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Maron’s bakery in Liberia

A chance to learn, a chance in life

Why I support Children in Crisis

2011: THE YEAR IN REVIEW

I was first introduced to Children in Crisis when family friends suffered a horrific personal tragedy. Their son was tragically killed in terrible circumstances. Recognising the impact such an event could have on the future of the family, they decided to channel their grief to positive means by raising funds for Children in Crisis. Climbing mountains is no mean feat for most of us, so just imagine what conquering Base Camp Everest, Kilimanjaro and Cotopaxi has meant for the family. They are a true inspiration and in turn have inspired others, to such an extent that with Children in Crisis they opened a school in their son’s name in Democratic Republic of the Congo. Like so many of their friends, to support them I have been able to bring together various elements of my professional and social lives to create events for Children in Crisis. It has been important for me that the administrative costs of Children in Crisis are as low as they feasibly can be and that every penny raised is put to great use. I have been impressed with how hard everyone works to raise funds and create sustainable educational and social infrastructure programmes in some of the most remote places in the world. And it works. Just look at their amazing work in Liberia as one example. Women setting up bakeries, schools built and teachers educated, all of which create networks and communities creating better futures for themselves. I am very honoured to have been invited to be a Trustee last year and to play my part in the development of the charity. There are many, many ways you too can get involved to lend your support and the website is full of ideas and updates about what’s going on. Any and every help is hugely appreciated. Julia Streets Director of Streets Consulting & Trustee of Children in Crisis Children in Crisis, 206 - 208 Stewart’s Road London SW8 4UB, UK tel: +4420 7627 1040 fax: +4420 7627 1050 info@childrenincrisis.org www.childrenincrisis.org Children in Crisis Italy, Foro Buonaparte 76, Milano, Italy tel. +39 02 89096744 - +39 02 72094645 info@childrenincrisis.it www.childrenincrisis.it

Children in Crisis protects and educates children facing the toughest hardships in countries affected by conflict or political instability. Founder and Life President: Sarah, Duchess of York. Registered office as above. UK Registered charity No. 1020488. Company No. 2815817.

DR Congo Photo: James Hickman


Thank you from Founder and Life President

Sarah, Duchess of York Once again we are privileged to have brought such important changes to some of the world’s most vulnerable and isolated people. Where lives are torn apart by conflict we have helped strengthen communities and bring stability. A chance to learn really is a chance in life. Despite our successes, this year has been clouded by grief. In the Democratic Republic of Congo we are recovering from the loss of dear friends who gave their lives for children in the DR Congo. It is in their memory that we will continue to strive to realise their vision of peace, hope and opportunity for the world’s forgotten children. I have such a deep admiration for all of our teams on the ground in Afghanistan, Liberia, Sierra Leone, the DR Congo and China. They reach so many in the hardest of circumstances. It is with their courage that we are starting to break the cycle of poverty. Their knowledge and understanding builds trust with communities and inspires courageous action from women and young girls to end their isolation and be heard.

I feel so proud and thankful for all of the hard work and dedication. Thank you to all our supporters, advisors and the Children in Crisis team. Without you we would be unable to continue our great work. To all our partners working in the field, all parents in the rural communities we work with, including the Bipimo mothers portrayed below, I thank you for all that you do to bring positive change in the lives of children and convince us and others that we really do have the strength to break the cycle of poverty in one generation.

Sarah, Duchess of York Founder and Life President

DR Congo. Mothers carrying sand for Bipimo Primary School, inaugurated June 2011.

Liberia

Chair

and Chief

Executive’s foreword

There is little cheer to find within the prolonged economic crisis. But people’s determination not to cut back on their generosity to charity is one of them. For many this is a clear reflection of their values, and a sharpened sense that ‘if we are finding it tough then those with far less must be finding it a lot tougher’.

hunger. For adults this may be reversible, but for children there are life long and inter-generational consequences.

Children above all bear the greatest burden when economies dip. At these times there are more children on the street, more children working, more children dropping out of school, more early marriage and more

We aim to catch children before they fall and to give them a voice in households and communities so that their needs cannot be ignored. But this is not enough. During economic downturns, national governments and the international community need far more of a focus on children. So as well as directly supporting the most vulnerable children, we will do far more to amplify children’s voices globally.

Olivier Taffin de Givenchy Chair

Koy Thomson Chief Executive

Children in Crisis - Our vision All children receive the learning needed for their flourishing and wellbeing.

Our mission Children in Crisis 206-208 Stewart’s Road London SW8 4UB

Telephone +44 (0)20 7627 1040 Fax +44 (0)20 7627 1050

E-mail info@childrenincrisis.org Website www.childrenincrisis.org

Founder and Life President Sarah, Duchess of York

Registered office as address UK Reg Charity No. 1020488 Company No. 2815817

Where resources are few, where education is needed to heal the nation, and where it is too remote for others, our aim is to support children to read, write, think, pursue their life goals and contribute positively to their communities. 1


Thank you from Founder and Life President

Sarah, Duchess of York Once again we are privileged to have brought such important changes to some of the world’s most vulnerable and isolated people. Where lives are torn apart by conflict we have helped strengthen communities and bring stability. A chance to learn really is a chance in life. Despite our successes, this year has been clouded by grief. In the Democratic Republic of Congo we are recovering from the loss of dear friends who gave their lives for children in the DR Congo. It is in their memory that we will continue to strive to realise their vision of peace, hope and opportunity for the world’s forgotten children. I have such a deep admiration for all of our teams on the ground in Afghanistan, Liberia, Sierra Leone, the DR Congo and China. They reach so many in the hardest of circumstances. It is with their courage that we are starting to break the cycle of poverty. Their knowledge and understanding builds trust with communities and inspires courageous action from women and young girls to end their isolation and be heard.

I feel so proud and thankful for all of the hard work and dedication. Thank you to all our supporters, advisors and the Children in Crisis team. Without you we would be unable to continue our great work. To all our partners working in the field, all parents in the rural communities we work with, including the Bipimo mothers portrayed below, I thank you for all that you do to bring positive change in the lives of children and convince us and others that we really do have the strength to break the cycle of poverty in one generation.

Sarah, Duchess of York Founder and Life President

DR Congo. Mothers carrying sand for Bipimo Primary School, inaugurated June 2011.

Liberia

Chair

and Chief

Executive’s foreword

There is little cheer to find within the prolonged economic crisis. But people’s determination not to cut back on their generosity to charity is one of them. For many this is a clear reflection of their values, and a sharpened sense that ‘if we are finding it tough then those with far less must be finding it a lot tougher’.

hunger. For adults this may be reversible, but for children there are life long and inter-generational consequences.

Children above all bear the greatest burden when economies dip. At these times there are more children on the street, more children working, more children dropping out of school, more early marriage and more

We aim to catch children before they fall and to give them a voice in households and communities so that their needs cannot be ignored. But this is not enough. During economic downturns, national governments and the international community need far more of a focus on children. So as well as directly supporting the most vulnerable children, we will do far more to amplify children’s voices globally.

Olivier Taffin de Givenchy Chair

Koy Thomson Chief Executive

Children in Crisis - Our vision All children receive the learning needed for their flourishing and wellbeing.

Our mission Children in Crisis 206-208 Stewart’s Road London SW8 4UB

Telephone +44 (0)20 7627 1040 Fax +44 (0)20 7627 1050

E-mail info@childrenincrisis.org Website www.childrenincrisis.org

Founder and Life President Sarah, Duchess of York

Registered office as address UK Reg Charity No. 1020488 Company No. 2815817

Where resources are few, where education is needed to heal the nation, and where it is too remote for others, our aim is to support children to read, write, think, pursue their life goals and contribute positively to their communities. 1


What’s new?

Funding priorities for 2012/13 As Children in Crisis embark on a new year, we do so with an unwavering commitment to ‘putting the last first’ and to supporting the most vulnerable children and their families to access the services and resources needed for their flourishing and well-being. For children around the world whose life situations are intolerable, Children in Crisis have a moral duty to respond. Protecting children from abuse, whether in school, family, in other institutions, or on the street, and supporting their educational needs is critical. We need to pay particular attention to children who face multiple discrimination or disadvantage, for reasons of ethnicity, gender, disability, income or other factors. This is why, in 2012, Children in Crisis will be embarking on several new and innovative research and development initiatives that will complement and strengthen our existing work with communities and ensure that the life realities for vulnerable, at risk children do not go unnoticed and unaddressed. In the Democratic Republic of Congo, where political instability led to the massacre that occurred last October and has tragically affected the lives of the local communities (see page 15), we have completed a risk assessment of the situation on the ground and, with loyal support from our funders and individual donors, we are restarting our brave and ambitious programme of school building and teacher training aimed at reaching every child on the Plateau. In Afghanistan, where chronic instability and conflict have put immense strain on the traditional family unit, Children in Crisis anticipates undertaking a six-month assessment into residential care of children 2

with funding from the EU that will provide valid and reliable data on the prevalence, characteristics and needs of children in unregulated institutions. This assessment will represent the first comprehensive research to be undertaken into residential care in Afghanistan, and will be used by Children in Crisis to argue for a reversal in the rapid growth of harmful institutional care, and to support small scale and family-based alternatives. In addition to our on-going programme on child protection and child rights (see page 20), we are also launching a new Community Based Education project to support with accelerated learning 300 out of school children in Kabul over a full three-year cycle until they can join a state secondary school. In Sierra Leone, we are particularly excited to be starting two new projects aimed at finding lasting solutions to quality schooling in remote and resource poor communities. Thanks to funding secured from one of our major donors, we are able to pilot a 20-month project in rural Sierra Leonean schools, supporting collective action by communities to overcome barriers to their children’s education, guided by the principle that change comes when actions are directed by communities, not for or on behalf of communities. We are also delighted to announce our very first grant from the UK Department for International Development, worth £446,595 over three years, to improve access to quality education in the most under-resourced chiefdoms of Kambia. We are seeking match funding for both of these projects in 2012 and 2013.

In Liberia, rural, poorly resourced communities continue to be affected by geographical isolation. As our work has moved further into the more remote areas of River Cess there has been a worrying decrease in teacher ability and the physical condition of schools. So we aim to develop innovative techniques to build schools from local but durable materials to overcome the challenges which we have experienced while building “the school that crossed a river”… (see Finally, increasing our capacity to grow our page 10). River Cess is one of the most income and scale up our programmes to marginalised counties in Liberia, with some respond flexibly to beneficiaries’ needs is of the poorest education services. In many even more important in these uncertain classrooms teachers have no training, having times. Income predictability is important only graduated from high school. To address too. For this purpose we are launching a this we have secured funding to conduct Development Fund to support our intensive refresher training for weaker investments in regular giving campaigns and teachers, alongside our on-going teacher in programme research. So we are seeking training and school building programme. donors willing to invest in our organisational Finally, since teachers and schools cannot growth in 2012 and beyond. succeed without parental support, and since girls will not be given the opportunities There is a great deal to motivate, they need without community challenge and inspire Children in understanding of the Crisis and our supporters as government’s ‘Girls´ we embark on a new year. I don’t believe Education Policy’, We do so with renewed in charity, I believe in training will be given to determination and solidarity. Charity is vertical, address these needs. conviction to do more, so it’s humiliating. It goes from do better and do so Evidence based the top to the bottom. Solidarity is hand in hand with research will horizontal. It respects the other the communities continue to be and learns from the other. I have with whom we work. critical to our change a lot to learn from people. agenda, and with Koy Thomson Eduardo Galeano local partners, we are Chief Executive about to develop a new country programme in Burundi, based on our To find out more about any of our new or on-going projects’ funding needs please contact findings and focussing on inclusive education Elisabeth Michau, Fundraising Director or for children from discriminated-against Sarah Rowse, Programme Director. Batwa communities. 3


What’s new?

Funding priorities for 2012/13 As Children in Crisis embark on a new year, we do so with an unwavering commitment to ‘putting the last first’ and to supporting the most vulnerable children and their families to access the services and resources needed for their flourishing and well-being. For children around the world whose life situations are intolerable, Children in Crisis have a moral duty to respond. Protecting children from abuse, whether in school, family, in other institutions, or on the street, and supporting their educational needs is critical. We need to pay particular attention to children who face multiple discrimination or disadvantage, for reasons of ethnicity, gender, disability, income or other factors. This is why, in 2012, Children in Crisis will be embarking on several new and innovative research and development initiatives that will complement and strengthen our existing work with communities and ensure that the life realities for vulnerable, at risk children do not go unnoticed and unaddressed. In the Democratic Republic of Congo, where political instability led to the massacre that occurred last October and has tragically affected the lives of the local communities (see page 15), we have completed a risk assessment of the situation on the ground and, with loyal support from our funders and individual donors, we are restarting our brave and ambitious programme of school building and teacher training aimed at reaching every child on the Plateau. In Afghanistan, where chronic instability and conflict have put immense strain on the traditional family unit, Children in Crisis anticipates undertaking a six-month assessment into residential care of children 2

with funding from the EU that will provide valid and reliable data on the prevalence, characteristics and needs of children in unregulated institutions. This assessment will represent the first comprehensive research to be undertaken into residential care in Afghanistan, and will be used by Children in Crisis to argue for a reversal in the rapid growth of harmful institutional care, and to support small scale and family-based alternatives. In addition to our on-going programme on child protection and child rights (see page 20), we are also launching a new Community Based Education project to support with accelerated learning 300 out of school children in Kabul over a full three-year cycle until they can join a state secondary school. In Sierra Leone, we are particularly excited to be starting two new projects aimed at finding lasting solutions to quality schooling in remote and resource poor communities. Thanks to funding secured from one of our major donors, we are able to pilot a 20-month project in rural Sierra Leonean schools, supporting collective action by communities to overcome barriers to their children’s education, guided by the principle that change comes when actions are directed by communities, not for or on behalf of communities. We are also delighted to announce our very first grant from the UK Department for International Development, worth £446,595 over three years, to improve access to quality education in the most under-resourced chiefdoms of Kambia. We are seeking match funding for both of these projects in 2012 and 2013.

