Governance

1% 3


Reporting from the field Bethan’s commute… Last time I visited Afghanistan, Kabul was covered in a layer of thick snow in the midst of the coldest winter for 20 years. At that stage the education team was just starting the long process of finding accommodation for our 5 new community based education centres (CBECs). From the windows of the office the snow gave the city a magical feel. But I was well aware of the effort being put in by the team heading out each day in the snow to canvass new areas and assess their suitability for centres. This was even more important than normal since these centres would be where we set up for a new three-year project. When I returned to Kabul this summer to review the progress so far on our new three year CBEC programme, I was amazed by what I saw. The Country Director told me we were going to take the long way around to the first centre so that I could drive the way the teachers walk each morning, 25 minutes after leaving the main road we arrived at the centre. Similarly at the second centre,

we climbed up and up the side of one of the mountains and reached the centre right at the top. From up there, the teachers proudly pointed out all the houses where the children walked from. I asked them about their commute and the teachers told me “the villagers are happy to have us here so we’re happy to be here”. Happy seems to be an understatement, even though this is part of a capital city of a country that has received huge amounts of aid, the community have never worked with an NGO before. These are Kabul’s forgotten communities and I’m proud that our staff could find them even in the midst of winter. As I squeezed myself onto the Central Line in London this morning I thought about the Children in Crisis teachers setting out on their daily commute up a mountain and once again felt grateful for the commitment and dedication of my Afghan colleagues. To read more stories straight from the field, follow our blog! www.childrenincrisis.org/blog

The CBEC 2 building in Tani Kot, District 7, Kabul. The centres are housed within basic community buildings in poorer, more isolated areas of the city.

Sediq is one of the CBEC teachers

Burundi The development phase of our new country programme in Burundi is well underway. This new programme will enable Batwa parents to support their children to go to and stay in primary school. We will support our local partner, Famille Maintenant (FAMA), in improving the living conditions of 88 Batwa families living in Muyinga Province, that’s 158 parents and their 345 children! People of the Batwa tribe have historically suffered discrimination in Burundi, with a lack of educational and work opportunities leading to terrible levels of poverty.

Our programme will seek to help the Batwa in a number of ways. To begin with, shelter and poor living conditions will be addressed with on-the-job training in building houses. The programme will of course provide school equipment and uniforms for Batwa school children. Agricultural development with training in cultivation methods should also improve food security on the 7 ½ ha of land already secured by FAMA to protect the livelihood of this small Batwa community.

Liberia - branching out, reaching out The Vocational Training Centre (VTC) in River Cess is going from strength to strength. Recent follow up visits to 2010 and 2011 graduates showed that many have gone on to set up their own businesses and feel better equipped now to deal with difficult, unexpected and often expensive circumstances, such as family members getting ill. More regular income, but also better money management and saving plans, have all contributed to improved financial stability.

introducing soap making, bicycle repair and vegetable gardening. Outreach courses have also been launched in the remote district of Moweh to benefit women who could not afford time away from home and the cost of regular trips to the VTC, ensuring that this valuable training reaches those who need it most.

Outreach pastry-making courses in Liberia

To build on the success of last year’s pastry, tailoring and hairdressing courses, new ones are starting at the Centre this September. Following a market analysis conducted in the spring, the team in River Cess is Children in Crisis protects and educates children facing the toughest hardships in countries affected by conflict or political instability.

4

To support our education and child protection programmes please return your donation form today or donate online.

