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The magazine for families in the quad-state area!

www.childguidemagazine.com

January/February 2018 Frederick & Washington counties, MD Eastern Panhandle, WV Frederick & Clarke counties, VA Franklin County, PA

Family Health

Enrollment Promotions & Open Houses for Private Schools, Preschools and Child Care Centers

Our Heads Up calendar of events features the area’s best in family-friendly fun!


Frederick County WIC Program 301-600-2507

Washington County WIC Program 240-313-3335

Have you made your appointment?

WIC is a nutrition program for women, infants, and children that gives extra food, health screenings, tips on healthy eating, breastfeeding support, and referrals to other services.

Call to find out if you are eligible. www.mdwic.org eWic is here!

Larry Hogan, Governor Boyd Rutherford, Lt. Governor Van Mitchell, Secretary, DHMH

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.


Ballet, Tap, Jazz & Modern

Toddler thru Adult

“ ...committed to keeping the art and discipline of classical dance alive in our community.”

Meet the teachers + Review the curriculum + Meet the principal & administrator + Meet other parents + Tour our campus • 34 YEARS IN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION • ACCREDITED BY A.C.S.I. & NORTH CENTRAL ASSOCIATION • LICENSED PRE-K4 PROGRAM • CERTIFIED DEDICATED TEACHERS • ONLINE GRADING & HOMEWORK • COMPUTER LAB • STRINGS & BAND PROGRAM • INTERSCHOLASTIC SPORTS • BEFORE & AFTER CARE 138 Greensburg Rd., Martinsburg FaithChristianAcademy.net Phone: (304) 263-0011 Faith Christian Academy does not discriminate on the basis of race, color or national origin.

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Child Guide

January/February 2018

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Child Guide is pleased to be available in schools in nine school districts. County boards of education, their agents and employees neither sponsor nor endorse this publication. The views expressed might or might not reflect those of the county boards of education or school administrations, and are neither approved nor disapproved by them.

www.childguidemagazine.com In this issue of

Our editorial mission: Child Guide strives to provide families and educators with a free publication packed with good ideas and local resources for raising happy, healthy children – because we believe that being a loving guide for your child is the most important job in the world.

WENDY C. KEDZIERSKI Founder/Editorial Consultant

CECILIA “CIS” RHYNE Publisher/Editor

Cis@childguidemagazine.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS pg.4

Family Health

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Personal Refliection . . . . . . . .8

Dental Saving Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 February is National Children’s Dental Health Month

Healthy Air – Healthy Kids . . . . . . . . . . . .6 How To Manage Your Child’s Screen Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

How to Mindfully Bust Out of a Hyperactive Lifestyle . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Living Healthier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Flu Shots The Nutrition Facts Label Can Help Young People Make Healthful Choices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Education Article:

pgs. 10-15

Suzanne Hovermale

Dr. Jean Moorjani, Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children

Private Schools, Preschools, & Child Care Open Houses & Enrollment Promotions . . . . . . . . . . .10-15 Schools Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-13

Jeanne-Marie Williams

Resources:

Index to Advertisers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24

Departments:

Dear Teacher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Follow Our Adventure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 A Cool Time at Ice Fest Heads Up Calendar of Events . . . . . . . . .20 Living Healthier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Flu Shots

Sisters Kayliana and Madelyn

from Hagerstown, MD, are featured on this Jan/Feb 2018 Child Guide cover

(order reversed in cover photo–Madelyn on left). Both girls celebrate birthdays in January – Happy Birthday from Child Guide!

Photo by Mary Pat Kelley Photography by Dale See ad on page 3.

January/February 2018

Mary Ellen Carmody

Christa Melnyk Hines

Listening for the Truth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Making the Most of Parent-Teacher Conferences

From the cover

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Mali Anderson

Child Guide

U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Beth Vollmer

Andrea Woroch

Sharon Zoumbaris

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Mary Pat Kelley

Jeanne-Marie Williams

ADVERTISING Office: 301-665-2817 cis@childguidemagazine.com

Child Guide, January/February 2018, Volume XVIII, Issue No. 1; headquartered in Hagerstown, MD, published by Child Guide Publishing, Inc. PO Box 3529 Hagerstown, MD 21742-3529

The design and contents are fully protected by copyright, and except as permitted by law must not be reproduced in any manner without written permission from the publisher. Manuscripts must be accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope. Child Guide is not responsible for unsolicited material. Child Guide does not necessarily endorse businesses or organizations contained herein and reserves the right to reject any advertising that we feel is not in keeping with the philosophy and spirit of the publication.

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Child Guide

January/February 2018

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How to Mindfully Bust Out of a Hyperactive Lifestyle BY

CHRISTA MELNYK HINES

A

s the chief director of your family's universe, you're the pulse-point of the home. But if that means you're struggling under the mantle of an unforgiving schedule, now is the time to re-evaluate. Your health and the overall wellbeing of your family depends on it. According to an annual survey called "Stress in America" conducted by the American Psychological Association (APA), adult stress levels are the highest that they've been in a decade. And women report higher levels of stress than men. "Wanting to please, wanting to be everything to everybody, women just keep extending themselves, until their minds and bodies cannot cope," says Rosalie Moscoe, RHN, RNCP, and author of Frazzled Hurried Woman! Your Stress Relief Guide to Thriving.

Health implications of stress. Stress is the body's way of

coping with what it perceives as a dangerous situation. When our body switches on the "fight or flight" survival mechanism, it releases a mix of hormones including adrenaline, norepinephrine, and cortisol into the body. We become hyper-focused, our heart beat and breathing rate increases, and we feel a boost of energy. Chronic stress, however, can contribute to health problems like heart disease and hypertension. It can lengthen the recovery time from illness and fuel other longterm health problems, like obesity, irritable bowel syndrome, high blood pressure, insomnia, headaches, depression and even infertility. "High levels of circulating stress hormones can impair adrenal function, resulting in brain fog, lethargy and the dreaded 'pregnant Page 4

January/February 2018

belly' even if you are not with child," says Elle Griffin, a natural fertility expert and feminine vitality coach. "Some women even start losing their hair."

Evaluate and prioritize.

Make a list of everything you do. Decide which items can be eliminated, pared down or delegated to others. Can you organize a carpool with another parent? Can you limit your kids' activities to one per season? Are there volunteer activities that you no longer find meaningful? Can your kids fold and put away laundry? "Dissect one of your most stressful commitments," Moscoe says. "Your own thoughts and feelings about what is expected of you will determine how much stress you will feel. If you have elder care, get your teenage kids or other family members to visit your folks and do errands. It doesn't have to be you all of the time." Even hiring a cleaning company to come in every other week can lighten the burden of overwhelming housework. Practice saying no. Once you've created some space on your calendar, avoid the temptation of adding any new commitments to your schedule. If you're asked to do something that doesn't match your priorities or interests, say: "I'm unable to do that right now, but thank you for thinking of me." Exercise. Expending energy helps boost energy. Carve out 15 to 30 minutes a day for exercise like biking, yoga, running or walking with a friend. Just don't put more pressure on yourself by forcing yourself to complete grueling daily workouts. Griffin warns that overtaxing an already stressed body with too much strenuous exercise

Child Guide

Free Meditation Apps Calm Omvana Headspace Relax Melodies Take a Break

can increase the stress hormone cortisol.

Plan meals ahead of time. To avoid fast-food runs during hectic weeks, on Saturday or Sunday, plan out the coming week's menu according to what's happening each day. Choose meals that are simple to make, but nutritious. When you head to the grocery store, purchase all of the ingredients you'll need for each meal to avoid last-minute trips to the store on a busy weeknight. Prep ingredients ahead of time if you can and work the crockpot. Also check out meal kit delivery and grocery store delivery services which can help you save time during hectic weeks. Avoid draining personalities. People who

constantly complain, gossip or act victimized can sap your energy. Instead, focus on surrounding yourself with people who inspire you. If you're someone who has a habit of focusing on the negative, try adopting a gratitude practice. By growing more aware of the good www.childguidemagazine.com


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Comprehensive Care at One Site Primary Care • Dental • Mental Health • Pharmacy • Lab

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301-745-3777

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HOME OF HEALTHY SMILES IN MOTION We accept most commercial insurances, MPC, Medicare, Maryland Medicaid, Maryland Healthy Smiles

things in life, the world can feel like a less hostile, stressful place. Take a digital detox. Social media can suck up vast chunks of time and add to your stress. According to the APA, individuals who constantly check their email, texts and social media accounts experience more stress. If you're having trouble signing off, try taking a "digital Sabbath", or a 24-hour break once a week to unplug from your email and social media accounts. "Taking a digital detox is one of the most helpful ways to manage stress related to technology use," says Lynn Bufka, Ph.D., APA's associate executive director for practice research and policy. To help you get better, more relaxed rest, before bedtime turn off screens, put away your phone and limit your exposure to news. Remember to breathe. For a quick relaxation response in a moment of stress, take a deep slow breath. Inhale and hold it. Then exhale the breath twice as long as you inhale. Do this a few times. Pursue pleasure. Above all, integrate activities into your day that bring you personal joy. Take at least 10 to 15 minutes a day for self-care. Read a book, make a collage, paint your nails or take a bubble bath. Indulge in a cupcake. Schedule a moms' night out with some girlfriends or a date night with your spouse. www.childguidemagazine.com

By taking a more mindful approach to how you spend your time, you can begin more joyfully engaging with the world on your terms. And when you take time to nourish your body, mind and spirit, you'll not only flourish, your family will too.

◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆ ◆

Simple ways to unwind

Color, paint or draw Get lost in a page-turner novel Nap Play a game with your kids Meditate for one to five minutes Watch a funny sitcom or movie Listen to your favorite music Walk outside Garden

Christa Melnyk Hines is a freelance journalist and author of Confidently Connected: A Mom's Guide to a Satisfying Social Life, a resource for moms seeking a more balanced social life that supports their emotional health.

Child Guide

January/February 2018

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Healthy Air – Healthy Kids BY MARY ELLEN CARMODY

re you having a bad air day? What do you know about the air you and your family breath? Where you live and work may have the same poor air quality as a NASA spaceship. Did you know indoor air pollutants are among the top five environmental risks to public health. Are your windows and doors shut in summer because of air conditioning and in winter to keep the heat in? If so the stagnant air builds up in larger amounts than we should be breathing. Living and working in places with air contaminants without decent ventilation can cause “sick building syndrome”. Sick Building Syndrome can cause headaches, respiratory problems, coughing, sore throats, watery itchy eyes and other symptoms. Could this be your house? These health issues are related to the amount of time spent in the building containing the various air contaminants, such as formaldehyde, fire-retardants, radon and cleaning solutions. However, thanks to NASA we have a space age solution that is easy and anyone can use. Houseplants. We can get a breath of fresh air from many houseplants that clean and detoxify the air. So how do we start to take control of our air quality and breath healthy air using house plants? According to NASA research, the Garden Mum is the number one air

A

Okay, what are these pollutants and where do they come from. Ammonia occurs in refrigerants, plastics, textiles, pesticides, dyes, and many household cleaning solutions. Benzene occurs in the use of petroleum products, including motor fuels and solvents. Active and passive cigarette smoke is also a significant source of Benzene. Page 6

January/February 2018

purifier. This inexpensive plant removes ammonia, benzene, formaldehyde and xylene from indoor air. And as an added bonus, they can be planted outside when they are finished blooming. The Spider Plant ranks number two. It is one of the easiest to grow which makes it a great choice for beginners. The spider plant also sends out shoots that will grow into baby spider plants. The spider plant removes formaldehyde and xylene. The Dracaena is a great air purifying plant. There are more than 40 different kinds which makes it easy to find one that is a perfect fit for your home or office. The dracaena removes benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene and xylene. But if you own a pet this plant may not be the best, as it is toxic to cats and dogs. Want to bring a bit of Asia into your room. Bring in a ficus tree. A native of southeast Asia that has some serious air cleaning abilities. It removes benzene, formaldehyde and trichloroethylene. Got a room that is low on light? The Peace Lily grows well in a shady spot with moist soil. Also has some major air cleaning abilities. This lovely plant removes ammonia, benzene, formaldehyde and trichloroethylene. For all you with black thumbs try the Snake Plant or sometimes called Mother-In-Law’s Tongue. It is one of the hardest houseplants to kill. It just wants a little water now Formaldehyde comes to us in many household items, such as grocery bags, wax paper, and paper towels. But the most significant source is pressed wood products made using adhesives that contain urea-formaldehyde resins. Xylene is used by the chemical industry and can be found in a variety of common products, including paint, paint

Child Guide

and again and some sun. And for that it removes benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene and xylene. Another pet friendly filtering super star is the Bamboo Palm. Best for full sun or bright light. Good for a room that needs a tall plant. They can grow to four to 12 feet while cleaning your air of benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene. In case you don’t know Aloe Vera has some serious health claims along with cleaning the air. The plant’s leaves contain a clear liquid full of vitamins, enzymes, amino acids and other compounds that have wound healing, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. This plant removes formaldehyde. Mary Ellen Carmody is a nonfiction freelance writer, avid photographer, wife and mother, who lives in a 200-year-old former inn in Pennsylvania.

remover, nail polish, air freshers, degreasing cleaner, glues and marking pens. Trichloroethylene (TCE) is mostly used in closed systems for manufacturing of chemicals. However, there are still some household products that contain TCE. If you search for TCE and “degreaser” you will find a number of products contain TCE. www.childguidemagazine.com


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Living Healthier BY

“Your Place For Birthday Fun!”