In Liberia, rural, poorly resourced communities continue to be affected by geographical isolation. As our work has moved further into the more remote areas of River Cess there has been a worrying decrease in teacher ability and the physical condition of schools. So we aim to develop innovative techniques to build schools from local but durable materials to overcome the challenges which we have experienced while building “the school that crossed a river”… (see Finally, increasing our capacity to grow our page 10). River Cess is one of the most income and scale up our programmes to marginalised counties in Liberia, with some respond flexibly to beneficiaries’ needs is of the poorest education services. In many even more important in these uncertain classrooms teachers have no training, having times. Income predictability is important only graduated from high school. To address too. For this purpose we are launching a this we have secured funding to conduct Development Fund to support our intensive refresher training for weaker investments in regular giving campaigns and teachers, alongside our on-going teacher in programme research. So we are seeking training and school building programme. donors willing to invest in our organisational Finally, since teachers and schools cannot growth in 2012 and beyond. succeed without parental support, and since girls will not be given the opportunities There is a great deal to motivate, they need without community challenge and inspire Children in understanding of the Crisis and our supporters as government’s ‘Girls´ we embark on a new year. I don’t believe Education Policy’, We do so with renewed in charity, I believe in training will be given to determination and solidarity. Charity is vertical, address these needs. conviction to do more, so it’s humiliating. It goes from do better and do so Evidence based the top to the bottom. Solidarity is hand in hand with research will horizontal. It respects the other the communities continue to be and learns from the other. I have with whom we work. critical to our change a lot to learn from people. agenda, and with Koy Thomson Eduardo Galeano local partners, we are Chief Executive about to develop a new country programme in Burundi, based on our To find out more about any of our new or on-going projects’ funding needs please contact findings and focussing on inclusive education Elisabeth Michau, Fundraising Director or for children from discriminated-against Sarah Rowse, Programme Director. Batwa communities. 3


Focus on

Child Rights and Child Protection The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) sets out human rights and special provisions for the care and protection of all children. This inspiring and hopeful global agreement has legal force in every country where we work, and informs our programmes. The rights within the convention can be divided into three broad categories:

Survival and Development The Convention tells us that all children have the right to develop to their own potential, but what does this mean for Children in Crisis? Across all our country programmes, basic health and hygiene classes give children and their families tips which may seem simple but can save lives, particularly of very young children. It is not enough though for children to simply survive .We believe that all children have the right to flourish. This is supported in the right of children to develop included within the UNCRC. Without an education, children will not grow into adults who are able to fully participate in the world. Not only does being unable to read, write or count inhibit an adult from

Tibetan Plateau, health education classes

becoming employed, it does not allow them to think, to question and to demand a brighter future from the people who are accountable to them. Another important aspect of the convention is that all children hold these rights, not just boys or those from a particular ethnic group. The convention, and likewise Children in Crisis’ work, is rooted in the principle of nondiscrimination. In relation to education, it’s not enough for adequate schooling just to exist; all children must be able to access it. So whether it be in Afghanistan, Liberia or DR Congo, we pay particular attention to girls' education. In Sierra Leone, Children in Crisis has recognised that children with disabilities are particularly vulnerable. During 2011, an assessment was conducted into the situation of children with disabilities in Kambia District. Likewise, in Burundi we are about to develop a new programme focusing on inclusive education for Batwa children.

Protection Children are humans, they have the same general rights as adults but they are particularly vulnerable and need a specific set of rights that recognise their particular and special need for protection. In the countries where we are working, we are confronted

4

with the sad truth that often those with responsibility to care for children have no idea about children’s rights and are those most likely to abuse them.

Afghanistan

Our teacher training focus means that we are frequently working with unqualified and untrained teachers. When faced with huge classes of multi-age students, unconfident teachers often resort to violent methods of punishment. It is our belief that violence breeds more violence and teachers have a responsibility not only to ensure children leave school having passed their exams, but also to understand that resorting to violence is wrong. This is vital to ensuring future peace for conflict affected and post conflict countries and consequently, alternative disciplining methods are integral to all our teacher training programmes. Children are also particularly vulnerable to sexual abuse especially by those in authority. In Liberia, Children in Crisis works directly to protect girls through the provision of girls’ clubs in schools where girls can discuss and address their concerns. As a result girls are feeling supported, are more likely to continue in school and are doing better in their classes. Within communities affected by war in Afghanistan, children may experience a range of child protection abuses. Children in Crisis is working alongside UNICEF to ensure that any child protection cases are adequately reported, addressed and followed up where necessary. Children in conflict with the law in Afghanistan may suffer abuse at the hands of police. We are committed to raising awareness of the rights of children among police and justice professionals and have made these rights relevant by relating them to Islamic texts and by training policemen.

Participation We believe that children have a right to contribute to decisions that will affect their lives, this does not mean that children make all decisions but that their views are taken

into account. Children have the right to be heard and also the right to hear. Children in Crisis recognises the importance of listening to children during the design, development, delivery and monitoring of our work and in taking the time to ask children their opinions when they may never have been asked before. Our projects are only as successful as the impact they make on children’s lives and the only way we can understand that is through listening to children. Throughout 2011 we have begun developing partnerships with organisations who are experts in child participation. We hope that throughout 2012 and beyond we will be able to work with these organisations to ensure that across all our countries, all children are fulfilling their right to participate whatever their gender, ability or ethnic group. Bethan Williams Programme Manager 5


Focus on

Child Rights and Child Protection The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) sets out human rights and special provisions for the care and protection of all children. This inspiring and hopeful global agreement has legal force in every country where we work, and informs our programmes. The rights within the convention can be divided into three broad categories:

Survival and Development The Convention tells us that all children have the right to develop to their own potential, but what does this mean for Children in Crisis? Across all our country programmes, basic health and hygiene classes give children and their families tips which may seem simple but can save lives, particularly of very young children. It is not enough though for children to simply survive .We believe that all children have the right to flourish. This is supported in the right of children to develop included within the UNCRC. Without an education, children will not grow into adults who are able to fully participate in the world. Not only does being unable to read, write or count inhibit an adult from

Tibetan Plateau, health education classes

becoming employed, it does not allow them to think, to question and to demand a brighter future from the people who are accountable to them. Another important aspect of the convention is that all children hold these rights, not just boys or those from a particular ethnic group. The convention, and likewise Children in Crisis’ work, is rooted in the principle of nondiscrimination. In relation to education, it’s not enough for adequate schooling just to exist; all children must be able to access it. So whether it be in Afghanistan, Liberia or DR Congo, we pay particular attention to girls' education. In Sierra Leone, Children in Crisis has recognised that children with disabilities are particularly vulnerable. During 2011, an assessment was conducted into the situation of children with disabilities in Kambia District. Likewise, in Burundi we are about to develop a new programme focusing on inclusive education for Batwa children.

Protection Children are humans, they have the same general rights as adults but they are particularly vulnerable and need a specific set of rights that recognise their particular and special need for protection. In the countries where we are working, we are confronted

4

with the sad truth that often those with responsibility to care for children have no idea about children’s rights and are those most likely to abuse them.

Afghanistan

Our teacher training focus means that we are frequently working with unqualified and untrained teachers. When faced with huge classes of multi-age students, unconfident teachers often resort to violent methods of punishment. It is our belief that violence breeds more violence and teachers have a responsibility not only to ensure children leave school having passed their exams, but also to understand that resorting to violence is wrong. This is vital to ensuring future peace for conflict affected and post conflict countries and consequently, alternative disciplining methods are integral to all our teacher training programmes. Children are also particularly vulnerable to sexual abuse especially by those in authority. In Liberia, Children in Crisis works directly to protect girls through the provision of girls’ clubs in schools where girls can discuss and address their concerns. As a result girls are feeling supported, are more likely to continue in school and are doing better in their classes. Within communities affected by war in Afghanistan, children may experience a range of child protection abuses. Children in Crisis is working alongside UNICEF to ensure that any child protection cases are adequately reported, addressed and followed up where necessary. Children in conflict with the law in Afghanistan may suffer abuse at the hands of police. We are committed to raising awareness of the rights of children among police and justice professionals and have made these rights relevant by relating them to Islamic texts and by training policemen.

Participation We believe that children have a right to contribute to decisions that will affect their lives, this does not mean that children make all decisions but that their views are taken

into account. Children have the right to be heard and also the right to hear. Children in Crisis recognises the importance of listening to children during the design, development, delivery and monitoring of our work and in taking the time to ask children their opinions when they may never have been asked before. Our projects are only as successful as the impact they make on children’s lives and the only way we can understand that is through listening to children. Throughout 2011 we have begun developing partnerships with organisations who are experts in child participation. We hope that throughout 2012 and beyond we will be able to work with these organisations to ensure that across all our countries, all children are fulfilling their right to participate whatever their gender, ability or ethnic group. Bethan Williams Programme Manager 5


Focus on

Top: Afghanistan Below: Tibetan Plateau

Women and Girls' Empowerment What girls want… Every girl is unique but there are some things that all girls want. Girls want good things to happen to them in life. But what girls want they can’t have. What the world needs is what girls want. There’s a solution in there somewhere. Girls want education. An eight year old boy in a village in northern Sierra Leone told us ‘it’s not worth educating girls’. Only eight and this little boy is already spouting deadly prejudices. Only eight and this little boy sees girls and women as less than human. Staying in school means delaying marriage and childbirth – something else that girls want. Girls marrying early are twice as likely to die from complications in pregnancy and childbirth – the most likely cause of death amongst young adolescent girls. Girls marrying later have fewer children. Girls want their parents and local opinion formers to encourage them to complete their education. This is why we spend so much time talking to families and communities about the importance of Democratic Republic of Congo

6

education for girls. We often tell the story of Muginalesa from the DR Congo, who returning from one of our village workshops, boldly asked her father to “send the cows back”. She fought off marriage to stay in school, even after she had been exchanged for cows by her father. An inspiration: but how much easier if every step didn’t have to be a fight for a chance in life. Good things come from opportunities, confidence, knowledge and being in control of your life. Quality education gives you those things. The young girls in our community education centres in Kabul know this. The world needs far fewer child deaths, less violence, more income for families, and strong communities. The solution: educate girls. Girls want to be healthy. They want to be able to protect themselves from HIV/AIDS and sexual violence. They know that they can’t do this by themselves – girls know that boys bear a great responsibility to change their behaviours. In Sierra Leone we trained teachers to deliver straight talking and participative lessons to girls and boys about relationships and sexual and reproductive health. Our evaluations showed that beliefs and behaviours changed. We believe these lessons saved lives. The world needs to do away with the scourge of HIV/AIDS. The solution: educate girls (and boys).

Girls want to earn their own living, to be economically independent and respected. They want to use an income to support their families, and to pay for education for themselves and their siblings – rather than to work 24/7 on household chores. In Liberia, women attending courses at our Vocational Training Centre to gain skills that help them earn an income tell us about the benefits of gaining self-sufficiency and being able to do something for themselves. One woman told us: “I want to help our children to go to school. A man can’t support a family only on his income”. The world needs households that are better able to cope with life’s everyday stresses and bring an end to poverty. The solution: build the capability of girls to earn a living. This is not just about righting an age old injustice that gives one half of humanity a hand up and the other half a kicking down. This is about the good society that we all want. An end to preventable child and maternal deaths; each and every individual contributing to their societies and engaged in fulfilling and useful economic activities; each and every individual protected from violence, discrimination and exploitation and fulfilling their full human potential. Girls have a very clear idea of what they want. Girls want to be heard and have a say over decisions that affect their lives. It is time we listened. Koy Thomson Chief Executive 7


Focus on

Top: Afghanistan Below: Tibetan Plateau

Women and Girls' Empowerment What girls want… Every girl is unique but there are some things that all girls want. Girls want good things to happen to them in life. But what girls want they can’t have. What the world needs is what girls want. There’s a solution in there somewhere. Girls want education. An eight year old boy in a village in northern Sierra Leone told us ‘it’s not worth educating girls’. Only eight and this little boy is already spouting deadly prejudices. Only eight and this little boy sees girls and women as less than human. Staying in school means delaying marriage and childbirth – something else that girls want. Girls marrying early are twice as likely to die from complications in pregnancy and childbirth – the most likely cause of death amongst young adolescent girls. Girls marrying later have fewer children. Girls want their parents and local opinion formers to encourage them to complete their education. This is why we spend so much time talking to families and communities about the importance of Democratic Republic of Congo

6

education for girls. We often tell the story of Muginalesa from the DR Congo, who returning from one of our village workshops, boldly asked her father to “send the cows back”. She fought off marriage to stay in school, even after she had been exchanged for cows by her father. An inspiration: but how much easier if every step didn’t have to be a fight for a chance in life. Good things come from opportunities, confidence, knowledge and being in control of your life. Quality education gives you those things. The young girls in our community education centres in Kabul know this. The world needs far fewer child deaths, less violence, more income for families, and strong communities. The solution: educate girls. Girls want to be healthy. They want to be able to protect themselves from HIV/AIDS and sexual violence. They know that they can’t do this by themselves – girls know that boys bear a great responsibility to change their behaviours. In Sierra Leone we trained teachers to deliver straight talking and participative lessons to girls and boys about relationships and sexual and reproductive health. Our evaluations showed that beliefs and behaviours changed. We believe these lessons saved lives. The world needs to do away with the scourge of HIV/AIDS. The solution: educate girls (and boys).

Girls want to earn their own living, to be economically independent and respected. They want to use an income to support their families, and to pay for education for themselves and their siblings – rather than to work 24/7 on household chores. In Liberia, women attending courses at our Vocational Training Centre to gain skills that help them earn an income tell us about the benefits of gaining self-sufficiency and being able to do something for themselves. One woman told us: “I want to help our children to go to school. A man can’t support a family only on his income”. The world needs households that are better able to cope with life’s everyday stresses and bring an end to poverty. The solution: build the capability of girls to earn a living. This is not just about righting an age old injustice that gives one half of humanity a hand up and the other half a kicking down. This is about the good society that we all want. An end to preventable child and maternal deaths; each and every individual contributing to their societies and engaged in fulfilling and useful economic activities; each and every individual protected from violence, discrimination and exploitation and fulfilling their full human potential. Girls have a very clear idea of what they want. Girls want to be heard and have a say over decisions that affect their lives. It is time we listened. Koy Thomson Chief Executive 7


Democratic Republic of Congo

Focus on

Quality Education

The key word here is ‘quality’ Our belief is that a quality education is the foundation for meeting needs, achieving a satisfactory quality of life and the ability to meaningfully pursue life goals. The key word here is ‘quality’. What counts as ‘quality’ education? A well-built school? Good exam results? Keen children, eager to learn? Caring teachers eager to teach? Quality education starts and ends with the child. All children have a right to access quality education. In Afghanistan, years of conflict and internal displacement have led to thousands of children being excluded from the state education system. Our Community-Based Education Centres in Kabul provide a safe learning environment for girls and boys to progress to grade 3 in one year, allowing them to then re-enter the state system. None of the pupils at these centres have ever been to school before – they have had to move Liberia, teacher training

8

around due to conflict, have had to work or their journeys to state schools have been too dangerous. In the DR Congo we are working with communities on the importance of sending all children to school, not just boys. Where girls are often seen as a commodity to be exchanged for cows, education is deemed as a waste of money. Our programme is changing that. More and more Congolese girls are starting and continuing primary education. All children have the right to be protected from being hurt and mistreated. Our programme in Liberia has resulted in a much better learning environment with established practices such as unfair testing, sex for grades and over-harsh punishment being dealt with and reduced. A key component of the teacher training programme in the DR Congo is positive discipline and the discussions that take place around the fact that violence breeds violence. In Afghanistan, Children in Crisis are training the National Police in child rights with the aim of eliminating corporal punishment of children in conflict with the law.