5


Reporting from the field Bethan’s commute… Last time I visited Afghanistan, Kabul was covered in a layer of thick snow in the midst of the coldest winter for 20 years. At that stage the education team was just starting the long process of finding accommodation for our 5 new community based education centres (CBECs). From the windows of the office the snow gave the city a magical feel. But I was well aware of the effort being put in by the team heading out each day in the snow to canvass new areas and assess their suitability for centres. This was even more important than normal since these centres would be where we set up for a new three-year project. When I returned to Kabul this summer to review the progress so far on our new three year CBEC programme, I was amazed by what I saw. The Country Director told me we were going to take the long way around to the first centre so that I could drive the way the teachers walk each morning, 25 minutes after leaving the main road we arrived at the centre. Similarly at the second centre,

we climbed up and up the side of one of the mountains and reached the centre right at the top. From up there, the teachers proudly pointed out all the houses where the children walked from. I asked them about their commute and the teachers told me “the villagers are happy to have us here so we’re happy to be here”. Happy seems to be an understatement, even though this is part of a capital city of a country that has received huge amounts of aid, the community have never worked with an NGO before. These are Kabul’s forgotten communities and I’m proud that our staff could find them even in the midst of winter. As I squeezed myself onto the Central Line in London this morning I thought about the Children in Crisis teachers setting out on their daily commute up a mountain and once again felt grateful for the commitment and dedication of my Afghan colleagues. To read more stories straight from the field, follow our blog! www.childrenincrisis.org/blog

The CBEC 2 building in Tani Kot, District 7, Kabul. The centres are housed within basic community buildings in poorer, more isolated areas of the city.

Sediq is one of the CBEC teachers

Burundi The development phase of our new country programme in Burundi is well underway. This new programme will enable Batwa parents to support their children to go to and stay in primary school. We will support our local partner, Famille Maintenant (FAMA), in improving the living conditions of 88 Batwa families living in Muyinga Province, that’s 158 parents and their 345 children! People of the Batwa tribe have historically suffered discrimination in Burundi, with a lack of educational and work opportunities leading to terrible levels of poverty.

Our programme will seek to help the Batwa in a number of ways. To begin with, shelter and poor living conditions will be addressed with on-the-job training in building houses. The programme will of course provide school equipment and uniforms for Batwa school children. Agricultural development with training in cultivation methods should also improve food security on the 7 ½ ha of land already secured by FAMA to protect the livelihood of this small Batwa community.

Liberia - branching out, reaching out The Vocational Training Centre (VTC) in River Cess is going from strength to strength. Recent follow up visits to 2010 and 2011 graduates showed that many have gone on to set up their own businesses and feel better equipped now to deal with difficult, unexpected and often expensive circumstances, such as family members getting ill. More regular income, but also better money management and saving plans, have all contributed to improved financial stability.

introducing soap making, bicycle repair and vegetable gardening. Outreach courses have also been launched in the remote district of Moweh to benefit women who could not afford time away from home and the cost of regular trips to the VTC, ensuring that this valuable training reaches those who need it most.

Outreach pastry-making courses in Liberia

To build on the success of last year’s pastry, tailoring and hairdressing courses, new ones are starting at the Centre this September. Following a market analysis conducted in the spring, the team in River Cess is Children in Crisis protects and educates children facing the toughest hardships in countries affected by conflict or political instability.

4

To support our education and child protection programmes please return your donation form today or donate online.

5


The work of Children in Crisis on this project has clearly contributed to putting social work ‘on the map’ in Afghanistan and has been positively received by most government, community-level religious and traditional authorities. External evaluation, July 2011.

Afghanistan: Child Rights Our Social Worker Training Programme in Afghanistan continues to be well regarded by all professionals involved in the care of children. As a result of our excellent reputation in the field, the EU has given Children in Crisis the responsibility to conduct an assessment of the quality of care received by children in orphanages. An agreement has now been signed with the Ministry of Labour, Social Affairs, Martyrs and the Disabled (MoLSAMD) to conduct this important research in 6 provinces; Herat, Badakhshan, Nanghar, Kabul, Kandahar and Ghazni. The rapid growth in institutional care of children in Afghanistan is indeed alarming. Since 2008, the number of public and private orphanages has increased from 30 to 70. This increase is contrary to Government policy. However, poverty stricken families affected by the on-going conflict continue to regard residential care as the only means to provide 6

their children with a decent education. Sarah Rowse, Programme Director says: “We have always known that this would be a challenging assessment to undertake given the many vested interests at stake in maintaining the status quo of orphanage and institutional care of children. The team have already encountered resistance at the launch events from the directors of private orphanages. It is extremely telling that in Jalalabad, the director of the state orphanage welcomed the assessment but stated that the researchers would not be able to conduct activities for three months from June, since the orphanages would be closed (in line with school holidays in this district) and all the children sent home. It is a curious definition of an orphanage…” Hopefully this research will contribute to reversing the trend and will help advocate for increased support to smaller scale and family-based alternatives.

