Page 1

w

WWI ILLLLAA M T TT EE WWOORRKKRROOOOMM ME ET

Brand | Concept | Development | Sample | Manufacture


W

Willamette Workroom Sample Room & Small Batch Manufacturer

Keri Ann Yourick 04294172 Academy of Art University Graduate School of Fashion December 15, 2017 | 12:00pm


05

Content 01 02 03 04 4

04 05

Business Overview »» »» »» »»

Business Description 8 Business Objectives 9 The Workroom Statement of Intent 10 Sustainability Principles 11

01

06

Market Research »» »» »» »» »»

Ecological & Social Concerns in Fashion Global Apparel Manufacturing and Sourcing U.S. Apparel Manufacturing Industry U.S. Consumer Research & Analysis Location Research & Analysis

14 23 34 44 56

02

Target Market »» »» »» »»

Target Business Overview Primary Target Business Secondary Target Business Tertiary Target Businesses

64 66 74 80

08

Competitive Analysis »» »» »» »» »» »»

Primary Research Summary & Insights 88 Competitor Overview 90 Values & Differentiations 96 Competitive Advantages 98 SWOT Analysis 99 Positioning Map 100

Willamette Workroom

07

03

06

Services Plan »» »» »» »» »»

Studio Space & Location List of Services List of Outside Vendors Production Capacity Cost of Production Labor

104 108 110 112 113

Product Plan »» »» »» »» »» »»

FACES Spring/Summer 2019 WEATHERED Fall/Winter 2019 Buttoned & Vented Tech Pack Cornered Rain Slick Tech Pack Breezy Cut Offs Tech Pack Production Calendar

116 128 140 146 152 159

Marketing Plan »» »» »» »»

Brand Overview Marketing Strategy Website Development Marketing Future Growth

07

162 164 168 171

Financial Plan »» »» »» »» »» »» »»

Start-Up Expenses Assortment Plan Sales/Stock & Cash Flow Profit & Loss Future Growth Roles, Responsibilities and Salaries Organizational Chart

174 178 182 184 188 190 191

»» APPENDIX 192

08 Willamette Workroom

5


01

Business Overview Imogene + Willie, Nashville

»» Business Description »» Business Objectives »» The Workroom Statement of Intent »» Sustainability Principles


Double Down Denim, Rivi Goods

Business Description

Willamette Workroom was founded as an alternative

QuickStudy, Instagram post

to the current, unsustainable fast fashion system, which focuses on selling too much clothing at rock bottom prices. Our aim is to bring individual expression back into dressing by developing wellcrafted and refined product. To accomplish this, we provide apparel development services as well as offer small-batch manufacturing to our clients. We are changing the way fashion designers and entrepreneurs build a brand. Willamette Workroom and its clients collaborate with global supply chain partners, aiming to create strong brand equity rooted in a conscientious, transparent supply chain.

Willamette Workroom helps brands streamline their

product development process by bringing patternmaking, sampling,

The Willamette Workroom Business Objectives

H

Help independent designers and fashion entrepreneurs build a brand identity based on The Willamette Workroom’s Sustainability Principles.

specification package building, and sourcing into the same U.S.based studio space.

Localize garment development services to minimize excessive resource consumption,

improve product quality, ensure efficient communication and productivity, and produce

Willamette Workroom helps its clients build a strong brand

story by sourcing fabrics from conscientious and innovative textile mills, providing small-batch manufacturing capabilities to minimize barriers to enter the market, and more quickly identifying what consumers want to buy without the major financial investment. Brands with the ambition to scale and attract a strong following will find success while working with Willamette Workroom. Our clients have the necessary tools to create and realize designs that are most relevant to their target consumers.

8

Willamette Workroom

designs most relevant to the target customer. Provide small-batch manufacturing services to eliminate financial barriers for independent brands so they can test their market while minimizing excess costs associated with overseas production minimums. Positively impact the community in which the business is located through outreach programs and repair & alteration services.

Willamette Workroom

9


The Workroom

Our Sustainability Principles

Our Intentions

Willamette Workroom works in collaboration

C

with designers and global supply chain

capturing noxious emissions, and using

partners to help independent designers build

alternative sources of energy independent

strong brand equity rooted in a sustainable

of nonrenewable fossil fuels.

only then can we change the conversation towards doing better in the fashion industry.

�

ommitment to buying textiles from mills that employ closedloop methods of production and

Our mission is to provide development and production services to young designers and fashion entrepreneurs looking to build a sustainable brand identity.

W

and transparent supply chain. Willamette Workroom will bring

finishing, including treating wastewater,

C R

ommitment to sourcing organically grown plant fibers and/or sourcing natural animal fibers that have

Willamette Workshop was founded on the

been acquired using humane methods.

philosophy of giving back to designers the creative expression lost because of pressures

educe contribution of excess

to outsource cheaper labor and materials.

carbon emissions that contribute to global warming, including

We look to eliminate the prohibitive barriers

emissions during transportation and

that up-start fashion businesses encounter

electric energy consumption.

while producing collections within the

all employees along the supply

industry. Collectively with our clients,

chain regardless of local laws and

Willamette Workshop is changing an industry

regulations.

that has lost sight of the importance of self-identification and individual expression

nvestment in the physical and mental

through clothing choices.

Our Statement on the Industry

G I

uarantee living wages are paid to

constraints of the current, globalized fashion

Alabama Chanin issues causing designs to lose integrity and

patternmaking, prototyping, fitting, and

In a company where development takes place

the original design intent. Bringing garment

sampling into one studio to ensure the best

overseas, key design details may get dumbed

development back to the U.S. gives designers

possible creation of the designer’s ideas.

down, replaced, or thrown out all together.

more opportunity to remain involved in the

This will include offering assistance sourcing

In this system, the sampling process requires

editing process, and will have positive effects

fabrics, trims, notions and finishing processes

weeks of development due to international

for the brand. In doing so, we are changing

from industry leaders in forward-thinking,

shipping, there is communication difficulty,

how the fashion industry conducts business.

sustainable production techniques. For

budget constraints, and other time sensitive

When clothing fits better and visually

interested clients, we will provide small-batch

resonates on a personal level with consumers,

manufacturing services as well.

health of all employees.

Denim sewing machine, Alabama Chanin

10

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

11


02

Market Research »» Ecological & Social Concerns in Fashion »» Global Apparel Manufacturing and Sourcing »» U.S. Apparel Manufacturing Industry »» U.S. Consumer Research & Analysis »» Location Research & Analysis: Portland, Oregon

Old Town, Portland, Travel Portland


ECOLOGICAL AND SOCIAL CONCERNS in fashion The Fashion Industry is unsustainable. The ever-increasing level of consumption and disposal, both by companies making products and consumers, has created seemingly irreversible damage to the environment and allowed for continual abuse of human labor.

A

All industries need to become aware of this

writer/researcher John Ehrenfeld are concerned

worldwide problem and make changes to

with communicating the inherent damages

minimize and reverse the damage. This is not a

caused by an industrialized world and how to

new call to action. In 1987 the United Nations

sustainably address them. Ehrenfeld subscribes

published their Report on the World Commission

to the tenant that acting sustainably allows

on Environment and Development in which the

successive generations of humans and other life

Commission identifies what will be a driving

to flourish on the planet forever. This definition

factor for this Willamette Workroom business

of sustainability serves as the cornerstone of why

proposal:

businesses like Willamette Workroom need to be more commonplace.

“Humanity has the ability to make development

The fashion industry today does not

businesses and consumers. The implications of

practice sustainable development. In fact, no

an Industrial Growth Society in the context of

industry in the Capitalist world truly practices

a globalized society are two-fold: (a) industries

self-imposed limitations on growth to allow

that practice global supply chaining negatively

time for the planet to adapt to human activity.

impact unindustrialized countries that further

It is quite the opposite. Modern economies are

contribute to the systemic problem of a linear

dependent on accelerating growth, infusing more

flow of product from raw material extraction to

capital into the system to grow more because

the landfill, causing unequal damage to those

growth signals a healthy economy. McDonough

countries with improper, limited disposal options,

& Braungart call this an Industrial Growth Society.

and (b) the increase in the number of economic

This accelerating growth must be coupled with

markets around the world that contribute to

the fact that most products are destined for the

this product flow already strains the planet’s

landfill, i.e. a linear product lifecycle model that

finite natural resources, especially as consumer

Walter Stahl in the 1970s coined as a cradle-

overconsumption shows no sign of slowing

to-grave model. Both of these systems working

(Shin So). Indefinite growth with no solutions in

in tandem results in a global economy that

place to capture the waste stream means human

churns out more product at quicker rates and at

impact on the planet will reach very quickly

lower prices, and after consumers have finished

the point when the earth can no longer absorb

using the product, it is thrown into the garbage

the effects, and the results will be nothing but

and landfilled. This should be concerning to all

devastating to the world population.

Source: Matthew Nager Photography

sustainable to ensure that it meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. The concept of sustainable development does imply limits… limitations imposed by the present state of technology and social organization on environmental resources and by the ability of the biosphere to absorb the effects of human activities.”

What the U.N. stated in that 1987

report has become the accepted definition of the word sustainability. Today experts such as

14

Willamette Workroom

Source: China Daily

Willamette Workroom

15


carbon emissions during transportation across

are greater. It may seem counter intuitive, but

the supply chain. The Industrial Growth Society

Grose explains how even though industrialized

together with globalization has exacerbated

economies like the U.S.’s have increased

every step of the apparel supply chain, creating

efficiencies and consume “fewer resources per

a race to the bottom of the supply chain,

one unit,” global resource use is always rising.

producing more cloths at cheaper prices than the

This is due to global population growth and

competition. Statistical analyses throw into stark

increased demand as more people share in the

conversation of globalization and perpetual

relief the reality of what this race to the bottom

prosperity of global economics. To increase fiber

growth into the context of the apparel supply

has meant for the planet. The Environmental

yields for a growing population, the industrialized

chain with the aim of understanding the major

Protection Agency estimates that 9% of world

world has resorted to developing better farming

supply chain players in relation to the product

landfill space is textile, leather, and rubber waste.

technologies, allowing for exponential growth

lifecycle and understanding the effects of the

According to the agency’s Advancing Sustainable

in response to society’s insatiable demand for

current global fashion supply chain. According to

Materials Management: Facts and Figures 2013,

more apparel. But the current supply chain is

the Okala Practitioner and the American Society

published in June of 2015, only 15.2% of textile

inadequate and unfair to those supplying the raw

of Industrial Designers, a leading resource for

solid waste is reclaimed, and 12.83 million tons

materials. Any financial prosperity does not trickle

ecological design consideration, the lifecycle of

of textile waste ended up in U.S. landfills in 2013.

down to the workers at the beginning of the

any product begins in the natural environment.

Overall trends in the report show that recycling

supply chain. Through a case study of California’s

(See Figure 2.1) The environment supplies the

rates are increasing across all solid waste, and per

most innovative cotton farmers, Grose highlights

base resources for new products while it also

capita waste generation has decreased slightly

this current problem by asking, “why is the most

takes back the waste accumulated throughout

from 4.44 to 4.40 million tons. But overall, total

productive agricultural county [the congressional

a product’s lifecycle. Natural resources are

solid waste generation increased an additional

district of Fresno] – in the world’s eighth largest

extracted as raw materials. In the apparel

3.5 million tons in 2013. These statistics indicate

economy [California] – also one of the most

supply chain, raw materials include natural

that our efforts have been insufficient to keep

socially degraded regions in the U.S.?” (226). It is

fibers grown by farmers or raised by ranchers,

up with population growth. Businesses need

because fashion’s current business and sourcing

as well as manufactured fibers, and are used

to make more pronounced efforts to apply

practices only serve those businesses that exploit

to make fabrics. These raw materials are

strategic sustainability principles across the

other businesses that come before them along

product lifecycle, and consumers need to demand

the supply chain.

The Apparel Product Lifecycle

This next section will put the

manufactured into useful components. In apparel,

Figure 2.1 - The Product Lifecycle Source: American Society of Industrial Designers

this would include the yarn mills that thread

transparency while being conscientious buyers to

fibers, production facilities that produce trims

begin reversing the adverse effects of the fashion

(zippers, buttons, snaps, etc.), textile mills that

industry.

parties equally, and the purpose of explaining

weave or knit unfinished fabrics and finishing

longer with alterations, by replacing parts, or by

mills that convert the unfinished fabric (greige

mending ripped and torn areas. Instead clothing

goods) through bleaching, dyeing, printing or

gets discarded at its end-of-life and landfilled.

the like, into fabrics that are ready for sewing. The end-use products like clothing, accessories,

backpacks, and shoes, are assembled, packaged,

followed this linear path from extraction to

and distributed to retailers for purchase. After

landfilling. Then consider that each phase also

being purchased by consumers, all products in

creates waste and excess materials that will be

the use phase need to be maintained and/or

thrown away including fabric cutting waste, dye

up-graded, which for clothing includes washing,

run off, untreated chemicals from washing and

drying, ironing, or dry cleaning during its useful

bleaching fibers and fabrics, noxious gas emitted

life. Rarely do consumers keep clothing in use

into the atmosphere during fiber production, and

16

Willamette Workroom

The apparel supply chain has always

Economic growth does not benefit all

the unfairness emphasizes the adverse effects of

In the essay, “Fashion as Material,” in the

the current fashion system on people and planet.

Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion,

There is a deep-rooted problem when economic

author Lynda Grose successfully identifies what

growth does not socially empower its most

is happening along the apparel supply chain as

fundamental workers, and instead of generating

it relates to a growth society. She summarizes

diverse wealth among individuals, it is generating

how material flows such as fiber production

noxious refuse across the entire planet. To be in

are indicators of its environmental impact.

balance with sustainable principles, companies

As economic activity increases, more virgin

must change the fundamental structure of the

materials need to be extracted from the natural

business so that the company grows in tandem

environment, processed and consumed, the

with ecology, culture, social justice, and economic

resulting negative impacts on the environment

theory.

Willamette Workroom

17


There are six areas of environmental impacts considered in Levi’s lifecycle assessment (Figure 2.2) including climate change, water intake, water consumption, eutrophication, land occupation, and abiotic depletion, but most important to note for denim jeans is that cotton fiber production and consumer use are the two largest impact areas.

suffocates waterways when excessive nutrients from

According to Levi’s, 68% of water

mining enter those waterways. Overall, production of

consumption in a pair of jeans comes from fiber

fibers remains the top negative environmental impact

production and 78% of land occupation is from

of the denim lifecycle according to Levis’ assessment.

fiber production. This phase includes growing

Figure 2.2 - Levi’s 501© Jeans Lifecycle Assessment Points Source: Levi Strauss & Co. 2015

Levi Strauss & Co. Case Studies Levi’s Lifecycle Assessment

18

Willamette Workroom

The following case studies will be used to highlight environmental, social, and

cotton plants, the ginning, and yarn processes,

which includes water use for dyeing the yarns.

makes an effort to distance itself from poor practices

The climate change impact area, which measures

for which, as Levi’s sees it, third party companies are

kilograms of carbon emissions into the atmosphere

responsible. This is problematic because when Levi’s

and contributing to global warming, is relative to

does not take responsibility for the vendors that

consumer care of jeans with 37% of emissions

supply raw materials directly to them, no solutions

during the lifecycle deriving from the use of

to pollution issues can be implemented. It is a form

nonrenewable energy when washing and drying

of greenwashing, a concept that will be further

clothing. Fabric production accounts for 27% of

explored in the U.S. Consumer Research and Analysis

negative climate impacts as well. Fiber production of

section of this paper. But in essence, Levi’s shifts

cotton contributes to 37% of water eutrophication

the blame for environmental disruption to others,

impacts. Water eutrophication refers to the addition

including the consumers purchasing Levi’s jeans,

of excess nutrients into water sources that constrict

instead of owning up to and addressing the negative

the amount of available oxygen needed for animals

impacts of its product development practices.

and plant life to thrive. Issues of untreated factory

It should be unacceptable in today’s globalized

Throughout the lifecycle assessment, Levi’s

wastewater still carrying particles from dye run-

economic degradation caused by the fashion industry. The first study uses Levi Strauss

economy for corporations to hire third party vendors

off, bleaches or detergents from washing affect

& Co.’s 2015 Lifecycle Assessment of the 501® Jean to highlight environmental impacts

to manufacture billions of dollars of product, and

eutrophication during the fiber production phase.

of the jeans from raw material extraction to waste treatment and evaluate the impacts

then to see that those same corporations take no

through quantitative methods. To look at social implications of the apparel supply chain,

responsibility for the waste byproducts. This is the

the Levi’s Sustainability Guidebook will offer deeper insights into corporate apparel

16% of the adverse effects on water resources comes

manufacturing practices including the treatment of apparel workers and how production

positions that have become so prevalent in the 21st

from “sundries and packaging.” This percentage is

practices impact people and the planet. The last case study looks at quantitative data

Century. It should serve as a warning to consumers

equal to the end-use consumer’s impact on healthy

of the negative impacts of a company’s business philosophy that accounts for human

that just because a company discloses CSR reports,

water. Sundries in denim might include items like the

capital as an expendable resource. Together these case studies create a strong argument

the reports do not require the company to alter

metal zippers, metal rivets, metal shank button, and

for why the fashion industry can no longer operate on a linear cradle-to-grave model,

its business practices. And that is especially true if

interior labels. Extracting mineral ores from natural

which counts success only as a measure of positive growth.

there is not enough consumer pressure to affect

environments to make these trims and notions

companies’ bottom lines.