All children have the right to qualified, motivated teachers. Child-centred methodologies form the focus of all of our teacher training programmes. In the DR Congo, Liberia and Sierra Leone we have chosen to work in areas where others do not tread; national and international organisations, governments and qualified personnel are in the main absent. Teachers working in these areas often only have a primary education themselves. They have had no access to national or additional training programmes or the most basic of teaching materials. They are often not registered, thus are not on the government payroll. We provide basic teaching methodology, sustained support and additional training. We also advocate and facilitate for teachers and schools to be registered with the state so that the state in turn becomes accountable for its children’s education. DRC, derelict school

All children have the right to a safe and secure classroom. We have so far built 4 schools in Liberia and are building our 9th in the DR Congo. These schools provide children and staff alike with a warm, dry and spacious environment

conducive to learning, and a tremendous sense that education is to be valued. Furthermore, they are fully equipped with desks, boards, water tanks and an array of teaching and learning aids. All children have the right to be supported by their families and communities. Working closely with communities is key to all of our programmes. Parents attend monthly meetings at the centres in Kabul and any problems such as absenteeism are dealt with verbally by the teachers, taking into account the low literacy levels of parents. In the DR Congo we train Parent Committees so that they are able to support school directors, as well as work with other parents on ways of actively participating in their children’s education. Literacy classes are held for mothers at the centres in Afghanistan and such classes will be rolled out in Sierra Leone in 2012. Improved levels of literacy have been shown to have a positive influence on children’s health and education and on gender equality. By placing the child firmly at the heart of everything we do and working positively with all actors involved in their education, Children in Crisis is contributing to the holistic development of all the children we work with and for. Quality education has to start and end with the child. Amy Parker Programme Manager

Afghanistan, community based education

9


Democratic Republic of Congo

Focus on

Quality Education

The key word here is ‘quality’ Our belief is that a quality education is the foundation for meeting needs, achieving a satisfactory quality of life and the ability to meaningfully pursue life goals. The key word here is ‘quality’. What counts as ‘quality’ education? A well-built school? Good exam results? Keen children, eager to learn? Caring teachers eager to teach? Quality education starts and ends with the child. All children have a right to access quality education. In Afghanistan, years of conflict and internal displacement have led to thousands of children being excluded from the state education system. Our Community-Based Education Centres in Kabul provide a safe learning environment for girls and boys to progress to grade 3 in one year, allowing them to then re-enter the state system. None of the pupils at these centres have ever been to school before – they have had to move Liberia, teacher training

8

around due to conflict, have had to work or their journeys to state schools have been too dangerous. In the DR Congo we are working with communities on the importance of sending all children to school, not just boys. Where girls are often seen as a commodity to be exchanged for cows, education is deemed as a waste of money. Our programme is changing that. More and more Congolese girls are starting and continuing primary education. All children have the right to be protected from being hurt and mistreated. Our programme in Liberia has resulted in a much better learning environment with established practices such as unfair testing, sex for grades and over-harsh punishment being dealt with and reduced. A key component of the teacher training programme in the DR Congo is positive discipline and the discussions that take place around the fact that violence breeds violence. In Afghanistan, Children in Crisis are training the National Police in child rights with the aim of eliminating corporal punishment of children in conflict with the law.

All children have the right to qualified, motivated teachers. Child-centred methodologies form the focus of all of our teacher training programmes. In the DR Congo, Liberia and Sierra Leone we have chosen to work in areas where others do not tread; national and international organisations, governments and qualified personnel are in the main absent. Teachers working in these areas often only have a primary education themselves. They have had no access to national or additional training programmes or the most basic of teaching materials. They are often not registered, thus are not on the government payroll. We provide basic teaching methodology, sustained support and additional training. We also advocate and facilitate for teachers and schools to be registered with the state so that the state in turn becomes accountable for its children’s education. DRC, derelict school

All children have the right to a safe and secure classroom. We have so far built 4 schools in Liberia and are building our 9th in the DR Congo. These schools provide children and staff alike with a warm, dry and spacious environment

conducive to learning, and a tremendous sense that education is to be valued. Furthermore, they are fully equipped with desks, boards, water tanks and an array of teaching and learning aids. All children have the right to be supported by their families and communities. Working closely with communities is key to all of our programmes. Parents attend monthly meetings at the centres in Kabul and any problems such as absenteeism are dealt with verbally by the teachers, taking into account the low literacy levels of parents. In the DR Congo we train Parent Committees so that they are able to support school directors, as well as work with other parents on ways of actively participating in their children’s education. Literacy classes are held for mothers at the centres in Afghanistan and such classes will be rolled out in Sierra Leone in 2012. Improved levels of literacy have been shown to have a positive influence on children’s health and education and on gender equality. By placing the child firmly at the heart of everything we do and working positively with all actors involved in their education, Children in Crisis is contributing to the holistic development of all the children we work with and for. Quality education has to start and end with the child. Amy Parker Programme Manager

Afghanistan, community based education

9


Focus on

Community Development

Community Building key to successful development If Western cultures are said to be losing the spirit of community, I know of several village communities with whom Children in Crisis work that could teach us a thing or two about community spirit and all it can lead to.

Neegbah School under construction, Liberia

Take, for example, Neegbah village community in rural Liberia; throughout 2011, villagers here worked tirelessly together to help reconstruct their primary school. This was not an easy task since Neegbah is cut off from the mainland by the fast flowing Cestos River. All building materials had to be transported in dug-out canoes, before being carried to the construction site on foot. It required a great deal of collaboration between villagers, village planning, organisation and community resolve. 10

‘The school that crossed a river’ (as it’s become known locally) was completed in time for the start of the 2011/12 academic year. It stands proud just outside the village and is a great example of community development in action, an approach that has shaped Children in Crisis’ work with communities throughout 2011, and that we’ll pursue with even greater conviction in 2012. At Neegbah, villagers young and old, male and female, from local Chief to village labourer, came together behind a common goal to support their children’s education and bring about positive change. With support and encouragement from Children in Crisis and our local partner, FAWE-Liberia, this

rejuvenated, more confident, more socially cohesive community shows no signs of stopping here. Since the inauguration in September, community nominated representatives from Neegbah have been petitioning the County Education Authorities for their newly built primary school to be awarded Junior High School status – this will make Neegbah only one of a handful of schools in the entire county to become a Junior High. The great efforts of the community have come to the attention of the Minister of Education for Liberia. He 'crossed the river' to visit the school personally – quite a coup. For the first time in many years, the future educational well-being of the children and young people from Neegbah has never looked brighter, and for this, Children in Crisis is delighted. It demonstrates to us how vitally important community development is to the long term well-being of any given community; how important it is that individuals, regardless of their social position and standing, are listened to and respected by others in that community, such that their voice and opinions, needs and concerns are heard and responded to. More often than not, in so many of the countries in which Children in Crisis work, whether in Afghanistan, Sierra Leone, Liberia or DR Congo, rurally isolated, village communities are undoubtedly fragile, worn down by grinding poverty and the terrible legacy of many years of conflict. This fragility may be evident in the exclusion of women from local decision making; the denial of fundamental rights to education for disabled children, for example; or through the unequal allocation and distribution of goods and services that each citizen within that village is rightly entitled; however this fragility manifests itself, the capacity of a community to manage action around their collective problems is a vitally important resource, particularly if their planning recognises the needs of the most vulnerable. Many cultures have specific words for this

Liberia, teacher training needs analysis

kind of action. In South Africa it is Ubuntu (interconnectedness and community action). In Rwanda it is Ubudehe (working together). As we build on our community development successes in 2012, it is Children in Crisis’ aim to develop specific methodologies to strengthen the culture of working together, so that we are really responding to the community’s analysis of problems and enable communities to identify and challenge barriers to education and to collectively plan, mobilise resources and deliver change. A community able to collectively analyse priorities and deliver projects is likely to have a unified and influential voice when it comes to negotiating for resources from local government. Just look at Neegbah. Sarah Rowse Programme Director 11


Focus on

Community Development

Community Building key to successful development If Western cultures are said to be losing the spirit of community, I know of several village communities with whom Children in Crisis work that could teach us a thing or two about community spirit and all it can lead to.

Neegbah School under construction, Liberia

Take, for example, Neegbah village community in rural Liberia; throughout 2011, villagers here worked tirelessly together to help reconstruct their primary school. This was not an easy task since Neegbah is cut off from the mainland by the fast flowing Cestos River. All building materials had to be transported in dug-out canoes, before being carried to the construction site on foot. It required a great deal of collaboration between villagers, village planning, organisation and community resolve. 10

‘The school that crossed a river’ (as it’s become known locally) was completed in time for the start of the 2011/12 academic year. It stands proud just outside the village and is a great example of community development in action, an approach that has shaped Children in Crisis’ work with communities throughout 2011, and that we’ll pursue with even greater conviction in 2012. At Neegbah, villagers young and old, male and female, from local Chief to village labourer, came together behind a common goal to support their children’s education and bring about positive change. With support and encouragement from Children in Crisis and our local partner, FAWE-Liberia, this

rejuvenated, more confident, more socially cohesive community shows no signs of stopping here. Since the inauguration in September, community nominated representatives from Neegbah have been petitioning the County Education Authorities for their newly built primary school to be awarded Junior High School status – this will make Neegbah only one of a handful of schools in the entire county to become a Junior High. The great efforts of the community have come to the attention of the Minister of Education for Liberia. He 'crossed the river' to visit the school personally – quite a coup. For the first time in many years, the future educational well-being of the children and young people from Neegbah has never looked brighter, and for this, Children in Crisis is delighted. It demonstrates to us how vitally important community development is to the long term well-being of any given community; how important it is that individuals, regardless of their social position and standing, are listened to and respected by others in that community, such that their voice and opinions, needs and concerns are heard and responded to. More often than not, in so many of the countries in which Children in Crisis work, whether in Afghanistan, Sierra Leone, Liberia or DR Congo, rurally isolated, village communities are undoubtedly fragile, worn down by grinding poverty and the terrible legacy of many years of conflict. This fragility may be evident in the exclusion of women from local decision making; the denial of fundamental rights to education for disabled children, for example; or through the unequal allocation and distribution of goods and services that each citizen within that village is rightly entitled; however this fragility manifests itself, the capacity of a community to manage action around their collective problems is a vitally important resource, particularly if their planning recognises the needs of the most vulnerable. Many cultures have specific words for this

Liberia, teacher training needs analysis

kind of action. In South Africa it is Ubuntu (interconnectedness and community action). In Rwanda it is Ubudehe (working together). As we build on our community development successes in 2012, it is Children in Crisis’ aim to develop specific methodologies to strengthen the culture of working together, so that we are really responding to the community’s analysis of problems and enable communities to identify and challenge barriers to education and to collectively plan, mobilise resources and deliver change. A community able to collectively analyse priorities and deliver projects is likely to have a unified and influential voice when it comes to negotiating for resources from local government. Just look at Neegbah. Sarah Rowse Programme Director 11


DR Congo:

2011 Highlights and Challenges Tragically, on 4th October 2011, our project vehicle travelling to the Plateau was ambushed 12 km from Fizi by the rebel group Mai Mai Yakutumba. Seven people were massacred, including four of our partner Eben Ezer Ministry International’s (EMI) project staff: The event has obviously shaken us to the core, however, our colleagues in the DR Congo and the bereaved families have shown immense strength and determination to continue the work started in 2007, which has had such a positive impact on people long isolated from development, prosperity and peace. In spite of the tragedy, there have been many significant achievements this year.

Teacher Training The second 4-year phase of the teacher training programme in the remote high plateau region of South Kivu, Eastern DR Congo, is now well under way. Following an extremely successful first phase between 2007 and 2009, we now have the ambitious aim of training every teacher and school director at every primary school on the Plateau. In a region that has experienced continual isolation from local, national and international developments in education, our programme aims to provide teachers, school directors, parent committees and

communities with the essential skills and knowledge to work towards ensuring the children of the Plateau have access to quality basic education. The teacher training team has doubled and two teams have been working with schools, communities and Parent Committees on the Uvira, Fizi and Mwenga High Plateau. In order to ensure the longevity of our work, we are in the process of establishing Teacher Support Networks (TSNs); this year 10 TSNs have been set up whose aim it is to provide continual professional development and peer support to all teachers in the catchment area. Another essential part of

our programme is the to the local communities, Theatre in Education providing not only a safe After the sketch (TIE) component in and conducive learning on girls’ education partnership with space for children, but and early marriage, all the Professor James also a hub for the girls are determined to compete Thompson from whole community; with their brothers to be the best In Place of War, Adult literacy classes in the class! We pray that EMI and University of have already started the animators conduct even more Manchester. The at Bipimo Primary awareness-raising sessions! training supports School with more Pauline, Muriza Village. community volunteers, than 40 women and Pastors, customary men learning Swahili leaders and the local radio and French. 2011 saw station in Minembwe to deliver the launch of a pilot Income sketches and to lead discussions and debates Generation Activity (IGA) project aiming to in the villages focusing on topics such as support communities with the maintenance early and forced marriage, girls’ education of the school whilst also investing in the and women’s participation. Feedback from local economy. Committees were trained this project has been extremely positive, in June 2011 and activities such as credit with communities feeling able to talk openly schemes and agricultural projects are about hitherto taboo subjects. already underway providing school communities access to savings needed for repairs, improvements and additional School Construction teaching resources. Our school construction and rehabilitation programme continues, seeing the completion Organisational of Bipimo and Kakuba Primary Schools Development and the building of Ngobi Primary School well underway, with the commitment of EMI is in the process of writing its first the local communities being paramount Strategic Plan with support from the project in the success of every school build. Once and as we look ahead, we stand united finished, the schools become a focal point with EMI to continue to work with Plateau communities to ensure every person has access not only to their basic rights, DRC, derelict school but also to a peaceful and prosperous future. Amy Parker Programme Manager

DRC, teacher training

12

13


DR Congo:

2011 Highlights and Challenges Tragically, on 4th October 2011, our project vehicle travelling to the Plateau was ambushed 12 km from Fizi by the rebel group Mai Mai Yakutumba. Seven people were massacred, including four of our partner Eben Ezer Ministry International’s (EMI) project staff: The event has obviously shaken us to the core, however, our colleagues in the DR Congo and the bereaved families have shown immense strength and determination to continue the work started in 2007, which has had such a positive impact on people long isolated from development, prosperity and peace. In spite of the tragedy, there have been many significant achievements this year.

Teacher Training The second 4-year phase of the teacher training programme in the remote high plateau region of South Kivu, Eastern DR Congo, is now well under way. Following an extremely successful first phase between 2007 and 2009, we now have the ambitious aim of training every teacher and school director at every primary school on the Plateau. In a region that has experienced continual isolation from local, national and international developments in education, our programme aims to provide teachers, school directors, parent committees and

communities with the essential skills and knowledge to work towards ensuring the children of the Plateau have access to quality basic education. The teacher training team has doubled and two teams have been working with schools, communities and Parent Committees on the Uvira, Fizi and Mwenga High Plateau. In order to ensure the longevity of our work, we are in the process of establishing Teacher Support Networks (TSNs); this year 10 TSNs have been set up whose aim it is to provide continual professional development and peer support to all teachers in the catchment area. Another essential part of

our programme is the to the local communities, Theatre in Education providing not only a safe After the sketch (TIE) component in and conducive learning on girls’ education partnership with space for children, but and early marriage, all the Professor James also a hub for the girls are determined to compete Thompson from whole community; with their brothers to be the best In Place of War, Adult literacy classes in the class! We pray that EMI and University of have already started the animators conduct even more Manchester. The at Bipimo Primary awareness-raising sessions! training supports School with more Pauline, Muriza Village. community volunteers, than 40 women and Pastors, customary men learning Swahili leaders and the local radio and French. 2011 saw station in Minembwe to deliver the launch of a pilot Income sketches and to lead discussions and debates Generation Activity (IGA) project aiming to in the villages focusing on topics such as support communities with the maintenance early and forced marriage, girls’ education of the school whilst also investing in the and women’s participation. Feedback from local economy. Committees were trained this project has been extremely positive, in June 2011 and activities such as credit with communities feeling able to talk openly schemes and agricultural projects are about hitherto taboo subjects. already underway providing school communities access to savings needed for repairs, improvements and additional School Construction teaching resources. Our school construction and rehabilitation programme continues, seeing the completion Organisational of Bipimo and Kakuba Primary Schools Development and the building of Ngobi Primary School well underway, with the commitment of EMI is in the process of writing its first the local communities being paramount Strategic Plan with support from the project in the success of every school build. Once and as we look ahead, we stand united finished, the schools become a focal point with EMI to continue to work with Plateau communities to ensure every person has access not only to their basic rights, DRC, derelict school but also to a peaceful and prosperous future. Amy Parker Programme Manager

DRC, teacher training

12

13


Achievements

325 teachers and 36 school directors trained in childcentred teaching methods, peace education, child rights and other essential disciplines.

