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Education for the world’s most vulnerable children

Making an impact on education ANNUAL REVIEW 09/10


A message from our Founder and Life President When I reflect upon Children in Crisis’ achievements in the last 17 years, and think about the need to understand and listen to the needs of children, it reminds me of the two big reasons I continue to be an active and passionate supporter, and why I encourage all around me to join in. First and foremost it is the evidence of impact on the lives of the children that we reach. In the plateau region of eastern Democratic Republic of Congo we have trained 140 teachers to provide quality education to their pupils. Through this programme alone we will reach 6,000 children every year in 35 communities. We are so encouraged by our results that we aim to expand the programme across the whole plateau, an area the size of Wales. We have had similar solid impacts in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Afghanistan and China.

01 Our mission 02  A message from our Chief Executive and Chairman 04 Where we work 06 Our priorities 08 What we do 10 Working with local partners 12 DRC 16 Sierra Leone 20 Liberia 24 Afghanistan 28 China 32 UK and Italy 33 Completed projects 34 Financial highlights 36 Thank you 37 How you can support our work

The second reason I stay close to Children in Crisis is because of the inspiration I derive from the partners, staff, trustees, founders and our community of supporters. We thank everyone immensely. Time and time again we see how generous people are of their time, efforts and valuable contributions, and this enables CIC to have a transformational effect on children’s lives.

Sarah, Duchess of York

OUR MISSION When Children in Crisis was founded we developed a simple mission: To give children in some of the world’s toughest situations, in the poorest countries, the education they need to help transform their lives.

WHAT WE DO

No matter where they are in the world, all children have a right to a quality education. No matter what their environment, gender, age, physical wellbeing, social status, ethnic background, or the political climate - these factors should not prejudice a child’s ability to live a healthy, happy and prosperous life. We are passionate about creating this fair world. In the world we envisage every child is learning in a safe and secure environment, girls and boys are treated equally, children’s rights are protected, and learning opportunities exist for parents, families and communities. All of our programmes work towards making this world a reality.

When you educate a child, their human potential flowers, and opportunities open. Their whole world changes as does their contribution to the world around them. A good education is an inoculation against poverty.

Front Cover: A young girl from Mishashu village where Children in Crisis have built have school. Photo: Esther Kwaku

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A message from our Founder and Life President When I reflect upon Children in Crisis’ achievements in the last 17 years, and think about the need to understand and listen to the needs of children, it reminds me of the two big reasons I continue to be an active and passionate supporter, and why I encourage all around me to join in. First and foremost it is the evidence of impact on the lives of the children that we reach. In the plateau region of eastern Democratic Republic of Congo we have trained 140 teachers to provide quality education to their pupils. Through this programme alone we will reach 6,000 children every year in 35 communities. We are so encouraged by our results that we aim to expand the programme across the whole plateau, an area the size of Wales. We have had similar solid impacts in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Afghanistan and China.

01 Our mission 02  A message from our Chief Executive and Chairman 04 Where we work 06 Our priorities 08 What we do 10 Working with local partners 12 DRC 16 Sierra Leone 20 Liberia 24 Afghanistan 28 China 32 UK and Italy 33 Completed projects 34 Financial highlights 36 Thank you 37 How you can support our work

The second reason I stay close to Children in Crisis is because of the inspiration I derive from the partners, staff, trustees, founders and our community of supporters. We thank everyone immensely. Time and time again we see how generous people are of their time, efforts and valuable contributions, and this enables CIC to have a transformational effect on children’s lives.

Sarah, Duchess of York

OUR MISSION When Children in Crisis was founded we developed a simple mission: To give children in some of the world’s toughest situations, in the poorest countries, the education they need to help transform their lives.

WHAT WE DO

No matter where they are in the world, all children have a right to a quality education. No matter what their environment, gender, age, physical wellbeing, social status, ethnic background, or the political climate - these factors should not prejudice a child’s ability to live a healthy, happy and prosperous life. We are passionate about creating this fair world. In the world we envisage every child is learning in a safe and secure environment, girls and boys are treated equally, children’s rights are protected, and learning opportunities exist for parents, families and communities. All of our programmes work towards making this world a reality.

When you educate a child, their human potential flowers, and opportunities open. Their whole world changes as does their contribution to the world around them. A good education is an inoculation against poverty.

Front Cover: A young girl from Mishashu village where Children in Crisis have built have school. Photo: Esther Kwaku

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A message from our Chief Executive If you start with the child, poverty can be ended in one generation. It is the reason why in the world of international development, the focus on children is tremendously important for me. After twenty years in the ‘aid business’ I am delighted to be coming on board as the new Chief Executive of Children in Crisis. Our area of expertise – improving life opportunities for children in conflict affected countries, is increasingly recognised as a global priority and we have made remarkable progress over the past year. The determination to reach children in the toughest environments is evident throughout our work. We aim to be leaders

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in the field, and to get even better at listening and responding to the needs and aspirations of children, their families and communities. It is not only the intellectual arguments but powerful streams of compassion and empathy which attract people to support CIC. Our job is to turn that into impact. This Annual Report shows how we do that.

Koy Thomson

A message from our Chairman It is usually my role as Chairman of Children in Crisis to tell the world about our work and how effective it is. However this year it is a great pleasure to have two major independent evaluations of our work in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Liberia speak for me. Let me reflect upon a few words from the evaluation of our DRC programme since they exemplify much of what CIC is about. The children are extremely remote from government or other services. One in three never go to school, let alone complete a basic education. The damp and cold schools that did exist had lost the trust of parents, with children passive and frightened of teachers. Our aim with our wonderful partner Eben-Ezer Ministries International was to improve the quality of primary education and through that create better lives and opportunities for children

displaced by conflict. The evaluation reported better teaching, children said they liked their teachers and learning, boys and girls of different tribes mixed freely, there were improvements in hygiene and cleanliness, parents were supportive, enrolment increased, and there were far higher pass rates in national exams. This makes me very proud. Of course not all is rosy, but without some mistakes we don’t learn. I, my fellow Trustees, and our three founding Vice Presidents look to the future with even more resolve to do better and achieve more.

Olivier de Givenchy

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A message from our Chief Executive If you start with the child, poverty can be ended in one generation. It is the reason why in the world of international development, the focus on children is tremendously important for me. After twenty years in the ‘aid business’ I am delighted to be coming on board as the new Chief Executive of Children in Crisis. Our area of expertise – improving life opportunities for children in conflict affected countries, is increasingly recognised as a global priority and we have made remarkable progress over the past year. The determination to reach children in the toughest environments is evident throughout our work. We aim to be leaders

02

in the field, and to get even better at listening and responding to the needs and aspirations of children, their families and communities. It is not only the intellectual arguments but powerful streams of compassion and empathy which attract people to support CIC. Our job is to turn that into impact. This Annual Report shows how we do that.

Koy Thomson

A message from our Chairman It is usually my role as Chairman of Children in Crisis to tell the world about our work and how effective it is. However this year it is a great pleasure to have two major independent evaluations of our work in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Liberia speak for me. Let me reflect upon a few words from the evaluation of our DRC programme since they exemplify much of what CIC is about. The children are extremely remote from government or other services. One in three never go to school, let alone complete a basic education. The damp and cold schools that did exist had lost the trust of parents, with children passive and frightened of teachers. Our aim with our wonderful partner Eben-Ezer Ministries International was to improve the quality of primary education and through that create better lives and opportunities for children

displaced by conflict. The evaluation reported better teaching, children said they liked their teachers and learning, boys and girls of different tribes mixed freely, there were improvements in hygiene and cleanliness, parents were supportive, enrolment increased, and there were far higher pass rates in national exams. This makes me very proud. Of course not all is rosy, but without some mistakes we don’t learn. I, my fellow Trustees, and our three founding Vice Presidents look to the future with even more resolve to do better and achieve more.

Olivier de Givenchy

03


WHERE WE WORK Children in Crisis works in seven countries including our two main offices in the UK and Italy.