A boy who had previously been out of school, now happily settled in one of the 5 community based education centres around Kabul.

Children in Crisis protects and educates children facing the toughest hardships in countries affected by conflict or political instability.

To support our education and child protection programmes please return your donation form today or donate online.

7


The work of Children in Crisis on this project has clearly contributed to putting social work ‘on the map’ in Afghanistan and has been positively received by most government, community-level religious and traditional authorities. External evaluation, July 2011.

Afghanistan: Child Rights Our Social Worker Training Programme in Afghanistan continues to be well regarded by all professionals involved in the care of children. As a result of our excellent reputation in the field, the EU has given Children in Crisis the responsibility to conduct an assessment of the quality of care received by children in orphanages. An agreement has now been signed with the Ministry of Labour, Social Affairs, Martyrs and the Disabled (MoLSAMD) to conduct this important research in 6 provinces; Herat, Badakhshan, Nanghar, Kabul, Kandahar and Ghazni. The rapid growth in institutional care of children in Afghanistan is indeed alarming. Since 2008, the number of public and private orphanages has increased from 30 to 70. This increase is contrary to Government policy. However, poverty stricken families affected by the on-going conflict continue to regard residential care as the only means to provide 6

their children with a decent education. Sarah Rowse, Programme Director says: “We have always known that this would be a challenging assessment to undertake given the many vested interests at stake in maintaining the status quo of orphanage and institutional care of children. The team have already encountered resistance at the launch events from the directors of private orphanages. It is extremely telling that in Jalalabad, the director of the state orphanage welcomed the assessment but stated that the researchers would not be able to conduct activities for three months from June, since the orphanages would be closed (in line with school holidays in this district) and all the children sent home. It is a curious definition of an orphanage…” Hopefully this research will contribute to reversing the trend and will help advocate for increased support to smaller scale and family-based alternatives.

A boy who had previously been out of school, now happily settled in one of the 5 community based education centres around Kabul.

Children in Crisis protects and educates children facing the toughest hardships in countries affected by conflict or political instability.

To support our education and child protection programmes please return your donation form today or donate online.

7


Democratic Republic of Congo: – increased enrolment Women’s community leader signing a contract with her thumb, taking ownership of the newly built Ngobi school.

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has been at the centre of one of the most violent conflicts since the Second World War. The eastern region of the country has been the most severely affected; 80% of families have been forced to flee their homes, many qualified teachers have left the country leaving a deep lack of skills, and the educational infrastructure is in an extremely poor state. Programme Manager for DRC, Amy Parker reports: “Through our on-going work with local partner Eben-Ezer Ministry International (EMI), some communities in South Kivu, DRC are now benefiting from well-built, well-resourced schools offering a positive learning environment for all. Parents are encouraged to take a more active role in the education of their children through their participation in all stages of the schools’ construction and as a result, enrolment rates are increasing. “A good example of this is the Ngobi Primary School. We began the construction in August 2011, and it was completed in June 2012. In anticipation of the new school opening, the enrolment has already increased from 152 to over 200 pupils! So we are definitely reaching out-ofschool children, this is extremely encouraging”. Lovely picture here of Rubyagiza, the new Education Manager for EMI. He is holding a baby from Ngobi village. The picture was taken on the night Amy arrived at Ngobi for the inauguration of the school. The hat is definitely his hat – Amy tells us red/pink is apparently a symbol of his family.