Over 13,000 children will receive a better quality

education as a result of training and support given by EMI-Children in Crisis.

165 teachers trained in basic Maths and French to enable them to deliver the curriculum.

330 parents involved in Parent Committees trained in

their roles and responsibilities regarding effective school management.

48 school directors and experienced teachers trained in peer support and 10 TSN

centres established providing continual professional support for over 250 teachers and school directors.

56 community members trained in participative theatre techniques and now actively working with their villages across Minembwe.

2 schools built and refurbished to a high standard providing a safe and conducive learning environment for over 320 children.

18 members from 3 IGA committees trained in planning and project management.

Emedu’s story Emedu is 12 years old. She used to live in the forest near Kipupu, but then both her parents fell sick and died. A local family took her in and allowed her to start school in September 2009, but she often had to stay at home to clean, collect water and wood and look after the children. The family also had problems paying school fees, so that meant that she would be chased away from school by the teachers. In July 2011, her grandparents heard where she was and went to collect her. She has just moved to Tulambo and is now in Year 2 at Tubangwa Primary School, one of the schools earmarked for the 2012-13 school construction programme. Emedu loves school more than anything else. Her biggest wish is to stay in school so that she doesn’t have to work in the fields; when she grows up she wants to be a teacher so that other children like her can achieve.

Our long term programme of improving education on the plateau is predominantly funded by substantial grants from Comic Relief and The Barings Foundation as well as a variety of other highly valued and committed supporters. 14

A tribute to our

Eraste Rwatangabo

lost friends

and colleagues in DR Congo

This Annual Review is dedicated to our courageous colleagues in DR Congo who tragically lost their lives on 4th October 2011 in a militia attack as they travelled on route to the High Plateau to conduct programme activities in schools and communities. Eraste Rwatangabo, who was the Education Manager at Eben Ezer Ministry International, Children in Crisis’ partner organisation in DR Congo, was the driving force behind our education programme. He died alongside Kandoti Tite (Deputy Education Manager), Gifota Edmond (Teacher Trainer), Musore Ruturutsa (Driver) and three other passengers. They were murdered on the grounds of their ethnicity by the rebel group Mai Mai Yakatumba. It was the most lethal attack on aid workers so far in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo and brings into sharp relief the daily risks that colleagues undertake in their pursuit for peace and development throughout the countries in which Children in Crisis work. The memories Children in Crisis have of our colleagues and dear friends from DR Congo will inspire and guide us in all our endeavours. In Gifota Edmond, we have lost a great teacher, a champion of education. In Musore Ruturutsa, the man who could navigate the mountain like no other, we have lost the person who gave safe passage to our team, and to countless others. Musore, quite literally, drove development to the Plateau. In Kandoti Tite we have lost a man of great kindness and humility; a man whose skills as a teacher trainer were unsurpassed. When Tite spoke, he never needed to raise his voice

to make his point; his words were always wise. And in Eraste Rwatangabo, we have lost a certain treasure, a true leader. There were none more compassionate that Eraste; none with more integrity or conviction to bring about change; to serve the children of DR Congo, such that they will have a better future; to bring peace and development across the Plateau. Those of you that have followed Children in Crisis’ response to the tragedy in DR Congo will know that we launched a Families Support Appeal to raise much needed funds to support the families of our murdered colleagues, and other families who have become victims of massacre in the region. We would like to take this opportunity to thank those who have donated to this appeal. In 2011 we have raised an incredible £36,851 (including gift aid). In addition, with support and advice from Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International, we are pursuing all avenues to bring the perpetrators of these heinous crimes to justice. As unimaginably painful as the events of 4th October 2011 have been, Children in Crisis and Eben Ezer Ministry International remain steadfast in our commitment to improve the educational opportunities for every child across the Plateau. In honour of our colleagues, Eraste Rwatangabo, Kandoti Tite, Gifota Edmond and Musore Ruturutsa, their legacies will live on. Sarah Rowse Programme Director 15


Achievements

325 teachers and 36 school directors trained in childcentred teaching methods, peace education, child rights and other essential disciplines.

Over 13,000 children will receive a better quality

education as a result of training and support given by EMI-Children in Crisis.

165 teachers trained in basic Maths and French to enable them to deliver the curriculum.

330 parents involved in Parent Committees trained in

their roles and responsibilities regarding effective school management.

48 school directors and experienced teachers trained in peer support and 10 TSN

centres established providing continual professional support for over 250 teachers and school directors.

56 community members trained in participative theatre techniques and now actively working with their villages across Minembwe.

2 schools built and refurbished to a high standard providing a safe and conducive learning environment for over 320 children.

18 members from 3 IGA committees trained in planning and project management.

Emedu’s story Emedu is 12 years old. She used to live in the forest near Kipupu, but then both her parents fell sick and died. A local family took her in and allowed her to start school in September 2009, but she often had to stay at home to clean, collect water and wood and look after the children. The family also had problems paying school fees, so that meant that she would be chased away from school by the teachers. In July 2011, her grandparents heard where she was and went to collect her. She has just moved to Tulambo and is now in Year 2 at Tubangwa Primary School, one of the schools earmarked for the 2012-13 school construction programme. Emedu loves school more than anything else. Her biggest wish is to stay in school so that she doesn’t have to work in the fields; when she grows up she wants to be a teacher so that other children like her can achieve.

Our long term programme of improving education on the plateau is predominantly funded by substantial grants from Comic Relief and The Barings Foundation as well as a variety of other highly valued and committed supporters. 14

A tribute to our

Eraste Rwatangabo

lost friends

and colleagues in DR Congo

This Annual Review is dedicated to our courageous colleagues in DR Congo who tragically lost their lives on 4th October 2011 in a militia attack as they travelled on route to the High Plateau to conduct programme activities in schools and communities. Eraste Rwatangabo, who was the Education Manager at Eben Ezer Ministry International, Children in Crisis’ partner organisation in DR Congo, was the driving force behind our education programme. He died alongside Kandoti Tite (Deputy Education Manager), Gifota Edmond (Teacher Trainer), Musore Ruturutsa (Driver) and three other passengers. They were murdered on the grounds of their ethnicity by the rebel group Mai Mai Yakatumba. It was the most lethal attack on aid workers so far in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo and brings into sharp relief the daily risks that colleagues undertake in their pursuit for peace and development throughout the countries in which Children in Crisis work. The memories Children in Crisis have of our colleagues and dear friends from DR Congo will inspire and guide us in all our endeavours. In Gifota Edmond, we have lost a great teacher, a champion of education. In Musore Ruturutsa, the man who could navigate the mountain like no other, we have lost the person who gave safe passage to our team, and to countless others. Musore, quite literally, drove development to the Plateau. In Kandoti Tite we have lost a man of great kindness and humility; a man whose skills as a teacher trainer were unsurpassed. When Tite spoke, he never needed to raise his voice

to make his point; his words were always wise. And in Eraste Rwatangabo, we have lost a certain treasure, a true leader. There were none more compassionate that Eraste; none with more integrity or conviction to bring about change; to serve the children of DR Congo, such that they will have a better future; to bring peace and development across the Plateau. Those of you that have followed Children in Crisis’ response to the tragedy in DR Congo will know that we launched a Families Support Appeal to raise much needed funds to support the families of our murdered colleagues, and other families who have become victims of massacre in the region. We would like to take this opportunity to thank those who have donated to this appeal. In 2011 we have raised an incredible £36,851 (including gift aid). In addition, with support and advice from Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International, we are pursuing all avenues to bring the perpetrators of these heinous crimes to justice. As unimaginably painful as the events of 4th October 2011 have been, Children in Crisis and Eben Ezer Ministry International remain steadfast in our commitment to improve the educational opportunities for every child across the Plateau. In honour of our colleagues, Eraste Rwatangabo, Kandoti Tite, Gifota Edmond and Musore Ruturutsa, their legacies will live on. Sarah Rowse Programme Director 15


Liberia:

2011 Highlights and Challenges In keeping with our aim of reaching communities in challenging environments poorly served by others, we have been deepening our work in the rural county of River Cess. In partnership with FAWE Liberia we reached even more schools, isolated by rivers and geographical barriers, and challenged by unqualified teachers and ramshackle school building.

Girls' education Girls’ clubs in Liberia. The posters show different situations that girls might face and are used as a trigger to discuss issues.

Life is tough for a young girl wanting to stay in school. Her family will look at her and expect her to be cleaning, earning, and caring for the household, not disappearing to school, or even worse expecting the family to pay school fees. The pressure to drop out and throw away future opportunities is immense. Young girls need all the support they can get, and some of the most effective support comes from other girls in the form of girls’ clubs. Trained supervisors help girls to establish clubs and encourage peer mentoring on overcoming the pressure to drop-out or how to face day to day problems such as sexual violence, forced marriage and early pregnancy. The priority in 2011 has been to find young women capable of training as girls’ club supervisors, and then effectively training them. In River Cess, there is only one High School for a population of around 70,000 and only six girls graduated from High School last year. Few women in rural River Cess have even completed their primary education, so it was a mark of success to have successfully trained 14 girls’ 16

club supervisors from 11 schools, who will work to encourage girls to enter and stay in school.

Teacher training Families who make big short-term sacrifices to send their children to school, are understandably quick to withdraw children from schooling if they feel they are getting nothing from it – particularly if the teachers are poorly skilled. From a child’s point of view, a teacher who respects and cares for them, and has the knowledge to teach, is the starting point for quality education. In Liberia, 73 teachers attended a carefully designed and challenging three-week training designed to build core skills, knowledge and attitudes. By the end of the training the teachers demonstrated an increased knowledge on teaching standards, methods and classroom management, girls’ rights and child protection and an understanding of HIV and AIDS. Principals from the schools also participated in a further three-day training to build their capacity to better support their teachers improve the quality of their lessons and to make their schools a safe place for children. But we need to ensure that trained teachers translate into better lives for children. In November the team travelled out to each of the schools to follow-up on the trained teachers, observe lessons delivered by teachers using newly learned skills, and provide additional support where needed.

Reaching the most remote schools requires significant dedication from the FAWE team who in some cases have to travel for over 5 hours by motorbike and then walk for another 5 hours. During these visits they found that positive changes are occurring in the schools and pupils interviewed have reported a reduction in physical punishments and are feeling more satisfied with school.

Adult literacy and vocational training One legacy of the war is that in rural areas as high as 3 out every 4 women are illiterate. Up to 40% of women will never have Liberia, tailoring classes attended school. The future for such women and for their children is bleak. The challenge is to break the transfer of disadvantage from one generation to another, by giving uneducated women a chance to re-enter education and other opportunities. 50 women graduated from FAWE’s Vocational Training Centre in River Cess in 2011. Follow-up support to the graduates is very important, not only to assist them with problems they may be facing but also to assess what we could improve or do differently. We have been learning a lot from those who graduated in 2010 and this year decided to introduce a month’s internship in a professional business for the trainees. Graduates from both 2010 and 2011 who

have set up businesses have reported an increased economic resilience to deal with difficult, unexpected and often expensive circumstances, such as family members getting ill. This is due to their now more regular income, as well as the enterprise training, which teaches better money management and the importance of saving. Graduates also emanate a noticeable sense of pride, achievement and confidence which was not as evident before they attended the centre.

School building September of this year also saw the opening of Neegbah Primary School, constructed with support from FAWE and Children in Crisis and one of the only permanent school structures in Yarnee District (see page 10). Enrolment rates have doubled at the primary school as parents are eager to send their children to the new school. Previous to this many children would cross the river each day to go to primary school, but stay at home when the journey was too dangerous during the rainy season. In 2011, Liberia also successfully saw its second democratic presidential election since the conflict. After going to a second round run-off Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the current president and Africa’s first elected female president, won the majority of the votes and is due to be inaugurated in January 2012. A hugely inspiring role model for girls in River Cess! Becky Midlane Programme Manager This fantastic, wide-ranging project was made possible by a generous multi-year grant by the UBS Optimus Foundation. We would also like to acknowledge the contribution of our long term supporter, The Vitol Charitable Foundation towards the work among several other contributors. 17


Liberia:

2011 Highlights and Challenges In keeping with our aim of reaching communities in challenging environments poorly served by others, we have been deepening our work in the rural county of River Cess. In partnership with FAWE Liberia we reached even more schools, isolated by rivers and geographical barriers, and challenged by unqualified teachers and ramshackle school building.

Girls' education Girls’ clubs in Liberia. The posters show different situations that girls might face and are used as a trigger to discuss issues.

Life is tough for a young girl wanting to stay in school. Her family will look at her and expect her to be cleaning, earning, and caring for the household, not disappearing to school, or even worse expecting the family to pay school fees. The pressure to drop out and throw away future opportunities is immense. Young girls need all the support they can get, and some of the most effective support comes from other girls in the form of girls’ clubs. Trained supervisors help girls to establish clubs and encourage peer mentoring on overcoming the pressure to drop-out or how to face day to day problems such as sexual violence, forced marriage and early pregnancy. The priority in 2011 has been to find young women capable of training as girls’ club supervisors, and then effectively training them. In River Cess, there is only one High School for a population of around 70,000 and only six girls graduated from High School last year. Few women in rural River Cess have even completed their primary education, so it was a mark of success to have successfully trained 14 girls’ 16

club supervisors from 11 schools, who will work to encourage girls to enter and stay in school.

Teacher training Families who make big short-term sacrifices to send their children to school, are understandably quick to withdraw children from schooling if they feel they are getting nothing from it – particularly if the teachers are poorly skilled. From a child’s point of view, a teacher who respects and cares for them, and has the knowledge to teach, is the starting point for quality education. In Liberia, 73 teachers attended a carefully designed and challenging three-week training designed to build core skills, knowledge and attitudes. By the end of the training the teachers demonstrated an increased knowledge on teaching standards, methods and classroom management, girls’ rights and child protection and an understanding of HIV and AIDS. Principals from the schools also participated in a further three-day training to build their capacity to better support their teachers improve the quality of their lessons and to make their schools a safe place for children. But we need to ensure that trained teachers translate into better lives for children. In November the team travelled out to each of the schools to follow-up on the trained teachers, observe lessons delivered by teachers using newly learned skills, and provide additional support where needed.