In regards to water eutrophication by Levi’s,

antithesis of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) job

Willamette Workroom

19


Levi’s Sustainability Guidebook Seemingly ahead of the curve on sustainable

The Sustainability Guidebook reveals the

transparent practices, Levi’s also published

results of assessing member factories with less

a Sustainability Guidebook in December

than encouraging results, with many factories

2013, assessing partner factories and their

committing “Zero Tolerance Violations” of

compliance to satisfactory rules and regulations

worker’s rights in each of the above categories

in terms of labor conditions, health, safety, and

as well as “Immediate Action Item” where the

environmental impacts. The report lays out a

factory is given a designated amount of time to

strong overview of the types of social-labor

address the issues. For the latter point, Levi’s did

issues that are common among big brands

not publish a follow up report indicating whether

working in the globalized fashion system.

or not partner factories with Immediate Action

Regulations addressed in the report in regards to

Items addressed the violations within the allotted

labor practices include:

timeframe. Here again this act of appearing

Minimum age requirements for hired workers, typically set to 15 years of age Disdain for prison and forced labor practices Disciplinary actions taken by factory owners, and disdain for mental and/or physical coercion

Source: Sustainability Portal, “Pablo-29”

Important to the Willamette Workroom

But what this Levi’s assessment emphasizes for

business model, in addition to the same

the Willamette Workroom business plan is the

environmental impacts that Levi’s looked at in their

importance of taking into consideration the fibers

lifecycle assessment report, are the environmental

and fabrics sourced for its clients’ apparel. The

impacts from the cut, sew, & finish processes. While

business cannot choose to run an efficient production

the impact from cut, make, trim (CMT) manufacturing

operation while ignoring the major environmental

appear not as directly impactful as fiber production,

implications of fibers, fabrics, and trims that go into

steps can be made to address energy efficiency

the development of any clothing.

during production processes, and minimal water consumption, especially in finishing processes.

Complying with legal requirements set by the governing bodies of home countries

transparent to consumers reveals a type of green washing tactic. The company shows that it is aware of the labor rights violations in its partner factories, creating a more positive appearance to consumers. But read between the lines and the “transparency” really shows violations and improperly managed factories to which Levi’s continues to solicit business.

Assessing ethical standards of factories including disdain for subcontracting, lack of transparency during assessments, bribery, and incorrect record keeping

Abiding by legal limits for working hours, typically local requirements are working less than 60 hours per week with one day off in seven

experts, the Worldwide Responsible Accredited

Paying minimum wage and benefits with no unfair wage deductions for tardiness, etc. Freedom of association and abiding by fair labor practices

countries as of December 2016. In an industry

Discrimination against religion, restricting reproductive rights of women, etc. Keeping dormitories safe and healthy when offered to employees

The global fashion industry has

done little work correcting these social injustices towards workers. One independent non-profit team of social compliance Production (WRAP) has only certified 2,268 factories employing 2,032,806 employees in 42 worth $1.2 trillion dollars, there is a steep disconnect between business practices and ethical considerations in business. This should not come as a surprise given the substantial supporting facts that align globalization and an Industrial Growth Society model, that is, growth is the bottom line, not care for people or planet.

Acquiring proper permits to operate factories legally

20

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

21


Ethiopia | Africa

Sweatshop Economics Case Study The United States National Bureau of Economics conducted a 13-month

Global Apparel Manufacturing & Sourcing Apparel manufacturing around the world earned a combined revenue of $620 billion in 2015 according to IBIS World market research.

study in the country of Ethiopia.

22

According to the study, researchers

be from workers to no longer submit to sweatshop

classify Ethiopia as being in the beginning stages of

conditions and instead move into more self-fulfilling

industrialization not unlike where the Western world

jobs.

was in the 19th century. The study first proves that,

“Sweatshops were highly beneficial to poorer nations’

to fuel sourcing practices that enable the oppression

economies.” But this is because “beneficial” gets

of unskilled, labor-intensive factory jobs, then the

defined as an economy showing positive growth in

only likely outcome will continue to be the one

its domestic products production, i.e. the country’s

already in place. A disconnect exists between how

gross domestic product (GDP) increased while

industrialized nations are influencing the labor

workers were subjected to work in a sweatshop.

practices of countries at the infancy of their industrial

However, this study showcases the importance of

revolutions but with the desires and ideals of the

considering humans’ desire for self-improvement,

countries’ citizens not dissimilar to Western nations.

not for the economic improvement of his or her

Deplorable factory conditions and sweatshops

home country. The study detailed that one-third

were the byproducts of the Western ideals of

of the 1,000 subjects offered a factory job in the

industrialization and the advancement of mankind.

increasing for the next five years as the world population

study quit within the first month, and 77% left their

There must be calls for the culture of fashion’s

also continues to increase along with disposable incomes.

factory job within 12 months when better-paying,

sweatshops to change in this modern, technologically

No company has a dominant share of the global apparel

often informal jobs presented themselves. It is a

advanced world, and for manufacturing jobs to be

manufacturing industry.

conclusion that supposes how Ethiopians preferred

more about appreciating the craft and handiwork

entrepreneurial jobs over industrial labor, looking

that goes into clothing and textile production. These

for safer working environments and/or higher

are sentiments that should carry through from the

paying positions instead. With access to information

farming and mining of raw materials to the end-use

becoming easier for developing nations, especially

consumer. Willamette Workshop positions itself as

with industrialized countries like the U.S. working to

an alternative solution that creates an enviable pool

empower communities around the world with access

of employment opportunities within manufacturing.

to computer information, the wider the desire will

One that does not treat human capital as expendable.

Willamette Workroom

Global Apparel Manufacturing Overview

If the current drive for low wages continues

The industry has grown 0.4% from 2011 – 2016. There

are over 180,000 businesses worldwide that collectively employ on average 5.5 million people. North Asia holds a 55% share of apparel manufacturing businesses with China housing the largest percentage within the region. While U.S. re-shoring efforts have made gains, companies continue to move production to lower wage countries as labor costs increase and markets become more saturated. Global apparel manufacturing is projected to continue

IBIS World market research

Willamette Workroom

23


U.S. Perspective

Sourcing Globally

On demand really means on demand, made to measure. It means no inventory... a really local supply chain,” Santora said. “If we stop thinking about solving for the purple dinosaur [the complex garment that can’t yet be made] and we start thinking about goods that are possible, we can start creating local supply chains that have on demand.

Pete Santora, Sourcing Summit 2017

24

Willamette Workroom

“We’ve always done it like this” is now an obsolete refrain, disruption has already happened and speed to market won’t solve all of sourcing’s problems. Tara Donaldson, Sourcing Journal Article Published October 20, 2017

Figure 3.1 - Number of Sourcing Partners for Companies with Less Than 1,000 Employees Source: US Fashion Industry Association

T

Source: Sourcing Summit 2017

Source: Alabama Chanin

The statistics of global sourcing

the top spot for sourcing destinations

countries with lower labor costs. The

overseas development and production.

an effort to ensure productivity while

illustrate how increasingly complex it

followed by Vietnam, India, Indonesia,

reality is that China will continue to

Willamette Workroom will create the

positively impacting consumer purchasing

is to participate in the global supply

and Bangladesh. Research emphasizes

produce less apparel over the coming

opportunity to offer its clients assistance

behaviors. Bringing development closer to

chain. These complexities have kept

the need to diversify sourcing activities

years as it specializes in achieving

with navigating a diverse array of

the designer would likely increase the cost

fashion entrepreneurs from starting a

in order to achieve better flexibility in

greater agility in the textile sector. This

alternative countries from which to

of production, but small companies will

new brand or start-up label. The United

today’s dynamic and changing fashion

downtrend in Chinese manufacturing

source materials in this new sourcing

save money on developing specification

States Fashion Industry Association’s

industry.

opens up opportunities for small U.S.

environment. More diverse options for

packages, patterns, and samples because

companies and independent labels

sourcing would also help keep American

wasteful interactions such as poor

to manufacture in the United States,

made apparel costs competitive when

prototype samples, language barriers,

(USFIA) annual Benchmark 2016 report on the state of global sourcing opinions

reported that 75% of small companies

even while sourcing the most advanced

produced in small batches domestically.

miscommunication, and excessive

with less than 1,000 employees source

that Chinese investment in technologies

textiles from China. For young brands

Willamette Workroom and other like-

shipping times will be cut out. It is all in

from six to ten different countries for

adopted to improve textile industry

with little start-up capital, the cost

minded businesses must come in to

an effort to support more effective and

apparel fabrication needs. This is up

practices has inversely required those

benefits of high minimum order quantities

assist during the design and development

efficient interactions between designers,

from 30% in 2015 (Figure 3.1). China is

companies to outsource production to

do not incentivize them to invest in

processes for fashion entrepreneurs in

suppliers and manufacturers.

The USFIA’s report reveals

Willamette Workroom

25


T

There is a need along the supply chain to radically alter the methods of collaboration and information sharing. Disconnected pockets of efforts to act in sustainable ways along the product lifecycle do not have any

“My concern now is the United States as a global trading partner and who [sic] is going to invest foreign direct investment of billions of dollars to take advantage of the U.S. market knowing that the U.S. is willing to walk away from trade-level agreements that people spent years negotiating, from promises that we made...” Gail Strickler, President of Global Trade at Brookfield Associates Sourcing Summit 2017

major impact on collaborative, sustainable apparel sourcing practices. In a written review during a talk at the Textile Exchange Sustainability Conference, Lucas Simons, CEO of NewForesight explains how the rules that

more for the sustainable organic product, the

currently govern the global sourcing game

farmers loose because they are at the end of

are inherently unsustainable, emphasizing

the supply chain, not getting proportionally

the definition of sustainability as adopting

compensated for their labor. Simons

practices that allow the environment,

blatantly acknowledges that companies

its animals, and human beings to thrive

cannot claim sustainability in other sectors

indefinitely within the Earth’s carrying

of the value chain of apparel development

capacity.

(like recycling used clothing in the case of H&M, or educating consumers on cold-wash

Simons explains how the sourcing

techniques to save energy like Levi’s) if cotton

supply chain nurtures unsustainable practices

farmers within their supply chain are living

because the global sourcing sector is “stuck”

below the poverty line. Helping people earn

due to the reality that “if anyone can be a

a fair wage and living above poverty is an

farmer, markets go for the lowest price and

equal part of the definition of sustainability.

there are no alternatives.” He assimilates

But without financial compensation from

it to a game of Monopoly where there can

consumer motivation to grow organic cotton,

only ever be just one winner in this type of

farmers will not bother working to update

system. When retailers and consumers want

to sustainable farming practices, and the

more organic cotton but no one wants to pay

problem will remain unsolved.

FIBER SOURCING 26

Willamette Workroom

In a presentation at the 2016 New York City Sourcing Journal Summit, the CEO of Esquel Group, John Cheh, discussed the “new normal” in apparel sourcing. It arose following the financial crisis and the rate at which the economy has been slow to recover. The old model, based on an investment-driven economy, overuses resources, builds up too much infrastructure, wastes real estate, and is therefore not a sustainable model. With fashion e-tailers taking more market share each year from traditional brick-and-mortar stores, the demand for apparel manufacturing is still increasing, with the most growth happening in emerging markets. Mature markets are slowing, and consumer buying habits are changing rapidly in response. As resources become scarcer, prices of raw materials and commodities will increase, so the result is that all industries tied to the global apparel supply chain will need to learn how to “provide quality service and value to customers,” according to Cheh. He is emphasizing that price, a set number, can no longer be a driving factor in the supply chain, but instead must take value and quality into account. The reality remains, however, that companies continue to move production to cheaper wage countries. The World Bank in April 2016 published a report highlighting that

1.2 million jobs would be created in India alone if labor wages in China increased 10%. Even more profound is that if global wage would increase by 1%, it would increase the number of women entering the work force by 18%. But to what end? It is clear that the global supply chain is in flux and opinions vary by country. Not all agree on the best solutions for large and small apparel companies, but what does need to be addressed is what Cheh presented: Companies can no longer build their brands by buying product “on the backs of cheap labor.” Shorter lead times are necessary for manufacturers and brands to remain competitive, and Cheh’s statement to this sentiment is relevant to Willamette Workroom’s business model. “In a world where shorter lead times are just as vital – if not more in some cases – as costs, suppliers would be better equipped to cut back on lead times if brands were better equipped to speed up their design and approval processes.” Regardless of whether independent designers in America choose to produce quantities of their collections in the U.S. or overseas, working locally with a development partner, such as Willamette Workroom, to streamline the prototype and specification processes would have the added benefit for brands and any manufacturers they work with overseas.

LABOR COSTS Willamette Workroom

27


Source: Sourcing Journal Article Published September 28, 2017

Trends in Sourcing Strategy

If things aren’t done to curb the pollution coming from the textile sector and elsewhere, Dr. Hugo-Maria Schally, who works on sustainable production efforts for the European

Commission, said, “We actually will see an ocean in 2050 where there’s more plastic than fish.”

The USFIA Benchmark 2016 report

According to the report’s final trend analysis, “ethical

highlights an important sourcing trend across

sourcing and sustainability will be given more weight

companies. USFIA reports that 78% of member

in U.S. companies’ sourcing decisions.” 89% of

respondents are sourcing directly through a

respondents say ethical issues are more important to

company’s select supplier and mill. This means that

their sourcing decisions in 2016 than they were five

78% of companies are looking to work with suppliers

years ago.” With a growing need to address ethical

that are able to manage the sourcing of textile and

and sustainable practices, Willamette Workroom, by

raw materials. This delineates the importance for

offering sourcing services, can address this market

Willamette Workroom to offer similar services to

trend by building contacts with factories and mills

potential business clients as a way to simplify the

that have already implemented or established

development process on the client’s end, help the

sustainable, ethical practices. It will be in the best

client focus on creativity and marketing, and also

interest of both the client business and Willamette

allows Willamette Workroom to better manage

Workroom to have updated contact information of

clients’ supply chain calendars to ensure timely,

suppliers in locations around the world with a diverse

productive communication. If larger companies buy

array of sustainable fabric solutions. Furthermore,

into the benefit of full-package manufacturing in

stocking yardage of a selection of these Prepare For

collaboration with manufacturers, then Willamette

Dye (PFD) sustainable fabrics will give Willamette

Workroom could successfully adapt these practices

Workroom an edge to sample, manufacture, and

on a smaller business scale for start-up brands.

get product to market quicker than others in the

competitive landscape.