8

Arlette’s own words, hopes and dreams

My name is Arlette and I am 15 year old. I live in a small village. I live with my mother, my two little brothers 13 and 9 and my little sister who is 11. I have 2 older sisters and an older brother who are married. They live far away. My older brother used to live close by, but he has just gone to Minembwe to find work. My father died when my youngest brother was 1 year old. So my mother does all the work. She cultivates so that she can find money for school fees. Us children are at school. Our house is very small. Everyone stays in the same room together. We have a field where we grow manioc and beans. We have 2 goats. Before I started school at 9 I looked after the children. I asked my mother if I could start. It used to be that all the girls stayed at home to work. We were miserable. Now there are girls in school. There are still many at home though – their parents don’t have the money to send them to school. There is hate between parents and children who don’t go to school. The children are embarrassed and angry that they can’t go. They think they are weak and that the children who go to school are strong. I feel at ease at school – I like our new school. It’s really good now, since it is new. At school we also learn about children’s rights. I know that children have the right to go to school. They have the right to be clothed. The right to be cared for when they are sick. In the past girls used to get married quite young here. Girls seem to get married later now. The girls are much happier – they want to study. I don’t want to get married until I’ve finished university. Life isn’t so good though. It is really difficult. Often our harvests are small. Times are really difficult in July-August and February-March. There are diseases that attack the manioc. There have been times when war was here. Yes, all around us. The rebels passed above and below. We had nowhere to run so we stayed and waited and prayed to God. He protected us and the bad people went away. I hope for Peace.

Children in Crisis protects and educates children facing the toughest hardships in countries affected by conflict or political instability.

To support our education and child protection programmes please return your donation form today or donate online.

9


Democratic Republic of Congo: – increased enrolment Women’s community leader signing a contract with her thumb, taking ownership of the newly built Ngobi school.

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has been at the centre of one of the most violent conflicts since the Second World War. The eastern region of the country has been the most severely affected; 80% of families have been forced to flee their homes, many qualified teachers have left the country leaving a deep lack of skills, and the educational infrastructure is in an extremely poor state. Programme Manager for DRC, Amy Parker reports: “Through our on-going work with local partner Eben-Ezer Ministry International (EMI), some communities in South Kivu, DRC are now benefiting from well-built, well-resourced schools offering a positive learning environment for all. Parents are encouraged to take a more active role in the education of their children through their participation in all stages of the schools’ construction and as a result, enrolment rates are increasing. “A good example of this is the Ngobi Primary School. We began the construction in August 2011, and it was completed in June 2012. In anticipation of the new school opening, the enrolment has already increased from 152 to over 200 pupils! So we are definitely reaching out-ofschool children, this is extremely encouraging”. Lovely picture here of Rubyagiza, the new Education Manager for EMI. He is holding a baby from Ngobi village. The picture was taken on the night Amy arrived at Ngobi for the inauguration of the school. The hat is definitely his hat – Amy tells us red/pink is apparently a symbol of his family.

8

Arlette’s own words, hopes and dreams

My name is Arlette and I am 15 year old. I live in a small village. I live with my mother, my two little brothers 13 and 9 and my little sister who is 11. I have 2 older sisters and an older brother who are married. They live far away. My older brother used to live close by, but he has just gone to Minembwe to find work. My father died when my youngest brother was 1 year old. So my mother does all the work. She cultivates so that she can find money for school fees. Us children are at school. Our house is very small. Everyone stays in the same room together. We have a field where we grow manioc and beans. We have 2 goats. Before I started school at 9 I looked after the children. I asked my mother if I could start. It used to be that all the girls stayed at home to work. We were miserable. Now there are girls in school. There are still many at home though – their parents don’t have the money to send them to school. There is hate between parents and children who don’t go to school. The children are embarrassed and angry that they can’t go. They think they are weak and that the children who go to school are strong. I feel at ease at school – I like our new school. It’s really good now, since it is new. At school we also learn about children’s rights. I know that children have the right to go to school. They have the right to be clothed. The right to be cared for when they are sick. In the past girls used to get married quite young here. Girls seem to get married later now. The girls are much happier – they want to study. I don’t want to get married until I’ve finished university. Life isn’t so good though. It is really difficult. Often our harvests are small. Times are really difficult in July-August and February-March. There are diseases that attack the manioc. There have been times when war was here. Yes, all around us. The rebels passed above and below. We had nowhere to run so we stayed and waited and prayed to God. He protected us and the bad people went away. I hope for Peace.