S HARON Z OUMBARIS

www.cluggys.com

Flu Shots

A

re you familiar with the term “community immunity”? It applies to a population and the more people in that group who are vaccinated or immune to a specific disease, the less likely it will be that others in the community will get the disease. Still feeling uncertain about getting a flu shot for yourself or a family member? Do these scenarios fit you? Maybe you never had a flu shot and never came down with the flu, so you think it is unnecessary. Or maybe you got a shot and then the flu and, so you think it doesn’t work. Either way, please think again. There are lots of factors that come into play when looking at the effectiveness of the flu vaccine. First and foremost, matching the current year’s vaccine and the different strains of influenza viruses that are out there in the community makes a difference in effectiveness. Age, health status are also important factors in how protective your flu shot may be. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommend that everyone 6 months and older get a flu shot based on basic math. According to CDC statistics, millions of people get the flu every year and of that number, hundreds of thousands are hospitalized and up to tens of thousands die from flu-related causes. What about the simple science of diseases and vaccinations? Each year scientists use research to determine the most common viruses they expect in the coming year. Some years are more on target than others, but basically the traditional vaccine protects against 3 viruses, influenza A (H1N1), another A (H3N2) and a B virus. The shot causes antibodies to develop in the body and those antibodies attack the germs if you become infected with any of those 3 viruses. Wait, there is more good news. Even if the viruses in the vaccine do not closely match what is out in the community the shot still provides some protection and helps prevent flu-related complications because those same antibodies offer what is called cross-protection against different but related flu viruses. That means the shot helps in more ways than you realize and may at the least lessen symptoms and stop complications if you do get the flu. The Maryland/Pennsylvania region is home to 20 percent of companies that develop vaccines. Athanasia Anagnostou, senior director at Immunomic Therapeutics located in Maryland, said in the Baltimore Sun, “Flu season is upon us and the influenza vaccination is the most effective way to protect you and your family from the virus and related complications.” Anagnostou added that the numbers do not lie, “the shot can reduce children’s risk of flurelated hospitalizations by 75 percent.” Remember the term “community immunity?” It is another good reason to get vaccinated. Your shot ultimately protects the people you care about, family members like babies, young children, seniors and people with weak immune systems or chronic health conditions. Do you have someone that fits that description in your family? I know I do.

393 Bedington Blvd, Chambersburg 717-267-3772

Mon-Thurs 2-9 pm • Fri 12 noon-9 pm • Sat 11 am-10 pm • Sun 12 noon-9pm Easy to get to Family Fun. • Exit 17 Off I-81. Turn onto Walker Road.

(301) 662-0133

Main (301) 662-1930 Billing • (301) 662-5399 Referrals

Sharon Zoumbaris is a librarian, freelance writer and author of several books dealing with health and nutrition. She lives with her family in Staunton, VA where they also run Geezer Farm, a small farm that produces organically-grown fruits and vegetables to sell at the Staunton Farmers Market.

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Child Guide

January/February 2018

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Muscular Skeletal Therapies, Inc. 295 Rock Cliff Dr., Martinsburg, WV 25401-2835 Peter J. Juergensen, NCLMT, CKTP Adam Drake, MS, ACT, LMT Kaela A. Lamon, LMT Vickie L. Bechtol, NCLMT Angela Wethington, LMT Alyssa K. Keener, LMT Samuel Evarts, LMT

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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder A Personal Reflection BY BETH VOLLMER

rowing up with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder during the 1980’s and 1990’s was challenging in many ways – being disorganized, having trouble concentrating and being mildly impulsive was stressful. I remember being young in elementary school and talking to friends instead of listening to the teacher. Our class sat in a big square with the desks in a square formation – mine was in the middle because I couldn’t concentrate. Sitting in the middle didn’t bother me, because having ADHD made it so that I didn’t focus too long on anything. I was never considered a trouble maker or a child that needed disciplining often. I am shy by nature, so that shyness counteracted the ADHD, which looking back now, I’m sure worked in my favor. I was tested in elementary school and was told I had “aspects,” of the disorder, which was the description of my diagnosis. Nothing more was done to help me combat losing concentration. School was a challenge, but I was always as successful as possible getting mostly good grades with the exception of math and science, where I had a lot of trouble. To this day, I will never understand math past pre-algebra. In science, I could have done better if I could have concentrated enough to keep studying it. I was extremely bored with science and could never keep my focus very long to study or be in class listening and taking notes. I made as much of an effort as possible with science – taking notes, underlining the text and making flashcards, but I lacked the concentration, discipline and maturity to keep at it. I was not on medication until I was much older, so that meant my entire schooling until I completed my associate’s degree at 23 years old was all by sheer force of will and not wanting to fail my classes. I decided to start toward getting a Bachelor’s degree at 27 years old. This time I chose to try medication, because I was tired of struggling.

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I knew my English degree program would require a lot of dedication and persistence. I tried the medication Straterra, which wasn’t a mainstream medicine, an aspect I preferred. It worked great and made my organization and concentration so much easier. I was able to see each topic as one thing, not a mixed-up mess of many different topics. My mind was more orderly and put together, and the chaos was replaced with calmness, allowing me to focus on my studies and complete my degree. Jenna Garner, LCSW-C BrookLane School Based Therapist, describes the symptoms of ADHD as the inability to complete a task, being disorganized, loosing items, making careless mistakes, and the inability to focus or finish school assignments. Garner says kids with ADHD, “have a constant vibration inside them and they don’t know how to manage that feeling. Their thoughts move quicker, their bodies move more and they can’t slow down.” The symptoms can range from the inability to complete a school assignment, chewing on their clothes, or tantrums due to excess energy. Success with an ADHD child happens with structure, managed symptoms and being given the freedom to move around like playing tag or chasing friends. Routines and dependability are important because it lets the child know what the next activity is which allows their brain to slow down so they don’t have to think as much. As adults, ADHD can be managed by having a job that requires a lot of movement instead of sitting still. It is possible to grow out of ADHD, but more so coping skills are utilized daily. Each person is different and requires thinking outside the box, so that the structure and lifestyle are individualized.

Beth Vollmer lives in Hagerstown, with her two-year-old son, Micah. Beth is passionate about writing, photography, animals, nutrition and exercise.

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February is National Children’s Dental Health Month Dental Saving Tips

You don't have to sacrifice your oral health for the sake of saving. Use these strategies to save on dental care services and keep smiling! Practice healthy dental habits. Preventing an expensive trip to the dentist can be as easy as practicing simple dental hygiene routines such as brushing twice a day and flossing at least once. This also includes replacing toothbrushes when necessary and cutting back on sugary food and drinks. These simple steps will go a long way and will easily prevent cavities and gum disease which normally cost hundreds to thousands of dollars in extreme cases. Ask about payment options. Work with your dentist's office to arrange options for paying for dental expenses such as a payment plan. Some dentists may consider a monthly payment plan, which may involve a fraction of the cost to be paid directly as a down payment. You should also consider paying cash and asking your dentist about any available cash discounts. Oftentimes paying in cash may save your dentist money by avoiding third-party costs and processing fees, so it's a win-win situation for both you and your dentist. Budget wisely and plan ahead. There are a variety of resources available to help you create a budget and plan for routine teeth cleaning or ensure you're prepared to cover any emergency dental issues that arise. Look for daily deals. Daily deal sites like Groupon and LivingSocial regularly feature discount vouchers for local dentists offering savings on cleaning and other speciality treatments. For instance, DentalPlans.com is another option where you'll save up to 60 percent on dental services, with additional discounts available using promo codes from sites like CouponSherpa.com, including 10-percent off and two months' coverage for free. Sign up for a discount card. If you sign up for a Dental Solutions Discount Card at edentalsolutions.com, you're able to save 20 percent

to 50 percent on routine checkups including cleanings as well as advanced dental care such as teeth whitening and oral surgery. The dental plan is available to anyone and costs only $10 a month for you and your family. Visit a dental school. The American Dental Association provides a list of dental schools across the country that offer cheaper dental services. The work is done by dental students under the supervision of experienced instructors, with up-to-date tools. Every dental school is different and has specific requirements, but you'll pay a fraction of what you would in a regular dentist's office. Consider community health clinics. Community Health Clinics allow sliding scale payments for patients without insurance based on income and family size. The sliding scale payment is based on the patient's ability to pay, which can include a reduced fee, or a free service (although this varies depending on the patient and the service). However, this option doesn't apply to everyone, and proof of annual household income is necessary when determining service cost. Find a charity or dental care awareness event. Several charities offer quality dental services at free or reduced costs depending on the service. These services provide thorough dental care regardless of income or health insurance coverage. Finding an oral care service for reduced cost can be tricky, but websites like The National Association of Free Clinics provides a list of member free clinics in each state.

Andrea Woroch is a money-saving expert who transforms everyday consumers into savvy shoppers by sharing smart spending tips and personal finance advice. As a sought-after media source, she has been featured among such top news outlets as Good Morning America, Today, CNN, Dr. OZ, New York Times, MONEY Magazine, Consumer Reports, Forbes and more. In addition, Andrea's stories have been published among leading publications and sites such as Yahoo!, AOL Daily Finance, CNN Money, Huffington Post, LearnVest and New York Daily News. Visit her website at AndreaWoroch.com and follow her on Twitter or Facebook for daily money tips.

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years of healthy smiles. From our family to yours. Child Guide

January/February 2018

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SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE & ENROLLMENT PROMOTIONS

Visit during the Open Houses listed or call the schools which interest you for an appointment to tour. See chart on pages 12-13 for comprehensive list of schools in our region who joined Child Guide for this enrollment promotion.

Enrolling for Summer & Fall Ages 14 months–Pre-K

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Let us bring out the light in your child. The Light of the Child Montessori School, LLC Now Accepting Applications for 2-1/2 to 5 year olds.

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January/February 2018

Listening for The Truth Making the most

out of parent-teacher conferences

By Mali anderson acing the hallway, awaiting my first conference with my daughter’s

P teacher, i tried to ignore the nervous knot in my stomach. What was he

going to tell me? Was she behind in her math skills? Too far ahead in reading? did she have a group of friends she played with regularly? But in the midst of my worry, i remembered when a friend of mine, a middle school teacher, told me the toughest part of her job wasn’t correcting papers or giving grades, it’s handling overbearing parents. in charge of nurturing our children, parents often walk into schools overly secure or downright defensive. With our own agendas forefront on our minds, we completely forget that the goal of parents and teachers is the same: to help children succeed. When going into a parent-teacher conference, “be open to hearing what the other has to report. That means focusing on what’s best for the child, on answering the question ‘What can we do to help this child thrive?’” says anne reeves, chair of education at susquehanna University.

Questions and Contributing

Preparing for a conference can help. ask your child what they think their teacher will say at the conference. This can provide specifics topics to address. For example, if a child is worried about their social studies grades, or their behavior in gym class, those are things to ask the teacher about. Keep in mind that a child’s impressions are one side of the story. if the teacher agrees, the two of you can create a plan to improve the situation. if the teacher disagrees, find out why the child feels this way. How can the situation be improved or the child’s confidence uplifted? Bringing sample work from a child’s outside activities or projects produced at home—books read, pictures painted, etc.—can help a parent explain what they are seeing in regards to a child’s ability and interest. “The

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Leaving on a High Note

At a conference, a parent learns their child is on-track academically and has a host of friends. No problem, right? Easy breezy! Not quite. Although a good conference is an excellent reason for celebration, remaining involved with a child’s education is essential. Looking over homework and remaining in touch with the teacher shows a child the importance of education. Also, remember that heading into the tiled halls of a school can flood a parent’s mind with memories of their own academic experience. This nostalgia can lull a parent into believing they know everything about the school and how the student body is being educated. But every school experience is unique. A child can be very different from a parent and educational philosophies change. So even if a child is doing well, seek opportunities to enhance their schooling. Putting forth the effort to remain informed will improve the odds of good conferences continuing into the future.