UNITED KINGDOM

 Delivering interactive drug and alcohol education within education centres

CHINA

ITALY

 Delivering interactive drug and alcohol education within education centres

SIERRA LEONE

 H IV and AIDS training to teachers  Rehabilitating schools

AFGHANISTAN

 Training young women in midwifery skills  Running community health projects

 Running community-based education centres  Child protection and child’s rights  Social worker training

DRC

Teacher training Community development Building schools

Liberia

 Training teachers in rural areas  Women’s vocational training  Girls’ education  Building schools

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WHERE WE WORK Children in Crisis works in seven countries including our two main offices in the UK and Italy.

UNITED KINGDOM

 Delivering interactive drug and alcohol education within education centres

CHINA

ITALY

 Delivering interactive drug and alcohol education within education centres

SIERRA LEONE

 H IV and AIDS training to teachers  Rehabilitating schools

AFGHANISTAN

 Training young women in midwifery skills  Running community health projects

 Running community-based education centres  Child protection and child’s rights  Social worker training

DRC

Teacher training Community development Building schools

Liberia

 Training teachers in rural areas  Women’s vocational training  Girls’ education  Building schools

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05


OUR PRIORITIES For 17 years our determination to reach those who are left out has impelled us to focus on countries affected by conflict and the vast proportion of the world’s population who face daily and grinding discrimination: Women and girls. For us this is a matter of principle as well as of practical priority. The greatest progress towards the global goals to end poverty will be made by focusing on the hardest to reach and the most vulnerable.

Working in Countries Affected by Conflict An unimaginable 72 million children never go to school with more than half of them in countries devastated by war. Countries affected by conflict are caught in a cycle of poverty, deprivation and violence which destroys schools, decimates the teaching profession, destabilises communities, and makes children vulnerable to abuse and exploitation.

At Children in Crisis we put communities, families and children at the centre of rebuilding their futures. We do this by listening to their priorities, setting plans together, and fully utilising their own knowledge, resources and energy to give their children better chances. Girls’ Education 41 million girls are out of school worldwide, 10 million more than boys. Poverty, unsafe school environments and entrenched opinions on the role of women and men all contribute to this imbalance which provides one of the most devastating roadblocks to the development of countries affected by conflict. Educating girls has a dramatic effect on both their lives and their community as a whole. A girl who completes primary school will marry later, be less likely to contract HIV, and have fewer children, all of whom will have a far higher chance of surviving beyond their fifth birthday. All of our projects focus on maximising female participation and encouraging the education of girls.

Right:

Young girls, such as Yvonne from eastern DR Congo, are often the first to be taken out of school to attend to household duties or look after siblings Photo: Esther Kwaku

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OUR PRIORITIES For 17 years our determination to reach those who are left out has impelled us to focus on countries affected by conflict and the vast proportion of the world’s population who face daily and grinding discrimination: Women and girls. For us this is a matter of principle as well as of practical priority. The greatest progress towards the global goals to end poverty will be made by focusing on the hardest to reach and the most vulnerable.

Working in Countries Affected by Conflict An unimaginable 72 million children never go to school with more than half of them in countries devastated by war. Countries affected by conflict are caught in a cycle of poverty, deprivation and violence which destroys schools, decimates the teaching profession, destabilises communities, and makes children vulnerable to abuse and exploitation.

At Children in Crisis we put communities, families and children at the centre of rebuilding their futures. We do this by listening to their priorities, setting plans together, and fully utilising their own knowledge, resources and energy to give their children better chances. Girls’ Education 41 million girls are out of school worldwide, 10 million more than boys. Poverty, unsafe school environments and entrenched opinions on the role of women and men all contribute to this imbalance which provides one of the most devastating roadblocks to the development of countries affected by conflict. Educating girls has a dramatic effect on both their lives and their community as a whole. A girl who completes primary school will marry later, be less likely to contract HIV, and have fewer children, all of whom will have a far higher chance of surviving beyond their fifth birthday. All of our projects focus on maximising female participation and encouraging the education of girls.

Right:

Young girls, such as Yvonne from eastern DR Congo, are often the first to be taken out of school to attend to household duties or look after siblings Photo: Esther Kwaku

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What we do

Below:

Teacher trainers reviewing the progress of their training in Kambia, Sierra Leone. Photo:Becky Midlane

We work in countries affected by conflict in Asia and Africa to ensure that when children go to school they are taught by trained teachers who are confident, knowledgeable and able to put the child at the centre of their education. Our work building and refurbishing schools provides communities with a facility in which their children can learn safely, in buildings that are fit for purpose. Our schools are designed in close consultation with children and their communities; they are built by local contractors using locally sourced materials and with community contributions, ensuring that they are owned and maintained by the communities they serve in the long-term. Of course a school without trained teachers is no use to anyone so our teacher training projects not only provide teachers with assistance with subject knowledge they may be lacking but we also train them in how to deliver lessons that genuinely engage their students. By providing a child with a complete primary education, that child’s prospects are dramatically increased, their lifetime earnings and life expectancy increase and they have the opportunity to play a more productive role in society.

Conflict affected countries especially, have some of the poorest health records in the world and often harbour the perfect conditions for rising HIV infection rates. In Sierra Leone over 50% of the population are under 18 and only an estimated 17% of these children understand the means of transmission of HIV. We work to ensure that not only are children informed of the dangers of HIV, but also that they know how to keep healthy generally. Lack of understanding of basic health concepts and the HIV virus contribute to the unnecessary deaths of millions of people a year in Africa and Asia. From condom use to basic hand washing it is often the simplest messages and methods that reap the biggest rewards, as such we work to help teachers deliver HIV and AIDS education in schools and train midwives to deliver basic assistance during pregnancy and act as community nurses. “Prevention is as important as ever, without a greatly expanded prevention effort, treatment is simply not sustainable”. Peter Piott Head of UN AIDS

profession and dilapidated school infrastructure. Families living in poverty often face the stark choice of investing in their child’s education or having the child work to earn money for the family. When children are taught by an untrained, unmotivated teacher in a near derelict school, the perceived worth of that education diminishes dramatically and many children are kept out of school. One of the keys to our success here is strengthening the community’s awareness of the value of education. We work with parents, consulting with them and providing practical support on a variety of issues including building support for the school, managing the school and encouraging their children – girls especially – to complete their education. “I was informed about the CIC Centre near to our home. One day the team leader and teachers of this Centre came to our home to survey out of school children. After requests to my Uncle from myself and CIC staff, he has finally permitted me to take admission in the Accelerating Education Class. Since I started attending the centre I feel very happy and think that my future will be better than now.”

Education and the Community Zarghun, 13 years old, from Kabul.

Education for Health Deprived areas invariably suffer from a lack of access to information and services. 08

Children that have been affected by conflict often receive appallingly low standards of education on account of a depleted teaching


What we do

Below:

Teacher trainers reviewing the progress of their training in Kambia, Sierra Leone. Photo:Becky Midlane

We work in countries affected by conflict in Asia and Africa to ensure that when children go to school they are taught by trained teachers who are confident, knowledgeable and able to put the child at the centre of their education. Our work building and refurbishing schools provides communities with a facility in which their children can learn safely, in buildings that are fit for purpose. Our schools are designed in close consultation with children and their communities; they are built by local contractors using locally sourced materials and with community contributions, ensuring that they are owned and maintained by the communities they serve in the long-term. Of course a school without trained teachers is no use to anyone so our teacher training projects not only provide teachers with assistance with subject knowledge they may be lacking but we also train them in how to deliver lessons that genuinely engage their students. By providing a child with a complete primary education, that child’s prospects are dramatically increased, their lifetime earnings and life expectancy increase and they have the opportunity to play a more productive role in society.