Children in Crisis protects and educates children facing the toughest hardships in countries affected by conflict or political instability.

To support our education and child protection programmes please return your donation form today or donate online.

9


Liberia: – Teachers’ words… Africa has the youngest population of any continent – in Liberia on the west coast, nearly half the population is aged under 15. This statistic, coupled with an education system wrecked by years of civil war has left Liberian children struggling to get the skills the country needs to move forward and girls’ education has been severely affected. Children in Crisis and local partner organisation The Forum for African Women Educationalists (FAWE Liberia), are training teachers, and raising awareness of the importance of education for girls. Over 7,000 children and young people are currently benefiting from the Children in Crisis Girls’ Education project. There are no other NGOs working to improve educational opportunities in River Cess. We always thought ‘discipline’ and ‘punishment’ are the same – now we can see that we used to punish and we should have been trying to discipline. We used to punish – and that makes the children scared and then they can’t learn anything. This is a big lesson for us.

I used to talk all the time in class – now for example – for spelling – I ask the children for words that we can learn to spell – I do not have to do all the thinking.

Derelict school in rural Liberia

Teachers are very appreciative of the support they are receiving from the FAWE trainers. An external evaluation that was undertaken earlier this year interviewed some of them. These testimonials speak for themselves…

Apart from increasing the skills and capabilities of teachers to deliver better quality formal education to children in River Cess, Children in Crisis and FAWE continue to work hard to overcome the challenges of recruiting young women capable of training as girls’ club supervisors, and then effectively training them. In River Cess, there is only one high school for a population of around 70,000 people and only six girls graduated last year. Few women in River Cess have even completed their primary education, so it was a mark of success to have successfully trained 14 girls’ club supervisors from 11 schools, who will work to encourage girls to enter and stay in school!

Testing and evaluation – we learned 12 different ways to do a test – before we only had 1 way and it was boring for the children. I always used to do ‘fill in the blank’ – now I set all sorts of test.

I learned about slow learner and fast learner – and they need different teaching styles sometimes. I did not know it before. 10

I cannot attend the Government training for teachers – I did not get a chance – but I got a chance at FAWE training – and FAWE comes round afterwards to see how we are doing – that does not happen with Government training.

Even I did not know everything about menstruation and HIV like we learned in the training – I did not know myself and I am a teacher.

Only six girls graduated from high school in River Cess County last year.

Children in Crisis protects and educates children facing the toughest hardships in countries affected by conflict or political instability.

To support our education and child protection programmes please return your donation form today or donate online.

11


Liberia: – Teachers’ words… Africa has the youngest population of any continent – in Liberia on the west coast, nearly half the population is aged under 15. This statistic, coupled with an education system wrecked by years of civil war has left Liberian children struggling to get the skills the country needs to move forward and girls’ education has been severely affected. Children in Crisis and local partner organisation The Forum for African Women Educationalists (FAWE Liberia), are training teachers, and raising awareness of the importance of education for girls. Over 7,000 children and young people are currently benefiting from the Children in Crisis Girls’ Education project. There are no other NGOs working to improve educational opportunities in River Cess. We always thought ‘discipline’ and ‘punishment’ are the same – now we can see that we used to punish and we should have been trying to discipline. We used to punish – and that makes the children scared and then they can’t learn anything. This is a big lesson for us.

I used to talk all the time in class – now for example – for spelling – I ask the children for words that we can learn to spell – I do not have to do all the thinking.

Derelict school in rural Liberia

Teachers are very appreciative of the support they are receiving from the FAWE trainers. An external evaluation that was undertaken earlier this year interviewed some of them. These testimonials speak for themselves…

Apart from increasing the skills and capabilities of teachers to deliver better quality formal education to children in River Cess, Children in Crisis and FAWE continue to work hard to overcome the challenges of recruiting young women capable of training as girls’ club supervisors, and then effectively training them. In River Cess, there is only one high school for a population of around 70,000 people and only six girls graduated last year. Few women in River Cess have even completed their primary education, so it was a mark of success to have successfully trained 14 girls’ club supervisors from 11 schools, who will work to encourage girls to enter and stay in school!