Processing Difficult News

Some conferences don’t go well. Although nobody knows your child better than you, it is beneficial to listen to a teacher’s view, even if the news isn’t good. Try to

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Private Schools, Preschools & Child Care Centers

teacher will almost certainly have examples of the child’s work available, but if the parent can bring in examples, too, that can fill out the picture,” continues Reeves.

take negative information and turn it into positive action. Understanding a problem makes it solvable. Putting together a plan, with the teacher and parent working in tandem, can lead to results. And be sure to ask the teacher what is the best way to stay in touch. Some teachers prefer email as opposed to phone calls. Although be careful with email in problem situations. If emails deliver bad news it is easy to respond defensive and fierce. If you have a hot temper, wait a day before responding. Or if you have a lot to address, set up a meeting. “If the conversation is entirely negative, and the teacher seems to dislike the child, or can’t remember anything about the child except negatives, this is a warning sign. The parent should tell the teacher about the child’s areas of special strengths, and ask about an improvement plan. If the teacher won’t agree to a plan for improvement of the child’s weak areas, or at a follow up meeting the negativity still continues, it is time to involve the guidance counselor as well and consider options like special help for the child, a change of classrooms, or even a change of school,” says Anne Rambo, author of I know My Child Can Do Better: A Frustrated Parent’s Guide to Educational Solutions. Primarily, it is important to be relaxed and prepared. A teacher is a vital part of a child’s life. Trading notes on a child’s development educates parents on the progress

Child Guide

continued on page 14

January/February 2018

Page 11


Private Schools, Preschoo It’s “Open Season” for Fall

School

& Location

The Banner School Frederick, MD

Ages/Grades Served

Phone

See ad page

Preschool 3 to 8th grade

301-695-9320

Educare Learning Center Jefferson, MD

Ages 8 weeks to School Age Preschool & Child Care

301-834-9007

10

Faith Christian Academy Martinsburg, WV

PreK4 to 12th grade

304-263-0011

1

Hagerstown Community College Children’s Learning Center Hagerstown, MD

Ages 2 to 5 Preschool and PreK classes

240-500-2322

15

The Light of the Child Montessori School, LLC Shepherdstown, WV

Ages 3 - 5

304-268-7075

10

Mother Seton School Emmitsburg, MD

PreK to 8th grade & Kindergarten Readiness

301-447-3165

15

The Mustard Seed Martinsburg, WV

Ages 14 months to Pre-K

304-263-9291

10

Powhatan School Boyce, VA

PreK to 8th grade

540-837-1009

11

St. John’s Regional Catholic School Frederick, MD

PreK3 through 8th grade

301-662-6722

14

Shalom Christian Academy Chambersburg, PA

Pre-K through 12th grade

717-375-2223

14

Trinity Learning School

3 & 4 year olds

301-824-6567

15

Smithsburg, MD

Page 12

January/February 2018

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ools & Child Care Centers

all and Ongoing Enrollment

e

m

Website

Open House & Enrollment Promotions

www.bannerschool.org

Open Houses: Wed., January 10, Sat., February 3, and Wed., March 7 from 9 to 11 am

www.educatewithcare.com

Open Enrollment for Summer & Fall in February. Rolling Enrollment all year long (based on availability).

www.faithchristianacademy.net

Mondays, January 22, February 26, and March 26 9 am to 6 pm

www.hagerstowncc.edu/clc

Open enrollment – registering for Fall 2018 Call for a tour

www.thelightofthechild-montessorischool.com

Now Accepting Applications!

www.MotherSetonSchool.org

Take A Tour Tuesday monthly from 9 am to 1 pm Private tours are also available by appointment. Tuesday, March 27 • 9:30-11 am

www.powhatanschool.org

Now Enrolling for Fall 2018. Campus tours offered daily (M-F) at 9:45 am – schedule on our website

www.sjrcs.org

Wed., January 31 from 9 to 11 am Also visit for Walk-in Wednesdays, 9-11 am or by appointment

www.shalomca.com

Sun., January 28, 2-5 pm; Tues., January 30, 9am-6pm Thurs., February 22, 9am-6pm; PreK Open Houses Whale Watch (1/30 & 2/22), 4-5 pm (preregistration required) Bear Hunts: (for future kindergarten students & parents only preregistration required) January 22 & 29 at 6 pm

www.tlcsmithsburg.org/learning

Sat., March 24, 10 am-12 noon

www.childguidemagazine.com

Child Guide

January/February 2018

Page 13


SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE & ENROLLMENT PROMOTIONS

Private Schools, Preschools & Child Care Centers

OPEN HOUSE

January 31 • 9-11 am 2017 National Blue Ribbon School of Excellence

Our students are testing within the top 15% of the nation in both math and language arts

• Pre-K3 through 8th grade • Enhanced STEM curriculum • Grants & Financial Aid Available • Before & After Care

Making the most out of parent-teacher conferences, cont. from page 11

of their children. In order to support a child’s growth effectively, we, as parents, need to be aware of the ups and downs of their learning experiences. So show up on time and enter the classroom willing to listen. Once you get used to having adult conversations in childsized chairs, the time flies by. How could it not? It’s a chance to talk about the most valuable treasure in our lives, our kids. A writer and mother, Mali Anderson is an active volunteer at her daughter's elementary school.

Conference Preparation Checklist

8414 Oppossumtown Pike, Frederick, MD

301.662.6722

Check-in With Your Child

www.SJRCS.org

Page 14

Ask your child about school as well as their relationship with their teacher and classmates. Review homework, report cards, and paperwork with grades or comments.

Jot Down Questions

Keep in mind a conference is led by the teacher and is usually scheduled for 30 minutes or less. Write down all the questions you have and try to condense them or prioritize them to insure the most vital topics are addressed.

Bring In Samples

This is especially important to illustrate any concerns you might have. Projects a child has done at home, either showing strengths or challenges, can give a teacher a rounded understanding, allowing them to provide more educational options.

Take Notes

Write down impressions or questions as the conference is occurring. After the conference, without the pressure of a timed meeting, review your notes. If, in hindsight, any issue is unclear, or wasn’t addressed, schedule a follow-up meeting.

January/February 2018

Child Guide

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m

Trinity Learning Center Caring Christian Classes for 3 & 4 year olds Enrolling for the 2018-2019 School Year

Open House

Saturday, March 24, 10 am - 12 noon

State Approved Curriculum and Credentialed Teachers Reasonably Priced Programs MSDE License #68969

16 N. Main St., Smithsburg, MD 21783

Private Schools, Preschools & Child Care Centers

301-824-6567

Email: tlcpreschool@myactv.net www.tlcsmithsburg.org/learning

Dear Teacher BY

PEGGY GISLER & MARGE EBERTS

Resolutions to Improve Family Face-to-Face Communication Parents: New Year's is the time of year

when resolutions are made to increase exercise or lose weight or one of a million things that people feel will help them to improve their lives. Resolutions focus on change! Every year as society becomes more and more high tech, families are spending less and less time communicating with each other because of absorption with their own electronic devices. This year parents should make a resolution along with their children to turn off all electronic devices and select one or more of the activities below or one of their own choosing to do at least once a week to focus on building better family face-to-face communication: n Resolve to eat dinner together as a family. n Resolve to find a hobby to do together as a family. n Resolve to start a family game night. n Resolve to talk together daily about your everyday experiences. Make an effort to find out what happened that was especially enjoyable. n Resolve to learn a new skill with your children. n Resolve to attend a cultural event with your children. n Resolve to start reading the newspaper as a family. Then have family discussions about world affairs, weather, movies and sports based on what the family has read in the newspaper. n Resolve to start exercising together whether it is jogging, yoga or tai chi.

www.childguidemagazine.com

Parents should send questions and comments to dearteacher@dearteacher.com or ask them on the columnists’ website at www.dearteacher.com. ŠCompass Syndicate Corporation, 2017 Distributed by King Features Syndicate

Child Guide

January/February 2018

Page 15


The Nutrition Facts Label Can Help Young People Make Healthful Choices

To help kids make healthful dietary choices, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) encourages kids to Read the Label!

The Nutrition Facts Label is a simple tool available on food and beverage packages. It lets kids know exactly what they're eating and helps them choose and compare snacks and other foods. The earlier kids start using the Nutrition Facts Label, the sooner they'll be making choices that keep them feeling great and on the path to long-term good health! Young people can follow these tips to get started – and they will soon see how easy reading the label really is! Parents, caregivers, and others who interact with young people can also help model label-reading by following these key steps, too.

Check the serving size. All of the nutrition information listed on the Nutrition Facts Label is based on one serving of that food. But, it's common for one package of a food to contain more than oneserving. If a package contains two (or more) servings and you eat the entire package, you are consuming two (or more) times the number of calories and nutrients listed on the Label. So be sure to check!

Consider the calories. For weight management (whether it's to lose, gain, or maintain weight), it's important to pay attention to the calories. The overall goal is to balance how many calories you eat with how many calories your body uses. As a general rule, 400 or more calories per serving for a single food item is high and 100 calories is moderate.

Choose nutrients wisely. There are certain nutrients that young people should aim to get "less of." These are saturated fat,sodium, and sugars. Kids can use the Percent Daily Value (%DV) on the Nutrition Facts Label to find foods that are lower in saturated fat and sodium. Here's an easy guideline: 5%DV or less of a nutrient means the food is low in that nutrient, and 20%DV or more means it's high! Sugars have no %DV, so remind kids to use the amount of grams (g) as a guide.

Kids can start using the Nutrition Facts Label today to compare foods and make smart snack choices. By knowing a food's serving size, calories, and nutrients – they can take charge of managing their own healthful diet!

Learn more at: http://www.fda.gov/Food/IngredientsPackagingLabeling/LabelingNutrition/ucm281746.htm http://www.fda.gov/Food/IngredientsPackagingLabeling/LabelingNutrition/ucm20026097.htm FDA has updated the Nutrition Facts Label for packaged foods. For more information on the proposed changes to the Nutrition Facts Label, visit: http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/ LabelingNutrition/ucm385663.htm Page 16

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How To Manage Your Child’s Screen Time Expert offers tips to help find balance between the time kids spend online and outside Courtesy Dr. Jean Moorjani, Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released new recommendations for children’s screen time limits in 2016. “Between social media, apps, video games and chatting with friends, kids often spend hours more each day looking at screens and they are starting much earlier in life,” said Jean Moorjani, MD, a pediatrician at Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children in Orlando, Florida. In fact, according to a recent survey, more than half of all children get their first cell phone by age 6, just as they’re starting first grade. Three out of four children now own tablets and nearly as many have video game consoles. “There is so much vying for a child’s attention, it doesn’t take much for kids to get preoccupied and spend a lot more time online than they do outside.” To help families find a healthy balance, Moorjani has some tips. Do more than set time limits – The current recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) puts a 2 hour time limit of screen time per day for children over the age of 2. But Moorjani says screens are so pervasive these days, merely setting time limits may not be enough. “It’s not just how much time your child spends on their devices, it’s the content they’re consuming. Parents need to know exactly what their children can see and control that content as much as possible.” Consider this: the current recommendations based on setting time limits for children published in 2011 and only addressed things like television and video games. However, because the first generation of tablets had just come out at that time, the guidelines don’t mention the use of tablets or smartphones by children. “We can’t watch our kids 24 hours a day to make sure they honor time limits, but we can control what kinds of content they have access to, and parents should take an active role in doing just that,” said Moorjani. Remember, not all screen time is bad – There is a difference between a child simply watching something on a device and actually interacting with it. “It’s the difference between consumption and creation,” said Moorjani. “If a child is passively consuming media, it’s not doing them any good, but there are some 80,000 apps considered educational that may actually help them.” During the summer months, in fact, many parents use educational apps to help their children retain and even sharpen things like language and math skills. A word of caution from the AAP, however: there are apps that claim to be educational, but to date, there has been little research to validate their educational value. To learn more about age-appropriate content, go to www.commonsensemedia.org.

www.childguidemagazine.com

Dawn Herron, a mother of 6 from Orlando, Florida, makes it a point to engage in screen time with her younger children, including Chapel, 7 (left), and Lillie, 13, (right).

Set up media-free zones in your house – One way to balance social media with personal interaction is to establish media-free zones in your house. “Make a rule that in certain places, or at certain times, there are to be no devices whatsoever,” said Moorjani. “The family table is a perfect place to start. No matter if we’re eating breakfast, lunch or dinner, the table is the one place where we communicate face-to-face and can really put the focus back on the family.” Bedrooms are another important media-free zone. Research has shown that the presence of screens in a child’s room – from televisions to smartphones – leads to later bedtimes and often serious disruptions in sleep patterns. Without rigid schedules during the summer months, kids may be more tempted to use screens in their bedrooms late into the night. To prevent the misuse of screens, make a family charging station so that all devices can be accounted for and monitored when they are not to be in use. Don’t leave kids to their own devices – The reason kids may not use their electronic devices as much during the school year is because they simply don’t have the time. Phones and tablets are forbidden in many classrooms, and if your child takes part in extracurricular activities, they may not have access to their devices until later in the evening. “If a busy schedule works during the school year, there is no reason it can’t work during the summer months, too,” said Moorjani. “With a little pre-planning, you can sign your kids up to play sports, go to camps, do volunteer work and a myriad of other activities that will limit their screen time opportunities.” Parents can also assign chores to children that require them to spend time outdoors and may want to consider creating physical challenges for kids to complete. “Set a goal for a certain number of miles they ride their bike each week, for example, or help them organize neighborhood basketball or softball tournaments,” said Moorjani. “If you don’t want your child staring at a screen this summer, give them something else to do. You may be surprised how much they like it.”