Conflict affected countries especially, have some of the poorest health records in the world and often harbour the perfect conditions for rising HIV infection rates. In Sierra Leone over 50% of the population are under 18 and only an estimated 17% of these children understand the means of transmission of HIV. We work to ensure that not only are children informed of the dangers of HIV, but also that they know how to keep healthy generally. Lack of understanding of basic health concepts and the HIV virus contribute to the unnecessary deaths of millions of people a year in Africa and Asia. From condom use to basic hand washing it is often the simplest messages and methods that reap the biggest rewards, as such we work to help teachers deliver HIV and AIDS education in schools and train midwives to deliver basic assistance during pregnancy and act as community nurses. “Prevention is as important as ever, without a greatly expanded prevention effort, treatment is simply not sustainable”. Peter Piott Head of UN AIDS

profession and dilapidated school infrastructure. Families living in poverty often face the stark choice of investing in their child’s education or having the child work to earn money for the family. When children are taught by an untrained, unmotivated teacher in a near derelict school, the perceived worth of that education diminishes dramatically and many children are kept out of school. One of the keys to our success here is strengthening the community’s awareness of the value of education. We work with parents, consulting with them and providing practical support on a variety of issues including building support for the school, managing the school and encouraging their children – girls especially – to complete their education. “I was informed about the CIC Centre near to our home. One day the team leader and teachers of this Centre came to our home to survey out of school children. After requests to my Uncle from myself and CIC staff, he has finally permitted me to take admission in the Accelerating Education Class. Since I started attending the centre I feel very happy and think that my future will be better than now.”

Education and the Community Zarghun, 13 years old, from Kabul.

Education for Health Deprived areas invariably suffer from a lack of access to information and services. 08

Children that have been affected by conflict often receive appallingly low standards of education on account of a depleted teaching


WORKING WITH LOCAL PARTNERS In all our overseas programmes Children in Crisis works in partnership with local organisations. Each partner contributes skills, knowledge and experience in developing projects which involve communities and are appropriate to the local environment. We work closely with partners to help develop their technical skills in training and education as well as assisting them in organisational and resource development, so that they can manage and support programmes more effectively in the longer term thus ensuring local ownership and sustainability of the projects.

Children in Crisis and Eben-Ezer Ministries International (EMI) Our partnership with EMI is a key example of a solid partnership. It is not only shared knowledge, but shared goals and values that have guaranteed our programme’s ongoing success.

The entire team is highly committed and equally determined to do all they can to improve the standards and coverage of primary education for children on the plateau of eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. “I want to thank CIC. Before we started in 2007 training teachers who had no documents, manuals or notes, they were arriving at school late and head teachers were not managing their schools. Since then we have improved school conditions and we are succeeding in showing the impact of managing schools properly. We are raising awareness of girls’ education…we have been telling teachers and parents that educating children, especially girls, gives them the best chance for improving their lives.” Rubyagiza, Teacher trainer for CIC-EMI

Right:

Eraste Rwatangabo, Programme Manager for our partner organisation Eben-Ezer Ministries International in DR Congo, talks to communities in Gitigarawa village, the location of one of our new schools. Photo: Esther Kwaku

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WORKING WITH LOCAL PARTNERS In all our overseas programmes Children in Crisis works in partnership with local organisations. Each partner contributes skills, knowledge and experience in developing projects which involve communities and are appropriate to the local environment. We work closely with partners to help develop their technical skills in training and education as well as assisting them in organisational and resource development, so that they can manage and support programmes more effectively in the longer term thus ensuring local ownership and sustainability of the projects.

Children in Crisis and Eben-Ezer Ministries International (EMI) Our partnership with EMI is a key example of a solid partnership. It is not only shared knowledge, but shared goals and values that have guaranteed our programme’s ongoing success.

The entire team is highly committed and equally determined to do all they can to improve the standards and coverage of primary education for children on the plateau of eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. “I want to thank CIC. Before we started in 2007 training teachers who had no documents, manuals or notes, they were arriving at school late and head teachers were not managing their schools. Since then we have improved school conditions and we are succeeding in showing the impact of managing schools properly. We are raising awareness of girls’ education…we have been telling teachers and parents that educating children, especially girls, gives them the best chance for improving their lives.” Rubyagiza, Teacher trainer for CIC-EMI

Right:

Eraste Rwatangabo, Programme Manager for our partner organisation Eben-Ezer Ministries International in DR Congo, talks to communities in Gitigarawa village, the location of one of our new schools. Photo: Esther Kwaku

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DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO

Previous page:

Children attending a numeracy lesson in Mishashu School, DR Congo. Photo: Esther Kwaku


DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO

Previous page:

Children attending a numeracy lesson in Mishashu School, DR Congo. Photo: Esther Kwaku


DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO

30 years of state neglect, over a decade of civil conflict, ongoing internal displacement and military operations have left the plateau region of South Kivu dysfunctional and in a state of decay. Children are taught in near derelict schools by teachers who have often had no training and use physical punishments to control their classes. We are working to improve the quality of schools and teaching standards and to restore the faith of communities in education on the plateau.

Teacher training When a family send their child to school they should expect that child to receive classes from a teacher who knows how to properly manage their classroom and how to deliver engaging and accurate lessons which are relevant and useful to the child. They should also expect that their child be treated fairly, encouraged and nurtured through positive discipline as opposed to demeaned and bullied by harsh physical punishment. Over the past year, we have been working with our partner Eben Ezer Ministries (EMI) to deliver the final year of a three year teacher training project across the plateau. The project aimed to make sure that children are taught by teachers who involve them in lessons and promote education as 14

the driving force behind change for their communities. Last year we trained 140 teachers to deliver lessons according to these principles to over 6,000 children year on year, restoring the value of education and rekindling the faith in education within 35 communities. Last year was the final year of this project and a consultant carried out a fully independent, external evaluation of our work; “The project has been remarkably effective: for a limited budget it has achieved demonstrable changes on a wide scale and has enabled improvements in the quality of education despite difficult working conditions… A further project phase is definitely recommended.” We are delighted with the changes we have made to education for these communities and are now embarking on an ambitious project to train all of the teachers, from all of the schools on the plateau over the next four years. Other Work Our work training teachers is changing the face of education on the plateau. But we haven’t stopped there! Last year we built two new schools in geographically remote communities chosen for their commitment to education and the dire state of their former school facilities. We worked with a

specialist architectural organisation whose advice has contributed to the design of schools that make use of the particular characteristics of the environment in which they are built, increasing their potential use by the wider community, sustainability and overall value for money. We have also been working with Association de Femmes Chrétiennes (AFEC) to address the literacy needs of the generation of women who were denied an education as a result of the conflict on the plateau. 20 literacy volunteers are now working in communities, reaching over 300 women per year. Where previously these women would have had no means of learning, they are now able to support their children in their learning and contribute to their community development. We will go on working with EMI and our other partners to ensure that future generations of children on the plateau have access to the standard of education and the facilities they deserve to avoid the mistakes of the past and forge their own path in life.

Achievements  140 teachers from 35 schools received training in child-centred, participatory teaching methods, child rights and other vital disciplines  6000 children will receive a better standard of education as a result of this year’s training alone 2 new schools will provide safe, appropriate learning environments to 600 children a year 20 literacy teachers are now active on the plateau, delivering literacy classes to 317 women this year

CASE STUDY – Cause for celebration For many years the community at Gitigarawa had been patching up their old school house, fighting a losing battle against the elements to keep the school useable. The collapse of a wall and the countless holes in the roof of the building meant that classes were constantly disrupted and children uncomfortable and distracted during lessons. In April 2010 we completed the building work on a brand new school for the children of Gitigarawa which will officially open in the next academic year. With the help of the community who contributed their time and effort to collect materials we have created a safe, modern school, specially designed to withstand the rigours of the plateau. The children of Gitigarawa can now learn in a school to be proud of. 15


DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO

30 years of state neglect, over a decade of civil conflict, ongoing internal displacement and military operations have left the plateau region of South Kivu dysfunctional and in a state of decay. Children are taught in near derelict schools by teachers who have often had no training and use physical punishments to control their classes. We are working to improve the quality of schools and teaching standards and to restore the faith of communities in education on the plateau.