Testing and evaluation – we learned 12 different ways to do a test – before we only had 1 way and it was boring for the children. I always used to do ‘fill in the blank’ – now I set all sorts of test.

I learned about slow learner and fast learner – and they need different teaching styles sometimes. I did not know it before. 10

I cannot attend the Government training for teachers – I did not get a chance – but I got a chance at FAWE training – and FAWE comes round afterwards to see how we are doing – that does not happen with Government training.

Even I did not know everything about menstruation and HIV like we learned in the training – I did not know myself and I am a teacher.

Only six girls graduated from high school in River Cess County last year.

Children in Crisis protects and educates children facing the toughest hardships in countries affected by conflict or political instability.

To support our education and child protection programmes please return your donation form today or donate online.

11


It's Children in Crisis Week! 19th - 25th November 2012

Show solidarity with mothers in Sierra Leone and run a Children in Crisis event in your own community during Children in Crisis Week!

Do you love fancy dress or are you a secret cake baker? Whatever you like to do, do it for Children in Crisis. Organise a fun-filled day at your school or at work and make a difference to those children who need it most.

Remember, remember, birthdays in September (October, November)... Visit our new Virtual Gift shop for presents galore!

Let’s Get Quizzical! Join the fun and buy a ticket to our quiz night on November 21st.

Celebrate Universal Children’s Day with us on 20th November or join in the fun by organising your own fundraising event. This year we are bringing you lots more reasons to get involved with Children in Crisis Week! November 20th is Universal Children’s Day and on this day we commemorate the basic human rights that children everywhere have: the right to survival; to develop to the fullest; to protection from harmful influences, abuse and exploitation; and to participate fully in family, cultural and social life. During Children in Crisis Week we want you to celebrate Universal Children’s Day by raising funds and awareness for the work we do and the amazing communities we work with. We have a heap of activities going on that you can take part in but we want you to organise some of your own!

If this Summer’s triumph by a certain Mr Wiggins has converted you to a strict two-wheels policy, why not gather some friends and do a cycle challenge! Where to cycle to? Now that’s up to you…

Can’t make the date? Why not organise your own… Contact us for a quiz pack.

Mothers in Sierra Leone getting together to find solutions for their own community’s problems

Organise a fabulous Dinner 4 Good in the comfort of your own home… Visit Dinner4good.com to start! We can’t wait to get cooking!

Here are some ideas… Children in Crisis protects and educates children facing the toughest hardships in countries affected by conflict or political instability. 12

Get involved! Visit www.childrenincrisis.org

13


It's Children in Crisis Week! 19th - 25th November 2012

Show solidarity with mothers in Sierra Leone and run a Children in Crisis event in your own community during Children in Crisis Week!

Do you love fancy dress or are you a secret cake baker? Whatever you like to do, do it for Children in Crisis. Organise a fun-filled day at your school or at work and make a difference to those children who need it most.

Remember, remember, birthdays in September (October, November)... Visit our new Virtual Gift shop for presents galore!

Let’s Get Quizzical! Join the fun and buy a ticket to our quiz night on November 21st.

Celebrate Universal Children’s Day with us on 20th November or join in the fun by organising your own fundraising event. This year we are bringing you lots more reasons to get involved with Children in Crisis Week! November 20th is Universal Children’s Day and on this day we commemorate the basic human rights that children everywhere have: the right to survival; to develop to the fullest; to protection from harmful influences, abuse and exploitation; and to participate fully in family, cultural and social life. During Children in Crisis Week we want you to celebrate Universal Children’s Day by raising funds and awareness for the work we do and the amazing communities we work with. We have a heap of activities going on that you can take part in but we want you to organise some of your own!