Important to the USFIA Benchmark 2016

report is the growing trend of ethical sourcing.

28

Willamette Workroom

Quote from Tara Donaldson, Sourcing Journal Article Published September 28, 2017

Willamette Workroom

29


UNITED STATES ECONOMY OVERVIEW

options. America’s population is aging, therefore medical and pension costs are rising, which may inhibit a small business

W

from making maximum profits because of government taxation to support the

With an economy gaining strength, there

The U.S. Economy faces longer-

are good indicators that it would support

term problems that may affect the

the income gap, and promote bringing

aging population. Energy shortages are

back a sustained middle class.

becoming more commonplace as the country is overly dependent on natural

establishing new business ventures.

success of a burgeoning small business

According to the CIA World Fact Book,

operation. Wage stagnation exists among

the U.S. Economy has been getting

lower-income families and is widening

further recovers from the 2008 recession,

running out. This gives small businesses

stronger since the economic collapse

the gap between the wealthiest people

other problems may affect establishing

like Willamette Workroom a chance to

in 2007 with a growth rate of 2.4%

and poorer individuals and families. By

a small business. There has been

develop a business from the ground

annually in 2015, up from 1.5% in 2013.

providing jobs in the manufacturing

inadequate investment in American

up by incorporating alternative energy

Additionally, unemployment rates are

sector, Willamette Workroom has the

public infrastructure, which may keep

resources from the beginning as a means

declining, and in 2015 rates were at 5.2%,

opportunity to promote and train a labor

some workers out of the labor pool

to minimize the immediate impacts of any

down one percentage point from 2014.

force, pay higher wages that could reduce

because of a lack of public transportation

future energy crises.

Additionally, while the U.S.

fossil fuels and oil that are quickly

�

By providing jobs in the manufacturing sector, Willamette Workroom has the opportunity to promote and train a labor force, pay higher wages that could reduce the income gap, and promote bringing back a sustained middle class. What We Want

Source: Indie Source

30

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

31


�

The United States runs at a trade deficit. In 2015 the U.S. imported over 27,215.7 million square meter equivalents (MSME) of apparel worth close to $88 billion dollars in goods.

U.S. IMPORT/EXPORT DATA The U.S. import data for all apparel and textiles total over $126 billion dollars in goods. This equates to the U.S. today importing 98% of all clothing, meaning a scant 2% of clothing worn in America is made in America (Figure 4.1).

These numbers reveal why the cut and sew apparel manufacturing industry in

America is experiencing negative growth. Global imports of apparel to the U.S. rose 2.4% by year-end 2015, but in the first seven months of 2016, global imports of apparel are down 0.5% compared to the previous year. Apparel fabric imports have been trending upwards, increasing 6.8% from 2014 to 2015, and in the first seven months of 2016, numbers are

Figure 4.1, opposite page

still seeing a 3.0% increase. While these numbers could be viewed as small or negligible, it is encouraging that manufacturing apparel in the U.S. may be one of the indicators of these

China imported the most textile and apparel product into the U.S. while India,

changes. This reflects positively on the cut and sew apparel industry because if imports of

Vietnam, Pakistan and Mexico round out the top five countries for imported apparel

fabric are increasing, and global imports of clothing are down, then the demand from U.S.

and textiles. Of the 63,523 MSME of textile and apparel imports, 30,868 MSME

based cut-and-sew apparel manufacturers could be seen as respectively increasing.

came from China alone (OTEXA Report, 9 September 2016). Combined U.S. world exports in 2015 totaled only $23.7 billion dollars of apparel and textiles (Ibid.).

32

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

33


U.S. Apparel Manufacturing Industry Analysis

Figure 4.2 - Decline of U.S. Apparel Manufacturing Jobs Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics

Figure 4.3 - Illustration of Negative Growth of Apparel Manufacturing Jobs Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics

Industry Overview

The apparel manufacturing industry in America

Figure 4.3 from the Bureau of Labor Statistics

generates $2 billion in annual revenue and shows a

shows current data for the first quarter of 2016 that

negative growth rate of -3.2% annually as of 2016

shows the continual decline in employment of the U.S.

(IBISWorld). Figure 4.2 charts the decline in apparel

apparel manufacturing industry to confirm the 3.2%

manufacturing employment across all industry segments

decline rate. IBISWorld forecasts that this industry will

current to 2011. Cut and sew apparel contractors and

continue to decline for another five years. For those

women’s cut and sew apparel manufacturing had the

working in the industry, the top business challenge

highest employment rates in 1990 but lost the largest

companies foresee (Figure 4.4) is the increase in market

percentage of employment by 2011 indicating these

competition in the United States (USFIA 2016). But

segments saw the most off-shoring efforts during the

the apparel manufacturing competitive landscape is

twenty years indicated in the figure. Currently women’s,

fragmented with the largest fifty companies in the

girls’, and infants’ cut and sew apparel manufacturing

U.S. generating less than 40% of the $2 billion total

accounts for 40% of annual industry revenue and

annual revenue. Major players in the industry include

men’s and boys’ account for 10% of annual revenue

Hanesbrands, Levi Strauss, PVH, Ralph Lauren, and VF

(Hoover’s 2016). Willamette Workroom should position

Corporation. But industry analysis shows that small

itself accordingly, offering services that are relevant to

companies are able to compete in this competitive

womenswear and childrenswear to ensure the business

landscape effectively when specializing in a specific

earns and maintains a percentage of the market share.

apparel and/or manufacture product category. Overall

34

Willamette Workroom

Figure 4.4 - Survey Results for Top Business Challenges Facing US Fashion Industry in 2016 Source: US Fashion Industry Association

Willamette Workroom

35


success in the industry will depend on businesses

workers specifically in apparel manufacturing (a

operating efficiently, maintaining regular

subsector included in the BLS data pool). The

contracts to produce product, and will also

two dominant counties in the US with the most

be influenced by consumer tastes and costing

apparel manufacturing establishments are Los

structure compared with overseas manufacturers.

Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim and New YorkNewark-Jersey City (Figure 4.7) totaling over

Industry location reports show the

50% of all manufacturing facilities in the US. The

areas of the United States where the most

industry is still heavily weighted in favor of these

apparel manufacturing businesses are located

two metropolitan areas because of the ability to

and where there is established industry with

maintain a manufacturing presence even in the

room for more businesses to enter the market.

face of mass off-shoring efforts in the past 30

The US Bureau of Labor Statistics reports

years. The next top three metropolitan areas with

6,874 apparel manufacturing establishments

manufacturing establishments include Miami-Fort

(Figure 4.5) employed 130,865 people as of

Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, San Francisco-

March 2016. The top five states for number of

Oakland-Hayward, and Chicago-Naperville-Elgin.

Figure 4.6 - Employment in US Apparel Manufacturing by State – May 2015

California (2,674), New York (1,172), Florida

Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics

(319), Texas (258), and North Carolina (204).

around the United States, the establishments

Illinois follows closely behind North Carolina

that do still operate provide adequate earnings

with 201 establishments. Figure 4.6 shows the

to support its workers. Those employed in the

states with the most employment of workers

industry enjoy above average hourly earnings,

in textile, apparel, and furnishings businesses

both for production/nonsupervisory positions

with California, North Carolina, Virginia,

as well as managers/supervisors. As of October

Georgia, and New Jersey employing the most

2016, average hourly wage was $17.83 and

workers. The image strongly correlates with

$13.51 for nonsupervisory/production roles.

states that have large employment numbers of

Data shown is an average of employees’ wages

establishments in apparel manufacturing include Despite dwindling manufacturing hubs

Figure 4.7 - US Metropolitan Areas with the Most Apparel Manufacturing Jobs – 2016 First Quarter Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics from across the US and do not necessarily

Figure 4.5 - Number of US Apparel Manufacturing Establishments – 2016 First Quarter Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics

36

Willamette Workroom

reflect the wage being earned by employees

in a specific metropolitan area. However, data

may find that providing specialized services not

does support that production operators likely

readily accessible in a region can charge premium

make an hourly wage close to the established

price for the service and therefore increase

government minimum wage for the city while

average earnings. Figure 4.9 (next page) visually

managers and supervisors are compensated with

confirms the average wage earnings data. The

a larger hourly wage commiserate on experience.

map shows metro areas color-coded according

Figure 4.8 (next page) confirms this, indicating

to average annual wage. Highest wages can be

average annual earnings differences between

found in metropolitan areas with higher minimum

sewing machine operators ($23,060 annually) and

wages as well as areas where there are more

supervisors ($45,520 annually).

employees working in higher paid positions.

Businesses looking to enter this industry

Willamette Workroom

37


Trends Influencing the

U.S. Apparel Manufacturing Industry The dominant mass-market fashion business today relies on selling cheap, knocked off, underwhelming clothing produced quicker than ever as consumers demand looks straight off the runways. Fast Fashion Values

Figure 4.8 - Average Earnings of Employees in US Apparel Manufacturing Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics

F Figure 4.9 - Visual Representation of Average Earnings by Apparel Manufacturing Employees Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics

The Business of Fashion

Fast fashion is fueled by the Internet’s instant

into a perpetual spiral of never-ending competition

availability of information. This method of production

for lower prices. It has created negative business

correlates directly with an economic system that

dynamics among suppliers and producers at every

requires continual growth as the hallmark of a

stage of the supply chain. Research reported by the

successful business. So if an apparel company can

USFIA in this year’s 2016 Benchmarking Study, shows

increase production speed, then it can achieve

that both e-commerce and fast fashion retailers are

faster growth, correlating to a company being

creating domestic market competition for those

viewed as successful. The problem with this kind of

retailers currently sticking to traditional methods of

growth, according the Kate Fletcher, Professor of

conducting fashion business, that is brick-and-mortar

Sustainability, Design, and Fashion at the Centre for

and catalog sales channels.

Sustainability (University of the Arts, London), is that

38

Willamette Workroom

in the apparel supply chain, this fast fashion model

The fashion business must still exist in an

burdens every part of the supply chain, throwing it

economic model, but Fletcher proposes that “steady-

Willamette Workroom

39


state economics” could help address the devastating effects fast fashion continues to have on the planet and on people. Rather than continuous growth and expansion, this alternative economic model depends on maintaining natural resources at a steady level. It is a change in qualitative measures that will have profound impacts on the ability of humankind to survive on this planet indefinitely. No step of the apparel supply chain and development process is exempt from harming ecosystems and workers, but presented here, Willamette Workroom would employ a business methodology that could combat the excess of current fast fashion waste and work towards making positive change for all involved.

Can lead to a more agile supply chain

Per unit, clothing costs less to produce overseas, but companies

that produce overseas need to have access to significant initial capital

Can provide shorter lead times

to afford the minimum order quantities, often in the tens of thousands,

May get a product launch off the ground sooner Can lower production costs to turn a profit earlier

and to travel to the manufacturing location for quality control purposes (Segran). Clothing companies that have found success in manufacturing in America, like activewear brand Yogasmoga and childrenswear label Petit

Many small batch manufacturers invest the time, resources, and expertise to help brands succeed (from Maker’s Row Online blog)

Peony, explain how locally producing their apparel allows their companies

Willamette Workroom will build its business by

the more difficult these types of quality checks and balances become. It

offering not only design and development services to its clients, but also small-batch manufacturing services to those clients. This important aspect of the business plan ensures that even small independent

to regularly check in on quality and to ensure proper treatment and pay for employees. The further companies are from the manufacturing facility, is likely that brand identity will suffer because of this disconnect between designer studio and production facility. While being established in America will still require manufacturing to scale up to compete with the influx of imported clothing, it is unrealistic that American-made products would ever directly compete with a $3 T-shirt from Target. However, in the larger context of creating and transforming the fashion industry into a sustainable industry, $3 T-shirts are in direct opposition to the desired transformation anyway. The most important point in Segran’s article on re-shoring American manufacturing is that companies making clothing in America, and using domestic production to their advantage, have disproved the idea that manufacturing quality apparel in the United States cannot be successful or profitable for brands.

Photograph by SF Gate

Clinton Park SF

Image Courtesy of Clinton Park SF Small Batch Manufacturing

As agility and speed-to-market dominates

larger apparel companies’ priorities for survival, the added benefits of localized lean, small-batch manufacturing, especially for young and burgeoning labels, cannot be understated. In a world dominated by global trade, local small-batch manufacturing can offer added benefits such as: Allow designers to more efficiently test the market and gauge consumer feedback Reduce the financial risks associated with excess inventory management

40

Willamette Workroom

designers have access to the resources that will help build their own businesses. There may also be added benefits to producing domestically given how seenow-buy-now fashion models have become more prominent. With American companies like Tommy Hilfiger and Ralph Lauren embracing this speed-tomarket model, producing domestically can shorten lead times and increase efficiency. There would be fewer cultural barriers, less miscommunications that could slow down the development process, and relatively short shipping time for samples and completed product.

Willamette Workroom

41


Re-Shoring Efforts

In the apparel manufacturing industry,

there are signs that re-shoring efforts are bringing manufacturing back to the US, which needs to be a positive trend to justify Willamette Workroom’s business model. According to leading market research firm A.T. Kearney, in general, the pace of off-shoring manufacturing jobs continues to outpace those of re-shoring efforts, but apparel manufacturing was the third largest re-shoring industry in the manufacturing sector in 2014 with 12% of re-shoring cases happening in apparel manufacturing (Figure 4.10). The key factor affecting this re-shoring trend, according to the report, revolves around the need for fashion companies to shorten their supply chains so that product can reach the selling floors more quickly. While it cannot be sustained for an indefinite amount of time, the fast fashion business model has proven valuable to consumers, and those values now need to be met by other retailers in order to

trendy product design entices consumers to buy the

jobs in research & development, design, or marketing.

But these conveniences come at a cost. For one,

most current, up-to-the-minute fashions. The value

In 2015, ranking Democrat Carolyn Maloney and the

goods imported from lower wage countries have

of see-now-buy-now has taken root under this fast

Joint Economic Committee highlighted this trend

cost millions of Americans their manufacturing

fashion umbrella and will not likely dissipate any time

of high-value jobs being located in the U.S., while

jobs. According to Goodman’s article, from 1999

soon, especially with top luxury giants like Burberry

manufacturing and labor have been outsourced

to 2011 Chinese imports eliminated 2.4 million

and Tom Ford leading the charge for immediate

to cheaper labor markets. But the report makes

American jobs across industries, one million of

purchasing after their runway shows. The consumer

an important case that cities around the country,

those specifically in manufacturing. While evidence

demand for speed to market has lead to greater

not just New York and Los Angeles, have begun

suggests that automation and mechanization has

awareness of labor compliance issues and poor

building a strong base of talented fashion design

cost more American jobs than global trade, the

quality assurance with overseas suppliers. This makes

talent, and it might prove beneficial to begin re-

sentiments of fear and anger are overwhelmingly

domestic manufacturing a desirable alternative for

shoring cut & sew manufacturing operations close to

present in response to the loss of jobs due to global

clothing brands (Abnett, K., 2016). Independent

these second-tier cities. That is because clusters of

competition. Arguably, lower, more competitive

labels like Shinola Detroit have seen success in

industry promote knowledge sharing and improves

global pricing is the root cause for needing to

building brand awareness with a strong brand identity

efficiencies that ultimately lead to more innovation

mechanize and invest in technologies that eliminated

established on the ethical basis of domestically

– as well as benefiting other industries in the area.

the need for human labor, as has been the case in

manufactured product. Willamette Workroom offers

According to Murphy’s report, both San Francisco,

clothing manufacturing.

a similar solution to independent designers looking

CA and Columbus, OH are home to over 500 fashion

to test the markets and create a strong, ethical

designers, Nashville, TN close to 275 designers,

Jacob van der Vis is an international

brand story that resonates with today’s conscious

and other cities like Dallas, TX and Seattle, WA

consumers.

have increasing numbers of fashion designers come

trade advisor to the Netherlands

into the area annually. If apparel manufacturing

Chamber of Commerce who

compete. In fast fashion, short lead times for both

operations continue to come back to the U.S., then it

summarized the argument succinctly:

production and distribution have led to the need

commonplace, jobs in the American fashion industry

for developing more manageable, smaller product

can be assumed that should facilities re-shore within

have revolved more and more around high-value

“…it’s not always that trade should

runs as a means to achieve quicker deliveries. This

proximity of these cities, there will likely be demand

jobs. These roles give a higher sense of personal

prevail against quality of life.”

speed to market, coupled with a focus on offering

for the manufacturing services as well as community

satisfaction to employees, and they consist largely of

backing to establish economically beneficial

Since the 1980s when off-shoring became

production jobs that will support the already existing high-value jobs.