Child Guide

January/February 2018

Page 17


Follow Our Adventure

A Cool Time at Ice Fest

by Jeanne-marie

Williams

A

dventures do not have to be exotic or expensive to be memorable and thrilling in your child’s heart. Some adventures are close to home, economical, and worth repeating. Chambersburg’s annual Ice Fest is such an adventure. This year, the sixteenth Ice Fest will be held January 25-28, 2018 in downtown Chambersburg’s square and will feature more than 80 ice sculptures. Last year was the first year Gabriel and I attended Ice Fest. I had thought about going before, but it never seemed to work for us for one reason or another. But after a friend had raved about how much fun he had taking his son to Ice Fest, I knew we had to work it into our schedule. We planned to arrive early to Ice Fest so that we could enjoy some of the festivities before it became very crowded. I found free parking on a side street slightly south of the square, and Gabriel and I hopped out of the car eager to explore. It would have been impossible to miss the ice sculptures as we began our meandering toward the square. Spaced every few feet apart, they dotted both sides of the street and sparkled in the mid-morning sun. The sculptures were sponsored by local businesses and organizations and they varied in both size and intricacy. While we saw a frosty diamond ring sponsored by a local jewelry store and sculpted ivy sponsored by a plant nursery, other glittering items were widely diverse and included everything from the Statue of Liberty to swans to snails to airplanes. Some also fit the winter theme such as glistening snowflakes, a Christmas tree, and a large sculpture that said, “Ice Fest.” Page 18

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Gabriel’s favorite sculptures were those which I would consider interactive. He loved being able to drop coins in the Make a Wish Foundation wishing well, and he also liked those sculptures where he could put his face into them, such as one where his head appeared to complete the icy body of a carved angel. He could even sit on some of the sculptures as if he were royalty on an ice throne. Much thought had been put into planning and preparing for the Ice Fest. Besides the many sculptures, there were food trucks and stands set up in the square for kettle corn and cocoa among other goodies. All businesses were open and full of people enjoying time shopping and warming up in between intervals spent outside at the Ice Fest. Gabriel and I ducked in and out of shops and cafes purchasing cocoa and coffee, muffins and cookies, and also Valentine candies to enjoy at home. While Gabriel tolerated the shopping, he was most happy when we participated in activities where he got to have some fun. All entertainment in which he participated was free of charge because it was also sponsored by local businesses. Gabriel first enjoyed stopping at a craft station to make a marshmallow snowman snack. This was near an obstacle course where he had to compete for best time in fulfilling a series of challenges. These included filling a bucket with ice cubes, zigzagging through hoops, putting an oversized t-shirt over his clothes and coat, and pulling a teddy bear on a toboggan through a maze of traffic cones without disrupting the bear from his seat. While Gabriel did not achieve the fastest time, he did receive a medal for participating and the positive encouragement from event volunteers. Our last stop at the Ice Fest was Gabriel’s favorite. The Ice Fest boasts a double-wide ice slide. Students from Wilson College volunteered with helping the children queue up and slide. Gabriel loved it and squealed with happiness each time he slid rapidly down the slide, after which, he immediately jumped up at the bottom and ran back to jump in line again. He www.childguidemagazine.com

repeated this many times until we were both very cold and decided it was time to go home and warm up for the day. While we loved everything about Ice Fest, we did not even get to participate in all the events available. We plan to return this year and maybe take in some of the other activities such as the Icing on the Cake decorating contest or the Frozen Flicks movie event, both of which are held on Saturday this year. Ice Fest also hosts a Snowfall Ball on Friday night and chili cook off and polar dunk plunge on Saturday. More information is available at www.icefestpa.com. Whatever we end up trying out this year, we know it will be super cool and lots of fun! Jeanne-Marie Williams is an analyst and a single mom who delights in homeschooling her son and taking him on adventures. She has too many hobbies and too little free time. She particularly enjoys finding humor in every day life and serving as her family's historian.

Child Guide

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January/February 2018

Page 19


Heads Up

January/February 2018

Through January 14

“HENSE: Paintings and Wall Collage by Alex Brewer,” Washington Co. Museum of Fine Art, Groh Gallery, Hagerstown (MD) City Park, Virginia Ave. Tues.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sun., 1-5 p.m. Art exhibit. 301/739-5727. www.wcmfa.org.

Through January 28

“Painted Pages: Illuminated Manuscripts 13th-18th Centuries,” Washington Co. Museum of Fine Arts, Hagerstown (MD) City Park, Virginia Ave. Tues.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sun., 1-5 p.m. Exhibition explores the golden age of handmade books. 301/739-5727. www.wcmfa.org.

Through February 18

Christmas at the Roundhouse, Hagerstown Roundhouse Museum, 296 S. Burhans Blvd. Fri., Sat. & Sun., 1-5 p.m. Enjoy the visions, sounds, and snows of Christmas, past and present, on an “O” gauge railroad featuring your favorite steam & diesel trains operating on four levels of winter wonderland. $6, adults; $1, ages 4-15; free, ages 3 & under. 301/739-4665. www.roundhouse.org.

January First Day Hike, Stauffer’s Marsh Nature 1ValleyPreserve, across from 4069 Back Creek Rd., Hedgesville, WV. 9:30-11 a.m.

Free. www.potomacaudubon.org. First Day Hike, Sky Meadows State Park, Historic Area, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. “History Gone Wild.” Meet by Log Cabin in the Historic Area. 540/592-3566. Williamsport Polar Bear Plunge, River Bottom Park, Williamsport, MD. 12 noon. Activities start at 10 a.m. 301/223-7711. www.williamsportmd.gov. Fort Ritchie Polar Bear Plunge, Lake Royer, Cascade, MD. 12 noon. Music and activities prior to 12 noon plunge. 301/2415085. Register online at www.TheFRCC.org. Free Movie Night, Smithsburg (MD) Library, Community Room, 66 E. Water St. 7-9:30 p.m. “Spider-Man: Homecoming.” Rated PG-13. Free refreshments. 301/8247722. www.washcolibrary.org. , 9, 16, 23 & 30 Saint Mary Catholic School Take a Look Tuesdays, 218 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 9-11 a.m. Fully accredited Pre-K through 8th grade. 301/733-1184. www.stmarycatholicschool.org. Mermaids vs. Pirates Party, Middletown (MD) Library, 101 Prospect St. 10:15-11:15 a.m. Centers of fun and a story or two. Ages birth to 5. 301/371-7560. www.fcpl.org. The LATCH Circle, Handley Library, 2nd floor children’s room, 100 W. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Presented by WIC Breastfeeding Staff. 540/722-3470. Meet a Sheriff, Handley Library, 100 W. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 4 p.m. Children hear a story read by Deputy Fritts and then do an activity. All ages. 540/662-9041. “One World, One Sky,” William M. Brish Planetarium, 20 Commonwealth Ave.,

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A look at what’s happening in the region

Hagerstown. 5:30-6:15 p.m. Take an imaginary trip from Sesame Street to the moon. Intended for PreK to early elementary age audiences. $3, adults; $2, children & students; free, senior citizens with WCPS Gold Card; $10, maximum family cost. 301/7662898. “We Are Stars,” William M. Brish Planetarium, 20 Commonwealth Ave., Hagerstown. 7-8 p.m. General audiences. $3, adults; $2, children & students; free, senior citizens with WCPS Gold Card; $10, maximum family cost. 301/766-2898. , 10, 17, & 24 St. John Regional Catholic School Walk-in Wednesday Tours, 8414 Opossumtown Pike, Frederick. 911 a.m. Prospective families for the 20182019 school year are encouraged to visit and take a tour. Open House is January 31. Call the Admission Office at 301/622-6722. www.sjrcs.org. La Leche Meeting, Bowman Library, 871 Tasker Rd., Stephens City, VA. 10 a.m. 540/869-9000. Family BINGO Night, Brunswick (MD) Branch Library, 915 N. Maple Ave. 6:30-7 p.m. 301/600-7250. www.fcpl.org. First Fridays Celebration of the Arts, Winchester. Special gallery events, musicians playing in restaurants and cafes, and many shops stay open late. www.oldtownwinchesterva.com. Free First Friday, Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum, 19 W. Cork Street, Winchester. 5-7:30 p.m. Free admission. 540/722-2020. www.discoverymuseum.net. Winter Campfire, Fountain Rock Park Shelter, 8511 Nature Center Place, Walkersville, MD. 6-8 p.m. Celebrate the New Year with an evening outside. Stories and songs. All ages. $5 per family. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. , 12, 19 & 26 Dance Party, Handley Regional Library Auditorium, 100 W. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 10:30 a.m. Toddlers, preschoolers and their grown-ups are welcome to come dance. 540/662-9041. www.handleyregional.org. to February 25 Winter Bounce Festival, Green Grove Gardens, 1032 Buchanan Trail East, Greencastle, PA. Fri., 5-9 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sun., 12 noon-5 p.m. Bouncing, games, dancing, parties, food and more fun for kids 12 & under. $10. 717/597-0800. www.greengrovegardens.com. www.phantomshadow.com/winter-bouncefestival/ Try it FREE Fitness Day, Clarke County Parks & Recreation, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Instructors will be onsite demonstrating the classes they teach. Your chance to try before you buy. Ages 16 & up. Zumba, 10-10:30 a.m.; Balance & Mobility, 10:45-11:15 a.m.; Cardio Kick, 11:30 a.m.-12 noon; FITT Forever, 3:15-3:45 p.m.; Fluid Motion, 3:45-4:15 p.m.; R&R Yoga, 4:15-4:45 p.m.; and Tai Chi, 4:45-5:15 p.m. 540/955-5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. “Rain Clouds & The Water Cycle,” Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 11 a.m. Learn about the world’s water cycle and make their own rain clouds in a jar. Fun, hands-on educational activity

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COMPILED BY SUZANNE HOVERMALE EMAIL CALENDAR@CHILDGUIDEMAGAZINE.COM

recommended for ages 7 & up. 301/7900076. www.discoverystation.org. Exploring the Night Sky in a Pop-up Planetarium, Foundation of the State Arboretum, Blandy Farm, Boyce, VA. 11:30 a.m. View a projection of the night sky, including planets, constellations, and more. Recommended for age 6 & above, with an adult. All welcome. Admission. 540/8371758, x224. www.blandy.virginia.edu. R.E.A.D. with Wags for Hope, Edward F. Fry Memorial Library, 1635 Ballenger Creek Pike, Point of Rocks, MD. 1-2 p.m. Children read to Reading Education Assistance Dogs. Grades K-5. 301/874-4560. www.fcpl.org. “Cartoon Fest 2018,” Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick. 2 p.m. Family-friendly event. Vintage animations on the big screen. Admission. 301/600-2828. www.weinbergcenter.org. Family Movie, Washington County Free Library, 100 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. 2 p.m. Popcorn and drinks provided. All ages. 301/739-3250. www.washcolibrary.org. Creative Outlet at The Delaplaine Arts Center, 40 S. Carroll St., Frederick. 3-5 p.m. “Antarctica – Crystal Watercolor Snowflake.” Family-friendly event that offers drop-in art activities for all ages. $2/ artist. 301/6980656. www.delaplaine.org. First Saturday in Downtown Frederick: “Afterglow,” Frederick. 5-9 p.m. Stroll the candlelit streets of Downtown Frederick. Latenight shopping, live entertainment, and a free trolley until 9 p.m. 301/698-8118. www.visitfrederick.org. , 13 & 20 Make and Take, Brunswick (MD) Branch Library, 915 N. Maple Ave. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Hands-on activity. Grades K-8. 301/600-7250. www.fcpl.org. R.E.A.D. with Wags for Hope, Urbana Regional Library, 9020 Amelung St., Frederick. 2-3 p.m. Children read to Reading Education Assistance Dogs. Grades K-5. 301/600-7000. www.fcpl.org. Sunday Afternoon Kids Canvas, Chambersburg (PA) Council for the Arts, 81 N. Main St. 2-4 p.m. “Monet’s Water Lilies.” Complete a “Famous Artist” acrylic on canvas painting. No experience needed. All materials supplied. Ages 6-14. Adults welcome. Fee. 717/264-6883. www.councilforthearts.net. , 14, 21 & 28 Antietam Station Winter Open House, 17230 Shepherdstown Pike, Sharpsburg, MD. 1-5 p.m. Featuring operating model train layouts and actual railroad equipment displays in nearly every area of the station house. www.antietamstation.com. , 14, 21, 28 & Feb. 4 Model Railroad Open House, Frederick County Society of Model Engineers, 423 E. Patrick St., Frederick. 1-4 p.m. Free. www.visitfrederick.org. Monday Mommy Meet-Up, Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 9-11:30 a.m. Enjoy conversation and morning coffee/tea hour in our parlor while little ones play and explore the music, art, and games of the area with developmentally appropriate toys. For infants and toddlers. $1 per child. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com.