If this Summer’s triumph by a certain Mr Wiggins has converted you to a strict two-wheels policy, why not gather some friends and do a cycle challenge! Where to cycle to? Now that’s up to you…

Can’t make the date? Why not organise your own… Contact us for a quiz pack.

Mothers in Sierra Leone getting together to find solutions for their own community’s problems

Organise a fabulous Dinner 4 Good in the comfort of your own home… Visit Dinner4good.com to start! We can’t wait to get cooking!

Here are some ideas… Children in Crisis protects and educates children facing the toughest hardships in countries affected by conflict or political instability. 12

Get involved! Visit www.childrenincrisis.org

13


Get involved!

8th September: It’s International Literacy day!

Thank you to all our loyal supporters without whom none of our work to protect and educate children in Afghanistan, DR Congo, Liberia and Sierra Leone would be possible!

Thanks also to everyone who has just started supporting Children in Crisis with a new monthly Direct Debit. Thank you so much for taking the time to complete the form or talk to one of our fundraisers. Through our Face-to-Face campaigns we find that we reach many more people than would otherwise know about our work and we are hoping that many more will join you in supporting our cause. To a charity of our size, the on-going support from individuals like yourself is invaluable. So a huge thank you and welcome on board to a very special charity!

Annual BGC Partners Charity Day We are delighted to announce that Children in Crisis was chosen again this year to benefit from the BGC Partners Charity Day on 11th September 2012! Every year, BGC and Cantor Fitzgerald donate 100% of their global revenues on the day to more than 75 charities around the world by hosting charities and celebrity ambassadors at their offices in commemoration of the 658 employees lost in the World Trade Center attacks. Thank you BGC Partners! 14

On International Literacy Day each year, UNESCO reminds the international community of the importance of literacy and adult learning globally. This is a great reason to raise funds and awareness for the work of Children in Crisis! Why not hold a cake sale at your book club, or take inspiration from teacher Alexandra MacFarlane who held a sponsored spellathon at her school (St Helens, in Hillingdon) raising over £6,000! So what will you be doing?

In the tracks of Bradley Wiggins… Back in June, Children in Crisis supporter and keen cyclist Chris Walker cycled all the way from London to Geneva, raising over £3,000 for Children in Crisis. Chris said ‘It was a great ride, and I certainly feel like I’ve earned the fundraising everyone donated too!’ If you’re feeling inspired to get on your bike & fundraise for Children in Crisis then we have plenty of challenges to choose from, please contact the events team!

Virgin London Marathon 2013 Whether you have secured a place in the London Marathon or not, please consider running for Children in Crisis on Sunday 21st April 2013! We have a limited number of Golden Bond places available so as soon as you hear the results from the ballot, do get in touch with us!

Schools can help too! Haddon Dene Primary School in Broadstairs took part in some school fundraising for Children in Crisis. Teacher Sheba Riches told us that her class baked cakes and managed to raise an incredible £262.88! If your school would like to help some of the world’s most vulnerable children then please contact the events team for a school pack with lots of fantastic ideas and tips!

Remember a Charity Week! Legacies are vital to help charities continue their work in the longer-term, please consider remembering Children in Crisis in your Will… Remember a Charity Week, on 17-23rd September 2012, is the perfect time for you to learn about how easy it is to include a donation to Children in Crisis within your Will and this newsletter alone will show you what a difference that donation really can make!

Financial transparency Children in Crisis are delighted to announce that we have received the Charities Online Financial Reporting and Accounts Awards 2012 from the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW), in recognition of the quality and transparency of our financial reporting. The judges said our reporting had ‘”Good balance, clarity, engagement and learning” and commented that it brings the charity to life. Children in Crisis protects and educates children facing the toughest hardships in countries affected by conflict or political instability.

Get involved! Visit www.childrenincrisis.org

15


Get involved!

8th September: It’s International Literacy day!

Thank you to all our loyal supporters without whom none of our work to protect and educate children in Afghanistan, DR Congo, Liberia and Sierra Leone would be possible!