Figure 4.10 - Percentage of Industries Re-shoring in US, 2011-2015 Source: A.T. Kearney

42

Willamette Workroom

Restricting Free Trade Global trade has affected the

Unease among Americans and across

workers in all industrialized countries is not a madeup sentiment. A 2014 Pew study concluded that of the 44 countries researched, 45% of respondents believed trade raised wages and only 26% believed trade lowered prices. Consumers are grappling now

uncompromising American lifestyle for decades.

with the implications of trade agreements made

Peter Goodman in an article for The New York Times

decades ago that paid little attention to the long-term

highlights a few: Raspberries on grocery store

effects of economic and government systems ill-

shelves in winter, better prices on basic goods,

prepared to invest in social programs to balance the

and the cheaper cost of childrenswear as imports

negative effects of losing jobs to imported goods. The

rose. With the advent of free trade agreements,

palpable discontent with the current state of import

like NAFTA opening up competition for market

quantities gives momentum and a sense of urgency

share from Mexico and Canada, and the World

to businesses like Willamette Workroom that can not

Trade Organization permitting China to join thus

only tap into this consumer uncertainty and animosity

eliminating trade quotas from imports, are a couple

towards cheap imported goods, but address it by

of reasons why Americans expect such comforts.

providing solutions.

Willamette Workroom

43


CONSUMER RESEARCH & ANALYSIS (U.S.) End User Consumer Research

Current consumer trends and demands will determine the types of businesses that are going to be successful in

The Ethical Consumer

There are definitive trends showing that

consumers are increasingly more interested in

that ethics is becoming more important and will continue

considering ethical claims when purchasing products

to influence buying habits in more tangible ways in the

including apparel. Establishing strong working

coming months and years.

relationships with brands that will put ethical considerations at the heart of their fashion labels would

tap into a growing desire for buying from conscious

outpace trust in big companies, indicating that smaller

brands. According to Mintel market research, 63% of

apparel companies that successfully tap into the ethical

consumers (over age 18, using the internet) in the United

consumer conscious will see a larger market share than

States believe that ethical issues are becoming more

previously. 61% of male of consumers between the ages

important (Figure 5.1). Hot button social issues like LGBT

of 18-34 and 54% of female consumers of the same

rights, living wages, and gender equality emphasize the

age reported that they trusted smaller companies to do

importance to the consumer of putting people ahead

the right thing when it came to making ethical decisions

of profit. According to market research conducted by

(Figure 5.4). This number skews higher than trust in big

Mintel, 23% of consumers are influenced to purchase

companies for consumers over 35, with 47% of males

products based on the company’s ethics; and 47% of

and 44% of females agreeing small companies make

consumers are sometimes influenced to buy (Figure 5.2).

ethical decisions.

the future. The retail landscape in a few short years has changed and remains in flux. The rise of e-commerce shopping

Consumers are also 51% more

has increased the market share for small designers and innovative independent brands and decreased the market share

likely to tell their friends about

for traditional retailers and large international fashion brands. For Willamette Workroom, its clients will be selling in this

an ethical product (Figure 5.1).

new retail landscape. By first understanding trends in consumer behavior and shopping habits, then Willamette Workroom

Further consumer research

can effectively market its own

highlights that consumers

services to clients navigating the

find companies to have more

new retail landscape. Customer

distinguished identities when

research and analysis will look at

they “[promote] a lifestyle just

the end-user consumer trends,

as much, if not more, than

further understand the changing

they promote the company

retail business landscape, and

itself� (Bonetto). Treatment of

look at the fashion design

employees (48%), provenance

services industry to create a

of product (34%), and

comprehensive understanding

environmental concerns (33%)

of the scope of the business-to-

all contribute to lifestyle

business apparel manufacturing

images that are of top concern

environment. From here,

to many consumers (Figure

Willamette Workroom will make

5.3, next page). The prior

calculated decisions on services offered to offer greater value to clients.

44

Willamette Workroom

Figure 5.1 - Consumer Opinions on Ethical Products, 2015 Source: Mintel Academic

statistics illustrate the growing concern by consumers

Trust in smaller companies has also begun to

Figure 5.2 - Percentage of Consumers Influenced by Ethics, 2015 Source: Mintel Academic

Willamette Workroom

45


Figure 5.7 - Percentage of Consumers Willing to Pay More for Sustainable Products Figure 5.3 - Top Ethical Considerations by Consumers Source: Mintel Academic

Source: Nielsen Global Corporate Sustainability Report, 2015

Future Consumer Buying Habits

Figure 5.4 - How Much do Consumers Trust Companies 2015 Source: Mintel Academic

The important trend of ethical and sustainable

With the demand growing among varying

product launches positively influencing consumers to

classes of consumers for conscious fashion, demand

buy those products means that Willamette Workroom

for businesses that help brands address this growing

will offer the sourcing and manufacturing services that

desire will also increase. Willamette Workroom can

independent designers will have a need to employ in

successfully help its clients tap into conscientiously-

order to meet the growing desire by consumers to

minded consumer desire by providing resources to map

purchase ethical products. In a report published by

supply chain transparency, locally manufacture product

Fashion Forecasting website WGSN, the consumer of

under excellent working conditions, and customize

2018 will have different priorities when considering

product further based on the desires of each client.

which brands to purchase. For instance, by 2018,

As sustainability moves to become the standard of

connected devices will outnumber human beings, with

companies, the idea of “eco-efficiency� for apparel

average consumers owning up to three personal devices.

brands will be one answer to the consumer demand for

Currently 91% of Gen X women and 76% of Gen X men

sustainability imperatives. This approach aims to reduce

believe contributing to local or global community work is

ecological damage and maximize efficiency in production

important, while Gen Z, not yet out of college, challenges

processes and research indicates that it does and will

the injustices of a globalized world, having been born

continue to matter to consumers.

digital natives and using smartphones.

46

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

47


A Quick Note on Green Washing

Figure 5.5 - U.S. Product Launches with Ethical Claims, 2015 Source: Mintel Academic

These days, green is the new black. Corporations are falling all over themselves to demonstrate that they are environmentally conscious. And every day, Americans are bombarded with

advertising about environmentally friendly goods and services. But how many really are green,

Figure 5.6 - Consumer Confusion About Ethical Products Source: Mintel Academic

and how many are just pretending?

The increase in consumer awareness of

packaging rose to 60% (Figure 5.5). And further

ethical product also leads to confusion about ethical

research shows that 68% of consumers are confused

claims. There is a true need in the fashion industry

about ethical icon usage, 46% are confused about

to help consumers understand what it can mean

how companies use ethical terms, and 61% agree

to be a sound, sustainable fashion brand; one that

that there needs to be strong regulation on how

makes a real positive impact on the environment

companies use ethical claims in its marketing (Figure

and creates positive change for people. It is not

5.6). While it is important to rethink where package

something that simply revolves around recycling or

and labeling comes from, this is a miniscule step

upcycling clothing, or sourcing sustainable cotton.

when considering the environmental and social

The fashion industry suffers from “green washing,”

implications across a product’s lifecycle. The lasting

attempting to confuse consumers into believing that

impacts that would come from improving human

a product is more sustainable or eco-friendly without

working conditions (currently under 10% of products

any real claim to the marketing tactic. For Willamette

claimed improved working conditions in 2015) and

Workroom and its clients, working collaboratively to

being made in an environmentally friendly manner

create sound ethical claims of product provenance

(currently less than 30% of product claims in 2015)

would begin to address this growing consumer

requires more work and more upfront capital

confusion. If the business strategy can work to solve

investment, but these are the areas that will truly

this consumer confusion problem for its clients,

cause lasting change. This is the ultimate goal of

this point creates a competitive advantage for the

the sourcing and small-batch Willamette Workroom

business.

business initiative, which is to help independent labels build a brand story around addressing the

Mintel reports show that in 2015 the

tougher but more effectual sustainability initiatives.

number of claims of using environmentally friendly

Quote, above, from GREENPEACE Organization’s Stop Greenwashing website

48

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

49


The 2015 Nielsen Global Corporate Sustainability Report shows that brands with a

commitment to sustainable practices saw 4% sales growth last year. By contrast, brands without sustainability commitments only grew 1%. Additionally, 66% of consumers reported they would

Retail and Fashion Businesses

pay more for sustainably made products - up from 55% in 2014 and 50% in 2013 (Figure 5.7). Retail Industry Research

The report also highlights that three out of four consumers ages 34 and under are willing to pay more for sustainably made products. Paying more for ethical product is a sentiment that crosses income boundaries as well, with consumers that make less than $20,000 annually are actually 5%

Changes in consumer attitudes towards

with product (Mack). Brands encourage Millennials

large, international brands, the decline of wholesale

to buy when they align with his or her aspirations,

and traditional brick-and-mortar retail sales, an

or by supporting causes that entice the shopper

increase in direct-to-consumer brands, and the return

to purchase. Millennials are viewed as “disruptors

of ‘Made in the USA’ brands have all contributed to a

with a cause,” and it is a motto that will translate

changing retail landscape. These specific trends have

into more sales if successfully exploited (Ibid). These

made it easier than before for young, independent

characteristics have all culminated in the growing

designers to enter the apparel market and will largely

success of direct-to-consumer (DTC) brands that

already begun outlining long-term sustainability goals, which indicates the shift in consumer

affect the pool of potential business clients for

forego traditional wholesale retail channels to create

awareness of sustainability in apparel has already begun to affect sales numbers of the large,

Willamette Workroom.

a seamless customer experience from webpage to

more willing to pay more for sustainable product than those making over $50,000 annually. Of those consumers willing to pay more for ethical product, 58% would pay more for environmentally friendly product, and 56% would pay more for product committed to social value (Figure 5.8). These numbers showed the largest increase in importance and should form the basis of Willamette Workroom’s client base looking to make specific ethical claims.

Large, global companies like H&M and previously discussed Levi Strauss & Co., have

established brands. CEO of H&M Karl-Johan Persson has led the charge by acknowledging that short-term profits will need to be forfeited in order to gain long-term success in sustainable efforts.

purchase and delivery.

The traditional apparel retail industry has

begun a slow decline in recent years due to two

large megatrends affecting the industry: Internet

over wholesale retailers: the ability to provide a better

trend report highlights that consumers are also holding companies accountable for their actions,

shopping and off-price retailing (Loeb). Traditional

customer experience, the opportunity to build brand

and that they respect companies that are authentic in their claims to sustainability efforts.

retailers lack the type of innovative thinking that

loyalty and relationships, and the chance to collect

The report highlights that companies that give insight into supply chain costs are seeing that

would bring customers back into stores and continue

consumer data to help personalize those experiences,

consumers positively react to receiving the information. Disclosing costs help consumers value the

to watch sales decline and operating costs increase.

making them more meaningful. In six short years

product more. Each of these points that resonate with consumers can be brought into practice by

The causes behind the waning retail industry can

even the DTC market share has become increasingly

Willamette Workroom for the benefit of its clients so that each can secure a share of the market in

be drawn to both the complete upheaval created

competitive. Where innovative thinkers with no

a meaningful way.

by Millennial shopping habits as well as direct-to-

design experience were once the disruptors of this

consumer business models. Interrelated, both of

new e-commerce model, now even seasoned industry

these trends have worked together to shape a new

professionals have found the benefits of selling

market for independent designers that did not exist

directly to consumers. Figure 5.9 and 5.10 reflect that

even five years ago.

both in the United States and globally, e-commerce

Within this discussion of the sustainability imperative, WGSN’s Future Consumer 2018

DTC brands have three large advantages

business-to-consumer sales will continue to grow.

With $2.45 trillion in spending power,

Millennials have completely uprooted retail shopping

Direct-to-consumer sales from a business perspective also provide several benefits to brands including:

behavior. Previously identified, Millennials have brought diversity, inclusivity, and gender fluidity to the forefront of buying habits. According to statistics reported by Forbes, Millennial shopping trends include more menswear sales growth, more men shopping online than women, though all consumers are shopping online more regularly, and Millennials Figure 5.8 - Top Reasons for Purchasing Sustainable Products, Global Respondents vs. Those Willing to Pay More Source: Nielsen Global Sustainability Report, 2015

50

Willamette Workroom

are looking for a personal relationship with brands that creates an overall experience when interacting

Receive customer feedback in real time Increase margins on sales Build personal relationships with customers Charge lower prices for higher-quality goods Able to sell internationally immediately (Sherman 2016).

Willamette Workroom

51


labels have the advantage of marketing money to promote and sell product, smaller designers can compete by focusing on particular regions or offering product in a niche specialty market (Ibid). This sector is highly fragmented with only 20% of annual revenue created from the top fifty largest professional services sectors.

The distribution of fashion designers across the United States (Figure 5.11) shows the likeliness of

fashion designers to be based in hubs that also have established industry in textile and apparel manufacturing. According to the BLS, New York and California have the largest concentrations of specialized design services, which includes fashion designers. Florida, Illinois, and Massachusetts follow, (Figure 5.12) data that also reflects the geographical map with New York employing over 4,000 designers, California about 2,800 designers, and Florida employing 905 designers. Fashion design jobs continue to grow at a 3% annual rate according the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which means for Willamette Workroom, if the trend for more direct-to-consumer brands continues to also grow, the potential market share of designers looking to establish independent brands will also continue to increase.

L-to-R Figure 5.9 & 5.10 – Direct-to-Consumer E-Commerce Sales Growth in US, 2011-2016 & Global E-Commerce Sales Growth Projection, 2014-2020 Source: Nielsen Global Sustainability Report, 2015

Professional Services Sector Including Fashion Designers

Selling directly to consumers will continue to become the norm; especially as the tech savvy Millennials and digital native Gen Zers, two of the largest generational cohorts, continue to see advantages of purchasing from brands with convincing causes.

For smaller, independent fashion labels

The last components of customer research

are the actual business-to-business fashion and innovative brand customers. This represents a pool of both fashion designers and the inexperienced but

to compete against the heavy-hitting industry

entrepreneurial thinkers and makers that have the

players is not impossible. Instead it requires a

potential to sell apparel directly to consumers as new

different strategy that taps into the new consumer

and independent brands.

consciousness that desires added value above and beyond just the product itself. Brands that can successfully create an emotional bond with shoppers will gain both customer loyalty and an advocate of the brand mission (Rasul). This is the strategic positioning Willamette Workroom looks to acquire, directly helping brands build a product line that will foster strong customer-brand relationships. Only the consumer can drive more demand for ethical products, so when the trends indicate positive correlation between ethical brand awareness and more purchases, businesses have to deliver.