Teacher training When a family send their child to school they should expect that child to receive classes from a teacher who knows how to properly manage their classroom and how to deliver engaging and accurate lessons which are relevant and useful to the child. They should also expect that their child be treated fairly, encouraged and nurtured through positive discipline as opposed to demeaned and bullied by harsh physical punishment. Over the past year, we have been working with our partner Eben Ezer Ministries (EMI) to deliver the final year of a three year teacher training project across the plateau. The project aimed to make sure that children are taught by teachers who involve them in lessons and promote education as 14

the driving force behind change for their communities. Last year we trained 140 teachers to deliver lessons according to these principles to over 6,000 children year on year, restoring the value of education and rekindling the faith in education within 35 communities. Last year was the final year of this project and a consultant carried out a fully independent, external evaluation of our work; “The project has been remarkably effective: for a limited budget it has achieved demonstrable changes on a wide scale and has enabled improvements in the quality of education despite difficult working conditions… A further project phase is definitely recommended.” We are delighted with the changes we have made to education for these communities and are now embarking on an ambitious project to train all of the teachers, from all of the schools on the plateau over the next four years. Other Work Our work training teachers is changing the face of education on the plateau. But we haven’t stopped there! Last year we built two new schools in geographically remote communities chosen for their commitment to education and the dire state of their former school facilities. We worked with a

specialist architectural organisation whose advice has contributed to the design of schools that make use of the particular characteristics of the environment in which they are built, increasing their potential use by the wider community, sustainability and overall value for money. We have also been working with Association de Femmes Chrétiennes (AFEC) to address the literacy needs of the generation of women who were denied an education as a result of the conflict on the plateau. 20 literacy volunteers are now working in communities, reaching over 300 women per year. Where previously these women would have had no means of learning, they are now able to support their children in their learning and contribute to their community development. We will go on working with EMI and our other partners to ensure that future generations of children on the plateau have access to the standard of education and the facilities they deserve to avoid the mistakes of the past and forge their own path in life.

Achievements  140 teachers from 35 schools received training in child-centred, participatory teaching methods, child rights and other vital disciplines  6000 children will receive a better standard of education as a result of this year’s training alone 2 new schools will provide safe, appropriate learning environments to 600 children a year 20 literacy teachers are now active on the plateau, delivering literacy classes to 317 women this year

CASE STUDY – Cause for celebration For many years the community at Gitigarawa had been patching up their old school house, fighting a losing battle against the elements to keep the school useable. The collapse of a wall and the countless holes in the roof of the building meant that classes were constantly disrupted and children uncomfortable and distracted during lessons. In April 2010 we completed the building work on a brand new school for the children of Gitigarawa which will officially open in the next academic year. With the help of the community who contributed their time and effort to collect materials we have created a safe, modern school, specially designed to withstand the rigours of the plateau. The children of Gitigarawa can now learn in a school to be proud of. 15


SIERRA LEONE Over the last 10 years Sierra Leone has been slowly emerging from the aftermath of a decade of civil conflict, which saw education and health systems and structures devastated. Widespread incidences of warcrimes such as sexual violence, mass killings and the random destruction of infrastructure have left a legacy of ruin for Sierra Leone’s people to contend with. One of the biggest road blocks to development in Africa is HIV and its devastating effect on peoples’ lives. While HIV infection rates in Sierra Leone are currently relatively low, 50% of the country’s population is under 18 and only a small percentage of these children understand what HIV is, how it is contracted and how to protect themselves. The risk of dramatically increased infection rates among the young is very real if nothing is done.

Teacher Training Over the course of the last year we have been working in partnership with the Forum for African Women Educationalists (FAWE) to provide teachers from the capital, Freetown, and the rural county of Kambia with training which not only improves the standard of their lessons in school, but also teaches them how to deliver HIV/AIDS and basic health information lessons to their classes. 16

In Sierra Leone, knowledge around HIV is key to living to give a healthy life versus one fraught with discrimination and stigma. We are making sure that when children attend a school staffed by one of our specially trained teachers they are taught not only what HIV is and what it can do to you, but how to avoid contracting it by following simple rules. The sessions also debunk myths and stigmas that are associated with people living with HIV and AIDS. Our work does not stop with training teachers. In order to make sure that the lessons taught in the classroom are not contradicted or dismissed by families and communities who are likely to have long held misconceptions about HIV and AIDS, we work with Community Teacher Associations (CTA) and parents to spread information on child rights and HIV/ AIDS among community members. The reinforcement of accurate messages on HIV and AIDS prevention in all aspects of a child’s life increases their adherence to lessons and provides a child with the knowledge they need to avoid needlessly contracting HIV. This year we reached 117 teachers in Freetown and Kambia, 70% of whom were women. We have also reached 26 CTA members and 721 parents. All of these people will contribute to the effort to provide the children of Sierra Leone with

the knowledge and support they need to live healthy, productive lives, working for their families and communities. Other Work One of the lasting effects of the conflict in Sierra Leone concerns the widespread devastation of school facilities and the lack of investment in schools subsequent to the conflict. We have continued to work on our school rebuilding programme to provide adequate school environments for students. This has included rehabilitating Bo and Mogbwemo primary schools and the roof at Goderich School as well as engaging in ongoing construction planning for work around a school at Kroo Bay. All of the areas we work in are chosen for their high levels of deprivation and the poor state of their facilities, these are the communities who most desperately need our help, and benefit most from assistance. Throughout the year we also completed the construction of a new library in Port Loko, which was completed and opened in November 2009 to a great deal of excitement. Additionally, we have embarked on a construction project with a new partner organisation called Educaid to build a senior secondary school in Rolal in Port Loko district.

Achievements  117 teachers trained to deliver a better standard of education and HIV/AIDS education  26 CTA members trained to disseminate accurate HIV/AIDS information  721 parents attended HIV/AIDS information sessions  3 schools rehabilitated to provide safe and appropriate learning environments  Over 6,000 children are now benefiting from a better standard of education and vital information on HIV and AIDS CASE STUDY - Nanah Kamara Nanah is 11 years old and is in class 5 at KDC Services School in Kambia District. Her teacher is Mrs Swardwoobay who attended the HIV and AIDS education training in 2009 and since then has been passing on her knowledge to her class. Nanah has three HIV and AIDS lessons a week, which she enjoys because she likes learning new things and passing her new knowledge onto others. Thanks to our teacher training Nanah knows how to avoid contracting HIV and AIDS and is spreading that knowledge to other children, just like her.

17


SIERRA LEONE Over the last 10 years Sierra Leone has been slowly emerging from the aftermath of a decade of civil conflict, which saw education and health systems and structures devastated. Widespread incidences of warcrimes such as sexual violence, mass killings and the random destruction of infrastructure have left a legacy of ruin for Sierra Leone’s people to contend with. One of the biggest road blocks to development in Africa is HIV and its devastating effect on peoples’ lives. While HIV infection rates in Sierra Leone are currently relatively low, 50% of the country’s population is under 18 and only a small percentage of these children understand what HIV is, how it is contracted and how to protect themselves. The risk of dramatically increased infection rates among the young is very real if nothing is done.

Teacher Training Over the course of the last year we have been working in partnership with the Forum for African Women Educationalists (FAWE) to provide teachers from the capital, Freetown, and the rural county of Kambia with training which not only improves the standard of their lessons in school, but also teaches them how to deliver HIV/AIDS and basic health information lessons to their classes. 16

In Sierra Leone, knowledge around HIV is key to living to give a healthy life versus one fraught with discrimination and stigma. We are making sure that when children attend a school staffed by one of our specially trained teachers they are taught not only what HIV is and what it can do to you, but how to avoid contracting it by following simple rules. The sessions also debunk myths and stigmas that are associated with people living with HIV and AIDS. Our work does not stop with training teachers. In order to make sure that the lessons taught in the classroom are not contradicted or dismissed by families and communities who are likely to have long held misconceptions about HIV and AIDS, we work with Community Teacher Associations (CTA) and parents to spread information on child rights and HIV/ AIDS among community members. The reinforcement of accurate messages on HIV and AIDS prevention in all aspects of a child’s life increases their adherence to lessons and provides a child with the knowledge they need to avoid needlessly contracting HIV. This year we reached 117 teachers in Freetown and Kambia, 70% of whom were women. We have also reached 26 CTA members and 721 parents. All of these people will contribute to the effort to provide the children of Sierra Leone with

the knowledge and support they need to live healthy, productive lives, working for their families and communities. Other Work One of the lasting effects of the conflict in Sierra Leone concerns the widespread devastation of school facilities and the lack of investment in schools subsequent to the conflict. We have continued to work on our school rebuilding programme to provide adequate school environments for students. This has included rehabilitating Bo and Mogbwemo primary schools and the roof at Goderich School as well as engaging in ongoing construction planning for work around a school at Kroo Bay. All of the areas we work in are chosen for their high levels of deprivation and the poor state of their facilities, these are the communities who most desperately need our help, and benefit most from assistance. Throughout the year we also completed the construction of a new library in Port Loko, which was completed and opened in November 2009 to a great deal of excitement. Additionally, we have embarked on a construction project with a new partner organisation called Educaid to build a senior secondary school in Rolal in Port Loko district.