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American Girl Book Club, Boonsboro (MD) Library, 401 Potomac St. 6 p.m. “Happy Birthday Addy.” A discussion with activities, games and crafts, for Grades 1-5. 301/4325723. www.washcolibrary.org. Winter Bird Walk & Driving Tour, Meeting spot at Martin’s Grocery Store in Charles Town then carpooling to various locations around Eastern Panhandle. 7:3011:30 a.m. www.potomacaudubon.org. “Take-a-Tour Tuesday,” Mother Seton School, 100 Creamery Rd., Emmitsburg, MD. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Applications for 2018-2019 now being accepted. Find out about our small classes, hands-on learning, well-rounded curriculum, extra-curricular activities, including our award-winning music and arts program. 301/447-3161. www.mothersetonschool.org. & 23 Itty Bitty Mornings, Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum, 19 W. Cork St., Winchester. 9-11 a.m. Ages 4 & under, accompanied by adults. 540/7222020. www.discoverymuseum.net. , 16, 23 & 30 Dance Party, Bowman Library, 871 Tasker Rd., Stephens City, VA. 4 p.m. Music and dancing for all ages. 540/869-9000. Banner School Open House, 1730 N. Market St., Frederick. 9-11 a.m. Visit Frederick County’s only non-sectarian, independent, co-educational day school for students in Preschool 3 through 8th grade. 301/695-9320. www.bannerschool.org. Shepherd Youth Chorus Auditions, Shepherd University, Shepherdstown, WV. 5:30-6:30 p.m. 304/876-5248. www.shepherd/edu/music/community. Shepherd Community Orchestra & Shepherd Junior String Ensemble Auditions, Shepherd University, Shepherdstown, WV. 67:30 p.m. 304/876-5248. www.shepherd/edu/music/community. , 17, 24 & 31 Parent & Me Little Artists, Clarke County Parks & Recreation, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 9:15-9:45 a.m. “Winter Mitten Collage” (1/10), “Polar Bear Finger Painting” (1/17), “Ice Painting and Marshmallow Sculpt” (1/24), and “Groundhog Hand/Footprint Paint” (1/31). Parents must attend class with child. $7 per child. Additional $5 supply fee for “Polar Bear Finging Painting.” Ages 2-5. 540/955-5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. Grandparents & Seniors Morning, For the Kids, By George Children’s Musem, Caperton Train Station, 229 E. Martin St., Martinsburg. 9 a.m.-12 noon. Tickets are $4/person. 304/264-9977. www.forthekidsbygeorge.org. NASA’s Citizen Science Programs, Renfrew Museum and Park, Visitors Center, 1010 E. Main St., Waynesboro, PA. 6:30 p.m. NASA scientist Todd Toth will discuss various citizen science programs at NASA, highlighting the GLOBE Program, an international science and education program that allows students and the public worldwide to participate in data collection and the scientific process. Free. 717/762-0373. www.renfrewinstitute.org. , 12, 18, 19, 25 & 26 Indoor Playground, Jefferson County Community Center, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Indoor play toys are provided and young children have plenty of room to run and play.

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Adults responsible for supervising children they bring. Ages 1-5. $5 for first child, $3 for additional siblings, and $40 for a 10punch pass. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. A Little Noon Music, Handley Library, Robinson Auditorium, 100 W. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 12:15 p.m. “John Arnold.” 540/869-9000. www.handleyregional.org. Snowflake Ball – Daddy Daughter Dance, George Washington Hotel Grand Ballroom, 103 East Piccadilly, Winchester. 6 p.m. Dancing, cookie decorating, professional photos with Cinderella and the fairy Godmother. Proceeds benefit Camp Fantastic. $50. www.visitwinchesterva.com to March 10 “Shrek – The Musical,” Way Off Broadway Dinner Theatre, 5 Willowdale Drive, Frederick. Fri. & Sat. evenings, 1st, 3rd & 5th Sun. matinees. 301/662-6600. www.wayoffbroadway.com. Hub City 100 Miler Kick-Off, Fairgrounds Park, 351 N. Cleveland Ave, Hagerstown. 100 miles in 100 days. Prizes and incentives given away weekly. $10 for 15-week registration, $20 with shirt, $25 with long sleeve t-shirt. Register your dog and get a t-shirt and doggie bandana for $25. 301/739-8577, x170. www.hagerstownmd.org. Cooking for Kids, Ballenger Creek Teaching Kitchen, 5420 Ballenger Creek Pike, Frederick. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., ages 10-13; 2-4 p.m., ages 5-9. $39. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. “Marshmallow Constellations,” Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 11 a.m. Children learn about the winter sky and constellations that they can see during this time of year. Make marshmallow constellations to take home. Suited for ages 7 & up. 301/790-0076. www.discoverystation.org. Family Movie, Boonsboro (MD) Library, 401 Potomac St. 11:30 a.m. “Despicable Me 3.” 301/432-5723. www.washcolibrary.org. Greenbrier State Park Polar Bear Plunge, 21843 National Pike, Boonsboro, MD. 12 noon. Take the plunge or enjoy the fun. Photo ops, costume judging, hot chocolate, coffee and pastries. Benefits Humane Society of Washington County. 301/733-2060. www.visithagerstown.com. Frozen Sing-Along, Handley Library, 100 W. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 12 noon-2 p.m. 540/662-9041, x11. Paws for Reading, Bowman Library, 871 Tasker Rd., Stephens City, VA. 1 p.m. Read a favorite book to a canine listener. Meet certified therapy dogs. 540/869-9000. Critter Care Day, Catoctin Creek Park & Nature Center, 2929 Sumantown Rd., Middletown, MD. 1-3 p.m. Have fun taking care of and interacting with our Nature Center animals. $12. Ages 6-8. 301/6002936. www.recreater.com. to Feb 18 “Puss in Boots,” Wonderment Puppet Theater, 412 W. King St., Martinsburg. Sat. & Sun., 1 p.m. $6. Free admission for children under age 2. 304/258-4074. www.wondermentpuppets.com. Winter Bird Walk, Cool Spring Preserve, 1469 Lloyd Rd., Charles Town. 9-11:30 a.m. Free. www.potomacaudubon.org. R.E.A.D. with Wags for Hope, C. Burr Artz Public Library, 110 E. Patrick St., Frederick. 1:30-2:30 p.m. Children read to

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Reading Education Assistance Dogs. Grades K-5. 301/600-1630. www.fcpl.org. Acrylic Painting, Jim Barnett Park, Arts & Crafts Room, 1001 E. Cork St., Winchester. 2-4 p.m. “Elsa from Frozen.” $17-$20, plus $5 materials fee. www.winchesterva.gov. School’s Out Sports Camp, Centerville Rec Center, in Centerville Elementary School, 3601 Carriage Dr., Frederick. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Sports and games such as soccer, basketball, flag football, baseball, ultimate frisbee, wiffle ball, lacrosse, and more will be played. Ages 612. $39. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. No School Fun Day, Jefferson County Community Center, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Come play sports, games, watch a movie, and more. Ages 5-12. $35. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. School Days Off at the Delaplaine, Delaplaine Visual Arts Education Center, 40 S. Carroll St., Frederick. 9:15 a.m.-5 p.m. Drop your child off for a variety of art adventures during FCPS days off. Ages 612. Fee. 301/698-0656. www.delaplaine.org. Playgroup Monday, Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 9:30 a.m.-12 noon. Bring your playgroup and friends and enjoy free play throughout the Manor house at a special rate. Ages 2 & up. $2 per child. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. La Leche Meeting, Handley Regional Library, 100 W. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 5:30 p.m. 540/662-9041. www.handleyregional.org. Schools Out for the Day, Clarke County Parks & Recreation, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Enjoy a variety of recreational activities. For students in K thru 5th grade. $25 per person per day. $16 for After School Participants. 540/955-5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. Storytime with Clifford the Big Red Dog, Urbana Regional Library, 9020 Amelung St., Frederick. 6:30-7 p.m. Join special guest Clifford the Big Red Dog for stories and songs. Ages birth-5. 301/6007000. www.fcpl.org. Homeschool Art Studio, Museum of the Shenandoah Valley, 901 Amherst St., Winchester. 10 a.m.-12 noon. Youth in grades 5-8 will develop their artmaking skills. www.themsv.org. Kinder Konzert, Hagerstown Community College, Kepler Theater, 11400 Robinwood Drive. 9:45 a.m.; 11 a.m.; 12:15 p.m. MSO musicians perform free concerts for preschool children. Woodwind Quintet, “Musical Building Blocks.” 301/797-4000. www.marylandsymphony.org. R.E.A.D. with Wags for Hope, Emmitsburg (MD) Branch Library, 300A S. Seton Ave. 5-6 p.m. Children read to Reading Education Assistance Dogs. Grades K-5. 301/600-6329. www.fcpl.org. Make-it, Take-it Family Craft Night, Clear Spring Library, 12624 Broadfording Rd. 5-6:45 p.m. Make a seasonal craft with your family. All ages. 301/842-2730. www.washcolibrary.org. Little Hands Cooking, Ballenger Creek Teaching Kitchen, 5420 Ballenger Creek Pike, Frederick. 10-11:30 a.m. Ages 2.5-5. $24. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com.

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Nerf Wars, Jefferson Co. Community Center, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 5-7:15 p.m., ages 5-9; 7:30-9:45 p.m., ages 10-14. Battle your friends in Nerf War Combat. Bring your Nerf blasters and darts. Pre-registration encouraged. $10. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. Mother & Me Tea, Jefferson County Community Center, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 6-8 p.m. Friday night cooking series. Puff pastry roll ups. Finish will include buttermilk cupcakes featuring chocolate ganache icing, peanut butter icing and marshmallow cream. Ages 6 & up. $35, plus $5 materials fee. Additional sibling, $15. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. “Area Show Choirs Concert Review,” The Apollo Civic Theatre, 128 E. Martin St., Martinsburg. 7 p.m. Admission. 301/2636766. www.apollocivictheatre.org. to April 13 Early Childhood Music Classes: Musical Discoveries, Shepherd University, Shepherdstown, WV. Fri., 9:15-10 a.m. Ages 18 months-3 years, with parent/caregiver. 304/876-5248. www.shepherd/edu/music/community. Early Childhood Music Classes: Music for Preschoolers, Shepherd University, Shepherdstown, WV. Fri., 10-10:45 a.m. Ages 3-5, with parent/caregiver. 304/876-5248. www.shepherd/edu/music/ community. Ukrainian Egg Workshop, Renfrew Museum and Park, Visitors Center, 1010 E. Main St., Waynesboro, PA. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Create an intricately decorated egg using techniques of the traditional Ukrainian folk craft. Hands-on instruction by Holly Olszewski. $25, RI members; $30, non-members. Ages 15 & up. Snow date: January 27. 717/762-0373. www.renfrewinstitute.org. Saturdays with a Scientist, Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum, 19 W. Cork Street, Winchester. 10:30 a.m. Program will touch on water themes. 540/722-2020. www.discoverymuseum.net. “Melting Snowman,” Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 11 a.m. Hands-on science activity. Children learn about basic chemistry while building their own snowman from scratch. Ages 7 & up. 301/7900076. www.discoverystation.org. Penguin Appreciation Day, Bowman Library, 871 Tasker Rd., Stephens City, VA. 11 a.m. Penguin Appreciation celebrations, modified storytime, and then join us for the Family Film at 1 p.m. 540/869-9000. Family Film, Bowman Library, 871 Tasker Rd., Stephens City, VA. 1 p.m. “Penguins of Madagascar.” 540/869-9000. Paws for Reading, Clarke County Library, 101 Chalmers Ct., Suite C., Berryville, VA. 1 p.m. Read a favorite book to a canine listener. Meet certified therapy dogs. 540/662-9041. Critter Care Day, Catoctin Creek Park & Nature Center, 2929 Sumantown Rd., Middletown, MD. 1-3 p.m. Have fun taking care of and interacting with our Nature Center animals. $12. Ages 9-11. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Food and the Civil Rights Movement, Handley Library, Robinson Auditorium, 100 W. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 2 p.m. Presentation celebrating the Civil Rights movement and Martin Luther King, Jr. Focus on the lunch counter sit-ins and also the African American restaurants in the Winchester area during the Civil Rights Movement. After presentation, a reception of Soul Food desserts. 540/6629041.