Reaching the most remote schools requires significant dedication from the FAWE team who in some cases have to travel for over 5 hours by motorbike and then walk for another 5 hours. During these visits they found that positive changes are occurring in the schools and pupils interviewed have reported a reduction in physical punishments and are feeling more satisfied with school.

Adult literacy and vocational training One legacy of the war is that in rural areas as high as 3 out every 4 women are illiterate. Up to 40% of women will never have Liberia, tailoring classes attended school. The future for such women and for their children is bleak. The challenge is to break the transfer of disadvantage from one generation to another, by giving uneducated women a chance to re-enter education and other opportunities. 50 women graduated from FAWE’s Vocational Training Centre in River Cess in 2011. Follow-up support to the graduates is very important, not only to assist them with problems they may be facing but also to assess what we could improve or do differently. We have been learning a lot from those who graduated in 2010 and this year decided to introduce a month’s internship in a professional business for the trainees. Graduates from both 2010 and 2011 who

have set up businesses have reported an increased economic resilience to deal with difficult, unexpected and often expensive circumstances, such as family members getting ill. This is due to their now more regular income, as well as the enterprise training, which teaches better money management and the importance of saving. Graduates also emanate a noticeable sense of pride, achievement and confidence which was not as evident before they attended the centre.

School building September of this year also saw the opening of Neegbah Primary School, constructed with support from FAWE and Children in Crisis and one of the only permanent school structures in Yarnee District (see page 10). Enrolment rates have doubled at the primary school as parents are eager to send their children to the new school. Previous to this many children would cross the river each day to go to primary school, but stay at home when the journey was too dangerous during the rainy season. In 2011, Liberia also successfully saw its second democratic presidential election since the conflict. After going to a second round run-off Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the current president and Africa’s first elected female president, won the majority of the votes and is due to be inaugurated in January 2012. A hugely inspiring role model for girls in River Cess! Becky Midlane Programme Manager This fantastic, wide-ranging project was made possible by a generous multi-year grant by the UBS Optimus Foundation. We would also like to acknowledge the contribution of our long term supporter, The Vitol Charitable Foundation towards the work among several other contributors. 17


Sierra Leone:

2011 Highlights and Challenges This year has seen a period of change in our work in Sierra Leone. After three years, our HIV and AIDS Education Programme, which trained primary school teachers in Freetown and Kambia to deliver factual and engaging lessons in HIV and other health issues, came to a close in April. Over the three years the programme has successfully trained 341 teachers, from 42 schools, who through their lessons will reach 21,499 children. In partnership with FAWE (Forum for African Women Educationalists), the local organisation we have been implementing the project with in Sierra Leone, Children in Crisis conducted an end of project evaluation in order to maximise our understanding of the successes of the project and areas which we can learn from. The evaluation found the project to have resulted in many significant achievements, with children, parents and teachers reporting an improved knowledge and understanding about HIV/AIDS and STI transmission; reduced stigma and discrimination towards people living positively with HIV and AIDS; and much improved school-community wide forums for dialogue and debate about issues of sexual health, risk reduction and child protection. Within the District of Kambia in

particular, the project appears to have made a significant contribution to placing HIV education on school and village agendas – raising much needed awareness and challenging misconceptions about HIV and STI transmission within rural locations where access to accurate information disseminated via public health campaigns or via the radio and TV, is limited. However, learning from our HIV work in schools indicated the greater need to work with teachers and schools to strengthen general teaching practice as well as specific health subjects. Combining our learning from the HIV project with a strategic review of our work in Sierra Leone we have spent time in 2011 developing the direction of our future work. Particularly in the more remote areas where we work, where schools are more isolated from state and Non Governmental Organisation (NGO) support, the importance of community support to education is paramount. We have decided to focus our work over the next few years in the poorer and remote chiefdoms of Kambia district, which has one of the lowest literacy rates in the country and where few other NGOs are working. Continuing to build and develop our expertise in teacher training and supporting better governance of schools, we will also expand our work to have a holistic approach to improving children’s education and wellbeing through supporting the literacy and education of parents and strengthening communities’ self-reliance to collectively invest in and support their school. In line with this we have successfully secured funding from the UK Department for International Development to run an educational

18

project in three of the most under-resourced chiefdoms of Kambia over the next three years. Working with communities, teachers, parents and school governing bodies, the aim will be to improve children’s learning and especially that of girls, by strengthening teaching standards, the learning environment, the overall running of the school, and the capacity of parents and community members to engage in and support their children’s learning. This year has also seen us develop the educational needs of children with new partnerships with Powerful disabilities. Using the report from the survey Information and Vision for the Blind, with we plan to hold a workshop in 2012 with whom we have been conducting a survey in the Kambia District Council to raise their Kambia of access to education for children awareness of the issue and look at how we with disabilities. Disabled children can be can start to ensure these children, who are some of the most vulnerable and hard amongst the most vulnerable in Kambia, are to reach children in Sierra Leone as they not overlooked. are often stigmatised due to superstition about their disability. Data and statistics Becky Midlane are notoriously lacking across the country, Programme particularly in the more rural Manager What moved areas, so a major aim of the people in the villages was survey was simply to try and the mixture of the team. Each team gain a greater understanding of had a blind or physically disabled person how many disabled children there accompanied by an able bodied person. are in Kambia district and what This gave them a lot of hope. It was important their current level of access to because people admired this coordination between education is. Of the children an able bodied person and a person with disability with disabilities interviewed and it made it easy for people to see that children with who were of school age 60% disabilities could have an education, could be leaders were not going to school and and contribute to the development of their community 40% were left alone in the and that they could work together” house during the day. Obstacles to getting an education included Jonathan Conteh, Director of Vision for the Blind, poor parental care, negative who coordinated the team conducting the public attitudes towards disability disability survey in Kambia. and lack of specialist schools or adequate skills in the current schools. Having strong reliable information will amplify the voice of disabled children and their champions and influence decisionsmakers to have greater consideration of

In 2010/11, the Sierra Leone programme was funded by the Medicor Foundation – Liechtenstein, and trusts and foundations. From 2012 a major funder for our new programme will be the UK Department for International Development. 19


Sierra Leone:

2011 Highlights and Challenges This year has seen a period of change in our work in Sierra Leone. After three years, our HIV and AIDS Education Programme, which trained primary school teachers in Freetown and Kambia to deliver factual and engaging lessons in HIV and other health issues, came to a close in April. Over the three years the programme has successfully trained 341 teachers, from 42 schools, who through their lessons will reach 21,499 children. In partnership with FAWE (Forum for African Women Educationalists), the local organisation we have been implementing the project with in Sierra Leone, Children in Crisis conducted an end of project evaluation in order to maximise our understanding of the successes of the project and areas which we can learn from. The evaluation found the project to have resulted in many significant achievements, with children, parents and teachers reporting an improved knowledge and understanding about HIV/AIDS and STI transmission; reduced stigma and discrimination towards people living positively with HIV and AIDS; and much improved school-community wide forums for dialogue and debate about issues of sexual health, risk reduction and child protection. Within the District of Kambia in

particular, the project appears to have made a significant contribution to placing HIV education on school and village agendas – raising much needed awareness and challenging misconceptions about HIV and STI transmission within rural locations where access to accurate information disseminated via public health campaigns or via the radio and TV, is limited. However, learning from our HIV work in schools indicated the greater need to work with teachers and schools to strengthen general teaching practice as well as specific health subjects. Combining our learning from the HIV project with a strategic review of our work in Sierra Leone we have spent time in 2011 developing the direction of our future work. Particularly in the more remote areas where we work, where schools are more isolated from state and Non Governmental Organisation (NGO) support, the importance of community support to education is paramount. We have decided to focus our work over the next few years in the poorer and remote chiefdoms of Kambia district, which has one of the lowest literacy rates in the country and where few other NGOs are working. Continuing to build and develop our expertise in teacher training and supporting better governance of schools, we will also expand our work to have a holistic approach to improving children’s education and wellbeing through supporting the literacy and education of parents and strengthening communities’ self-reliance to collectively invest in and support their school. In line with this we have successfully secured funding from the UK Department for International Development to run an educational

18

project in three of the most under-resourced chiefdoms of Kambia over the next three years. Working with communities, teachers, parents and school governing bodies, the aim will be to improve children’s learning and especially that of girls, by strengthening teaching standards, the learning environment, the overall running of the school, and the capacity of parents and community members to engage in and support their children’s learning. This year has also seen us develop the educational needs of children with new partnerships with Powerful disabilities. Using the report from the survey Information and Vision for the Blind, with we plan to hold a workshop in 2012 with whom we have been conducting a survey in the Kambia District Council to raise their Kambia of access to education for children awareness of the issue and look at how we with disabilities. Disabled children can be can start to ensure these children, who are some of the most vulnerable and hard amongst the most vulnerable in Kambia, are to reach children in Sierra Leone as they not overlooked. are often stigmatised due to superstition about their disability. Data and statistics Becky Midlane are notoriously lacking across the country, Programme particularly in the more rural Manager What moved areas, so a major aim of the people in the villages was survey was simply to try and the mixture of the team. Each team gain a greater understanding of had a blind or physically disabled person how many disabled children there accompanied by an able bodied person. are in Kambia district and what This gave them a lot of hope. It was important their current level of access to because people admired this coordination between education is. Of the children an able bodied person and a person with disability with disabilities interviewed and it made it easy for people to see that children with who were of school age 60% disabilities could have an education, could be leaders were not going to school and and contribute to the development of their community 40% were left alone in the and that they could work together” house during the day. Obstacles to getting an education included Jonathan Conteh, Director of Vision for the Blind, poor parental care, negative who coordinated the team conducting the public attitudes towards disability disability survey in Kambia. and lack of specialist schools or adequate skills in the current schools. Having strong reliable information will amplify the voice of disabled children and their champions and influence decisionsmakers to have greater consideration of

In 2010/11, the Sierra Leone programme was funded by the Medicor Foundation – Liechtenstein, and trusts and foundations. From 2012 a major funder for our new programme will be the UK Department for International Development. 19


Afghanistan:

Uzra’s story

2011 Highlights and Challenges For over past thirty years, Afghanistan has been in a situation of chronic instability and conflict. The number of Afghans who have known their country at peace is far exceeded by those who have known it only at war. It is estimated that only 60% of school-aged children are enrolled in school. Children are forced to support their families by working long hours and are often subject to exploitation and abuse. Conflict as well as the effects of drought have caused widespread displacement and an estimated 400 people are still being displaced every day. In Afghanistan, Children in Crisis has worked for the past fourteen years to ensure that children are both educated and protected. Throughout 2011 we have been active in seven provinces across the Central Region of Afghanistan. We run Community Based Education Centres in five vulnerable communities on the outskirts of Kabul City benefitting almost 300 children. The centres are all located in areas particularly badly impacted by the ongoing wars in Afghanistan where many homes and public buildings have been destroyed and existing community structures torn apart. The Children in Crisis education centres provide not only classes for overage and

out of school children to accelerate their progress into government school but also work with families and communities to build self-sufficiency and foster positive attitudes towards the education of children, particularly girls. The project has also worked with over 230 women to establish small-scale savings groups. These groups allow women not only to save and take loans to develop small-scale businesses but also provide their first and often their only opportunity to meet with and socialise with women outside the home.

225 Children graduated from

the education centres and were integrated into government schools in March 2011

Children in Crisis is committed not only to ensuring that children are entering education, but also that they are safe and protected in communities, orphanages and schools. We are working with a wide variety of government institutions from police stations to schools, orphanages and juvenile prisons to ensure that children are safe and protected. Within schools we are informing teachers about the rights of children using verses from the Koran to set this in the Islamic context and make it relevant. Teachers and police are also taught positive disciplining techniques to prevent them resorting to violence when children misbehave.

297 Children are currently attending

We also believe that whenever it is safe for children to do so, they should live and grow up within their family homes. Poor families often see orphanages as a positive place to send children so that they can be fed and provided with an education. Our work with communities and orphanages aims to ensure that children are not being unnecessarily sent away from their families but that families are supported to keep their children at home.

346 staff from orphanages and

Bethan Williams Programme Manager 20

Achievements

the education centres and have recently passed their exams to progress to the final 3 months of their studies

827 teachers trained in the

rights of children and positive discipline techniques

78 police trained in the rights of children and positive discipline techniques

99 Social workers and 101

community workers received training in basic social work

Uzra graduated from Children in Crisis’ Char Qala centre in March this year and is now attending government school. Similar to many families in Afghanistan, Uzra’s family fled the Taliban regime to live in Pakistan and has never before attended school. Uzra was young enough to attend school when she returned to Afghanistan but her father would not let her. He thought the school was too far and he didn’t see the point of her going. When the centre opened close to her house she was allowed to attend. Uzra learnt a lot of new things and started to look forward to going to school. Seeing her progress at the centre changed Uzra’s father’s outlook. Previously he thought that girls could not learn in the same way as boys. Now she’s proved him wrong and he trusts her to get an education, because of this he allows her to attend government school. Uzra told us that in the past she didn’t have much hope for her future but now she’s learning at school she believes that she will have a bright future and wants to go on to be a teacher to help other girls in the future.

juvenile prisons received training in child rights and child protection and are responding effectively to reports of abuse

472 Judges, prosecutors and lawyers

received training in the Juvenile Code of Afghanistan and alternatives to detaining children

Thanks to significant grants from UNICEF, World Vision, the Vitol Charitable Foundation and many other contributors we have been able to improve the lives of thousands of children in Afghanistan this year. We hope that additional funding from the EU in 2012 will support a research programme on Afghan orphanages. 21


Afghanistan:

Uzra’s story

2011 Highlights and Challenges For over past thirty years, Afghanistan has been in a situation of chronic instability and conflict. The number of Afghans who have known their country at peace is far exceeded by those who have known it only at war. It is estimated that only 60% of school-aged children are enrolled in school. Children are forced to support their families by working long hours and are often subject to exploitation and abuse. Conflict as well as the effects of drought have caused widespread displacement and an estimated 400 people are still being displaced every day. In Afghanistan, Children in Crisis has worked for the past fourteen years to ensure that children are both educated and protected. Throughout 2011 we have been active in seven provinces across the Central Region of Afghanistan. We run Community Based Education Centres in five vulnerable communities on the outskirts of Kabul City benefitting almost 300 children. The centres are all located in areas particularly badly impacted by the ongoing wars in Afghanistan where many homes and public buildings have been destroyed and existing community structures torn apart. The Children in Crisis education centres provide not only classes for overage and

out of school children to accelerate their progress into government school but also work with families and communities to build self-sufficiency and foster positive attitudes towards the education of children, particularly girls. The project has also worked with over 230 women to establish small-scale savings groups. These groups allow women not only to save and take loans to develop small-scale businesses but also provide their first and often their only opportunity to meet with and socialise with women outside the home.

225 Children graduated from

the education centres and were integrated into government schools in March 2011

Children in Crisis is committed not only to ensuring that children are entering education, but also that they are safe and protected in communities, orphanages and schools. We are working with a wide variety of government institutions from police stations to schools, orphanages and juvenile prisons to ensure that children are safe and protected. Within schools we are informing teachers about the rights of children using verses from the Koran to set this in the Islamic context and make it relevant. Teachers and police are also taught positive disciplining techniques to prevent them resorting to violence when children misbehave.