Achievements  117 teachers trained to deliver a better standard of education and HIV/AIDS education  26 CTA members trained to disseminate accurate HIV/AIDS information  721 parents attended HIV/AIDS information sessions  3 schools rehabilitated to provide safe and appropriate learning environments  Over 6,000 children are now benefiting from a better standard of education and vital information on HIV and AIDS CASE STUDY - Nanah Kamara Nanah is 11 years old and is in class 5 at KDC Services School in Kambia District. Her teacher is Mrs Swardwoobay who attended the HIV and AIDS education training in 2009 and since then has been passing on her knowledge to her class. Nanah has three HIV and AIDS lessons a week, which she enjoys because she likes learning new things and passing her new knowledge onto others. Thanks to our teacher training Nanah knows how to avoid contracting HIV and AIDS and is spreading that knowledge to other children, just like her.

17


SIERRA LEONE

Pic: Children at Goderich Primary School Photo: Sophie Spring

Bert


SIERRA LEONE

Pic: Children at Goderich Primary School Photo: Sophie Spring

Bert


Pic: Children from River Cess County where CIC and FAWE work Photo: Becky Midlane

LIBERIA


Pic: Children from River Cess County where CIC and FAWE work Photo: Becky Midlane

LIBERIA


LIBERIA

Below: Yasmine proudly showing the stitches she had learnt on the sewing machine since starting at the VTC. Photo: Becky Midlane

Virtually nothing of the education system remained after Liberia’s 14 years of civil war devastated its infrastructure. The majority of schools in the country were destroyed and thousands of teachers were displaced, leaving many children with no suitable environment in which to learn. For some children, the period of civil war encompassed their entire schooling years and even today, seven years after the official end of the conflict, 56% of females and 39% of males have never attended school and many women struggle to earn a living due to a lack of marketable skills.

Female Education For many women in Liberia a lack of education means there are very few opportunities available to earn a living, resulting in many families living in abject poverty as parents are unable to provide for their children. Vocational skills provide an excellent opportunity for these women and combined with learning basic literacy it enables them to earn enough money to support and educate their children. To this end we opened a new vocational training centre (VTC) in Cestos City, River Cess County. The young women from Cestos are extremely dedicated to their learning and keen to gain knowledge and 22

skills that give them control over their lives and new opportunities they otherwise would not have access to. Since classes began at the centre 140 women have enrolled in training and are receiving lessons in literacy and numeracy, as well as tailoring, pastry making and hair dressing. A common problem faced by many women looking to learn new skills is that they are already mothers and are unable to give the time to their own development as they have childcare duties to uphold. In order to ensure that these women, who need this training more than anyone, are able to access the opportunities at the VTC, we run a crèche to look after the young children while their mothers attend classes. The women who attended the VTC last year are determined to take control of their own lives and support their families properly and it is a privilege to help them achieve this. Other Work During the years of conflict state-run teacher training was non-existent resulting in an urgent need for qualified teachers in Liberian schools. Working with the Forum for African Women Educationalists’ (FAWE) Liberia branch, this year we have successfully provided basic and specialised teacher training for 97 primary school teachers in River Cess County. The teachers received training in teaching

methodologies to ensure that their classes are engaging, interactive and child-centred, as well as in gender issues to make sure that their teaching is equally responsive to girls and boys. Now thousands of children in River Cess County are benefiting from a better standard of education and girls are better supported in their efforts to gain an education. We have also embarked on a new three-year project which will continue focusing on girls’ and women’s education in Liberia.

CASE STUDY – Yasmine Every morning, 19 year old Yasmine is always the first to arrive at the Vocational Training Centre. She is currently attending both an adult literacy and tailoring class. Yasmine is determined to learn and improve both her life and the lives of her young children. In a recent maths test, she was marked 9 out of 10, and was positively overflowing with pride with her achievement:

Achievements  40 women attended vocational and 1 literacy training at the VTC 97 primary school teachers received training  4,700 children are now receiving a better standard of education thanks to our teacher training

‘I can write good now. I want to learn more. When I finish here, I will be a good tailor. This will make me a better mother.’


LIBERIA

Below: Yasmine proudly showing the stitches she had learnt on the sewing machine since starting at the VTC. Photo: Becky Midlane

Virtually nothing of the education system remained after Liberia’s 14 years of civil war devastated its infrastructure. The majority of schools in the country were destroyed and thousands of teachers were displaced, leaving many children with no suitable environment in which to learn. For some children, the period of civil war encompassed their entire schooling years and even today, seven years after the official end of the conflict, 56% of females and 39% of males have never attended school and many women struggle to earn a living due to a lack of marketable skills.

Female Education For many women in Liberia a lack of education means there are very few opportunities available to earn a living, resulting in many families living in abject poverty as parents are unable to provide for their children. Vocational skills provide an excellent opportunity for these women and combined with learning basic literacy it enables them to earn enough money to support and educate their children. To this end we opened a new vocational training centre (VTC) in Cestos City, River Cess County. The young women from Cestos are extremely dedicated to their learning and keen to gain knowledge and 22

skills that give them control over their lives and new opportunities they otherwise would not have access to. Since classes began at the centre 140 women have enrolled in training and are receiving lessons in literacy and numeracy, as well as tailoring, pastry making and hair dressing. A common problem faced by many women looking to learn new skills is that they are already mothers and are unable to give the time to their own development as they have childcare duties to uphold. In order to ensure that these women, who need this training more than anyone, are able to access the opportunities at the VTC, we run a crèche to look after the young children while their mothers attend classes. The women who attended the VTC last year are determined to take control of their own lives and support their families properly and it is a privilege to help them achieve this. Other Work During the years of conflict state-run teacher training was non-existent resulting in an urgent need for qualified teachers in Liberian schools. Working with the Forum for African Women Educationalists’ (FAWE) Liberia branch, this year we have successfully provided basic and specialised teacher training for 97 primary school teachers in River Cess County. The teachers received training in teaching

methodologies to ensure that their classes are engaging, interactive and child-centred, as well as in gender issues to make sure that their teaching is equally responsive to girls and boys. Now thousands of children in River Cess County are benefiting from a better standard of education and girls are better supported in their efforts to gain an education. We have also embarked on a new three-year project which will continue focusing on girls’ and women’s education in Liberia.

CASE STUDY – Yasmine Every morning, 19 year old Yasmine is always the first to arrive at the Vocational Training Centre. She is currently attending both an adult literacy and tailoring class. Yasmine is determined to learn and improve both her life and the lives of her young children. In a recent maths test, she was marked 9 out of 10, and was positively overflowing with pride with her achievement:

Achievements  40 women attended vocational and 1 literacy training at the VTC 97 primary school teachers received training  4,700 children are now receiving a better standard of education thanks to our teacher training

‘I can write good now. I want to learn more. When I finish here, I will be a good tailor. This will make me a better mother.’


Pic: Children at a CIC Community-Based Education Centre in Kabul. Photo: Bethan Willams

AFGHANISTAN


Pic: Children at a CIC Community-Based Education Centre in Kabul. Photo: Bethan Willams

AFGHANISTAN


AFGHANISTAN

Below: A young boy participates in a numeracy class at a CIC Community-Based Education Centre. Photo: Bethan Willams

Afghanistan has been devastated by over three decades of conflict and political instability. Generations of children have missed out on an education and traditional community networks and support structures have been destroyed. Children and women in particular have suffered, being denied the rights which exist to protect them. The most deprived communities of Afghanistan face an uncertain future, but with support they can take back control of their own lives.