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Martinsburg. 10:30 a.m.-12 noon. Using basic paperfolding tips and tricks, students will decorate their creations and use them as the basis for storytelling activities. Different project each of the four weeks. $48 for four weeks. Pre-registration required. 304/620-7277. www.berkeleyartswv.org. Faith Christian Academy Open House, 138 Greensburg Rd., Martinsburg. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Interdenominational Christian school for students in PreK – 12th grade. 304/263-0011. www.FaithChristianAcademy.net. “Freedom Train,” Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick. 10 a.m. & 12:15 p.m. Explore the true story of Harriet Tubman in a musical retelling. Recommended for grades 3-9 in connection with the FCPS social studies curriculum. Admission. 301/600-2828. www.weinbergcenter.org. Sensory Friendly Film, Carroll Arts Center, 91 W. Main St., Westminster, MD. 10:30 a.m. “Sing.” Brighter lighting & lower sound. Rated PG. Under age 18 must be supervised by adult. Free, reservations required. Reserve your space by emailing dgemmill@ccg.carr.org. 410/848-7272. www.carrollcountyartscouncil.org. “A Part of the Sky Called Orion,” William M. Brish Planetarium, 20 Commonwealth Ave., Hagerstown. 5:30-6:15 p.m. Intended for elementary age- general audiences. $3, adults; $2, children & students; free, senior citizens with WCPS Gold Card; $10, maximum family cost. 301/766-2898. Teen Idol 2018 Reboot Auditions, 28 South Restaurant, 28 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. 6-8 p.m. Competition for ages 1519. Vocal and Spoken Word Only. Register when you arrive. 301/739-3250, x270. www.washcolibrary.org. “Cowboy Astronomer,” William M. Brish Planetarium, 20 Commonwealth Ave., Hagerstown. 7-8 p.m. Intended for general audiences. $3, adults; $2, children & students; free, senior citizens with WCPS Gold Card; $10, maximum family cost. 301/766-2898. R.E.A.D. with Wags for Hope, Middletown (MD) Library, 101 Prospect St. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Children read to Reading Education Assistance Dogs. Grades K-5. 301/371-7560. www.fcpl.org. , 30, Feb 6 & 13 Tuesday Morning Home School Art Class, Chambersburg (PA) Council for the Arts, 81 N. Main St. 10:30-11:45 a.m. Children discover and develop their inner creativity. A new art project and technique explored each week. All materials provided. Ages 6-10. Fee. 717/2646883. www.councilforthearts.net. After School Art Explorers: Adventure with Animals, Chambersburg (PA) Council for the Arts, 81 N. Main St. 4:30-5:45 p.m. Explore new materials and techniques in a variety of projects inspired by the animal world. New projects each week. Students work with graphite, paint and pastel. All materials provided. Ages 6-10. Fee. 717/264-6883. www.councilforthearts.net. Paws for Reading, Handley Library, 100 E. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 6 p.m. Read a favorite book to a canine listener. Meet certified therapy dogs. 540/662-9041. Free Movie Night, Bridge of Life Center, Hagerstown. 7 p.m. Enjoy a free Hollywood film. Popcorn and soda in a safe, family-friendly environment. www.BridgeofLife.org. to 28 IceFest ’18, Downtown Chambersburg, PA. Winter festival featuring custom designed ice sculptures on display, ice carving, ice slide, ballroom dancing at the Snowfall Ball, chili cook-off, dunking at

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must be potty trained. 540/955-5147. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. Paint Night, Clarke County Parks & the Polar Dunk Plunge, cake viewing and Recreation, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. tasting, scavenger hunt, and more. 6-8 p.m. “Red Cardinal.” For ages 18 & up. www.festivalsinpa.com/ice-fest/ Children 10 & up can register if they are Movie and Popcorn, Brunswick painting alongside a registered parent. $38. (MD) Branch Library, 915 N. Maple 540/955-5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. Ave. 1:30-3:30 p.m. “Pele: Birth of a Legend.” to Feb 2 Catholic Schools Rated PG. Grades 6-12. 301/600-7250. Week, Mother Seton School, 100 www.fcpl.org. Creamery Rd., Emmitsburg, MD. Mother Seton Fun with Magnets, Thurmont (MD) School will celebrate Catholic Schools Week Regional Library, 76 E. Moser Rd. 3-4 p.m. and the blessing of Catholic education with a Explore magnets with games and crafts. variety of events. Applications for 2018-2019 Grades K-5. 301/600-7200. www.fcpl.org. now being accepted. 301/447-3161. Chef’s Favorite, Jefferson Co. Community www.mothersetonschool.org. Center, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Catholic Schools Week Open House, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 6-8 p.m. Friday Saint Mary Catholic School, 218 W. night cooking series. Guacamole with Washington St., Hagerstown. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Tostones, Ricotta Stuffed Calzones, and Prospective new students and families are Baklava. Ages 16 & up. $35, plus $5 invited to learn about our fully accredited Prematerials fee. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. K through 8th grade. 301/733-1184. & 28 “Flights of Imagination,” www.stmarycatholicschool.org. Capitol Theatre Center, 159 S. Main to March 17 “Junie B. Jones, St., Chambersburg. 7 p.m. The Chambersburg The Musical,” The Washington Ballet. Will also perform January 28 during Ice County Playhouse Dinner Theater and Fest at 4 p.m. Admission. 717/263-0202. Children’s Theater, 44 N. Potomac St., www.thecapitoltheatre.org. Hagerstown. Sat., 11:30 a.m. Hour long www.chambersburgballet.org. musical, preceded by a snack lunch. Maugansville Ruritan Country Admission. 301/739-7469. Breakfast, Maugansville (MD) www.washingtoncountyplayhouse.com. Community Center, Maugans Ave. 6:30-11 “Mark Nizer - Juggler,” Capitol a.m. All you can eat pancakes, sausage, Theatre Center, 159 S. Main St., scrambled eggs, sausage gravy, coffee and Chambersburg. 7 p.m. Combination of original orange juice. 301/790-1417. comedy, world class juggling, movement, www.visithagerstown.com. music and technology. Admission. 717/263R.E.A.D. with Wags for Hope, Brunswick 0202. www.thecapitoltheatre.org. (MD) Branch Library, 915 N. Maple Ave. & 30 and Feb 22 Shalom 10:30-11:30 a.m. Children read to Reading Christian Academy Open House, Education Assistance Dogs. Grades K-5. 126 Social Island Rd., Chambersburg. Jan. 301/600-7250. www.fcpl.org. 28, 2-5 p.m.; Jan. 30, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Feb. 22, Baking for Kids, Ballenger Creek Teaching 9 a.m.-6 p.m. An accredited, independent Kitchen, 5420 Ballenger Creek Pike, Christian school committed to develop lives of Frederick. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., ages 8-12; consequence in the world for the Kingdom of 2-4 p.m., ages 5-7. $31. 301/600-2936. God. PreK – 12th grade. Tour our campus, www.recreater.com. meet with admissions and financial aid R.E.A.D. with Wags for Hope, Thurmont representatives, receive information packet (MD) Regional Library, 76 E. Moser Rd. 11 and learn about scholarship opportunities. No a.m.-12 noon. Children read to Reading pre-registration required. 717/375-2223. Education Assistance Dogs. Grades K-5. www.shalomca.com. 301/600-7200. www.fcpl.org. No School Days, Winchester Parks Get Ready for Groundhog Day, Catoctin & Recreation, 1001 E. Cork St., Creek Park & Nature Center, 2929 Winchester. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Childcare for ages Sumantown Rd., Middletown, MD. 11 a.m.-12 5-12. Register by the Monday prior to date noon. Learn about this furry weather predictor, needed. Fee. www.winchesterva.gov. play a game with shadows, and make your School Days Off at the Delaplaine, own groundhog puppet. Ages 3-5. $6. Delaplaine Visual Arts Education Center, 40 S. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Carroll St., Frederick. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Drop your Paws for Reading, Bowman Library, 871 child off for a variety of art adventures during Tasker Rd., Stephens City, VA. 1 p.m. Read a FCPS days off. Ages 6-12. Fee. 301/698favorite book to a canine listener. Meet 0656. www.delaplaine.org. certified therapy dogs. 540/869-9000. Harry Potter Marathon, Bowman Library, Teen Idol 2018 Reboot Auditions, 871 Tasker Rd., Stephens City, VA. 1-8 p.m. Washington County Free Library, Community School is out so head to Hogwarts. Movie Room, 100 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. 1-4 marathon of “Sorcerer’s Stone,” “Chamber of p.m. Competition for ages 15-19. Solo, duet or Secrets,” and “Prisoner of Azkaban.” Enjoy trio singing or instrumental acts, dance butterbeer and chocolate frogs. 540/869performances and dramatic interpretations 9000. welcome. Register when you arrive. 301/739- Movies from Books, Urbana Regional 3250, x270. www.washcolibrary.org. Library, 9020 Amelung St., Frederick. 2:30-6 “Glow-in the-Dark Bouncy Balls,” p.m. “The Lion, the Witch, and The Wardrobe.” Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., All ages. 301/600-7000. www.fcpl.org. Hagerstown. 2 p.m. Hands-on science activity Powhatan School Applications suited for ages 5 & up. 301/790-0076. Due, 49 Powhatan Lane, Boyce, VA. www.discoverystation.org. Applications for pre-kindergarten through Parent’s Night Out, Clarke County Parks & eighth grade are due in Admissions Office by Recreation, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. January 31. To schedule a campus tour, 5-8:45 p.m. Ages 3-12. $20. Pizza, fun and contact 540/837-1009 or online at games while parents get a night out. Kids www.powhatanschool.org.

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registration required. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Banner School Open House, 1730 N. Market St., Frederick. 9-11 a.m. Visit Frederick County’s only non-sectarian, independent, co-educational day school for students in Preschool 3 through 8th grade. 301/695-9320. www.bannerschool.org. 4th Annual River Rat Day, Williamsport, MD. 10 a.m. If Willie the River Rat sees his La Leche Meeting, Bowman Library, 871 shadow, expect six more weeks of winter. Town merchants have bargains, special Tasker Rd., Stephens City, VA. 10 a.m. cheese items on their menus, and prizes. 540/869-9000. Meet on the steps of Town Hall. 301/223Eidolon Winter Tree Identification, 7711. www.williamsportmd.gov. Eidolon Nature Preserve, 2146 Orleans Rd., Great Cacapon, WV. 10 a.m.-12 noon. Family- “Candy Science,” Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 11 a.m. Children friendly winter tree identification field trip. ages 5 & up are invited to participate in Free. www.potomacaudubon.org. hands-on science activities that use Skittles “What Cassini Told Us About Saturn,” and Pop Rocks. 301/790-0076. Renfrew Museum and Park, Visitors Center, www.discoverystation.org. 1010 E. Main St., Waynesboro, PA. 7 p.m. Astronomy program. Presented in partnership R.E.A.D. with Wags for Hope, Edward F. Fry Memorial Library, 1635 Ballenger Creek with Tri-State Astronomers. Program on the Pike, Point of Rocks, MD. 1-2 p.m. Children dramatic end of the historic Cassini read to Reading Education Assistance Dogs. spacecraft mission to Saturn, and what Grades K-5. 301/874-4560. www.fcpl.org. astronomers learned from the nearly two Rockin’ Rocks & Fabulous Fossils, decades the Cassini was in orbit. Night sky Catoctin Creek Park & Nature Center, 2929 viewing after, weather permitting. Free. Sumantown Rd., Middletown, MD. 1-3 p.m. 717/762-0373. www.renfrewinstitute.org. Join Spelunker John Powers and learn about , 2, 8, 9, 15, 16, 22 & 23 the many rocks and minerals in the collections Indoor Playground, Jefferson County Community Center, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, at Catoctin Creek Park. Ages 8-12. $10. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Shenandoah Junction, WV. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Family Movie, Washington County Free Indoor play toys are provided and young children have plenty of room to run and play. Library, 100 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. 2 p.m. Popcorn and drinks provided. 301/739Adults are responsible for supervising the 3250. www.washcolibrary.org. children they bring. Any preschools or large Creative Outlet at The Delaplaine Arts groups, please call in advance. Ages 1-5. $5 Center, 40 S. Carroll St., Frederick. 3-5 p.m. for first child, $3 for additional siblings, and “India - Elephant.” Family-friendly event that $40 for a 10-punch pass. 304/728-3207. offers drop-in art activities for all ages. $2 per www.jcprc.org. artist. 301/698-0656. www.delaplaine.org. to 27 8th Annual Washington Co. First Saturday in Downtown Frederick: Art Educators Exhibit, Washington County Arts Council, 34 S. Potomac St., Suite “Fire In Ice,” Frederick. 5-9 p.m. Ice sculptures, fire dancers and activities for all 100, Hagerstown. Tues.-Fri., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; ages. Late-night shopping, live entertainment, Sat., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Opening reception Feb. 1, 5-7 p.m. 301/791-3132. www.washington- and a free trolley until 9 p.m. 301/698-8118. www.visitfrederick.org. countyarts.com. First Fridays Celebration of the Arts, “Boys & Girls Club of Frederick Co. 1st Annual Comedy Night,” Weinberg Center Winchester. Special gallery events, for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick. 7 musicians playing in restaurants and cafes, and many shops stay open late. www.oldtown- p.m. Comdians Anita Renfroe and Collin Moulton share their humorous perspective on winchesterva.com. the highs and lows of parenting. All proceeds First Friday Fun, Rose Hill Manor Park, benefit the Boys & Girls Club of Frederick 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 9:30-10:30 County. Admission. 301/600-2828. a.m. Fun filled story and art exploration program. Pre-registration recommended. Ages www.weinbergcenter.org. 2-4. $4. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. All County Orchestra Concert, North Home School Days, Catoctin Creek Park & Hagerstown High School, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., Hagerstown. 7 p.m. Hear some of the Nature Center, 2929 Sumantown Rd., best middle and high school orchestra Middletown, MD. 1-3 p.m. Allow experienced musicians in Washington County. Admission. naturalists to enrich your child’s studies. 301/766-2928. www.wcps.k12.md.us. “Rockin’ Rocks.” Ages 5-7 & 8-12. $9. & 17 Family Film, Bowman Library, 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. 871 Tasker Rd., Stephens City, VA. 1 p.m. 2018 Winter Olympics at the Library, “Bob the Builder: Snowed Under” (2/3) & Boonsboro (MD) Library, 401 Potomac St. 5 “Kung Fu Panda 3” (2/17). 540/869-9000. p.m. Teens are invited to compete in some , 4, 10, 11, 17, 18, 24 & 25 wacky races and crazy competitions for a “Q The Witch and The Magical Orb,” chance at the medals. For ages 13-18. Maryland Ensemble Theatre, 31 W. Patrick 301/432-5723. www.washcolibrary.org. St., Frederick. 1:30 p.m. Fun Company & 3 Daddy Daughter Dance, production. Story by Ashli Chesire. Adapted for Frederick Fairgrounds, Null Bldg, 797 E. stage by Caitlyn Joy. Admission. 301/694Patrick St., Frederick. Fri., 7:30-9:30 p.m.; 4744. www.marylandensemble.org. Sat., 4-6 p.m.; Sat., 7:30-9:30 p.m. Dress to R.E.A.D. with Wags for Hope, impress while dancing the night away. Free Urbana Regional Library, 9020 4x6 souvenir portrait, door prizes, music and light refreshments. Ages 4-12. $50 / couple. Amelung St., Frederick. 2-3 p.m. Children $25 each add’l child. Space limited. Advance read to Reading Education Assistance

St. John Regional Catholic School Open House, 8414 Opossumtown Pike, Frederick. 9-11 a.m. Prospective families for the 20182019 school year are encouraged to visit. Additional times by appointment. Call the Admission Office at 301/622-6722. www.sjrcs.org.