297 Children are currently attending

We also believe that whenever it is safe for children to do so, they should live and grow up within their family homes. Poor families often see orphanages as a positive place to send children so that they can be fed and provided with an education. Our work with communities and orphanages aims to ensure that children are not being unnecessarily sent away from their families but that families are supported to keep their children at home.

346 staff from orphanages and

Bethan Williams Programme Manager 20

Achievements

the education centres and have recently passed their exams to progress to the final 3 months of their studies

827 teachers trained in the

rights of children and positive discipline techniques

78 police trained in the rights of children and positive discipline techniques

99 Social workers and 101

community workers received training in basic social work

Uzra graduated from Children in Crisis’ Char Qala centre in March this year and is now attending government school. Similar to many families in Afghanistan, Uzra’s family fled the Taliban regime to live in Pakistan and has never before attended school. Uzra was young enough to attend school when she returned to Afghanistan but her father would not let her. He thought the school was too far and he didn’t see the point of her going. When the centre opened close to her house she was allowed to attend. Uzra learnt a lot of new things and started to look forward to going to school. Seeing her progress at the centre changed Uzra’s father’s outlook. Previously he thought that girls could not learn in the same way as boys. Now she’s proved him wrong and he trusts her to get an education, because of this he allows her to attend government school. Uzra told us that in the past she didn’t have much hope for her future but now she’s learning at school she believes that she will have a bright future and wants to go on to be a teacher to help other girls in the future.

juvenile prisons received training in child rights and child protection and are responding effectively to reports of abuse

472 Judges, prosecutors and lawyers

received training in the Juvenile Code of Afghanistan and alternatives to detaining children

Thanks to significant grants from UNICEF, World Vision, the Vitol Charitable Foundation and many other contributors we have been able to improve the lives of thousands of children in Afghanistan this year. We hope that additional funding from the EU in 2012 will support a research programme on Afghan orphanages. 21


China:

Community Midwife and the children she helped deliver

2011 Highlights and Challenges On the remote Tibetan plateau of China girls and women are responsible for the lion's share of domestic chores and animal husbandry, and are dedicated to caring for their families and contributing to their communities. Yet they face poor access to quality healthcare and, consequently, many experience complications in pregnancy and childbirth; these are preventable complications that too often prove fatal for mother and baby. Safe delivery and healthy mothers are the key to children’s early development and capability to develop and learn in later life. Since 2004 Children in Crisis and local partner organisation Jinpa have been delivering a Midwife Training programme in Yushu Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture (TAP) to address this.

Midwife Training Re-starts

Changes the programme is bringing about

The Midwife Training programme was suspended following a devastating earthquake in April 2010 in Yushu Town, where the residential training takes place. The earthquake resulted in the deaths of thousands of people and the collapse of over 85% of buildings. After more than a year we were delighted that Jinpa was able to re-start the training for 22 young semi-nomadic Tibetan women in July 2011; quite an achievement under such difficult circumstances. Reconstruction is underway in Yushu Town but the majority of people remain in tented accommodation. Rebuilding has been slow and people are facing another extremely cold winter in tents. In these challenging conditions Jinpa have set up a well-functioning tented compound where the training was being delivered in 2011.

Focus group discussions and interviews with midwife trainees and graduates during a programme visit in September clearly demonstrated that the training provides young women with opportunities to learn and develop skills and knowledge that they would not otherwise have. It also enables them to increase their self-confidence:

Training classes taking place on tented compound

22

However, there are a number of challenges surrounding the programme and partnership that call for careful consideration.

It is important for women to have someone they can seek advice from. As one midwife said: ‘In remote nomadic areas there are very few doctors and even if there is one it would be a male doctor so women face difficulties to be open with them, midwifery is very important to deal with women’s issues . . .’

Challenges Children in Crisis much admires the tenacity and commitment of our partner organisation Jinpa and the midwives trained over the years. In light of the devastating impact of the 2010 earthquake, Jinpa’s ability to resume the Midwife Training programme from July 2011 has been impressive.

Now I can read and write . . . I am more courageous and have more hope in myself and my ability to help others

Sarah Jones Programme Support Manager

Tsering's Story When we met this graduate midwife she was extremely pleased because she had been elected as the new village leader. This was a significant event as this post has never before been held by a woman.

2009 Graduate, age 27

Women in their communities also reported the changes they have experienced since gaining access to a trained midwife. These included greater awareness about basic health and hygiene, support for women during pregnancy, the presence of midwives at births, and increased status of women.

The programme is operating in an increasingly sensitive political environment, which poses significant questions about our ability to undertake programme visits of sufficient length and scope of activities, to monitor and evaluate the work and to communicate with Jinpa to the level we see necessary for a strong, flourishing and mutually beneficial partnership. The unpredictability and uncertainty of the post-earthquake situation, the challenging political environment, and the communication and reporting weaknesses raise concerns that we will not be able to monitor, plan and assess outcomes to a level maintaining due diligence. As such, towards the end of 2011 the programme was put under review to assess the viability of the work going forwards.

Graduate Midwife, age 32

For her, the reason to enrol in the Midwife Training course was clear: ‘about 60% of pregnant women or during birth face a great deal of problems and I felt it very important to help them’. The training gave her opportunities she would otherwise not have had. In her own words, ‘When I first came here I was illiterate and when somebody in my family got sick I didn’t consider it as an issue that needed solutions. But after I graduated I know a lot of things people should do to be healthy and I can protect myself better from illnesses’.

This year’s life-saving midwife training programme was only made possible thanks to the generosity of our long-term partners Barclays Capital who, alongside several other donors, have funded the programme. 23


China:

Community Midwife and the children she helped deliver

2011 Highlights and Challenges On the remote Tibetan plateau of China girls and women are responsible for the lion's share of domestic chores and animal husbandry, and are dedicated to caring for their families and contributing to their communities. Yet they face poor access to quality healthcare and, consequently, many experience complications in pregnancy and childbirth; these are preventable complications that too often prove fatal for mother and baby. Safe delivery and healthy mothers are the key to children’s early development and capability to develop and learn in later life. Since 2004 Children in Crisis and local partner organisation Jinpa have been delivering a Midwife Training programme in Yushu Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture (TAP) to address this.

Midwife Training Re-starts

Changes the programme is bringing about

The Midwife Training programme was suspended following a devastating earthquake in April 2010 in Yushu Town, where the residential training takes place. The earthquake resulted in the deaths of thousands of people and the collapse of over 85% of buildings. After more than a year we were delighted that Jinpa was able to re-start the training for 22 young semi-nomadic Tibetan women in July 2011; quite an achievement under such difficult circumstances. Reconstruction is underway in Yushu Town but the majority of people remain in tented accommodation. Rebuilding has been slow and people are facing another extremely cold winter in tents. In these challenging conditions Jinpa have set up a well-functioning tented compound where the training was being delivered in 2011.

Focus group discussions and interviews with midwife trainees and graduates during a programme visit in September clearly demonstrated that the training provides young women with opportunities to learn and develop skills and knowledge that they would not otherwise have. It also enables them to increase their self-confidence:

Training classes taking place on tented compound

22

However, there are a number of challenges surrounding the programme and partnership that call for careful consideration.

It is important for women to have someone they can seek advice from. As one midwife said: ‘In remote nomadic areas there are very few doctors and even if there is one it would be a male doctor so women face difficulties to be open with them, midwifery is very important to deal with women’s issues . . .’

Challenges Children in Crisis much admires the tenacity and commitment of our partner organisation Jinpa and the midwives trained over the years. In light of the devastating impact of the 2010 earthquake, Jinpa’s ability to resume the Midwife Training programme from July 2011 has been impressive.

Now I can read and write . . . I am more courageous and have more hope in myself and my ability to help others

Sarah Jones Programme Support Manager

Tsering's Story When we met this graduate midwife she was extremely pleased because she had been elected as the new village leader. This was a significant event as this post has never before been held by a woman.

2009 Graduate, age 27

Women in their communities also reported the changes they have experienced since gaining access to a trained midwife. These included greater awareness about basic health and hygiene, support for women during pregnancy, the presence of midwives at births, and increased status of women.

The programme is operating in an increasingly sensitive political environment, which poses significant questions about our ability to undertake programme visits of sufficient length and scope of activities, to monitor and evaluate the work and to communicate with Jinpa to the level we see necessary for a strong, flourishing and mutually beneficial partnership. The unpredictability and uncertainty of the post-earthquake situation, the challenging political environment, and the communication and reporting weaknesses raise concerns that we will not be able to monitor, plan and assess outcomes to a level maintaining due diligence. As such, towards the end of 2011 the programme was put under review to assess the viability of the work going forwards.

Graduate Midwife, age 32

For her, the reason to enrol in the Midwife Training course was clear: ‘about 60% of pregnant women or during birth face a great deal of problems and I felt it very important to help them’. The training gave her opportunities she would otherwise not have had. In her own words, ‘When I first came here I was illiterate and when somebody in my family got sick I didn’t consider it as an issue that needed solutions. But after I graduated I know a lot of things people should do to be healthy and I can protect myself better from illnesses’.

This year’s life-saving midwife training programme was only made possible thanks to the generosity of our long-term partners Barclays Capital who, alongside several other donors, have funded the programme. 23


UK

Learning and Sharing The Learning Commitment

d:side

d:side becomes an independent charity! Children in Crisis has been running the UK d:side programme for over ten years, providing interactive drug and alcohol education to primary school children to equip them with the knowledge and skills needed to make healthy choices. In 2011, we worked closely with the d:side Area Co-ordinator in Leeds to support the process of setting up and registering d:side as an independent charity that launched itself in 2011.

Key achievements of the programme Before the end of the programme we undertook an internal end of project evaluation. Overall the findings were very positive and provided evidence of the programme’s impact on children’s knowledge and behaviour. The key achievements and findings from the report included:

Over the ten year period, the numbers of children

reached increased from 11,270 to 21,000 children

Children remember the d:side visits up to and beyond

the four years after they have received them and their retention of knowledge and skills developed is strong in the short to medium term

One thing I remember about d:side is: ‘Smoking creates tar in the lungs’; ‘Alcohol can make you drunk’; ‘Alcohol can damage your liver'. Children from Moortown Primary School, March 2011

In 2010/11 the d:side programme received funding from local authority contracts, trusts, groups, schools and other donations. Children in Crisis’ involvement in the d:side programme came to a close on 31st March 2011. d:side being now set up as an independent organisation, we are delighted that this important work is continuing. Sarah Jones, Programme Support Manager

At Children in Crisis we are continuously learning and reviewing our approaches, structures, process for measuring impact and performance, and the ways we work to ensure that what we are doing makes the greatest difference in the most meaningful way to the children and communities we work with and for. The learning process is not just about what we have learnt as an organisation, it is about the shared learning with and from our partner organisations and the children and communities we work with and how we act on this learning.

Knowing What We Are Achieving and What We Can Do Better Accountability is a priority for Children in Crisis and we want to rigorously measure the impact we are having and clearly convey this to our supporters, partners and beneficiaries, 24

as well as to other organisations. External and internal evaluations of our work are good examples of how we are doing this. This year there have been three internal evaluations and one external evaluation of our work; we make these available on our website in order to be fully transparent. These enable us to robustly assess the change the work is bringing about and learn what and how we could do better. In Afghanistan an external evaluation of our social worker training programme took place that highlighted the significant contribution the project has made to putting social work ‘on the map’ in Afghanistan. At the same time it highlighted the opportunity to increase the emphasis on longer term sustainability through a period of consolidation. Adjusting plans to improve results based on evaluations and our on-going monitoring and evaluation ensures we develop thorough planning mechanisms that focus resources on achieving goals. Both internal and external evaluations undertaken throughout the year have aimed to ensure that children’s voices are sought and heard. This not only makes sense but is essential when we consider that children are at the heart of everything we do and that it is their right to have a say over decisions that affect their lives. In Sierra Leone, children’s feedback on our HIV and AIDS education programme, which drew to a close in 2011, made it clear that future work needs to ensure that issues of school drop-out and non-enrolment due to hunger and lack of sufficient food are addressed. 25


UK

Learning and Sharing The Learning Commitment

d:side

d:side becomes an independent charity! Children in Crisis has been running the UK d:side programme for over ten years, providing interactive drug and alcohol education to primary school children to equip them with the knowledge and skills needed to make healthy choices. In 2011, we worked closely with the d:side Area Co-ordinator in Leeds to support the process of setting up and registering d:side as an independent charity that launched itself in 2011.

Key achievements of the programme Before the end of the programme we undertook an internal end of project evaluation. Overall the findings were very positive and provided evidence of the programme’s impact on children’s knowledge and behaviour. The key achievements and findings from the report included:

Over the ten year period, the numbers of children

reached increased from 11,270 to 21,000 children

Children remember the d:side visits up to and beyond

the four years after they have received them and their retention of knowledge and skills developed is strong in the short to medium term

One thing I remember about d:side is: ‘Smoking creates tar in the lungs’; ‘Alcohol can make you drunk’; ‘Alcohol can damage your liver'. Children from Moortown Primary School, March 2011

In 2010/11 the d:side programme received funding from local authority contracts, trusts, groups, schools and other donations. Children in Crisis’ involvement in the d:side programme came to a close on 31st March 2011. d:side being now set up as an independent organisation, we are delighted that this important work is continuing. Sarah Jones, Programme Support Manager

At Children in Crisis we are continuously learning and reviewing our approaches, structures, process for measuring impact and performance, and the ways we work to ensure that what we are doing makes the greatest difference in the most meaningful way to the children and communities we work with and for. The learning process is not just about what we have learnt as an organisation, it is about the shared learning with and from our partner organisations and the children and communities we work with and how we act on this learning.

Knowing What We Are Achieving and What We Can Do Better Accountability is a priority for Children in Crisis and we want to rigorously measure the impact we are having and clearly convey this to our supporters, partners and beneficiaries, 24

as well as to other organisations. External and internal evaluations of our work are good examples of how we are doing this. This year there have been three internal evaluations and one external evaluation of our work; we make these available on our website in order to be fully transparent. These enable us to robustly assess the change the work is bringing about and learn what and how we could do better. In Afghanistan an external evaluation of our social worker training programme took place that highlighted the significant contribution the project has made to putting social work ‘on the map’ in Afghanistan. At the same time it highlighted the opportunity to increase the emphasis on longer term sustainability through a period of consolidation. Adjusting plans to improve results based on evaluations and our on-going monitoring and evaluation ensures we develop thorough planning mechanisms that focus resources on achieving goals. Both internal and external evaluations undertaken throughout the year have aimed to ensure that children’s voices are sought and heard. This not only makes sense but is essential when we consider that children are at the heart of everything we do and that it is their right to have a say over decisions that affect their lives. In Sierra Leone, children’s feedback on our HIV and AIDS education programme, which drew to a close in 2011, made it clear that future work needs to ensure that issues of school drop-out and non-enrolment due to hunger and lack of sufficient food are addressed. 25


At Children in Crisis we know that the change we make cannot be assumed to speak for itself. We have robust systems and processes for measuring our impact but we are constantly learning which means we know there is always room for improvement. Learning from our programme in Liberia has shown us that the programme would benefit from using less monitoring tools, more effectively employed, and we have adapted the work accordingly. We have also taken concrete steps towards strengthening the way we measure change over the year, undertaking desk-based research on best practice and holding an internal workshop to review our approach and identify what works and what can be improved. This will be a good basis from which we pursue further work in this area in 2012.