52

Willamette Workroom

Figure 5.11 - Employment of Fashion Designers by State, May 2015 Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

The professional services sector in the US

includes a percentage of fashion designers, both selfemployed and employed by larger brands. Providing business-to-business services, Willamette Workroom looks to this sector of professionals as one portion of its client base. For fashion designers, demand for their products is driven by profits of those seeking their products and the health of the US economy (Hoover’s). Purchasing apparel is an indicator of a strong economy. These companies will be profitable only with a regular flow of projects. While large

Figure 5.12 - Number of Fashion Designers Employed by State, 2016 First Quarter Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Willamette Workroom

53


The “Makers” Market Segment

Direct-to-consumer business models

This movement is a direct result of

began early on by those innovative entrepreneurs

individuals having access to information readily

that saw voids in a broken customer experience. In

available on the Internet. It has also become easier

apparel design, truly innovative ideas have come

to find the tools that help innovators establish their

from all manner of individual. The ‘Maker’ market

own businesses. Maker’s Row is one such resource. It

segment has been establishing itself for years now,

is a website dedicated to helping establish business

but it is rarely counted among statistics for private

connections between independent apparel makers

companies. Often makers see themselves not as

and apparel supply chain partners and manufacturers.

designers but something different, defined outside

Maker’s Row tweeted that “there are people wanting

of conventional lines of businesses. But it is a base of

to make in a local, customized way without large-

self-taught apparel designers that have the potential

scale production that needs to be sent overseas.”

to fill the client list for Willamette Workroom.

The website boasts a resource of 10,000 American

The Maker Movement has been gaining

mainstream media traction, especially in America. In 2014 President Obama and the White House hosted the first annual White House Maker Faire while also designating a National Week of Making to highlight the importance of American innovation. And Michelle Obama has held fashion workshops highlighting this growing role of makers in apparel and local manufacturing technologies.

factories, and over 100,000 brands have used these resources to source local manufacturers. Very clearly there is a growing interest in this small-batch and local production that helps emerging designers and businesses to achieve their goals. It is a movement that cannot be ignored by a business such as Willamette Workroom that looks to support this growing market of makers.

With growing interest in individuals

“making,” there will continue to be a growing need for companies that support those that

Alabama Chanin

make. Willamette Workroom situates itself among those businesses offering support to makers interested in apparel. Figure 5.13 shows major cities across the United States with established Maker Faire’s in recognition of the importance of handmade, crafted product as well as innovative approaches to consumer problem solving. San Francisco founded the first Maker Faire, it is part of a region of the U.S. that has grasped the concept of ‘making’ and supported new industry to assist those that want to turn an idea into a business. From San Francisco to Vancouver there are strong indicators of a presence of ‘makers’ that are underserved when it comes to apparel manufacturing infrastructure. This region of the US shows strong cause to begin building infrastructure that will support fashion brands with a decidedly Pacific Northwest (PNW) attitude.

Figure 5.13 - Map of U.S. Cities with Maker Faires Source: makerfaire.com

54

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

55


LOCATION RESEARCH & ANALYSIS Consideration of Business Location Needs PORTLAND, OREGON

Photo by Keri Yourick

Oregon is an inspiration. Whether you come to it, or are born to it, you become entranced by our state’s beauty, the opportunity she affords, and the independent spirit of her citizens.

W

Tom McCall, 30th Governor of Oregon 1973

With the world being infinitely connected

manufacturing facility in cities with a thriving

today, there are few barriers to communication,

industry already, the level of competition would

especially in an industry like fashion apparel

be fierce. Therefore, establishing Willamette

manufacturing that is already dependent on

Workroom in a more centralized urban center

today’s communication technologies. Advanced

could allow the business to be more competitive

communication technologies have allowed

and reach a broader client base outside of major

fashion labels large and small from all over the

fashion capitals. These underserved designers of

world to produce collections in any number of

the Pacific Northwest reflect on feeling left out

countries while sourcing materials from others.

of the American manufacturing scene and may be

Because the American apparel manufacturing

prohibited to expand because of the prohibitive

industry began a mass exodus of outsourcing

costs and quantities required by overseas

that has continued since the 1980s, few

manufacturers. Figure 6.1 (next page) is a further

manufacturing hubs remain in the country.

excerpt from the Bureau of Labor Statistics data

However, some manufacturing-centric cities are

table of US apparel manufacturing establishments

being revived.

by metropolitan area. It shows that the Pacific Northwest, here including San Francisco-

Photo by Keri Yourick

56

Willamette Workroom

While New York and Los Angeles

Oakland-Hayward, Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, and

remain the largest cities for locating clothing

Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro does have already

manufacturing services, industries have begun

established numbers of manufacturers, though

to resurface in towns around North and South

not on the scale of Los Angeles. Combined

Carolina as well as in New England. While there

the metro areas contain 265 establishments

would be obvious benefits to establishing a small

employing a total of 3,838 workers as of March

Willamette Workroom

57


coffee obsession, weekend brunch scene,

does not have a historical costume

reimagined as a retail district with the

and sensitive local government, the city’s

collection, the city is home to the Textile

established boutiques being established

character makes it ideal for a small-

Hive. It is an archive space housing over

by women entrepreneurs and includes

batch apparel manufacturer. The city has

40,000 original textiles. Moved from

shops like West End Select Shop that

done much to ensure that no big-box

New York City, the collection continues

stocks local label designs, and Frances

retailers can set up shop (Wolk). The

to serve as a source of inspiration for

May, an influential shop carrying local

city’s inhabitants are known to muster

designers from across the US and in

designers and international independent

up a “make-do” attitude, which lends

multiple disciplines.

labels as well.

affordable, especially in relation to other

West Coast major cities like Seattle and

largest concentration of art galleries in

according to Time Magazine is the best

San Francisco. Another well-known

the city. Along with the arts scene comes

indie fashion week in the US, and it is

stereotype is that Portlanders are

a notable fashion and small businesses

the only carbon-neutral fashion week in

stubborn, but it is one of the reasons why

that support the creative fields. The

the world. The fashion week showcases

the local business scene is thriving as well.

Pearl District is most noted for its First

the importance of slow fashion and the

Again, just like keeping out chain retailers,

Thursday Gallery Walk, started in the

values of a sustainable mindset. Set in

shopping local is a common practice. The

1980s and running ever sense. A healthy

Portland, the shows bring designers from

culture in Portland is to think about the

arts scene bodes well for establishing a

all across the Pacific Northwest. Showing

“long haul” and therefore sustainability

new manufacturing business that would

since 2003, it is the third longest-running

practices factor into all business plans

appeal to artists and designers alike.

fashion week in the US.

Consumer Trends

itself to keeping the city still considerably

Figure 6.1 - Number of U.S. Apparel Manufacturers in Major Pacific Northwest Cities, 2016 First Quarter Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

2016. Willamette Workroom looks to the

an energy-efficient future. Portland with

population of over 632,000 people,

Pacific Northwest to establish its business

its already notable fashion scene will also

growing 8.3% from 2010 to 2015. Over

because of existing apparel manufacturing

be beneficial to Willamette Workroom

44% of the population of Portland has

infrastructure, a less competitive

because target businesses from across

earned a bachelor’s degree or higher,

landscape of like businesses, proximity

the Pacific Northwest will regularly attend

above the national average, with a median

to larger manufacturing hubs like Los

notable fashion events in Portland.

household income of $53,230 reported in

Angeles, and access to international shipping ports connecting the area to the sourcing powerhouses of the East.

On a basic level, Willamette

Demographics

The current economic conditions

in the state of Oregon show signs of

2014.

Also encouraging for starting

a new business in Portland, according to research conducted by Biz2Credit in

Workroom will look to establish in the

strong growth and a thriving independent

Portland metro area that allows for

arts scene that would support the

easy travel in and out of for clients and

establishment of new creative businesses.

supplier shipments, and established and

The Portland, Oregon metropolitan

reliable public transportation systems.

area boasts a total population close to

Access to Portland’s rail, air, and highway

2.35 million people and grew at a rate

shipping routes will be necessary to

of 1.5% from 2014-2015. Overall the

ensure access to a variety of shipping

cost of living in Oregon is competitive

methods across the US, as needed. The

with other states like Nevada, Utah, and

city has good electrical infrastructure,

Arizona, but remains more affordable than

but more importantly with strides being

Colorado, Washington, and California.

the city’s most recognizable saying, and

made in alternative energy upgrades for

Oregon was the third fastest growing

those living in Portland embrace it. Among

economy in 2015. Portland city has a

the stereotypes like the city’s artisanal

58

Willamette Workroom

2014, Portland had the country’s secondhighest revenue reported from companies with less than 250 employees. The city prides itself on supporting local and small, and handmade goods. The mantra “Keep Portland Weird” is easily recognizable.

Sociographics “Keep Portland Weird.” This is

in Portland. This is encouraging for a business like Willamette Workroom that is founded on sustainability practices.

The Pearl Arts District has the

On the fashion front, the

Portland Fashion Week

Northwest area of the city known as Nob Hill and its independent fashion

Interests & Attractions

boutiques showcase local, handcrafted

and shop handmade. This trend flows

products as well as other oddities for

across the food scene, drinks, and apparel

the curious consumer. Local designer

options. The city has a strong support

many diverse neighborhoods, each with

shopping is also centered in the Central

structure that allows local artisans and

its own personality. The Downtown

Eastside neighborhood, where boutiques

designers to showcase and sell limited

area of the city is home to the Portland

like Six/Seven and Wildfang sell locally

quantities of exclusive items only available

Art Museum and McMenamins Crystal

made fashion goods. Adorn is a boutique

in Portland. The Portland Saturday

Ballroom, a long-standing concert venue

in the Division/Clinton neighborhood that

Market has given a space to independent

that once hosted Jimi Hendrix and The

sells apparel from local Pacific Northwest

artists and designers since 1974. With

Grateful Dead. While the art museum

designers. The West End of Portland was

over 350 members today, the market is

Portland is a city made up of

Portlanders like to shop local

a micro-business incubator for the city Photo by Keri Yourick

(Beck). The market is a large reason why Portland has become an internationally known destination for handcrafted items. Several boutiques in Portland only sell handcrafted in Oregon items, boutiques like Made Here PDX, Crafty Wonderland, and Made in Oregon to name a few.

Willamette Workroom

59


Portland Oregon

Sourcing materials, gaining exposure, and getting affordable access to equipment, like industrial sewing machines and digital textile printers are other big challenges. Really, we’re missing a [sic] incubator that wants to help designers grow and thrive, to start small and grow with us.

Apparel Manufacturing Industry Overview

T

What are the most formidable challenges for a fashion designer starting out in Portland? Response from designer Katie Guinn, 2014

The apparel manufacturing industry in Oregon and Portland is limited to 62 establishments employing 991 employees (Figure 6.2). Especially given the predominance of other locally produced goods like coffee, beer, and food, representation of local apparel manufacturing is lacking. While some designers like Jennifer Thomas, designer of Jet Clothing, have opened their own

Private, NAICS 315 Apparel manufacturing, All Counties in Oregon 20…rterly Census of Employment and Wages - Bureau of Labor Statistics

infrastructure is nonexistent to locally based designers. This makes price still much higher for all raw materials and labor than if collections were produced in Los Angeles for example. The Portland Garment Factory has seen success providing small-batch manufacturing and

PRINT

Private, NAICS 315 Apparel manufacturing, All Counties in Oregon 2015 Annual Averages, All establishment sizes Source: Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages - Bureau of Labor Statistics County

production facility in town to be able to produce close to the retail store, most designers report that manufacturing

11/23/16, 2:33 PM

Annual Establishments

Annual Average Employment

U.S. TOTAL 6,940 135,263 Oregon 62 991 Jackson County, Oregon 7 90 Marion County, Oregon 6 214 Multnomah County, Oregon 29 416 Washington County, Oregon 7 59 Footnotes: This table excludes rows with suppressed employment and wages

Total Annual Wages

Annual Average Weekly Wage

$5,181,597,623 34,676,372 4,512,012 6,077,837 16,214,482 1,542,237

$737 673 961 547 750 503

Annual Wages per Employee

$38,308 34,988 49,995 28,468 39,024 26,140

Annual Average Employment Location Quotient

Total Annual Wages Location Quotient

1.00 0.57 1.13 1.52 0.89 0.22

1.00 0.57 1.99 1.44 0.90 0.12

Figure 6.2 - Number of Apparel Manufacturers in Oregon, 2015 Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

design services to local designers while working to keep pricing competitive with LA and San Francisco producers (Cooper, 2014).

Portland is full of independent designers selling

their own Made in the USA clothing lines and those designers have lamented the lack of manufacturing

Photo by Keri Yourick

resources in Portland. There is a clear

Portland offers vast opportunities to

demand for manufacturing services in

fill a need in the market for a small-

the city and Willamette Workroom would

batch manufacturing facility with the

be fulfilling that need while supporting

opportunity to scale up into a much

an up-and-coming locally made clothing

large production facility. It is an exciting

scene. Large companies like Nike and

time to get involved in an established

Adidas have been established for many

maker scene and work to make apparel

years in Portland, but have contributed

manufacturing just as common as a

little to building up a manufacturing

jewelry or furniture designers in Portland.

industry in the city.

60

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

61


03

Target Market

Quick Study Instagram

»» Target Business Overview »» Primary Target Business »» Secondary Target Business »» Tertiary Target Businesses

62

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

63


Target Business Overview

B

Based on the prior extensive consumer research,

have an established brand but are looking to build

Willamette Workroom will look to an ideal target

brand recognition based on sustainable practices.

customer business that finds it important to

In this case the relationship is less dependent on

the designer to create an ethical brand image

a collaborative design and development process.

and product offering. Whether these clients

Instead the ethical sourcing strategies that

are seasoned industry veterans or self-taught

Willamette Workroom can offer as well as initial

designers their business strategy must include

prototyping services will be more beneficial to this

partnering with a local production business

client, but not design and development assistance.

and working closely together to develop and produce small-batch apparel runs. This close partnership is essential to the success of the independent apparel brand so that their product may enter the marketplace regularly, working outside the traditional fashion calendar to disrupt the successful, current fast fashion model of production and marketing. As the mediator in the design process, Willamette Workroom must offer sound, sustainable design consultation services, from initial sketches through to development and production, that will ensure successful differentiation when the client enters the DTC

64

Working as a ‘Made in the USA’ manufacturer is more sustainable in practice than overseas production runs. Benefits of producing locally can eliminate the barrier of excessive minimum production quantities that larger Asian-based factories require to achieve maximum efficiency in the factory. While some target customers may not find that sustainability claims are relevant to their consumer base, smaller production quantities may be most beneficial. Willamette Workroom may also find the benefits of working with clients by only producing relatively smaller runs of apparel for the label. This keeps employees employed

e-commerce market.

consistently, providing necessary, year-round work

Willamette Workroom will also look to identify

time and effort into developing the sustainable, DTC

target customer businesses that may already

fashion brands.

Willamette Workroom

and allow Willamette Workroom to continue to put

All Images from the Quick Study Website

Willamette Workroom

65


Primary Target Business Fashion Start-Up Sustainable Brand Identity Close Partnership Full Service Key Distinguishing Factors: + A new brand – creative director for the brand likely has a keen sense of styling and a unique viewpoint, but lacking the

Brand Profile: Quick Study – Established 2013 in Portland, Oregon “Embrace the unexpected and dress up in clothing that’s suited for the journey from ‘here’ to ‘there.’ Be a Quick Study. Dress to ride.”

necessary experience to design and fully develop their concepts into clothing

Recent graduate from a fashion design or merchandising program

Business Model: Quick Study was founded by Caitlin McCall as a cyclist-friendly brand for the feminine-set dressers.

Entrepreneur looking to develop a fashion brand

Innovating with silhouette and stretch, breathable, & upcycled fabrics, Quick Study is a brand working to innovate in cycling-

+ With limited manufacturing and technical design experience, the primary business looks to Willamette Workroom for full-

ready apparel that bucks the menswear trends in favor of functional, feminine designs.

service product development offerings that will take their brand from concept through to final limited production quantities + Utilizing in-house, stocked fabrics will be most important for these brands because of high minimum order quantities (MOQ)

McCall graduated from the Portland Fashion Institute’s Fashion Forward program in 2013. In an interview, McCall expressed

from raw materials suppliers

the difficulty of “balancing production while managing her company’s growth” as being her greatest challenge.