Community Based Education Centres We have been operating three Community Based Education Centres (CBECs) in the most deprived areas of Kabul. Located in secure buildings, close to the communities they serve, these centres run a variety of courses, designed to enable children to access education, help them stay in school and to provide the means for their families to earn a living more effectively and support their children in their education. Over the past year our work running the community centres has been instrumental in helping children gain access to state schools through our accelerated learning courses. We have also been providing homework support to children in danger of dropping out of school because of time 26

constraints, since many of these children have to work to support their families as well as going to school. The community centres have become a real focus for the most deprived areas of Kabul. Not only have we delivered classes to 781 children, but we have also provided 110 women their first ever literacy lessons and a further 108 have been attending tailoring classes so they can support their families more effectively. Delivering education to women and children in Kabul’s most deprived areas presents many challenges. Entrenched opinions and traditional views of the role of women and children often present barriers to their participation. However, by working closely with community leaders and fathers, we have seen attendance at our centres soaring, the benefits of education and the value of vocational and literacy skills becoming apparent to all involved. We have recently opened a fourth Community Based Education Centre and are hoping to open a fifth to make sure we are reaching as many children as possible. The centres really do change peoples’ lives, presenting them with opportunities they would otherwise never have access to.

Other Work

CASE STUDY – Seemor

We have also been making excellent progress in our work increasing the capacity of social workers to deliver better care in Afghanistan’s central provinces. There is no vocational qualification for social workers in Afghanistan and the majority of those people working with extremely vulnerable children have received no training whatsoever. We have been providing formal training and coaching support to social workers in institutions for the past two years to enable them to meet the needs of some of Afghanistan’s most deprived children. We have also been working with UNICEF to set up Child Protection Action Networks (CPANs) to ensure that children in Kabul City and across the Central Region have access to the help they need, when they need it. Approximately 1,800 children are already benefiting from better care and support.

Seemor’s story is not uncommon among the children at the community centres. Her daily routine is long and hard, starting at 3am and ending at 9pm but she says that she cannot imagine missing her classes. Having never had access to education before, she enjoys discovering new things every day. For a child like Seemor, the opportunity to join a government school realistically means the difference between a life of poverty, confined to her home, or the opportunity to continue to High School and University and eventually earn a living to support her family. Our centres offer hundreds of children the chance to change their lives and help their communities to break the cycle of poverty.

Achievements  781 Children attended classes at the CBECs  374 Women attended classes to learn new skills  7 Self help savings schemes were set up to help women support their families  4 Provincial social worker networks were set up  127 social workers underwent training


AFGHANISTAN

Below: A young boy participates in a numeracy class at a CIC Community-Based Education Centre. Photo: Bethan Willams

Afghanistan has been devastated by over three decades of conflict and political instability. Generations of children have missed out on an education and traditional community networks and support structures have been destroyed. Children and women in particular have suffered, being denied the rights which exist to protect them. The most deprived communities of Afghanistan face an uncertain future, but with support they can take back control of their own lives.

Community Based Education Centres We have been operating three Community Based Education Centres (CBECs) in the most deprived areas of Kabul. Located in secure buildings, close to the communities they serve, these centres run a variety of courses, designed to enable children to access education, help them stay in school and to provide the means for their families to earn a living more effectively and support their children in their education. Over the past year our work running the community centres has been instrumental in helping children gain access to state schools through our accelerated learning courses. We have also been providing homework support to children in danger of dropping out of school because of time 26

constraints, since many of these children have to work to support their families as well as going to school. The community centres have become a real focus for the most deprived areas of Kabul. Not only have we delivered classes to 781 children, but we have also provided 110 women their first ever literacy lessons and a further 108 have been attending tailoring classes so they can support their families more effectively. Delivering education to women and children in Kabul’s most deprived areas presents many challenges. Entrenched opinions and traditional views of the role of women and children often present barriers to their participation. However, by working closely with community leaders and fathers, we have seen attendance at our centres soaring, the benefits of education and the value of vocational and literacy skills becoming apparent to all involved. We have recently opened a fourth Community Based Education Centre and are hoping to open a fifth to make sure we are reaching as many children as possible. The centres really do change peoples’ lives, presenting them with opportunities they would otherwise never have access to.

Other Work

CASE STUDY – Seemor

We have also been making excellent progress in our work increasing the capacity of social workers to deliver better care in Afghanistan’s central provinces. There is no vocational qualification for social workers in Afghanistan and the majority of those people working with extremely vulnerable children have received no training whatsoever. We have been providing formal training and coaching support to social workers in institutions for the past two years to enable them to meet the needs of some of Afghanistan’s most deprived children. We have also been working with UNICEF to set up Child Protection Action Networks (CPANs) to ensure that children in Kabul City and across the Central Region have access to the help they need, when they need it. Approximately 1,800 children are already benefiting from better care and support.

Seemor’s story is not uncommon among the children at the community centres. Her daily routine is long and hard, starting at 3am and ending at 9pm but she says that she cannot imagine missing her classes. Having never had access to education before, she enjoys discovering new things every day. For a child like Seemor, the opportunity to join a government school realistically means the difference between a life of poverty, confined to her home, or the opportunity to continue to High School and University and eventually earn a living to support her family. Our centres offer hundreds of children the chance to change their lives and help their communities to break the cycle of poverty.

Achievements  781 Children attended classes at the CBECs  374 Women attended classes to learn new skills  7 Self help savings schemes were set up to help women support their families  4 Provincial social worker networks were set up  127 social workers underwent training


Pic: A midwife talking to young children in the TAP about the spread of germs and infections. Photo: Jinpa

CHINA Children in Crisis works on the Yushu Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture (TAP) in remote Western China with local partner organisation Jinpa. In this remote region where there is extremely limited access to healthcare and education, the infant mortality rate is alarmingly high (as high as 1 in 4) and there is little understanding of the most basic health and hygiene techniques.

Midwife Training Programme Our Midwife Training Programme trains young women from the nomadic and semi-nomadic communities of the Yushu TAP in midwifery, basic health, hygiene and first aid, providing them with skills, knowledge and a sense of empowerment and purpose in being able to help their communities, especially women. Over the last year CIC and Jinpa have continued to successfully deliver the Midwife Training Programme in Nangchen County and in December 2009, 50 young women graduated from the course. Throughout the year they have been putting their new skills and knowledge into practice in their communities with the support of Jinpa. In order to ensure that the newly trained women are properly supported and confident in their roles they also attended refresher courses so they could exchange information and lessons learned about their experiences working in 29


Pic: A midwife talking to young children in the TAP about the spread of germs and infections. Photo: Jinpa

CHINA Children in Crisis works on the Yushu Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture (TAP) in remote Western China with local partner organisation Jinpa. In this remote region where there is extremely limited access to healthcare and education, the infant mortality rate is alarmingly high (as high as 1 in 4) and there is little understanding of the most basic health and hygiene techniques.