For Children in Crisis, facilitating this space for sharing learning and experiences with and between our partner organisations is an important part of what we do both for our own learning and that of our partners, whom all share a common goal. Throughout the year we have also scaled up the extent to which we shared experiences of successes and challenges across countries that could be drawn upon in other contexts, from low cost school resources, such as rice sacks, in DR Congo to effective training approaches on monitoring and evaluation in Liberia. These exchanges across partner organisations are something we will be building on in 2012 and beyond to strengthen how we learn as an organisation, how our partners learn, how we learn collectively, and as a vital way of achieving our strategic goal of seeing ‘strong, responsive organisations capable of initiating sustained changes for the communities they serve’*. Sarah Jones Programme Support Manager A teacher in Liberia

Exchange Event. Four days at a (donated) rural retreat in Surrey meant we could Strength in Shared engage in discussions and group work on shared goals and approaches, what Learning works and what does not, and how By sharing learning, both good and lessons learned can be shared bad, organisations are across country programmes better able to know to strengthen the work we . . . I enjoyed what to do more do independently and my time with all of the of, what to do less collectively. team at Children in Crisis of, and what can be and look forward to working In November 2011 we done better. In March to bring change in our also organised a workshop 2011 representatives communities and the lives of in London for our from our partner the people we work with. colleagues of Children in organisations in Crisis Italy to build their Rufus Mandein, Project Manager Afghanistan, DR Congo, capacity to fundraise. FAWE Liberia, Liberia and Liberia travelled to the UK for our first Learning 26

Democratic Republic of Congo

*For a copy of Children in Crisis 20112014 strategy, please visit our website.

Liberia, focus group

27


At Children in Crisis we know that the change we make cannot be assumed to speak for itself. We have robust systems and processes for measuring our impact but we are constantly learning which means we know there is always room for improvement. Learning from our programme in Liberia has shown us that the programme would benefit from using less monitoring tools, more effectively employed, and we have adapted the work accordingly. We have also taken concrete steps towards strengthening the way we measure change over the year, undertaking desk-based research on best practice and holding an internal workshop to review our approach and identify what works and what can be improved. This will be a good basis from which we pursue further work in this area in 2012.

For Children in Crisis, facilitating this space for sharing learning and experiences with and between our partner organisations is an important part of what we do both for our own learning and that of our partners, whom all share a common goal. Throughout the year we have also scaled up the extent to which we shared experiences of successes and challenges across countries that could be drawn upon in other contexts, from low cost school resources, such as rice sacks, in DR Congo to effective training approaches on monitoring and evaluation in Liberia. These exchanges across partner organisations are something we will be building on in 2012 and beyond to strengthen how we learn as an organisation, how our partners learn, how we learn collectively, and as a vital way of achieving our strategic goal of seeing ‘strong, responsive organisations capable of initiating sustained changes for the communities they serve’*. Sarah Jones Programme Support Manager A teacher in Liberia

Exchange Event. Four days at a (donated) rural retreat in Surrey meant we could Strength in Shared engage in discussions and group work on shared goals and approaches, what Learning works and what does not, and how By sharing learning, both good and lessons learned can be shared bad, organisations are across country programmes better able to know to strengthen the work we . . . I enjoyed what to do more do independently and my time with all of the of, what to do less collectively. team at Children in Crisis of, and what can be and look forward to working In November 2011 we done better. In March to bring change in our also organised a workshop 2011 representatives communities and the lives of in London for our from our partner the people we work with. colleagues of Children in organisations in Crisis Italy to build their Rufus Mandein, Project Manager Afghanistan, DR Congo, capacity to fundraise. FAWE Liberia, Liberia and Liberia travelled to the UK for our first Learning 26

Democratic Republic of Congo

*For a copy of Children in Crisis 20112014 strategy, please visit our website.

Liberia, focus group

27


Children in Crisis Italy Founded in 1999, Children in Crisis Italy is our sister organisation which shares the same purpose and values as Children in Crisis UK. During the past twelve years it has contributed to several joint programmes as well as implemented programmes of its own. These are the main activities that Children in Crisis Italy is focusing on in 2011/ 2012.

Tanzania: supporting the education of Girls

Ecuador: reaching out to street-working children

In cooperation with FAWE Tanzania, Children in Crisis Italy supports the education of over 100 girls in Tanzania. The programme consists of a Girls Bursary Scheme to sustain the secondary school education of girls who have completed primary school (free of charge and accessible to all children) but whose families cannot afford the cost of secondary schooling. Tanzania has one of the worst rates of secondary school attendance in Africa with an enrolment ratio of only 5%. We focus on the most vulnerable groups, frequently AIDS orphans. Our intervention also involves the improvement of the school environment in three schools in rural areas through the building and restructuring of residential, teaching and sanitary facilities. The programme is enacted within FAWE’s Centre of Excellence project that empowers schools and communities to adopt a gender-sensitive approach to education, promoting equality and the rights of women within a highly discriminatory context.

For several years Children in Crisis Italy has partnered with Fundación Juconi Ecuador to support the street-working children programme in Guayaquil, targeting the most marginalised children of the suburban neighbourhoods characterised by extreme poverty, crime, violence, addiction and abuse. The ultimate goal is to eradicate child labour and violence within the family. We have supported over 200 children with 46 currently within our child sponsorship scheme lasting on average 4 years. The sponsorships cover the costs of school expenses (including uniforms, shoes and school supplies), monthly food baskets, emergency medical expenses, twice-weekly in-home visits by professional psychologists (family key workers), as well as sports, arts and entertainment group activities.

Ecuador

Haiti: a school for the children of Joineau In the aftermath of the devastating earthquake that hit Haiti in January 2010, the supporters of Children in Crisis Italy mobilised to raise funds in order to contribute to the reconstruction and development of this country. Children in Crisis Italy has partnered with Caritas Ambrosiana to participate in the development of the school system in a remote rural area of the island, near Thomazeau, Ouest District. With the resources collected we have contributed to the construction of a pre-school at Joineau, benefiting 120 children aged 3 to 6 years. The programme also includes the construction of a primary school and teacher training.

Liberia: reaching the most remote communities Following an in-country visit last June, Children in Crisis Italy is committing to school development in remote areas of River Cess County in cooperation with Children in Crisis UK and FAWE Liberia. Our fundraising efforts are focusing on obtaining the resources necessary to develop a novel approach in school building, using mostly local materials, in order to support the most distant communities that cannot be reached by road. The aim is that of building sufficient schools to respond to the needs of an entire rural district. In addition, we will carry on supporting the Vocational Training Centre for women built in Cestos City.

Italy: Pepita Youth Orchestra The idea at the base of the Pepita Youth Orchestra programme comes from the Venezuelan system of youth orchestras ʻEl Sistema’ created by Jose Abreu in the 1970s 28

Italy, Pepita Youth Orchestra

and currently involving 250,000 children from deprived areas of this country. Our programme has the objective of establishing a permanent classical music youth orchestra in the city of Milan, involving youths between 10 and 19 years of age from suburban areas, in order to promote social participation and integration. The methodology is centred around the practice of music as a group activity, offering lessons to children, mostly from deprived backgrounds, who have a passion for music but no previous musical experience. Our aim is not to train expert musicians but to promote team-work within the common project of the orchestra. Pepita has been supported by the Milan town council and currently involves 88 children, with 40 forming the Orchestra that has already performed in several official occasions.

Education on positive life-style choices Children in Crisis Italy implements health education programmes, ʻConviamo’ and ʻDecidi’, in primary schools, with the aim to encourage healthy life-style choices and prevent negative behaviour such as bullying, drug and alcohol dependencies and eating disorders. ʻConviamo’ currently involves a network of 8 schools in the city of Milan, involving every year 2,000 children, as well as their teachers and families. Our approach involves highly interactive classroom activities as well as teacher training. The programme is supported by the Milan Town Council. Associazione Children in Crisis Italy President Barbara Bianchi Bonomi Vice-President Silvana Lauria 29


Children in Crisis Italy Founded in 1999, Children in Crisis Italy is our sister organisation which shares the same purpose and values as Children in Crisis UK. During the past twelve years it has contributed to several joint programmes as well as implemented programmes of its own. These are the main activities that Children in Crisis Italy is focusing on in 2011/ 2012.

Tanzania: supporting the education of Girls

Ecuador: reaching out to street-working children

In cooperation with FAWE Tanzania, Children in Crisis Italy supports the education of over 100 girls in Tanzania. The programme consists of a Girls Bursary Scheme to sustain the secondary school education of girls who have completed primary school (free of charge and accessible to all children) but whose families cannot afford the cost of secondary schooling. Tanzania has one of the worst rates of secondary school attendance in Africa with an enrolment ratio of only 5%. We focus on the most vulnerable groups, frequently AIDS orphans. Our intervention also involves the improvement of the school environment in three schools in rural areas through the building and restructuring of residential, teaching and sanitary facilities. The programme is enacted within FAWE’s Centre of Excellence project that empowers schools and communities to adopt a gender-sensitive approach to education, promoting equality and the rights of women within a highly discriminatory context.

For several years Children in Crisis Italy has partnered with Fundación Juconi Ecuador to support the street-working children programme in Guayaquil, targeting the most marginalised children of the suburban neighbourhoods characterised by extreme poverty, crime, violence, addiction and abuse. The ultimate goal is to eradicate child labour and violence within the family. We have supported over 200 children with 46 currently within our child sponsorship scheme lasting on average 4 years. The sponsorships cover the costs of school expenses (including uniforms, shoes and school supplies), monthly food baskets, emergency medical expenses, twice-weekly in-home visits by professional psychologists (family key workers), as well as sports, arts and entertainment group activities.

Ecuador

Haiti: a school for the children of Joineau In the aftermath of the devastating earthquake that hit Haiti in January 2010, the supporters of Children in Crisis Italy mobilised to raise funds in order to contribute to the reconstruction and development of this country. Children in Crisis Italy has partnered with Caritas Ambrosiana to participate in the development of the school system in a remote rural area of the island, near Thomazeau, Ouest District. With the resources collected we have contributed to the construction of a pre-school at Joineau, benefiting 120 children aged 3 to 6 years. The programme also includes the construction of a primary school and teacher training.

Liberia: reaching the most remote communities Following an in-country visit last June, Children in Crisis Italy is committing to school development in remote areas of River Cess County in cooperation with Children in Crisis UK and FAWE Liberia. Our fundraising efforts are focusing on obtaining the resources necessary to develop a novel approach in school building, using mostly local materials, in order to support the most distant communities that cannot be reached by road. The aim is that of building sufficient schools to respond to the needs of an entire rural district. In addition, we will carry on supporting the Vocational Training Centre for women built in Cestos City.

Italy: Pepita Youth Orchestra The idea at the base of the Pepita Youth Orchestra programme comes from the Venezuelan system of youth orchestras ʻEl Sistema’ created by Jose Abreu in the 1970s 28

Italy, Pepita Youth Orchestra

and currently involving 250,000 children from deprived areas of this country. Our programme has the objective of establishing a permanent classical music youth orchestra in the city of Milan, involving youths between 10 and 19 years of age from suburban areas, in order to promote social participation and integration. The methodology is centred around the practice of music as a group activity, offering lessons to children, mostly from deprived backgrounds, who have a passion for music but no previous musical experience. Our aim is not to train expert musicians but to promote team-work within the common project of the orchestra. Pepita has been supported by the Milan town council and currently involves 88 children, with 40 forming the Orchestra that has already performed in several official occasions.

Education on positive life-style choices Children in Crisis Italy implements health education programmes, ʻConviamo’ and ʻDecidi’, in primary schools, with the aim to encourage healthy life-style choices and prevent negative behaviour such as bullying, drug and alcohol dependencies and eating disorders. ʻConviamo’ currently involves a network of 8 schools in the city of Milan, involving every year 2,000 children, as well as their teachers and families. Our approach involves highly interactive classroom activities as well as teacher training. The programme is supported by the Milan Town Council. Associazione Children in Crisis Italy President Barbara Bianchi Bonomi Vice-President Silvana Lauria 29


Financial Summary for year ending 31 March 2011

How we helped children in 2010/11 The total income for the period was £2,616,005 a 29% increase compared to 2009/10. The increase is due to the success of four major funding applications for our programmes in Afghanistan, DR Congo and Liberia. The total expenditure for the period was £2,334,508. The amount spent on charitable activities in 2010/11 was £1,733,777 a 9% increase on the previous year due to rolling out the new programmes in Afghanistan, DR Congo and Liberia. The reason expenditure has not yet risen in line with income is because some of the grant and contract income received during the second half of 2010/11 was for a full project year so not all of it had been spent by March 2011 but will be in the first half of 2011/12.

Expenditure

We are very grateful for the loyal support we receive from grant-making trusts and foundations, corporate donors and generous individuals. The diversity of our funding sources, including the security of large numbers of supporters choosing to donate through regular monthly gifts, have helped achieve stability and we are encouraged that individual donations rose again in 2010/11 despite the difficult economic climate. The income from corporate and individual supporters who organise their own fundraising initiatives, or take part in our events and challenges, is equally valuable.

Acknowledgements We are very grateful for the loyal support we receive from grant-making trusts and foundations, corporate donors and generous individuals who share our vision of a world where all children receive the learning needed for their flourishing and well-being. Main funders who contributed to our work during the financial year 2010/11:

Trusts and Foundations A & S Burton Charitable Trust Allan and Nesta Ferguson Charitable Settlement Baring Foundation Bliss Family Charity

How you gave in 2010/11

British and Foreign School Society Bryan Guinness Charitable Trust Charles Dunstone Charitable Trust Cheruby Trust

Income

Dennis Alan Yardy Charitable Trust Donald Forrester Trust Edgar and Mary Traylen Charitable Trust Evan Cornish Foundation Fulmer Charitable Trust Gilbert and Eileen Edgar Foundation Harapan Trust Ian Askew Trust John Ellerman Foundation

Governance

1%

Challenges

7%

Cost of generating funds 26%

Events

6%

Education – Health

Individual giving

26%

Education – Community 28%

Corporate donations

11%

Education – Schools

Grants

26%

Programme contracts

24%

17% 28%

These summarised accounts may not contain sufficient information to allow for a full understanding of the financial affairs of the charity. For further information the full accounts, the auditors’ report on those accounts and the Trustees’ Annual Report should be consulted. Copies of these can be obtained from Children in Crisis or downloaded from our website. The full audited accounts were approved on 22 September 2011 and together with the annual report have been submitted to the Charity Commission and the Registrar of Companies. The opinion of the auditors was unqualified.

30

Thank you!