+Sustainability is the cornerstone of the brand. There are a number of different facets to showcasing the sustainability efforts of a brand, especially at a time when the climate change discussion is getting national recognition

PRODUCT

New brands will be regionally located from San Francisco to Vancouver

Creatively cut dresses, a one-piece Samurai Suit, and a cropped sweatshirt make up the assortment. Every piece

Will already have obtained funding through business and/or loans

incorporates a fabric or finish that provides odorless, antibacterial, and/or wicking properties for the cycling woman.

+ May be looking to start a crowdfunding campaign to raise more of the necessary funds to cover larger production runs and/

Product categories include: dresses (3 styles and a jumpsuit) and cut & sew knitwear (1 style)

or develop more pieces in a collection

Fabrics used include recycled polyester, bamboo rayon blend, and upcycled wool

PRICE

Moderate price – dresses retail for $210 and the cropped sweater for $150

+ Located in the PNW region of the USA means this new brand will be looking for development partners that specialize in casual sportswear designs (lifestyle pieces)

Hubris Apparel – Portland

Carolyn Hart Designs – Portland

Rose Temple – Portland

day48 (Taj Barnett)

Minnow Shirt (Minnow LLC)

PROMOTION

Minimal Luxe Coats (Victoria Cullinan LLC)

Presence on Social Media including Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Tumblr

H Bar C (Rick Stahl)

McCall has been featured in Portland Mercury Bike Issue, the Mercury blog, Portland Business Journal, and other

Rags of the Valley (Kasey Faver)

cycling-specific zines.

Caela Hopkins (Pinstripe office/beach pants)

Quick Study had recently been showing at Portland fashion shows like Alley33 and Fade to Light

Blazers (Irene Kilowoko)

Custom Henleys (Seth Hauben)

66

Willamette Workroom

PLACE Quick Study has a presence in Portland, but currently sells Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) on their website.

Willamette Workroom

67


Other Primary Target Businesses

Spring/Summer 2017 Carolyn Hart Designs is based in Portland, Oregon. Founded in 2005 the brand most recently showed its Fall 2017 collection at the Fade to Light multidimensional fashion show in Portland in September 2017. The brand does not consistently release collections. Willamette Workroom can help with consistent production calendars to get product to vendors and consumers. The designer has an affinity for using draped knits. The workroom can help with sourcing higher quality, sustainable options as well as Fall/Winter 2016

sourcing more dynamic and woven fabrics as well. The brand’s price point is consistent with local, made in Portland pricing.

Spring/Summer 2017 Spring/Summer 2016

Fall/Winter 2015 Hubris Apparel is based in Portland, Oregon. Established in 2010, the company’s owner/

Currently Available on Etsy

designer is passionate about designing for women with curves, giving all women confidence in dressing. While the company has been designing and selling clothing since 2012, there has not been consistent seasonal releases of collections. Working with Willamette Workroom would give the brand the opportunity to design regularly and offer customers new designs on a regular schedule. This will maintain customer loyalty. Hubris Apparel rather exclusively only designs dresses. By working further with Willamette Workroom, the brand can confidently begin to branch out into other product categories.

68

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

69


Maker’s Row Potential Primary Target Clients Start-up fashion brands can be found across the United States, and a resource like Maker’s Row brings together both manufacturers and designers, making it easier to connect. Willamette Workroom will look to Maker’s Row as a reliable resource to drum up additional business outside of its targeted, full package collaboration clients. Projects on Maker’s Row vary in complexity and desired outcome. Willamette Workroom looks to work with those clients with a solid initial idea that can be executed effectively. It is also desirable to find projects that feel like a true brand could be built from the initial idea. In this way, the workroom has the upper hand in working with burgeoning labels from the beginning. Each project will need a number of services fulfilled from patterning and sampling, to sourcing, making tech packs, and producing a small batch run of garments. This resource will be important to keep Willamette Workroom working and in business, especially in the months when production is heavier and creative, development tasks are much lighter for the year round fashion brands.

Rose Temple was founded by Natalia Sasnow. Originally based in Colombia, she moved the brand to Portland after a year sabbatical in

All Looks Fall 2017

2010. The brand’s mission is to make clothing of good design, with quality materials, and with excellent craftsmanship. The brand has a strong wholesale presence, but to get consumers excited about direct to consumer sales Willamette Workroom can help make product more readily available for on-line sales. The brand could build upon its Colombian heritage and love of craftsmanship by working with Willamette Workroom to create an exceptional brand story around natural fabrics, perhaps sourced from Colombia and South America, and the eclectic roots of the founder.

70

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

71


72

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

73


Secondary Target Business Established Brands Made in the U.S.A. Uses Multiple Services as Needed Key Distinguishing Factors: + Not a newly established brand – the creative director has already been working with partner manufacturers, relying on the

Brand Profile: Older Brother – Established 2013 in Portland, Oregon “Playful Spirits : Natural Classics” – Olderbrother is a playful, eco-sustainable, naturally dyed, gender-neutral contemporary collection from Portland for the slow fashion revolution.

partners to build specification packages and manufacture small to medium production runs (less than 300 pieces) + With more experience working in the industry these brands will look to pick and choose specific manufacturing services that

Business Model: Olderbrother touts itself as being at the forefront of the “slow fashion” movement. The two designer

Willamette Workroom offers, as needed

friends source eco-conscious fabrics that are biodegradable – made from organic fibers or renewable plant-based synthetics.

+ These brands are sustainably oriented by producing locally and in the US – Willamette Workroom’s sustainable business

Currently the brand garment dyes and produces in Los Angeles.

practices and local production capabilities are a real advantage to this group, and a big selling point

It is likely that this group has already made contacts with their chosen suppliers, therefore in-house stocked

PRODUCT

fabrics will be less important though potentially advantageous to supplement into designs

Genderless, naturally dyed, biodegradable, finding beauty in the imperfect

+ Established brands that fall into this category are proud to be based in the PNW - and it ensures easier access when

Product categories include coats, trousers, cut and sew knitwear tops, collared shirts, tees, shorts

checking in on development and production

Products are dyed in natural shades of charcoal, indigo, black, or undyed

Nau Clothing – Portland

Older Brother – Portland

Prairie Underground – Seattle

Soya Concept – Vancouver

PostScript Apparel – Seattle

Lizz Basinger – Portland

WILD Outdoor Apparel – Portland

PRICE

Priced at the Moderate price point – Prices range from $95 for tees to $300 for outerwear

+ Listed brands have already established brand principles that include being manufactured locally and/or emphasize working sustainably and sourcing sustainable fabrics – they are inherently sustainable by producing local - even if their brand identity

PLACE

may not be based on sustainability

Olderbrother has an on-line e-commerce site and workers with a limited number of wholesale accounts including

Beams in Japan, Frances May, Steven Alan, and Glasswing.

PROMOTION

74

Willamette Workroom

Lookbooks showcasing the seasonal line are available on the website

Active on social media sites including Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest

Willamette Workroom

75


Other Secondary Target Businesses

Lizz Basinger produces collections twice a year with an emphasis on sustainable practices, Made in America and organic when possible. The brand identity is strongly rooted in the eco-conscious movement, but Willamette Workroom believes we have additional knowledge and resources to boost that branding message even further. The brand has not released a collection for 2017, which leads the workroom to believe there may be opportunity to market our local services to help the business get product to market quickly.

As the original “Mountain to Bar� company, Wild has become a staple of the Portland and PNW fashion scene. The rugged aesthetic and urban wearability have garnered the brand faithful clients across the region. Wild does not rely on seasonal apparel releases and instead banks on selling classic staples year round. Willamette Workroom’s aim to work with Wild would be a quick prototyping samples, or unique, hand-crafted projects through out the year. The technical construction of each piece will likely be prohibitive to manufacture year round, which is why Wild is not seen as a primary target.

76

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

77


Nau comes from a long tradition of technical outerwear worn as lifestyle pieces. The company is a large, established With a dedicated team of 11, Prairie

brand in the Northwest of the United States. However they

Underground has built a following of loyal

carry unique, quirky pieces in the store that may not want to

customers. The label releases collections five

be made in large quantities.

different times of the year, but has seen a reduction in this trend in 2017. Currently the

Willamette Workroom could collaborate with Nau on

brand has only released up to Summer 2017 and

small projects, like using upcycled fabric from past season

no Fall collection has been released.

collections or returned, unsalable clothing items.

Speed to market is important for a brand aimed

The aesthetic is clean and minimal, using unfussy colors in

at offering clothing to its customers multiple

touch with nature. There could be exciting opportunities to

times a year. Having shorter lead times for

test the market with brighter, more vibrant pieces without

producing small batches of items could be

making a huge commitment to manufacturing quantities.

beneficial to the label, especially if certain items sell more quickly than others.

78

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

79


Tertiary Target Business A Emerging & Established Brands Located Outside PNW Uses Multiple Services Key Distinguishing Factors:

Brand Profile: Jiberish – Established in 2005 in Denver, CO “Being based at the foot of the Rocky Mountains in Denver, Colorado, outdoor influences are apparent in the quality of our garments.” Business Model: Jiberish is a Colorado lifestyle brand and has supported a growing number of professional freestyle skiers to

+ With similarities to both the primary and secondary target businesses, this other tertiary group is located outside of the

rep their clothing line. The company sells its collections at a flagship boutique in Denver and with specialty retailers across the

Pacific Northwest region of the United States.

US. Currently most manufacturing occurs overseas.

These brands are less likely to work with a manufacturing partner in the US because of cost restrictions, but would find advantages in the services offered, especially with sustainable production and rapid prototyping.

+ These brands have varying experience when it comes to knowledge of the product development process. + Some of these brands may be very interested in establishing a sustainable fashion brand identity, in which case producing in the US would be less of an issue in exchange for the marketing potential of a sustainable partnership.

Brands less likely to market themselves as sustainably made but interested in producing apparel in the USA for the

ease of communication and quick turnaround may also be part of this group.

PRODUCT

Product designed specifically for outdoor use and on the ski slopes

Simple, clean aesthetic with a flair for 90s vintage silhouettes

Product categories include outerwear, pants & shorts, knit tops & sweaters, and baseball caps

+ These brands may not be exclusively Made in the USA, either, but prefer to complete design and development work within + America and utilize overseas manufacturing facilities to complete final production numbers to meet the desired price point. + These brands may find the in-house stock of prepared for dye (PFD) fabrics to be beneficial to meet minimums, or may already have established vendor relationships with fabric suppliers. + Examples of other tertiary target businesses include:

Trim & Taylor (Bozeman, MT)

Jiberish (Denver, CO)

PRICE

Flynn Skye (L.A., CA)

Hackwith Design House (Minneapolis, MN)

Style Mafia (Miami, FL)

Amur (USA)

Erica Tanov (Berkeley)

Welcome Stranger (San Francisco)

80

Willamette Workroom

Priced between Mass and Moderate price points –$75 for tailored shirts to $160 for outerwear

PLACE

Studio and Flagship in Denver, CO with an e-commerce website & specialty wholesale accounts

PROMOTION

Jiberish outfits twelve professional freestyle skiers to wear product during major competitions

Social media presence on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter

Jiberish frequently collaborates on designs with other extreme sport lifestyle brands as well as creates custom music

playlists in collaboration with up and coming artists and producers

Willamette Workroom

81


Other Tertiary Target Businesses

Designed in Montana and manufactured in China, Trim & Tailor would need to increase its price point on certain styles to successfully manufacture in America. However, more considered, sustainably

Erica Tanov and Amur both have strong Direct-to-Consumer presences across the Internet. Both labels have a strong brand

manufactured fabrics would serve the brand well.

aesthetic in terms of the design eye, but neither places much emphasis on a transparent supply chain. It is “business as usual� for these brands. Willamette Workroom would want to develop a strong Pitch Box for brands of this calibre, showcasing beautiful construction and fabric sourcing to entice a collaboration piece (or collection) with a Made in USA manufacturer.

Based in Minnesota, Hackwith Design House releases new items every Monday while stocking year round basics. The company sews to order, but a unique collaboration between two design/manufacturers could be a unique marketing angle for both.

82

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

83


Tertiary Target Business B National Corporations Require Quick Turnaround A la carte Manufacturing Brand Profile: Adidas – Established in 1924 just outside of Portland, Oregon “Our love for sport drives who we are and what we do. Every day.” Key Distinguishing Factors:

Business Model: Adidas Group owns nine other shoe and apparel companies like Reebok, TaylorMade, and Rockport. Employing over 1 million workers, the company posted $16.9 billion in revenue in 2015. Early efforts in sustainable practice

+ The Pacific Coast and Pacific Northwest are home to large apparel companies that may find a need to partner with a local manufacturer for smaller, in-house projects or rapid turnaround on developing new product ideas

Nike

Adidas

New Balance

Pendleton

include working toward supply chain transparency. PRODUCT

Adidas offers product in apparel, footwear, accessories, and sport-specific gear

Apparel Product categories include jackets, sweaters, tops, pants, tights, shorts, and sports bras

Tommy Bahama

REI

Levi’s

Columbia Sportswear

Nautilus

Patagonia (Southern California)

+Established brands have an in-house design team and typically manufacture overseas (with few exceptions) but smaller projects for exclusive in-house use could arise

Recent collaborations include The North Face and The Cloth Foundry, both located in the Bay Area, teamed up to

make a locally produced, sustainable hoody. Patagonia currently partners with Alabama Chanin, a small facility in

Alabama, to upcycle down jackets into neck scarves.

+ Manufacturing services will be most valuable to these large industry companies

Quick turnaround time is the most important selling point

+ These companies have no need for sourcing services as they have already established their own contacts over decades in business + Sustainability is not a huge factor to business sales numbers, however most of these companies have made sustainability

PRICE

Priced in the Mass price point – Product ranges from $40 for tops to $150 for jackets (footwear excluded)

PLACE

With 7 headquarters around the world, Adidas operates 1,616 retail stores

pledges as a part of company ethics PROMOTION

84

Willamette Workroom

Adidas advertises across all major media outlets especially television commercials.

Their strong brand recognition comes from athlete endorsements and team sponsorships

Adidas Social Media following includes Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest

Willamette Workroom

85


04

Competitive Analysis

Laure de Sagazon

»» Primary Research Summary & Insights »» Competitor Overview »» Values & Differentiations »» Competitive Advantages »» SWOT Analysis »» Positioning Map

86

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

87


efficiently. Similarly, by interviewing manufacturers and understanding their biggest challenges when working with clients, Willamette Workroom can look to provide different services or strategies to control those challenges where possible.

Educating new brands to understand the amount of

Having samples/prototypes made in a reasonable

collections (AS)

Meeting production minimums, having too much excess made product inventory (CC)

Primary Research Summary & Insights

Factories specializing in one product category are always

“Market the story. Especially if you’re manufacturing yourself. Pay living wages. Products

unable to reorder fabric again (JS)

Interview with S. Heard, SF, September 22, 2017

production space (AS)

capital needed to successfully develop and manufacture

Meeting MOQs on fabric & trim orders (CC)

have to be expensive. Sell retail, not wholesale.�

Keeping clients on a timeline to ensure enough

Biggest challenges for design/development:

amount of time (CC)

Raleigh Denim

Biggest challenges for manufacturers:

Keeping the cash flowing when working with young brands (JS) Keeping up the work during slow season DecemberMarch (AS)

booked, and expensive (CC) Start up brands producing small batch earn lower margins (JS) Sourcing fabric from jobbers to meet minimums but

T

The goals of conducting interviews with both designers and manufacturers was to obtain more specific information on

Alabama Chanin

what are the biggest challenges in manufacturing apparel, both from a creative perspective and a technical perspective. By understanding how designers approached the development and production process and where their biggest frustrations were, Willamette Workroom can work to address those challenges with more innovative thinking strategies to collaborate more

88

Willamette Workroom

Sewing Machine and Patterns

Willamette Workroom

89


Competitor Overview: Direct

MODHOUSE LLC

Competitor Overview: Direct

Studio 317

815 SE Grant St Portland, Oregon

1255 NW 9th Ave., #506 Portland, Oregon

Founded in 2014

Founded in 2015

“Studio 317 is an advanced

“Turning your apparel line into a

for a wide range of apparel and

innovation and prototype studio soft good products.”

reality, one collection at a time.”