Thanks also to everyone who has just started supporting Children in Crisis with a new monthly Direct Debit. Thank you so much for taking the time to complete the form or talk to one of our fundraisers. Through our Face-to-Face campaigns we find that we reach many more people than would otherwise know about our work and we are hoping that many more will join you in supporting our cause. To a charity of our size, the on-going support from individuals like yourself is invaluable. So a huge thank you and welcome on board to a very special charity!

Annual BGC Partners Charity Day We are delighted to announce that Children in Crisis was chosen again this year to benefit from the BGC Partners Charity Day on 11th September 2012! Every year, BGC and Cantor Fitzgerald donate 100% of their global revenues on the day to more than 75 charities around the world by hosting charities and celebrity ambassadors at their offices in commemoration of the 658 employees lost in the World Trade Center attacks. Thank you BGC Partners! 14

On International Literacy Day each year, UNESCO reminds the international community of the importance of literacy and adult learning globally. This is a great reason to raise funds and awareness for the work of Children in Crisis! Why not hold a cake sale at your book club, or take inspiration from teacher Alexandra MacFarlane who held a sponsored spellathon at her school (St Helens, in Hillingdon) raising over £6,000! So what will you be doing?

In the tracks of Bradley Wiggins… Back in June, Children in Crisis supporter and keen cyclist Chris Walker cycled all the way from London to Geneva, raising over £3,000 for Children in Crisis. Chris said ‘It was a great ride, and I certainly feel like I’ve earned the fundraising everyone donated too!’ If you’re feeling inspired to get on your bike & fundraise for Children in Crisis then we have plenty of challenges to choose from, please contact the events team!

Virgin London Marathon 2013 Whether you have secured a place in the London Marathon or not, please consider running for Children in Crisis on Sunday 21st April 2013! We have a limited number of Golden Bond places available so as soon as you hear the results from the ballot, do get in touch with us!

Schools can help too! Haddon Dene Primary School in Broadstairs took part in some school fundraising for Children in Crisis. Teacher Sheba Riches told us that her class baked cakes and managed to raise an incredible £262.88! If your school would like to help some of the world’s most vulnerable children then please contact the events team for a school pack with lots of fantastic ideas and tips!

Remember a Charity Week! Legacies are vital to help charities continue their work in the longer-term, please consider remembering Children in Crisis in your Will… Remember a Charity Week, on 17-23rd September 2012, is the perfect time for you to learn about how easy it is to include a donation to Children in Crisis within your Will and this newsletter alone will show you what a difference that donation really can make!

Financial transparency Children in Crisis are delighted to announce that we have received the Charities Online Financial Reporting and Accounts Awards 2012 from the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW), in recognition of the quality and transparency of our financial reporting. The judges said our reporting had ‘”Good balance, clarity, engagement and learning” and commented that it brings the charity to life. Children in Crisis protects and educates children facing the toughest hardships in countries affected by conflict or political instability.

Get involved! Visit www.childrenincrisis.org

15


Sierra Leone. Mothers getting together to discuss their children’s education in a Children in Crisis workshop.

Why I support Children in Crisis “

My grandfather served in the war and my grandmother was a housewife. Of the many things they taught me, regardless of my educational background, reading is life's most important gift. There's so much to be learnt, imagined, pictured and hoped for. And with hope, there is so much more that can be achieved. And looking at the crisis in Africa especially, what the children need is some form of education that will allow them to continue reading about the world and hoping for a better future. With all the tragedies that surround these children, there is nothing wrong with a little hoping. So my support to Children in Crisis is on behalf of my late grandparents, John and Kiki who lived an extraordinary and full life. Lara Zalena Kamal

206 - 208 Stewart’s Road London SW8 4UB tel: +44 (0)20 7627 1040 fax: +44 (0)20 7627 1050 info@childrenincrisis.org www.childrenincrisis.org

Children in Crisis protects and educates children facing the toughest hardships in countries affected by conflict or political instability. Founder and Life President: Sarah, Duchess of York. Registered office as above. UK Registered charity No. 1020488. Company No. 2815817.

Autumn 2012 Newsletter  

Our newsletter from Autumn 2012.

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