Midwife Training Programme Our Midwife Training Programme trains young women from the nomadic and semi-nomadic communities of the Yushu TAP in midwifery, basic health, hygiene and first aid, providing them with skills, knowledge and a sense of empowerment and purpose in being able to help their communities, especially women. Over the last year CIC and Jinpa have continued to successfully deliver the Midwife Training Programme in Nangchen County and in December 2009, 50 young women graduated from the course. Throughout the year they have been putting their new skills and knowledge into practice in their communities with the support of Jinpa. In order to ensure that the newly trained women are properly supported and confident in their roles they also attended refresher courses so they could exchange information and lessons learned about their experiences working in 29


Below: Midwife delivering health education to children

CHINA

Photo: Jinpa

their villages and brush up on any skills they might be unclear on. After passing their final assessments all 50 young women received a Basic Doctor’s Certificate. The women are all now practicing in their own communities and have provided help to thousands of villagers and attended a total of 168 births. In March 2010 a further 22 young women from Nangchen County began their residential training at the Yushu Medical School in Jiegu (Yushu Town), to take the total number of midwives in the extremely remote county to 72. However, the course was postponed because of the devastating earthquake that hit Jiegu in April 2010 after only six weeks of the training. The Medical School collapsed and sadly a number of the course teachers were killed. Since the earthquake, we have been working with Jinpa to identify the best way to support reconstruction efforts now and in the longer term. Health Education Programme During the summer months of 2009 we delivered health education workshops to communities in Nangchen County where the lack of understanding of hygiene and germs means many ailments that are preventable frequently develop into more serious, potentially fatal problems due to lack of basic knowledge. 30

The workshops have proven to be a successful way of promoting health and hygiene among communities. 48 of the 50 young women enrolled on the Midwife Training Programme worked with the Jinpa team to deliver the workshops. This is extremely effective because people can relate to the young women from their own communities while reinforcing the role of the young women as health advisors and midwives in their communities. Achievements   2,780 villagers have sought help from the midwives  All the midwives have been called out to assist a sick villager or attend a birth  44 midwives have given heath talks to township meetings arranged by the authorities  252 men (9%) have asked for help since the midwives returned to their villages and 2528 women (91%)  662 pregnant women have asked for help or advice  The midwives have attended a total of 168 births

CASE STUDY - Tsering Lhacle Before the course Tsering had received two years of primary education and her main role in her community was yak herding. She could recognise letters in the Tibetan alphabet but after the literacy course at the beginning of the Midwife Training Course she can now read and write. Tsering says that nobody in her community had any ideas about health or hygiene before she came on the course. They did not believe in germs and the role they play in the spread of illness and disease.

31


Below: Midwife delivering health education to children

CHINA

Photo: Jinpa

their villages and brush up on any skills they might be unclear on. After passing their final assessments all 50 young women received a Basic Doctor’s Certificate. The women are all now practicing in their own communities and have provided help to thousands of villagers and attended a total of 168 births. In March 2010 a further 22 young women from Nangchen County began their residential training at the Yushu Medical School in Jiegu (Yushu Town), to take the total number of midwives in the extremely remote county to 72. However, the course was postponed because of the devastating earthquake that hit Jiegu in April 2010 after only six weeks of the training. The Medical School collapsed and sadly a number of the course teachers were killed. Since the earthquake, we have been working with Jinpa to identify the best way to support reconstruction efforts now and in the longer term. Health Education Programme During the summer months of 2009 we delivered health education workshops to communities in Nangchen County where the lack of understanding of hygiene and germs means many ailments that are preventable frequently develop into more serious, potentially fatal problems due to lack of basic knowledge. 30

The workshops have proven to be a successful way of promoting health and hygiene among communities. 48 of the 50 young women enrolled on the Midwife Training Programme worked with the Jinpa team to deliver the workshops. This is extremely effective because people can relate to the young women from their own communities while reinforcing the role of the young women as health advisors and midwives in their communities. Achievements   2,780 villagers have sought help from the midwives  All the midwives have been called out to assist a sick villager or attend a birth  44 midwives have given heath talks to township meetings arranged by the authorities  252 men (9%) have asked for help since the midwives returned to their villages and 2528 women (91%)  662 pregnant women have asked for help or advice  The midwives have attended a total of 168 births

CASE STUDY - Tsering Lhacle Before the course Tsering had received two years of primary education and her main role in her community was yak herding. She could recognise letters in the Tibetan alphabet but after the literacy course at the beginning of the Midwife Training Course she can now read and write. Tsering says that nobody in her community had any ideas about health or hygiene before she came on the course. They did not believe in germs and the role they play in the spread of illness and disease.

31


UK In the UK, our interactive drug and alcohol education project, d:side, aims to present children throughout the Leeds area with well researched and accurate information about the effects that drugs and alcohol have on their bodies and provides a forum for children to discuss the issues that are raised. The programme focuses on developing the children’s knowledge, skills and attitudes, equipping them with the appropriate life skills to successfully manage sensitive situations with their peers and encouraging a positive approach to life, especially in relation to drugs and alcohol. The educators deliver engaging sessions using a range of interactive tools, such as the giant cigarette, to convey important information in a fun and child-friendly way. During the 2009-2010 academic year d:side visited 112 primary schools and delivered over 1,160 sessions to reach approximately 21,000 children.

ITALY In Italy we have a long standing partnership with our partner organisation in Milan who provide d:side drug and alcohol education. d:side in Italy is now a well-established programme in the City of Milan, receiving the support of the local town council and local health authorities. The programme is also being delivered in Umbria with the financial support of the local regional authorities and has been met with incredible enthusiasm and participation from schools and pupils.

Completed projects East Timor and Ukraine East Timor

Ukraine

After eight years of extremely successful work in East Timor, including rebuilding 18 schools and training over 400 teachers, CIC closed the programme at the end of October 2009. This decision was taken to avoid duplication after the Government announced it was taking responsibility for in-service teacher training. This positive and natural end to our work in East Timor is what we aim for in all the countries we work in.

The Life Without Drugs programme in Ukraine came to an end in December 2009 after successfully delivering drug and alcohol education to thousands of children since 2001. The closing of the programme coincided with the end of the partnership agreement between Children in Crisis and local partner Oleksandr Feldman’s Foundation. This has been a very successful project and the Oleksandr Feldman’s Foundation will continue to run the programme. CIC has built the capacity of the Foundation’s educators and the Foundation has become well established since the programme began, leaving them in a very strong position to continue working in the drug and alcohol education arena.

During the first half of 2009 Children in Crisis completed a six-month research phase into education in rural schools in East Timor as part of a project with UNICEF on Multigrade Education. A key aspect of this period involved sensitising officials in the Ministry of Education (MoE) on the Multigrade approach and how it might fit with East Timor’s education system. UNICEF and MoE plan to use this research to develop a pedagogical approach for primary and secondary schooling. Children in Crisis delivered teacher training to 46 in-service primary school teachers as part of Plan International’s ‘Healthy Children in Child Friendly Schools Project’ during the summer of 2009. We also completed Uacala school during this period and supported five schools by providing much needed furniture so that children have a stable, learner-friendly environment to attend classes in.

32

This year the educational team continued with drugs and alcohol sessions for 6-12 year olds in schools in Chervonozavodskij, October and Lenin areas, reaching an average of 12,000 pupils. During the Autumn term, sessions were held in 14 primary schools and 4 secondary schools reaching a total of around 3,750 students. Throughout July and August, during the summer holidays, the team spent time developing practical training programmes on HIV that can be used in sessions aimed at teenagers.

33


UK In the UK, our interactive drug and alcohol education project, d:side, aims to present children throughout the Leeds area with well researched and accurate information about the effects that drugs and alcohol have on their bodies and provides a forum for children to discuss the issues that are raised. The programme focuses on developing the children’s knowledge, skills and attitudes, equipping them with the appropriate life skills to successfully manage sensitive situations with their peers and encouraging a positive approach to life, especially in relation to drugs and alcohol. The educators deliver engaging sessions using a range of interactive tools, such as the giant cigarette, to convey important information in a fun and child-friendly way. During the 2009-2010 academic year d:side visited 112 primary schools and delivered over 1,160 sessions to reach approximately 21,000 children.

ITALY In Italy we have a long standing partnership with our partner organisation in Milan who provide d:side drug and alcohol education. d:side in Italy is now a well-established programme in the City of Milan, receiving the support of the local town council and local health authorities. The programme is also being delivered in Umbria with the financial support of the local regional authorities and has been met with incredible enthusiasm and participation from schools and pupils.

Completed projects East Timor and Ukraine East Timor

Ukraine

After eight years of extremely successful work in East Timor, including rebuilding 18 schools and training over 400 teachers, CIC closed the programme at the end of October 2009. This decision was taken to avoid duplication after the Government announced it was taking responsibility for in-service teacher training. This positive and natural end to our work in East Timor is what we aim for in all the countries we work in.

The Life Without Drugs programme in Ukraine came to an end in December 2009 after successfully delivering drug and alcohol education to thousands of children since 2001. The closing of the programme coincided with the end of the partnership agreement between Children in Crisis and local partner Oleksandr Feldman’s Foundation. This has been a very successful project and the Oleksandr Feldman’s Foundation will continue to run the programme. CIC has built the capacity of the Foundation’s educators and the Foundation has become well established since the programme began, leaving them in a very strong position to continue working in the drug and alcohol education arena.