Modhouse is a full-service product development studio and works with emerging brands looking to launch a first line or

The studio was established to help its clients save time in the creative process by providing local designers and entrepreneurs

established brands looking to expand. Clients looking to offer private label apparel to its customers will benefit from working

the opportunity to be hands-on during the prototyping process.

with Modhouse and its team of industry experts that have successfully launched private label brands.

Studio 317 works with all manner of clients including DIY enthusiasts, small and medium design houses and larger companies in the area like Nike, Adidas, Columbia, and DaKine.

Modhouse can help brands build out and deliver a new brand or private label strategy. Services Offered:

Services Offered:

Brand development – to ensure successful brand positioning

Line planning – Market, competitor, consumer research, calendar and finance targets

Design – to brief in-house team on style, silhouette direction of clients

Material Sourcing – network of 30 suppliers to work with that are within budget

Tech Packs

Branding – internal and external brand labeling and manage label production once approved

Samples – 1st samples through pre-production

Fit sessions

Production – contacts with premium factories around globe, manage production through delivery

Consulting – hourly service to support any creative, business, product needs

Product Category Specialization? Technical Outerwear, Outdoor, Activewear, Leather, Lifestyle, Accessories Current Clients: Bourbon & Blue, Holly & Tanager, SparkFire Active

Full-service product development acts like true collaboration with clients regardless of experience Services designed to help clients build a successful private label brand Network of sourcing partners established Brand development services ensure successful clients to also ensure the success of Modhouse Contacts with manufacturers around globe may mean more competitive costing

90

Willamette Workroom

Patternmaking – from 1st to production pattern, digitized on Optitex software

Prototype sewing – from 1st to production sample, Bill of Materials, and construction detail info

Sample sewing – up to 50 pieces small batch sewing, client supplies fabric, trims, and accessories

Tech packs – prototype, pattern and grading, construction details, costing, and graded specs

Sourcing and manufacturing support – guidance through manufacturing process/troubleshooting

Product innovation concepts

Trims & textiles library – access to fabric swatches, headers from suppliers, Pantone color cards

Bonding Equipment

Creative design space – for team building or teaching available at an hourly rental rate

Competitive Advantages? Offers clients access to cutting edge machinery and construction techniques using bonding technology & prototyping daunting, innovative product ideas. Clients: Anywhere Apparel, DYNE, Chromat, BLKRBN, ProperBeast, Gretchen Treser Design

Prior Clients: Wilder & Sons, Cirq, Zuala Strengths

Design and development consultation provided as needed.

Weaknesses Minimum production runs begin at 300 units prohibitive to young labels Not necessarily producing in USA Minimal marketing efforts, no media exposure Difficult to offer a la carte services to brands that do not need full-service

Strengths

Weaknesses

Optitex 3D prototyping software

In-house production quantities limited to 50 pieces

Only publicly available bonding machinery in Pacific

Technical innovation competitive advantage will not cater to ready-to-

Northwest

wear and casual lifestyle apparel lines

Trims and Textiles library eases sourcing difficulties

Sourcing fabrics and trims needs to be completed by the client

Creative design space for all promotes studio and provides a

Limited media and marketing efforts on-line with no client testimonials

mean for advertising

or reviews

Partnered with Chinese company Reliable Source Industrial

New investment money and partnership with Chinese backer competes

in November 2016 to offer small batch manufacturing

with “Locally” and Made in USA claims

Willamette Workroom

91


Competitor Overview: Direct

JLD-Studios

Competitor Overview: Indirect

Factory 45

7911 NE 33rd Dr., Ste. 120 Portland, Oregon

www.factory45.com

Founded in 2011

Founded in 2014

“The resource you need to start,

“An online accelerator program that

grow, and manage your fashion

takes sustainable fashion apparel

line.”

companies from idea to launch.”

The team takes a collaborative approach to cut and sew production as well as apparel development to make JLD-Studios a truly “full-service” apparel manufacturer. Free initial consultation service. Services Offered:

Factory45 helps entrepreneurs launch clothing companies that are sustainably and ethically made in the USA. Through

Design

+ Technical Design – creating full technical packages to use in production including construction details

information, garment specifications, bill of materials, Pantone color assignment, and fabric research

+ Patternmaking – creating the garment prototype and finalizing digital patterns, making fit adjustments,

and grading the specifications

+ Textile Print Design – ensuring accurate repeats and original art based on client design direction. Services

include rotary repeats, screen separation, engineered prints, placed graphics, embroidery layouts, full color

digital printing

Print

+ Sublimation printing for apparel with no minimums

+ Manufacturing cut and sew capabilities with no production minimums (currently 100 pieces maximum)

+ Average lead times:

Services Offered:

Program consists of five (5) on-line modules

One – Sourcing: Learn to effectively research and source fabric and materials and includes resource list of

suppliers of sustainable fabrics

Two – Brand Identity: Identify target customer and get their attention

Three – Pre-production: Make connections with experienced patternmakers, sample manufacturers, and

Four – E-commerce Marketing: Marketing and social media tactics and launch strategies

Five – Preparing for Launch: Crowdfunding advice to raise funds and build brand awareness

one of Factory45’s entrepreneurs had an even more successful Kickstarter campaign after completing the program.

Full Production: 8-12 weeks

Product Category Specialization? Technical knit activewear and casual styles (men & women) Clients: D-Up Active, Tara’s Elegance, NURi Atheletics, Biblisa

Strengths

Weaknesses

Optitex 3D digital prototyping Providing digital grading services in-house Direct communication with larger production facilities, as needed Custom textile print design No minimums on any services including production and textile prints Laser cutting for exceptional accuracy Activeseam sewing technology for compression and technical knit construction

Minimal SEO, web presence

Willamette Workroom

Cost: $500/month for six months

Competitive Advantages? Founder Shannon Whitehead had the most successful crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter; then

Samples: 2-3 weeks

92

manufacturer, and raise money to fund product launch in 6 months.

training in specification sheets including budget analysis

Produce

an application process, the program provides entrepreneurs the resources and connections to source fabric, find a US

Minimal marketing/media coverage No on-line client reviews Does not attend tradeshows Does not produce soft goods, home goods, childrenswear, intimates/swim, denims, leathers, knit hats, or eveningwear/ bridal

Prior Successful Applicants: Vetta, Tsoia, Ode to Mother, Mamachic Co., Wynn Ruby, Ruth & Ragnar, Ponybabe, The Hangar Valet, Sarah-Valin

Strengths

High-profile media coverage of Factory45 in Vogue, The Huffington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and Good Morning America Enabling entrepreneurs to build an apparel brand without partnering with manufacturers from the start Resources of contacts for sourcing, sampling, and development Successful client testimonials that prove the success of the program Accessible cost for entrepreneurs with minimal starting cash flow

Weaknesses Competitive application and selection process will leave out some individuals Limits marketing and business growth to crowdfunding platforms Does not train program participants on wholesale and/or tradeshow promotion for more extensive seasonal collections Incubator program best suited for selling ONE initial idea, not build a lifestyle fashion brand Program promotes DTC sales channel only

Willamette Workroom

93


Competitor Overview: Indirect

Good Clothing Company

Competitor Overview: Indirect

Sewn Goods

1913 East Adler St. 681 Falmouth Rd., Ste. C-11

Seattle, WA

Mashpee, Massachusetts

Registered in 2013

Founded in 2015

“SEWN GOODS is a pattern service and development house with a focus on menswear, womenswear, and bags.”

“Ethical, sustainable and small batch production for independent designers.”

Good Clothing Company is dedicated to rebuilding the US apparel manufacturing industry. GCC defines making ethical

Sewn Goods founders were also designers and bring their understanding of the importance of a solid concept as well as

apparel for its clients by using environmentally sustainable production practices and paying a living wage to employees.

paying attention to trends and reference points beyond the scope of fashion. Sewn Goods strengths lie in designs with

GCC currently operates out of two locations in Massachusetts, the small batch location in Cape Cod and a larger capacity production hub in Fall River, the location of original garment manufacturers during the industrial revolution. Services Offered:

modern minimal silhouettes combined with classic tailoring elements. Sewn Goods works with clients to build a strong concept, from just one style to building an entire cohesive collection that fits the brands aesthetic and target customer. Services Offered:

Production services

Complete Cut Make Trim services

Patternmaking – from 1st pattern development, pattern auditing, correction, and grading

Pattern drafting and grading

Sewn product design – to include patterns, tech packs, sources, and showroom samples

Design development – strengthen and refine designs and solving design issues for best fit

Sourcing – local and national supplier contacts and advise on necessary steps to take

Sample making – from prototype to final sales sample as part of entire production-ready package

Sample development

Consulting services (one hour sessions with owner Kathryn Hilderbrand)

Manufacturing 101 – how to put together a production-ready package

Marketing and Branding – grow an audience, keep them engaged, social media base

Designing for business success – putting together a cohesive collection at the right price

Labels – branding and legal compliance

Product Category Specialization? Soft Goods (bags), minimal & classic menswear and womenswear Known Clients: Jessalin Beutler

Clients: La Fille Colette, Tabii Just, GreenLinebyK, Speak Your Silence, Alchemy Detroit

Strengths

Capabilities to manufacture small minimums (10) up to thousands Strong SEO for “sustainable clothing production” Broad media exposure and state-recognized awards promoting the company Owner Kathryn Hilderbrand, Master Tailor and 30 years of experience On-line E-commerce sight to sell client product directly to consumers In-house clothing line Good Apparel may keep production running even during slow months

94

Willamette Workroom

Weaknesses Emphasis of the business on manufacturing Does not offer sourcing services May bring sustainability practices into question if fabrics/trims not sourced ethically Location in Cape Cod may deter some clients from New York to travel Services designed around more experienced designers ready to go into production

Strengths

Weaknesses

Strong internet presence when searching for Seattle-based manufacturer

Does not offer small batch manufacturing services

Offer services from a designer’s background that helps build a client’s

Does not have specialty skills in more ready-to-wear apparel

brand image

categories

Niche manufacturing success in soft goods

Difficult to find customer reviews or extensive marketing

Offers sourcing services to clients

efforts

Seattle HQ is in the heart of the Pacific Northwest with access to clients

Unsure if company has contacts for production

from Vancouver to SF and beyond

manufacturing

Willamette Workroom

95


Willamette Workroom VALUES & DIFFERENTIATIONS Conducted research revealed key areas of improvement in the current U.S. manufacturing industry. To be successful in the competitive landscape, Willamette Workroom should focus on agility, creative sourcing solutions, and a flexible costing structure.

Offering service upgrades above and beyond typical development and production such as PFD fabrics and better client timeline management

2

John Sun and Charlie Cronk cited

difficulty for smaller labels to pay for minimums start at 1000m. Without having too much excess sewn product, brands need assistance

Focus on quick turnaround times for sampling, prototyping

to not get stuck with too high minimums. Willamette Workroom will have the resources resources exist in the industry to enable pattern

to create a list of suppliers offering much

common response to challenges while developing

makers and sample sewers to create more

smaller minimums. Also, Willamette Workroom

a product is the inefficiency of the prototyping

successful initial prototyping that Willamette

can add into its business structure a library of

phase. Charlie Cronk cited lead times for samples

Workroom will factor into the business plan.

Prepared for Garment Dye fabrics that clients

from a Vancouver factory reaching 8-12 weeks,

Considerations will be made to accelerate

may purchase for their collections. Additional

not 3-4 weeks. Alex Snyder at DNA Group in

the prototyping process with clients by also

contacts in garment dyeing will make this an

the last year invested in 3D imaging software

not overbooking during initial sampling work.

attractive offering.

that allows the company to make immediate

Service structure can include a set number

pattern changes on screen then visually see

of days for each client for rapid prototyping

the alteration on a human body. Technological

sessions if financially viable.

Based on primary research interviews, a

Willamette Workroom can consult

with brands on the advantages of producing off the regular fashion calendar and during down months to procure services from supplier and manufacturing partners that may otherwise be

on fabrics from overseas suppliers that typically

1

unavailable.

3

Flexibility of services for clients as needed, from brand consultation to a la carte pattern work

New clients coming into DNA group

according to Alex Snyder need help from A to Z beginning a fashion line. Beyond consulting new designers on brand development, Willamette Workroom will secure more consistent work by offering a full menu of services that can be used as needed, when needed by other brands looking for local manufacturing services. The core of the business will address sustainable brand development, but will not limit other potential clients from coming to the factory.

Images Left to Right: Sewing Studio, Double Down Denim, Alabama Chanin

96

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

97


Competitive Advantages As a service company, Willamette Workroom can only prove successful by putting clients first and adapting to the needs of their business. The collaborative

Strengths

Opportunities

»» Emphasis on collaborative partnership with start-up brands

»» As an ethical manufacturer, taking advantage of tax credits

»» Consulting with all clients that work with the factory on advantages of sustainable brand identity management

»» Government subsidies to bring back Made in America manufacturers

»» Providing most versatile fabrics on hand that are sustainably made, PFD to alleviate MOQ barriers for new brands

»» Current consumer trends are demanding more ethically made product

»» Providing rapid prototyping turnaround

»» Desire growing to support small businesses

»» Small batch manufacturing services allows smaller brands an opportunity to scale at a reasonable budget

»» Paradigm shift for “lasting product” means more demand for quality, crafted, Made in USA apparel

»» Located in an underserved area of the US with a strong entrepreneurial & independent designer scene

Threats

relationship between factory and designer is crucial for both to be successful.

Weaknesses Fostering a close, collaborative partnership with brands from design development through to production Emphasizing sustainability principles in all business practices Offering prototyping and sampling with increased efficiency and quicker turnaround Enabling brands to take advantage of small batch manufacturing

»» Off-shoring apparel manufacturing is still king and business will not be able to compete with price »» Higher operating/production costs will keep potential clients away »» Getting exposure and gaining reputation for good work will take time

»» Unfavorable trade agreements for raw materials sourcing including duty and exchange rates as well as accessibility to raw materials »» Uncertainty following the upheaval of the current US political environment may mean markets take a dive, taxes raised on small businesses »» Loosing future consumer demand and support for ethical and sustainable products and suppliers »» Artist movement in Portland does not want to work with a manufacturing partner, choosing to navigate production alone

»» Start-up costs will be substantial and lack of capital to open »» Building sourcing contacts working in sustainable fabric production »» Young founder is uncommon in the manufacturing world and may be less respected »» Sustainable fabric/trim suppliers too expensive or nonexistent

Elizabeth Suzann Studios

Flexibility of services offered a la carte allowing clients to use any combination as needed

Alabama Chanin

98

Willamette Workroom

Selection of in-house, sustainable PFD fabrics of various weights that eliminate the MOQ barrier to entry and reduce cost

Willamette Workroom

99


Willamette Workroom POSITIONING MAP

Hackwith Design House

100

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

101


05

Services Plan

Damir Doma

»» Studio Space & Location »» List of Services »» List of Outside Vendors »» Production Capacity »» Cost of Production Labor

102

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

103


Willamette Workroom Location Ford Building PDX

Workroom Inspiration Images Laure de Sagazon, Paris

Ford Building Exterior

1,251 square feet 2nd Floor Skylight Suite $18/sf/year Located at: The Ford Building 2505 SE 11th Ave. Portland, OR 97202

The Ford Building was built in 1914 by the Ford Motor Company as an assembly and distribution plant for its famous Model-T. It’s seen many uses in its life and is currently home to an array of creative offices, retail stores, and artists studios in addition to Ford Food + Drink, The Factory, Duchess Clothier, Vinnies @ The Ford, Blaq Paks and Pinterest.