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Dogs. Grades K-5. 301/600-7000. www.fcpl.org. Monday Mommy Meet-Up, Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 9-11:30 a.m. Enjoy conversation and morning coffee/tea hour in our parlor while little ones play and explore the music, art, and games of the area with developmentally appropriate toys. For infants and toddlers. $1 per child. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. African American Heritage Month Speaker, Renfrew Farm, Wagon Shed, 1010 E. Main St., Waynesboro, PA. 1-3 p.m. “Struggles Between Slavery & Abolition in South Central PA.” Free, but donations accepted. www.renfrewmuseum.org. “Zula Patrol: Under the Weather,” William M. Brish Planetarium, 20 Commonwealth Ave., Hagerstown. 5:30-6:15 p.m. Intended for PreK to early elementary age audiences. $3, adults; $2, children & students; free, senior citizens with WCPS Gold Card; $10, max. family cost. 301/766-2898. Valentine Candy Science, Smithsburg (MD) Library, Community Room, 66 E. Water St. 6:30 p.m. Try sweet experiments with candy. For ages 4-12. Call for reservations. 301/8247722. www.washcolibrary.org. “Black Holes: The Other Side of Infinity,” William M. Brish Planetarium, 20 Commonwealth Ave., Hagerstown. 7-8 p.m. Intended for general audiences. $3, adults; $2, children & students; free, senior citizens with WCPS Gold Card; $10, maximum family cost. 301/766-2898. , 12, 20 & 27 Dance Party, Bowman Library, 871 Tasker Rd., Stephens City, VA. 4 p.m. Music and dancing for all ages. 540/869-9000. February 6, 13, 20 & 27 Saint Mary Catholic School Take a Look Tuesdays, 218 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 9-11 a.m. Learn about our fully accredited Pre-K through 8th grade. 301/7331184. www.stmarycatholicschool.org. , 14, 21 & 28 Parent & Me Little Artists, Clarke County Parks & Recreation, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 9:15-9:45 a.m. “Celery Stalk Roses Printmaking” (2/7), “Fruit Loop String Hearts” (2/14), “Open Painting” (2/21), and “Open Playdoh Day” (2/28). Parents must attend class with child. $7 per child. Additional $5 supply fee for all classes except “Open Painting.” Ages 2-5. 540/955-5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. Grandparents & Seniors Morning, For the Kids, By George Children’s Musem, Caperton Train Station, 229 E. Martin St., Martinsburg. 9 a.m.-12 noon. Tickets are $4/person. 304/264-9977. www.forthekidsbygeorge.org. “Creatures of the Night,” Renfrew Museum and Park, Visitors Center, 1010 E. Main St., Waynesboro, PA. 6 p.m. Adult Owl Walk. Naturalist Lori Schlosser conducts an outdoor walk to areas of Renfrew Park likely to attract owls. Pre-walk information session about the nocturnal creatures and methods to locate them. Ages 15 & up. Pre-registration required. Free. 717/762-0373. www.renfrewinstitute.org. Paws for Reading, Handley Library, 100 E. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 6 p.m. Read a favorite book to a canine listener. Meet certified therapy dogs. 540/662-9041. “Pirate School: The SCIENCE of Pirates!” Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick. 10 a.m. & 12:15 p.m. Kids explore math and engineering. Recommended for grades K-5 in connection with the FCPS math and science curriculum.

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Admission. 301/600-2828. www.weinbergcenter.org. A Little Noon Music, Handley Library, Robinson Auditorium, 100 W. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 12:15 p.m. “Celtic Circle.” Traditional Scottish and Irish folk music. 540/869-9000. www.handleyregional.org. , 16 & 23 Dance Party, Handley Regional Library Auditorium, 100 W. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 10:30 a.m. Toddlers, preschoolers and their grown-ups are welcome to come dance. 540/662-9041. www.handleyregional.org. Antietam Station Model Train Sale, Washington County Agricultural Education Center, 7313 Sharpsburg Pike, Boonsboro, MD. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Model train sale. All Gauges, Brass, Lionel & American Flyer. Railroad Collectibles and Hobby Tools and Parts. $5 admission. www.antietamstation.com. Hello Holidays: Valentine Craft Make and Take, Emmitsburg (MD) Branch Library, 300A S. Seton Ave. 10:30 a.m.-12 noon. All materials provided to make a special Valentine craft. Ages 0-10. 301/600-6329. www.fcpl.org. Cooking for Kids, Ballenger Creek Teaching Kitchen, 5420 Ballenger Creek Pike, Frederick. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., ages 1013; 2-4 p.m., ages 5-9. $39. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. “Valentine’s Day Math,” Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 11 a.m. Fun Valentine’s Day STEAM craft activity. Children work in teams of four to complete their craft while doing basic arithmetic. Program recommended for children in kindergarten through 2nd grade. 301/7900076. www.discoverystation.org. Wood Carving with Hand-Held Power Tools, Brunswick (MD) Branch Library, 915 N. Maple Ave. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Join wood carving artist Gary Carver as he demonstrates techniques for woodcarving and shares examples of his work. Hands-on opportunities. 301/600-7255. www.fcpl.org. Family Movie, Handley Library, Robinson Auditorium, 100 W. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 12 p.m. “The Emoji Movie.” 540/869-9000. www.handleyregional.org. Paws for Reading, Bowman Library, 871 Tasker Rd., Stephens City, VA. 1 p.m. Read a favorite book to a canine listener. Meet certified therapy dogs. 540/869-9000. Parent’s Night Out, Clarke County Parks & Recreation, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 5-8:45 p.m. Ages 3-12. $20. Pizza, fun and games while parents get a night out. Kids must be potty trained. 540/955-5147. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. All County Band Concert, North Hagerstown High School, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., Hagerstown. 7 p.m. Hear some of the best middle and high school band musicians in Washington County. Admission. 301/7662928. www.wcps.k12.md.us. & 11 Maryland Symphony Orchestra, The Maryland Theatre, 21 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. Sat., 7:30 p.m.; Sun., 3 p.m. “Puccini’s Tosca.” Presented as a semi-staged production in Italian with English supertitles. Featuring Hub Opera Ensemble. Admission. 301/797-4000. www.marylandsymphony.org. R.E.A.D. with Wags for Hope, C. Burr Artz Public Library, 110 E. Patrick St., Frederick. 1:30-2:30 p.m. Children read to Reading Education Assistance Dogs. Grades K-5. 301/600-1630. www.fcpl.org. Sunday Afternoon Kids Canvas, Chambersburg (PA) Council for the Arts, 81 N.

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Main St. 2-4 p.m. “Matisse’s Goldfish.” Complete a “Famous Artist” acrylic on canvas painting. No experience needed. All materials supplied. Ages 6-14. Adults welcome. Fee. 717/264-6883. www.councilforthearts.net. Acrylic Painting, Winchester Parks & Recreation, Jim Barnett Park, Arts & Crafts Room, 1001 E. Cork St., Winchester. 2-4 p.m. “Heart Locket.” $17-$20, plus $5 materials fee. www.winchesterva.gov. African American Heritage Month Speaker, Renfrew Farm, Wagon Shed, 1010 E. Main St., Waynesboro, PA. 1-3 p.m. “Role of the Church, People of Color in the Bible, and John Brown.” Free, but donations accepted. www.renfrewmuseum.org. American Girl Book Club, Boonsboro (MD) Library, 401 Potomac St. 6 p.m. “Happy Birthday Samantha.” Discussion with activities, games or crafts. For grades 1-5. 301/432-5723. www.washcolibrary.org. , 13 & 14 Hello Holidays: Valentine Craft Make and Take, Thurmont (MD) Regional Library, 76 E. Moser Rd. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. All materials provided to make a special Valentine craft. Ages 0-10. 301/600-7200. www.fcpl.org. “Take-a-Tour Tuesday,” Mother Seton School, 100 Creamery Rd., Emmitsburg, MD. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Applications for 2018-2019 now being accepted. Find out about our small classes, hands-on learning, well-rounded curriculum, extra-curricular activities, including our award-winning music and arts program. 301/447-3161. www.mothersetonschool.org. Hello Holidays: Anti-Valentine Party, Middletown (MD) Library, 101 Prospect St. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Grades 6-12. 301/371-7560. www.fcpl.org. Teen Chocolate Treats, Smithsburg (MD) Library, Community Room, 66 E. Water St. 6:30 p.m. Make some chocolate treats for someone you love or for yourself. Everything provided. For ages 13-19. 301/824-7722. www.washcolibrary.org. Love is An Open Door Storytime with Elsa and Anna, Urbana Regional Library, 9020 Amelung St., Frederick. 6:30-7 p.m. Snowy stories, songs and frozen fun with speical royal guests. Ages birth-5. 301/600-7000. www.fcpl.org. “An Evening with Travis Tritt,” The Maryland Theatre, 21 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. 7 p.m. Admission. 301/7902000. www.mdtheatre.org. & 27 Itty Bitty Mornings, Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum, 19 W. Cork Street, Winchester. 9-11 a.m. For ages 4 & under, accompanied by their adults. 540/722-2020. www.discoverymuseum.net. Hello Holidays: Valentine’s Day Storytime, Middletown (MD) Library, 101 Prospect St. 10:05-10:45 a.m. Music, stories and a craft centered around the theme of LOVE. 301/371-7560. www.fcpl.org. Hello Holidays: Valentine’s Day Stories and Crafts, Emmitsburg (MD) Branch Library, 300A S. Seton Ave. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Ages 3-5. 301/600-6329. www.fcpl.org. Hello Holidays: Bring the One You Love Dance, Urbana Regional Library, 9020 Amelung St., Frederick. 2:30-3:30 p.m. Celebrate Valentine’s Day with dancing and seasonal activities. 301/600-7000. www.fcpl.org. Hello Holidays: Valentine’s Day Craft, Edward F. Fry Memorial Library, 1635 Ballenger Creek Pike, Point of Rocks, MD. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Make and take a last minute

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Valentine’s Day craft for the one you love. Grades K-5. 301/874-4560. www.fcpl.org. Sweetheart Day: Parent’s Night Out, Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 5-9 p.m. Kids explore history of the holiday, celebrate friendship and craft their own valentines while parents enjoy a few hours out. Parents can drop off between 5-6 p.m. and pick up between 8-9 p.m. Ages 3-13. $10. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. “Frederick Music Showcase, Vol. 4,” Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick. 7 p.m. A celebration of local music featuring some of the top bands and musicians of Frederick County and the surrounding areas. Admission. 301/6002828. www.weinbergcenter.org. R.E.A.D. with Wags for Hope, Emmitsburg (MD) Branch Library, 300A S. Seton Ave. 5-6 p.m. Children read to Reading Education Assistance Dogs. Grades K-5. 301/600-6329. www.fcpl.org. Make-it, Take-it Family Craft Night, Clear Spring Library, 12624 Broadfording Rd. 56:45 p.m. Make a seasonal craft with your family. All ages. 301/842-2730. www.washcolibrary.org. Little Hands Cooking, Ballenger Creek Teaching Kitchen, 5420 Ballenger Creek Pike, Frederick. 10-11:30 a.m. Ages 2.5-5. $24. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Home School Days, Catoctin Creek Park & Nature Center, 2929 Sumantown Rd., Middletown, MD. 1-3 p.m. Allow experienced naturalists to enrich your child’s studies. “Science of Crystals.” Ages 5-7 & 8-12. $9. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Teen Movie Matinee, Urbana Regional Library, 9020 Amelung St., Frederick. 2-4 p.m. “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2.” Snacks provided. Grades 6-12. 301/600-7000. www.fcpl.org. Nerf Wars, Jefferson County Community Center, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 5-7:15 p.m., ages 5-9; 7:30-9:45 p.m., ages 10-14. Battle your friends in Nerf War Combat. Bring your Nerf blasters and darts. Pre-registration encouraged. $10. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. Saturdays with a Scientist, Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum, 19 W. Cork Street, Winchester. 10:30 a.m. Program will touch on water themes. 540/722-2020. www.discoverymuseum.net. Pancakes & Pajamas, Boonsboro (MD) Library, 401 Potomac St. 11 a.m. Family Storytime in your PJs. Create works of pancake art with syrup, whipped cream and candies. Registration required. 301/4325723. www.washcolibrary.org. “Frozen Bubbles,” Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 11 a.m. Explore the science behind frozen bubbles. Suitable for all ages. 301/790-0076. www.discoverystation.org. “Michael Rosman: Amazing Feats of Comedy,” Carroll Arts Center, 91 W. Main St., Westminster, MD. 11 a.m. Presidents Day School Holiday. High-energy Ringling-trained entertainer. Juggling, unicycling, and comic clowning. $8-$10. 410/848-7272. www.carrollcountyartscouncil.org. Dinosaur Fun, Thurmont (MD) Regional Library, 76 E. Moser Rd. 11-11:30 a.m. Learn fun dinosaur facts, play with dinosaur figures, and make a dinosaur craft. Ages 2-8. 301/600-7200. www.fcpl.org. Paws for Reading, Clarke County Library, 101 Chalmers Court, Suite C, Berryville, VA. 1