During the first half of 2009 Children in Crisis completed a six-month research phase into education in rural schools in East Timor as part of a project with UNICEF on Multigrade Education. A key aspect of this period involved sensitising officials in the Ministry of Education (MoE) on the Multigrade approach and how it might fit with East Timor’s education system. UNICEF and MoE plan to use this research to develop a pedagogical approach for primary and secondary schooling. Children in Crisis delivered teacher training to 46 in-service primary school teachers as part of Plan International’s ‘Healthy Children in Child Friendly Schools Project’ during the summer of 2009. We also completed Uacala school during this period and supported five schools by providing much needed furniture so that children have a stable, learner-friendly environment to attend classes in.

32

This year the educational team continued with drugs and alcohol sessions for 6-12 year olds in schools in Chervonozavodskij, October and Lenin areas, reaching an average of 12,000 pupils. During the Autumn term, sessions were held in 14 primary schools and 4 secondary schools reaching a total of around 3,750 students. Throughout July and August, during the summer holidays, the team spent time developing practical training programmes on HIV that can be used in sessions aimed at teenagers.

33


FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS 09/10 BALANCE SHEET AT 31ST MARCH 2010

INCOMING RESOURCES

EXPENDITURE BY PROGRAMME ACTIVITY

2010

2009

2010

2009

Community        550,493

36%

£

£

£

£

Health               424,941

27%

1,503,817

1,616,191

47,264

76,314

Schools

37%

189,655

254,336

7,907

6,167

Investment income   2,938

48,325

1,010,152

1,307,691

(64,494)

(101,496)

Voluntary income Event income

Tangible Fixed Assets Investments Current Assets

573,352

1,548,786

Grants/Contracts for Operational programmes Total Incoming Resorces

335,205

523,020

2,031,615

2,441,872

Liabilities within one year

Cost of Generating Funds Charitable activities

737,542

801,762

1,548,786

1,797,666

Governance costs

34,874

36,579

Total Resources Expended 2,321,202

2,636,007

NET ASSETS

for the year

Designated funds (289,587)

(194,135)

Restricted funds Total Funds

Gain/(loss) on investments

1,738

9

(287,849)

(194,126)

Total funds brought forward 1,288,678

1,482,804

Total funds carried forward 1,000,829

1,288,678

Net movements in funds

1,000,829

1,288,676

FUNDS General funds

Net income/(expenditure)

EXPENDITURE BY COUNTRY

Amounts falling due

Afghanistan

456,673

DRC

290,186

29% 19%

Liberia

219,518

14%

UK

212,536

14%

Sierra Leone

153,798

10%

China

94,528

6%

40,908

Sri Lanka

70,646

5%

721,069

959,702

East Timor

47,089

3%

1,000,829

1,288,678

3,812

0%

244,271

288,068

35,489

Other

1,548,786

RESOURCES EXPENDED A full set of accounts can be found on our website or requested from Head Office

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35


FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS 09/10 BALANCE SHEET AT 31ST MARCH 2010

INCOMING RESOURCES

EXPENDITURE BY PROGRAMME ACTIVITY

2010

2009

2010

2009

Community        550,493

36%

£

£

£

£

Health               424,941

27%

1,503,817

1,616,191

47,264

76,314

Schools

37%

189,655

254,336

7,907

6,167

Investment income   2,938

48,325

1,010,152

1,307,691

(64,494)

(101,496)

Voluntary income Event income

Tangible Fixed Assets Investments Current Assets

573,352

1,548,786

Grants/Contracts for Operational programmes Total Incoming Resorces

335,205

523,020

2,031,615

2,441,872

Liabilities within one year

Cost of Generating Funds Charitable activities

737,542

801,762

1,548,786

1,797,666

Governance costs

34,874

36,579

Total Resources Expended 2,321,202

2,636,007

NET ASSETS

for the year

Designated funds (289,587)

(194,135)

Restricted funds Total Funds

Gain/(loss) on investments

1,738

9

(287,849)

(194,126)

Total funds brought forward 1,288,678

1,482,804

Total funds carried forward 1,000,829

1,288,678

Net movements in funds

1,000,829

1,288,676

FUNDS General funds

Net income/(expenditure)

EXPENDITURE BY COUNTRY

Amounts falling due

Afghanistan

456,673

DRC

290,186

29% 19%

Liberia

219,518

14%

UK

212,536

14%

Sierra Leone

153,798

10%

China

94,528

6%

40,908

Sri Lanka

70,646

5%

721,069

959,702

East Timor

47,089

3%

1,000,829

1,288,678

3,812

0%

244,271

288,068

35,489

Other

1,548,786

RESOURCES EXPENDED A full set of accounts can be found on our website or requested from Head Office

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I would like to help Children in Crisis

THANK YOU All of our vital work around the world relies on the kindness and generosity of our supporters. We are incredibly lucky to have the support of trusts, foundations, companies and generous individuals who all contribute to our work, sharing our vision of a world where all children have access to the education that they deserve. If you have given a donation to our work in the past year, thank you. You have made a difference to the lives of children who need our help, to help themselves. Below are some supporters who have been especially important to our work, thank you for all your help, together we have achieved some incredible work this past year; Argus Media Audrey and Stanley Burton Charitable Trust The Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) AXA Investment Managers Barclays Capital BGC Partners Bliss Family Charity British and Foreign School Society Cass Art Claviga Comic Relief Deborah Helsby EDF Tax Fred Anson The German Embassy, Kabul Grahame Harding Hugh Edmeades Jersey Overseas Aid Commission

36

JP Morgan Private Bank Julia Streets Lee Bates LK Bennett London Marathon 2010 runners Medicor Foundation Number 42 Oliver Bonas Princess Beatrice of York Ron Friend Savills Shanley Charitable Trust St Georges Hospital RAG Association The Economist Group Charitable Trust Tom Eastell Turing Foundation UNICEF Vitol Charitable Foundation World Bank World Vision Zochonis Foundation

Our Trustees: Olivier de Givenchy – Chairman Mark Olbrich – Treasurer Yvonne Ike Deborah Helsby Chris Ambler Linda Wendel Grahame Harding (until 09/09) Paul Szkiler (until 09/09) James Lowther (until 09/09) Glenda Marchant (until 03/10) Gilda Moratti (from 04/09) Alexandra Buxton (from 12/09) Our Ambassadors: Princess Beatrice of York Fiona Phillips Rula Lenska

I WOULD LIKE TO DONATE £


HOW YOU CAN HELP

Children in Crisis 206-208 Stewart’s Road, London, SW8 4UB Tel:

+44(0)20 7627 1040

Fax:

+44(0)20 7627 1050

E-mail: info@childrenincrisis.org

£60

could pay for a medical kit including thermometer, stethoscope, iodine and blood pressure monitor, for a trainee midwife in China.

£106

Website: www.childrenincrisis.org

Children in Crisis Italy Onlus Viale E. Stefini 2 20125 Milano Italy Tel:

+39 02 67479243

Fax:

+39 02 37050577

could provide health materials (soap, tooth brush, shampoo, towel etc) for one Community Based Education Centre in Afghanistan for one year.

E-mail: info@childrenincrisis.it

£240

Sarah, Duchess of York

could provide one School Tool Kit for one school in DRC as part of a Teacher Training Programme. These kits include teaching resources, classroom materials and teacher resource packs.

Website: www.childrenincrisis.it Founder and Life President:

Registered office as address. Reg Charity No. 1020488 Company No. 2815817

£1,796

could pay for 640 parents of primary school children to participate in education sessions run by community group members trained as part of our HIV/AIDS Education Project in Sierra Leone.

£3,500

could pay for 30 sewing machines that will enable women and girls to take part in tailoring classes at the Vocational Training Centre in Liberia for one year as part of our Girls Education Project.

Education for the world’s most vulnerable children

Annual Review 2009 - 2010  
Annual Review 2009 - 2010  

Our annual review of 2009 - 2010.

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