M J C Stone Charitable Trust Madeline Mabey Trust Maria Marina Foundation Marr-Munning Trust Medicor Foundation - Liechtenstein Mercury Phoenix Trust N Smith Charitable Settlement Paget Trust Peter Foden Family Trust Reuben Foundation Rhododendron Trust

Roger Vere Foundation Sanne Charitable Trust

The Ashmore Foundation

Scotshill Trust

The Economist

Shanley Charitable Trust

Trulife

Swire Charitable Trust

Usborne Publishing Ltd

Turing Foundation

UBS Optimus Foundation

Unite Foundation

Vitol Services Limited

WGH Lowe Charitable Trust Zochonis Charitable Trust

Corporate donors Argus Media Ltd Barclays Bank PLC BGC Partners Child Protection UK Ltd Chi-X Europe LTD

Multilateral, Government and NonGovernmental donors Australian Embassy for International Development (AusAid)

Credit Suisse

Children Services of Leeds City Council

Excel I.T. Ltd

Comic Relief

Harbour & Jones

Germany Embassy, Kabul

Instinet Europe Ltd

Jersey Overseas Aid Commission

Johnson & Johnson

UNICEF

JP Morgan

World Bank

Melton Legal Search

World Vision

MoneyGram International Number 42 New Digital Partnership Penguin Group UK PomeGreat Reed Elsevier

Photo credits: James Hickman Sarah Jones Becky Midlane Amy Parker Sarah Rowse Joe Spikes Koy Thomson Jessi Hanson

31


Financial Summary for year ending 31 March 2011

How we helped children in 2010/11 The total income for the period was £2,616,005 a 29% increase compared to 2009/10. The increase is due to the success of four major funding applications for our programmes in Afghanistan, DR Congo and Liberia. The total expenditure for the period was £2,334,508. The amount spent on charitable activities in 2010/11 was £1,733,777 a 9% increase on the previous year due to rolling out the new programmes in Afghanistan, DR Congo and Liberia. The reason expenditure has not yet risen in line with income is because some of the grant and contract income received during the second half of 2010/11 was for a full project year so not all of it had been spent by March 2011 but will be in the first half of 2011/12.

Expenditure

We are very grateful for the loyal support we receive from grant-making trusts and foundations, corporate donors and generous individuals. The diversity of our funding sources, including the security of large numbers of supporters choosing to donate through regular monthly gifts, have helped achieve stability and we are encouraged that individual donations rose again in 2010/11 despite the difficult economic climate. The income from corporate and individual supporters who organise their own fundraising initiatives, or take part in our events and challenges, is equally valuable.

Acknowledgements We are very grateful for the loyal support we receive from grant-making trusts and foundations, corporate donors and generous individuals who share our vision of a world where all children receive the learning needed for their flourishing and well-being. Main funders who contributed to our work during the financial year 2010/11:

Trusts and Foundations A & S Burton Charitable Trust Allan and Nesta Ferguson Charitable Settlement Baring Foundation Bliss Family Charity

How you gave in 2010/11

British and Foreign School Society Bryan Guinness Charitable Trust Charles Dunstone Charitable Trust Cheruby Trust

Income

Dennis Alan Yardy Charitable Trust Donald Forrester Trust Edgar and Mary Traylen Charitable Trust Evan Cornish Foundation Fulmer Charitable Trust Gilbert and Eileen Edgar Foundation Harapan Trust Ian Askew Trust John Ellerman Foundation

Governance

1%

Challenges

7%

Cost of generating funds 26%

Events

6%

Education – Health

Individual giving

26%

Education – Community 28%

Corporate donations

11%

Education – Schools

Grants

26%

Programme contracts

24%

17% 28%

These summarised accounts may not contain sufficient information to allow for a full understanding of the financial affairs of the charity. For further information the full accounts, the auditors’ report on those accounts and the Trustees’ Annual Report should be consulted. Copies of these can be obtained from Children in Crisis or downloaded from our website. The full audited accounts were approved on 22 September 2011 and together with the annual report have been submitted to the Charity Commission and the Registrar of Companies. The opinion of the auditors was unqualified.

30

Thank you!

M J C Stone Charitable Trust Madeline Mabey Trust Maria Marina Foundation Marr-Munning Trust Medicor Foundation - Liechtenstein Mercury Phoenix Trust N Smith Charitable Settlement Paget Trust Peter Foden Family Trust Reuben Foundation Rhododendron Trust

Roger Vere Foundation Sanne Charitable Trust

The Ashmore Foundation

Scotshill Trust

The Economist

Shanley Charitable Trust

Trulife

Swire Charitable Trust

Usborne Publishing Ltd

Turing Foundation

UBS Optimus Foundation

Unite Foundation

Vitol Services Limited

WGH Lowe Charitable Trust Zochonis Charitable Trust

Corporate donors Argus Media Ltd Barclays Bank PLC BGC Partners Child Protection UK Ltd Chi-X Europe LTD

Multilateral, Government and NonGovernmental donors Australian Embassy for International Development (AusAid)

Credit Suisse

Children Services of Leeds City Council

Excel I.T. Ltd

Comic Relief

Harbour & Jones

Germany Embassy, Kabul

Instinet Europe Ltd

Jersey Overseas Aid Commission

Johnson & Johnson

UNICEF

JP Morgan

World Bank

Melton Legal Search

World Vision

MoneyGram International Number 42 New Digital Partnership Penguin Group UK PomeGreat Reed Elsevier

Photo credits: James Hickman Sarah Jones Becky Midlane Amy Parker Sarah Rowse Joe Spikes Koy Thomson Jessi Hanson

31


Get involved!

We thank all those whose support continues to make our work possible, individuals and organisations, celebrity supporters, trustees and volunteers who have given generously of their time throughout 2011. This page is dedicated to you… Thank you!

Challenges Extreme Mother

Royal Parks Half Marathon Our Children in Crisis half-marathon team gathered on the 9 October 2011 to run the Royal Parks Half-Marathon, together they raised an incredible £16,893! This unique 13.1 mile run started in Hyde Park and covered Kensington Deborah Helsby, Gardens, Green Park and St Trustee of Children in Crisis, James Park. Will you join our and friends. team in 2012?

By skiing 550km across the Arctic Circle, Sabine Diederichs took on the challenge of a lifetime in March 2011 and raised an awe-inspiring £21,679 for Children in Crisis.

The Ultimate Cycle Challenge In November 2011, Rachel Nash took on the Ultimate Challenge and conquered 420km of the Death Valley by bicycle. Many people overlook the park due to the misguided belief that Congratulations Rachel! it is lifeless, but this 3.4 million acre park is not only the largest park in the USA, it also is one of the most striking landscapes on Earth. What will your challenge be in 2012?

Top Fundraiser Marathon runner, Mark Howe, became our Top Fundraiser this year as he raised over £10,000 by running the Virgin London Marathon 2011! What an outstanding achievement! 32

Appeals

Events Children in Crisis Annual Dinner Our fundraising dinner held on 9th March 2011 at the Roof Gardens in Kensington raised a fabulous £115,000. A big thank you to all those who attended and made this event such an amazing evening! This year’s dinner is held on 1st March 2012 please contact our events team should you wish to book a table.

The Royal Hat Children in Crisis are absolutely delighted by the success of Princess Beatrice’s Royal Wedding Hat auction in May 2011, and would like to thank Princess Beatrice, the very generous successful bidder and all who have helped to make this auction the charity event of 2011. In total The Royal Hat raised £81,100 in aid of Children in Crisis and Unicef.

Success on the trading floor!

Got a present to buy? Scrap that gift list, put up your feet and forget those heavy shopping bags. Come to Children in Crisis' virtual gift shop: www.childrenincrisisgifts.org

the BGC Partners charity day in London's Canary Wharf. BGC Partners give up their commission every year on the nearest trading day to 9/11 to 75 charities worldwide. We are delighted that Children in Crisis was chosen as one of the 25 UK charities which benefited in 2011. Thank you BGC for your very generous grant of £75,000!

Get Quizzical during Children in Crisis Week! Thank you to everyone who attended our quiz night at Sway on 16 November and contributed to raising a total of £34,200 for Children in Crisis. Lord Jeffrey Archer, our celebrity auctioneer, did a wonderful job at auctioning all our prizes! Children in Crisis Week will start on 19th November this year. What will you do to celebrate the Universal Children’s day on Tuesday 20th November 2012?

Quiz night at Barclays On the 24 November 2011 another incredibly successful quiz night took place in association with Barclays. Huge thanks to Fred Anson, event organiser, quiz-master and all round entertainer, for organising the evening and putting on such a well-loved annual event! The quiz night this year made an amazing £55,000 of which one third went to Children in Crisis. To organise your own corporate quiz night and request a quiz pack, please visit our website.

Give girls an education, not hand-outs! Through the generosity of our supporters who responded to our Christmas appeal and who donated during the Big Give December Challenge, Children in Crisis raised an impressive £32,000 to improve girls' education and livelihood in rural Liberia. Thank you!

Congratulations to Keziah Spaine, aged 11, who has made a collection for Children in Crisis and raised a fantastic £31.86! She says: “As I am also a young person, I thought of you because the way in which you help young people is outstanding…”

Sarah, Duchess of York, HRH Princess Beatrice and HRH Princess Eugenie, representing Children in Crisis on BGC charity trading day.

On 12 September 2011, Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie took to the trading floor with their mother Sarah, Duchess of York, to represent Children in Crisis at

Streets in the City Huge thanks to Julia Streets, business woman, comedienne and Trustee of Children of Crisis, for the numerous comedy nights she has organised in the City in aid of Children in Crisis throughout the year. 33


Get involved!

We thank all those whose support continues to make our work possible, individuals and organisations, celebrity supporters, trustees and volunteers who have given generously of their time throughout 2011. This page is dedicated to you… Thank you!

Challenges Extreme Mother

Royal Parks Half Marathon Our Children in Crisis half-marathon team gathered on the 9 October 2011 to run the Royal Parks Half-Marathon, together they raised an incredible £16,893! This unique 13.1 mile run started in Hyde Park and covered Kensington Deborah Helsby, Gardens, Green Park and St Trustee of Children in Crisis, James Park. Will you join our and friends. team in 2012?

By skiing 550km across the Arctic Circle, Sabine Diederichs took on the challenge of a lifetime in March 2011 and raised an awe-inspiring £21,679 for Children in Crisis.

The Ultimate Cycle Challenge In November 2011, Rachel Nash took on the Ultimate Challenge and conquered 420km of the Death Valley by bicycle. Many people overlook the park due to the misguided belief that Congratulations Rachel! it is lifeless, but this 3.4 million acre park is not only the largest park in the USA, it also is one of the most striking landscapes on Earth. What will your challenge be in 2012?

Top Fundraiser Marathon runner, Mark Howe, became our Top Fundraiser this year as he raised over £10,000 by running the Virgin London Marathon 2011! What an outstanding achievement! 32

Appeals

Events Children in Crisis Annual Dinner Our fundraising dinner held on 9th March 2011 at the Roof Gardens in Kensington raised a fabulous £115,000. A big thank you to all those who attended and made this event such an amazing evening! This year’s dinner is held on 1st March 2012 please contact our events team should you wish to book a table.

The Royal Hat Children in Crisis are absolutely delighted by the success of Princess Beatrice’s Royal Wedding Hat auction in May 2011, and would like to thank Princess Beatrice, the very generous successful bidder and all who have helped to make this auction the charity event of 2011. In total The Royal Hat raised £81,100 in aid of Children in Crisis and Unicef.

Success on the trading floor!

Got a present to buy? Scrap that gift list, put up your feet and forget those heavy shopping bags. Come to Children in Crisis' virtual gift shop: www.childrenincrisisgifts.org

the BGC Partners charity day in London's Canary Wharf. BGC Partners give up their commission every year on the nearest trading day to 9/11 to 75 charities worldwide. We are delighted that Children in Crisis was chosen as one of the 25 UK charities which benefited in 2011. Thank you BGC for your very generous grant of £75,000!

Get Quizzical during Children in Crisis Week! Thank you to everyone who attended our quiz night at Sway on 16 November and contributed to raising a total of £34,200 for Children in Crisis. Lord Jeffrey Archer, our celebrity auctioneer, did a wonderful job at auctioning all our prizes! Children in Crisis Week will start on 19th November this year. What will you do to celebrate the Universal Children’s day on Tuesday 20th November 2012?

Quiz night at Barclays On the 24 November 2011 another incredibly successful quiz night took place in association with Barclays. Huge thanks to Fred Anson, event organiser, quiz-master and all round entertainer, for organising the evening and putting on such a well-loved annual event! The quiz night this year made an amazing £55,000 of which one third went to Children in Crisis. To organise your own corporate quiz night and request a quiz pack, please visit our website.

Give girls an education, not hand-outs! Through the generosity of our supporters who responded to our Christmas appeal and who donated during the Big Give December Challenge, Children in Crisis raised an impressive £32,000 to improve girls' education and livelihood in rural Liberia. Thank you!

Congratulations to Keziah Spaine, aged 11, who has made a collection for Children in Crisis and raised a fantastic £31.86! She says: “As I am also a young person, I thought of you because the way in which you help young people is outstanding…”

Sarah, Duchess of York, HRH Princess Beatrice and HRH Princess Eugenie, representing Children in Crisis on BGC charity trading day.

On 12 September 2011, Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie took to the trading floor with their mother Sarah, Duchess of York, to represent Children in Crisis at

Streets in the City Huge thanks to Julia Streets, business woman, comedienne and Trustee of Children of Crisis, for the numerous comedy nights she has organised in the City in aid of Children in Crisis throughout the year. 33


Maron’s bakery in Liberia

A chance to learn, a chance in life

Why I support Children in Crisis

2011: THE YEAR IN REVIEW

I was first introduced to Children in Crisis when family friends suffered a horrific personal tragedy. Their son was tragically killed in terrible circumstances. Recognising the impact such an event could have on the future of the family, they decided to channel their grief to positive means by raising funds for Children in Crisis. Climbing mountains is no mean feat for most of us, so just imagine what conquering Base Camp Everest, Kilimanjaro and Cotopaxi has meant for the family. They are a true inspiration and in turn have inspired others, to such an extent that with Children in Crisis they opened a school in their son’s name in Democratic Republic of the Congo. Like so many of their friends, to support them I have been able to bring together various elements of my professional and social lives to create events for Children in Crisis. It has been important for me that the administrative costs of Children in Crisis are as low as they feasibly can be and that every penny raised is put to great use. I have been impressed with how hard everyone works to raise funds and create sustainable educational and social infrastructure programmes in some of the most remote places in the world. And it works. Just look at their amazing work in Liberia as one example. Women setting up bakeries, schools built and teachers educated, all of which create networks and communities creating better futures for themselves. I am very honoured to have been invited to be a Trustee last year and to play my part in the development of the charity. There are many, many ways you too can get involved to lend your support and the website is full of ideas and updates about what’s going on. Any and every help is hugely appreciated. Julia Streets Director of Streets Consulting & Trustee of Children in Crisis Children in Crisis, 206 - 208 Stewart’s Road London SW8 4UB, UK tel: +4420 7627 1040 fax: +4420 7627 1050 info@childrenincrisis.org www.childrenincrisis.org Children in Crisis Italy, Foro Buonaparte 76, Milano, Italy tel. +39 02 89096744 - +39 02 72094645 info@childrenincrisis.it www.childrenincrisis.it

Children in Crisis protects and educates children facing the toughest hardships in countries affected by conflict or political instability. Founder and Life President: Sarah, Duchess of York. Registered office as above. UK Registered charity No. 1020488. Company No. 2815817.

DR Congo Photo: James Hickman


2011 Year in Review