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January/February 2018 Heads Up Calendar of Events

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La Leche League Meeting, Handley Library, Children’s Room, 100 W. Piccadilly St., p.m. Read a favorite book to a canine listener. Winchester. 5:30 p.m. Talk with others and share experiences. No registration necessary. Meet certified therapy dogs. 540/955-5144. Free. 540/662-9041, x16. “Miss Berkeley County Scholarship Black History Month: “Hidden Figures” Pageant,” The Apollo Civic Theatre, 128 E. Martin St., Martinsburg. 6:30 p.m. Admission. Movie Night, Edward F. Fry Memorial Library, 1635 Ballenger Creek Pike, Point of Rocks, 301/263-6766. www.apollocivictheatre.org. MD. 6-8 p.m. Rated PG. 301/874-4560. “Discover and Explore: Chinese www.fcpl.org. New Year,” Urbana Regional Library, & 20 No School Days, Winchester 9020 Amelung St., Frederick. 1-3 p.m. Parks & Recreation, 1001 E. Cork St., Celebrate Chinese New Year – the Year of the Winchester. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Childcare for ages Dog. Festivities for all ages include stories, crafts, traditional Chinese games, and music. 5-12. Register by the Monday prior to date needed. Fee. www.winchesterva.gov. 301/600-7012. “In Their Own Voices,” Catoctin MSO Recital/Valentine’s Concert, Furnace Historical Society, 12607 Washington County Museum of Fine Arts, Catoctin Furnace Rd., Thurmont, MD. 11 a.m.Hagerstown (MD) City Park, Virginia Ave. at Park Circle. 2:30 p.m. “The Kuznik Trio.” Wine 1 p.m. Living history and heritage food event and Chocolate Reception to follow. 301/739- commemorating Black History Month. Free. 443/463-6437. www.visitfrederick.org. 5727. www.wcmfa.org. & 22 Everyday Etiquette for Kids, School’s Out Sports Camp, Walkersville (MD) Rec Center, 83 W. Centerville Rec Center, in Centerville Frederick St. 4-5:30 p.m. Interactive, hands-on Elementary School, 3601 Carriage Dr., two session program designed to increase Frederick. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Sports and games children’s confidence and boost their such as soccer, basketball, flag football, baseball, ultimate frisbee, wiffle ball, lacrosse, communication skills. Ages 5-10. $50. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. and more played. Ages 6-12. $39. 301/600Kinder Konzert, Hagerstown 2936. www.recreater.com. Community College, Kepler Theater, No School Fun Day, Jefferson County Community Center, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, 11400 Robinwood Drive. 9:45 a.m.; 11 a.m.; Shenandoah Junction, WV. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Play 12:15 p.m. MSO musicians perform free sports, games, watch a movie, and more. Ages concerts for preschool children. Brass Quintet, “Brass Menagerie.” 301/797-4000. 5-12. $35. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. www.marylandsymphony.org. Red Cross Babysitter Training, Clarke Paws for Reading, Handley Library, 100 E. County Parks & Recreation, 225 Al Smith Piccadilly St., Winchester. 6 p.m. Read a Circle, Berryville, VA. 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Successful completion of final tests is required favorite book to a canine listener. Meet certified therapy dogs. 540/662-9041. for certification. Ages 11-15. $70. 540/955Super Hero Party, Hagerstown 5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. Community College, ARCC Arena, School Days Off at the Delaplaine, Delaplaine Visual Arts Education Center, 40 S. 11400 Robinwood Dr. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Activity stations: Bat Cave shopping, sand art, Carroll St., Frederick. 9:15 a.m.-5 p.m. Drop temporary superhero tattoos, moonbounce, your child off for a variety of art adventures scooters, coloring, magic shows, parade and during FCPS days off. Ages 6-12. Fee. more. Costumes encouraged. No tickets at 301/698-0656. www.delaplaine.org. door. Register online at www.eventbrite.com or Playgroup Monday, Rose Hill Manor Park, mail in/drop off registration. Ages 1-12, $5; 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 9:30 a.m.-12 Ages 13 & up/spectators, $2; Ages less than noon. Bring your playgroup and friends and enjoy free play throughout the Manor house at 12 months, free. 240/313-2805. www.washcorecfit.com. a special rate. Ages 2 & up. $2 per child. Daddy Daughter Dance, Jefferson County 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Community Center, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, African American Heritage Month Speaker, Renfrew Farm, Wagon Shed, 1010 Shenandoah Junction, WV. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Be E. Main St., Waynesboro, PA. 1-3 p.m. “Harriet your daughter’s Prince Charming. Crafts, Tubman and Freedom Seekers from Maryland music, and food. Photo opportunities available. All ages. $20/couple with dinner to Pennsylvania.” Free, but donations accepted. www.renfrewmuseum.org.

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The Banner School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Cluggy’s Family Amusements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Discovery Station . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Back Cover Educare Learning Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Faith Christian Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Family Healthcare. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Frederick Pediatric Dentistry . . . . . . Back Cover Hagerstown Community College Children’s Learning Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Kids First Swim Schools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Let There Be Rock School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Back Cover

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option; $10/couple without dinner; $8, add’l sibling. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. & 24 “The Addams Family – A New Musical Comedy,” The Maryland Theatre, 21 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. Fri., 7:30 p.m.; Sat., 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m. St. Maria Goretti Players and The Cumberland Valley School of Music. Check for age appropriateness. Admission. 301/7902000. www.mdtheatre.org. Maugansville Ruritan Country Breakfast, Maugansville (MD) Community Center, Maugans Ave. 6:30-11 a.m. All you can eat pancakes, sausage, scrambled eggs, sausage gravy, coffee and orange juice. 301/790-1417. www.visithagerstown.com. R.E.A.D. with Wags for Hope, Brunswick (MD) Branch Library, 915 N. Maple Ave. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Children read to Reading Education Assistance Dogs. Grades K-5. 301/600-7250. www.fcpl.org. Baking for Kids, Ballenger Creek Teaching Kitchen, 5420 Ballenger Creek Pike, Frederick. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., ages 8-12; 2-4 p.m., ages 5-7. $31. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. R.E.A.D. with Wags for Hope, Thurmont (MD) Regional Library, 76 E. Moser Rd. 11 a.m.-12 noon. Children read to Reading Education Assistance Dogs. Grades K-5. 301/600-7200. www.fcpl.org. Family Movie, Boonsboro (MD) Library, 401 Potomac St. 11:30 a.m. “Lego Ninjago Movie.” 301/432-5723. www.washcolibrary.org. “Sweet Competition,” Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum, 19 W. Cork Street, Winchester. 12 noon-3 p.m. Jimmy & Liz Reed, authors of the book SWEET COMPETITION, will be sharing their talents. 540/722-2020. www.discoverymuseum.net. Paws for Reading, Bowman Library, 871 Tasker Rd., Stephens City, VA. 1 p.m. Read a favorite book to a canine listener. Meet certified therapy dogs. 540/869-9000. Paint Night, Clarke County Parks & Recreation, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 6-8 p.m. “Love Birds.” Ages 18 & up. Children 10 & up can register if painting alongside a registered parent. $38. 540/955-5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. “Teelin Irish Dance Company: Celtic Storm,” Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick. 7 p.m. Percussive Irish dance and music. Admission. 301/600-2828. www.weinbergcenter.org. “Apollo Talent Show Extravaganza,” The Apollo Civic Theatre, 128 E. Martin St.,

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INDEX OF ADVERTISERS

The Light of the Child Montessori School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Lizzy Fontaine – 31 Gifts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Mother Seton School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Muscular Skeletal Therapies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 The Mustard Seed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 The Pediatric Center of Frederick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Photography by Dale. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Powhatan School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Preschool Fair of Frederick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Back Cover

Child Guide

Martinsburg. 7 p.m. Admission. 301/2636766. www.apollocivictheatre.org. Free Movie Night, Bridge of Life Center, Hagerstown. 7 p.m. Film, popcorn and soda in a safe, family-friendly environment. www.BridgeofLife.org. Faith Christian Academy Open House, 138 Greensburg Rd., Martinsburg. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Inter-denominational Christian school for students PreK – 12th grade. 304/263-0011. www.FaithChristianAcademy.net. African American Heritage Month Speaker, Renfrew Farm, Wagon Shed, 1010 E. Main St., Waynesboro, PA. 1-3 p.m. “Shockey Farm, Underground Railroad.” Free, but donations accepted. www.renfrewmuseum.org. Home School STEM “Magnets,” Boonsboro (MD) Library, 401 Potomac St. 1 p.m. STEM Challenge: Make it Move with Magnets. 301/432-5723. www.washcolibrary.org. “Planetary Visions,” William M. Brish Planetarium, 20 Commonwealth Ave., Hagerstown. 5:30-6:15 p.m. Intended for elementary age - general audiences. $3, adults; $2, children & students; free, senior citizens with WCPS Gold Card; $10, maximum family cost. 301/766-2898. Elementary Arts Festival, North Hagerstown High School, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., Hagerstown. 6-8 p.m. Washington County (MD) elementary students perform and display their talents. Admission. 301/7662928. www.wcps.k12.md.us. Family Storytime, Emmitsburg (MD) Branch Library, 300A S. Seton Ave. 6:30-7 p.m. 301/600-6329. www.fcpl.org. R.E.A.D. with Wags for Hope, Middletown (MD) Library, 101 Prospect St. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Children read to Reading Education Assistance Dogs. Grades K-5. 301/371-7560. www.fcpl.org. “Moons: Worlds of Mystery,” William M. Brish Planetarium, 20 Commonwealth Ave., Hagerstown. 7-8 p.m. Intended for general audiences. $3, adults; $2, children & students; free, senior citizens with WCPS Gold Card; $10, max. family cost. 301/766-2898. Family Tunes and Tales: Symphony Storytime with Frederick Symphony Orchestra, Emmitsburg (MD) Branch Library, 300A S. Seton Ave. 10:30-11 a.m. FSO musicians perform classical music to beloved stories, followed by a musical instrument petting zoo provided by Music and Arts. 301/600-6329. www.fcpl.org.

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ProDesign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 St John Regional Catholic School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Shalom Christian Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Shepherd University – Community Music . . . . . 1 Shepherdstown School of Dance . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Toothman Orthodontics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Trinity Learning Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 WIC of Frederick & Washington Co., MD . . . . . . . Inside Front Cover

www.childguidemagazine.com


MUSIC LESSONS FOR KIDS 5-17 & ADULTS DRUMS • GUITARS • KEYBOARD • SINGING Youth Bands • Live Performances • Musicianship AFTERSCHOOL COMMUNITY CENTER

1017 S. Queen St., Martinsburg, WV 301-418-0715 Letthereberockwv.com

Open 3-8pm Monday – Friday & 10am-4pm Saturdays

Visit Facebook page at Letthereberockschoolpanhandle

Attention Parents Participating preschools and child care centers will have tables set up to answer your questions. Receive a detailed guide booklet and a goodie bag from area sponsors. Children welcome!

Free Event

16th Annual Preschool and Child Care Fair DATE: January 23rd, 2018 • TIME: 4:00 – 6:00 pm LOCATION: Elks Lodge #684, 289 Willowdale Drive, Frederick, MD 21702 Follow us on Facebook @ Frederick Area Preschool Fair Hosted by MOMS Club of Frederick North


Frederick

Pediatric

Dentistry LLC

WINNER! Best of the Best Frederick News Post

Pediatric Dentists: Dr. Joseph Camacho Dr. Joanne Amigo Dr. Ester Kim Dr. Vani Takiar Orthodontist: Dr. Robin Choi

ADA Recognized Specialists in Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics Serving the Frederick Area for 20 Years! Now Offering Compassionate Care in both Frederick & Hagerstown! Parents Always Welcome in Treatment Rooms No Restraints Used In-Office Sedation Available On Staff at Frederick Memorial Hospital Many PPO Insurance Plans Accepted Complimentary Exams for Babies Under 18 Months! Patients with Special Needs Laser Lip and Tongue Tie Release Children and Adults Braces in our Frederick Office Frederick Office 77 Thomas Johnson Drive, Suite A

301-682-3887 Hagerstown Office 1150 Omega Drive, Suite 102

www.fpdentistry.com 240-513-6161

January/February 2018 Child Guide  
January/February 2018 Child Guide  

Child Guide begins the year with a Family Health theme, plus a special School Enrollment section with Open Houses and enrollment promotions....

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