Sewing Studio Inspiration 4 Elizabeth Suzann

104

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

105


Floor Plan

Work Space $350

Cutting Tables $350 each Hanging/Storage Space Fixtures $450 peppermillantiques.com

Additional Storage Space

Ironing Boards

Sewing Machines

dustymars.net

Drafting Tables Mobile Tool Chests

Cutting Tables

Built-in Storage Hanging Space & Shelving

Seating Area

(4) Mannequins $1200

Desk/OďŹƒce Space

Sliding Barn Door Entry

Machine Leases $357/ month for 6 machines Office Chairs, homedepot.com

106

Willamette Workroom

Gravity-feed irons and boards $656

Willamette Workroom

107


Willamette Workroom List of Services Start of New Season Consultation

Cut&Sew Knits - 2 hours

$80/hour - 1 hour session

Dresses and Skirts - 2.5 hours

The entrepreneurs working with Willamette Workroom on two seasons regularly each year will have a consultation session before beginning patterning, sourcing, and production to review brand direction, collection concept and discuss relevant trend analysis. Brands may also use this time to discuss sustainability efforts in brand messaging. First Pattern & Fit Block $120/hour Fit block and pattern development will be billed on the hour. In general, product categories will have a specified amount of time to complete, but the price may fluctuate depending on the complexity of the design. The following are general guidelines for different product categories:

Casual Tops - 2 hours Pants and shorts - 3 hours Tailored Tops - 3 hours

Sample and Final Fitting

Brand Development

$200 - $400+

$275/hour

Samples sewn in final fabric will be billed per

Willamette Workroom’s purpose of offering brand

garment, not hourly, and based on complexity of

development services is to help clients build a

design. The client will have another opportunity

sustainable business structure. Clients will learn

to review final fit and to make corrections before

how to achieve sustainability in all facets of business

approving final patterns for production.

practice including different practices above and

Denim Tops and Bottoms - 3 hours

Additional Samples, as needed

Outerwear - 3.5 hours

$175 - $350+

(Items with lining will be billed one additional hour)

Additional samples after the first final sample will

Fit Session(s)

cost about $25 less per sample. Additional samples

$60/hour

may include sales samples, marketing samples, and

Once the muslin fit block is complete, clients will review the overall style and fit with Willamette Workroom. Any changes or corrections to the pattern will be billed separately if major changes are needed. Small fit updates will not be billed. Final changes can be made after the final sample is sewn but before confirming the fit for production.

Images from VillageTailor.com

beyond ethical fabric sourcing. If clients choose to pay for brand consultations, Willamette Workroom will offer sourcing services at no additional charge. Consultation Packages Billed hourly for a pre-set number of hours

size sets. Clients have the option to pay for manual

Willamette Workroom will offer new clients that

grading completed by Willamette Workroom, billed at

are not one of the three brands working with us

$100 per hour for up to three sizes. Manual grading is

consistently the option to purchase consulting

an additional service offered as needed.

packages to ensure enough time to help complete

Sourcing Assistance $75/hour Willamette Workroom will offer sourcing services to any interested clients. Billed hourly, the workroom will assist in sourcing sustainable fabrics, trims, hang tags, brand, size and care/content labels, and packaging. If clients have purchased a block number of hours for consultation services, then sourcing

projects. Consultation services are billed at $80/hour for 8 hours, 16 hours, 24 hours, 96 hours. Consultation packages may be preferable for clients that require difficult and custom fitting, exceptional or artisanal sourcing, trend research, and manual grading and fitting. Willamette Workroom will consider completing custom orders for clients on a case by case basis.

assistance will be offered at no additional cost (within reason). Full Technical Package $300/style Each garment clients develop with Willamette Workroom may also be turned into a technical package. This service may also be offered to clients if a fit sample is provided from another source. The specification pack will include a front and back view of a technical sketch, design details, points of measure, grade specs, and a bill of materials.

108

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

109


Willamette Workroom List of Outside Vendors

Labels & Hang Tags Mikan Printing Inc., Vancouver Valerie Mikan vmikan@mikanprinting.com

Semi-customizable options $45 for 100

Garment Dye

$115 for 1000 (basic design) +$30 set up fee

Botanical Colors, Seattle

Zipper pulls, hang tags, patches, badges, woven labels

Kathy Hattori botanicalcolors@gmail.com Samples: $25 - $40 per piece

THE/STUDIO

Production minimum 50 pcs/color

Justin Morris

Production pricing $14 - $22 per piece, dependent upon complexity

justin.morris@thestudio.com

Lead Time: 6 weeks

Brand Labels

500 pieces, 1 color $0.23 each

Digital Patterning

Hang Tags

500 pieces, 1 color Printed $0.53 each

Smart Pattern Making, LA

Care/Size Labels

2202 S Figueroa St. #543 (323) 960-1050

500 pieces, 1 color $0.23 each

Contact on-line message Lead Time: 3 weeks

Digitize Patterns

Up to 12 pieces, $5 per piece

Grading Patterns

Willamette Workroom aims to work with several vendors in a collaborative, meaningful way to help its

Up to 12 pieces, $5 per piece

clients receive the best branding collateral. Outside vendors may change as new needs for clients arise, and clients

Marker

within its first three years to speed up patternmaking and pre-production processes.

Up to 12 pieces, $50 - $100 Lead Time: 4 weeks for all digital services

are also able to source their own collateral. The company hopes to ultimately bring digital patterning in-house

Garment dye is an additional service Willamette Workroom hopes to fully develop in the first year of

business, both with Botanical Colors and other partners in the future. Working with garment dye specialists will be important for the workroom as the business looks to stock sustainable, PFD fabrics to offer clients.

110

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

111


Willamette Workroom Production Capacity

T

The ideal annual production for Willamette

Medium Run Designer:

Workroom includes small batch manufacturing

Shorts - 90 units

numbers for three different brands across two

Short Sleeve Tops - 75 units

seasons, spring/summer and fall/winter. The

Dresses - 50 units

manufacturing numbers include three sizes of

Pants - 90 units

production runs, small, medium, and large, for an annual production capacity of 3,275 units.

Willamette Workroom Cost of Production Labor Average % Cost of Labor Relative to Cost of Goods Shirt

Jacket

Shorts

Avg Total

Labor

$10.35

$12.40

$9.67

$10.81

Long Sleeve Tops - 75 units

COG

$40.40

$34.30

$24.95

$33.22

Jackets - 150 units

%

26%

36%

39%

33%

Cut&Sew Knits - 150 units Cut&Sew Heavy Knits - 150 units Denim - 180 units (Total 1,010 units)

112

TOPS COGS

$10,575.00 $41,985.00

Small Run Designer:

Large Run Designer:

BOTTOMS COGS

Shorts - 60 units

Shorts - 120 units

Short Sleeve Tops - 45 units

DRESSES COGS

Short Sleeve Tops - 150 units

Dresses - 30 units

Dresses - 75 units

Pants - 60 units

Pants - 120 units

Long Sleeve Tops - 45 units

Long Sleeve Tops - 150 units

Jackets - 100 units

Jackets - 200 units

Cut&Sew Knits - 60 units

Cut&Sew Knits - 300 units

Cut&Sew Heavy Knits - 60 units

Cut&Sew Heavy Knits - 300 units

Denim - 90 units (Total 550 units)

Denim - 300 units (Total 1.715 units)

Willamette Workroom

$4,150.00

KNITWEAR COGS

$14,025.00

OUTERWEAR COGS

$16,625.00 $87,360.00

$28,828.80

33%

Tot COG

Labor

Est of Labor

Cost

Cost

Willamette Workroom

113


06

Product Plan

Alabama Chanin

»» FACES Spring/Summer 2019 »» WEATHERED Fall/Winter 2019 »» Buttoned and Vented Tech Pack »» Cornered Rain Slick Tech Pack »» Breezy Cut Offs Tech Pack »» Production Calendar

114

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

115


FACES SPRING/SUMMER 2019

116

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

117


Willamette Workroom SS19 Trend Research

COCONUT MILK

BLEACHED CORAL

SUNBURNED

ORANGE CRUSH

MELLOW YELLOW

Spring/Summer 2019 is focused on youthful experience, carefree and vibrant.

HILLSIDE

Colors are washed out and damaged, as if being left in the sun for too long. 

SEAFOAM

Silhouettes are loose and breezy, meant to capture the feeling of

PALM

the island winds. Details are not overly technical or designed. Instead, the focus is

BLOWN OUT

on the fabric, the hand feel, and functionality.

BARRELS

VIOLA

DEEPER THOUGHTS

118

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

119


120

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

121


Item#: SPSU 20322 100% Tencel lyocell shirting plain weave Trim: 100% cotton cupro 2x2 ribknit Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $17.50/$35

Item#: SPSU 20423 100% Tencel lyocell shirting plain weave Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $37.50/$75

Item#: SPSU 20424 100% silk ribbed crepe Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $32/$64

122

Willamette Workroom

Item#: SPSU 20225 100% Tencel plain weave shirting Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $17.50/$35

Item#: SPSU 20226 55% recycled cotton/45% Tencel jersey knit Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $15/$30

Item#: SPSU 20327 55% hemp/45% organic cotton chambray Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $25/$50

Willamette Workroom

123


Item#: SPSU 10874 81% cotton/19% Tencel denim (10.5oz) Size Range: 24 - 31 Target COG/WS: $47.50/$95

Item#: SPSU 10680 81% cotton/19% Tencel denim (10.5oz) Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $67.50/$135

Item#: SPSU 10975 55% hemp/45% organic cotton plain weave bottomweight Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $30/$60

Item#: SPSU 10776 81% cotton/19% Tencel denim (10.5oz) Size Range: 24 - 31 Target COG/WS: $32.50/$65

124

Willamette Workroom

Item#: SPSU 10881 55% hemp/45% organic cotton plain weave denim Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $25/$50

Willamette Workroom

125


Item#: SPSU 20177 100% nylon taslan Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $27.50/$55

Item#: SPSU 30525 100% nylon taslan Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $34.50/$69

Item#: SPSU 20178 100% nylon taslan Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $30/$60

Item#: SPSU 30526 100% nylon taslan 100% Tencel plain weave lining Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $40/$80

126

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

127


WEATHERED FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 9

128

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

129


Willamette Workroom FW19 Trend Research

TECHNICAL/FUNCTIONAL RAWHIDE

HAZE

GRAPHITE

Fall/Winter 2019 brings the

PLUM BERRY

vibrancy of spring into the richer context of fall, and into transition.

BURNT

Colors are saturated, muddy, and as dark as dusk. Silhouettes make a bold, strong

SAFFRON

statement with unique details that appear handworked and one of a

TANNED

kind. Details are an important part of each silhouette. Weighty fabrics

BARK

create a resilient backdrop for these details to pop.

GREYSCALE

INDIGO

NORTH SIDE MOSS

PASTURE

130

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

131


WORKWEAR

CASUAL SPORTSWEAR

132

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

133


Item#: AUWT 20380 100% cotton cupro twill weave Trim: 100% cotton cupro 2x2 ribknit Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $19.50/$39

Item#: AUWT 20483 90% cotton cupro/10% spandex plain weave Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $14/$28

Item#: AUWT 20381 100% cotton cupro twill weave Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $15/$30

Item#: AUWT 20184 60% reclaimed wool/40% cotton gabardine Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $27.50/$55

Item#: AUWT 20482 100% Tencel lyocell shirting plain weave Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $35/$70

134

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

135


Item#: AUWT 20185 90% cupro/10% spandex plain weave Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $25/$50

Item#: AUWT 20186 50% reclaimed wool/40% cotton/10% spandex gabardine Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $31/$62

136

Willamette Workroom

Item#: AUWT 10787 100% organic cotton denim (11.5oz) Size Range: 24 - 31 Target COG/WS: $49/$98

Item#: AUWT 10788 70% reclaimed wool/30% Tencel lyocell gabardine Size Range: 24 - 31 Target COG/WS: $35/$70

Willamette Workroom

137


Item#: AUWT 30690 100% reclaimed wool melton Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $45/$90

Item#: AUWT 30691 100% reclaimed wool melton Size Range: xs - xl Target COG/WS: $42.50/$85

Willamette Workroom Technical Packages

Item#: Item#: AUWT AUWT 10999 10999 100% 100% PETPET polyester polyester ripstop ripstop SizeSize Range: Range: xs - xs xl -Target xl Target COG/WS: COG/WS: $29/$58 $29/$58

138

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

139


w

W I L L A M E T T E

Style Design Detail

WILLAMETTE WORKROOM

SPSU20424

Missy

Spring 2019

WOR K RO O M

W I L L A M E T T E

Style Type

Apparel

No of Item(s)

1

Style No

SPSU20424

Description

Buttoned & Vented Tailored Shirt

Garment Wash/Treatment Tech-Pack Due

11/30/2017

Status

In Progress

Design Contact

Style Category

Woven Tops

Tech Design Contact

Size Range

XS - XL

Sourcing Contact

Size Class

Missy

Copyright © 2009-2017 by Gerber Technology. All rights reserved.

Willamette Workroom

Style Design Detail

WILLAMETTE WORKROOM

SPSU20424

Missy

Spring 2019

WOR K RO O M

Division

Fashion Merchandising

Style Type

Apparel

Active

Yes

No of Item(s)

1

Created By

Keri Yourick

Style No

SPSU20424

Created Date

11/16/2017

Description

Modified By

Keri Yourick

Buttoned & Vented Tailored Shirt

Modified Date

11/21/2017

Details 1

140

w

Garment Wash/Treatment Tech-Pack Due

11/30/2017

Status

In Progress

Design Contact

Style Category

Woven Tops

Tech Design Contact

Size Range

XS - XL

Sourcing Contact

Size Class

Missy

Division

Fashion Merchandising

Active

Yes

Created By

Keri Yourick

Created Date

11/16/2017

Modified By

Keri Yourick

Modified Date

11/21/2017

Details 2 Printed By Keri Yourick @ 11/21/2017 6:24 PM

Page 1 of 3

Copyright © 2009-2017 by Gerber Technology. All rights reserved.

Printed By Keri Yourick @ 11/21/2017 6:24 PM

Page 2 of 3

Willamette Workroom

141


w

W I L L A M E T T E

W I L L A M E T T E W O R K RTailored O O M Shirt - Imperial View Portrait (POM Comments) SPSU20424

Missy

Spring 2019

WOR K RO O M

W I L L A M E T T E

Style Type

Apparel

No of Item(s)

1

Style No

SPSU20424

Description

Buttoned & Vented Tailored Shirt

Garment Wash/Treatment Tech-Pack Due

11/30/2017

Status

In Progress

Design Contact

Style Category

Woven Tops

Tech Design Contact

Size Range

XS - XL

Sourcing Contact

Size Class

Missy

Division

Fashion Merchandising

Active

Yes

Created By

Keri Yourick

Created Date

11/16/2017

Modified By

Keri Yourick

Modified Date

12/2/2017

Women's Top - Woven

Size Class

Missy

Sample Size

M

Description

Women's Woven Top

Size Range

XS - XL

Method-System

Incremental - Imperial

POM

Description / Comments

+Tol

-Tol

XS

S

M

L

XL

LT005

Front Length From HPS

1/4

-1/4

25

25 1/2

26

26 1/2

27

ADHOC

Back Length From HPS

1/4

1/4

27

27 1/2

28

28 1/2

29

ADHOC

Across Front (8" Down From HPS)

1/4

1/4

14 1/4

14 3/4

15 1/4

15 3/4

16 1/4

ADHOC

Across Back (8" Down From HPS)

1/4

1/4

16 1/2

17

17 1/2

18

18 1/2

LT015

Back Neck Drop

1/8

-1/8

1 1/4

1 3/8

1 1/2

1 5/8

1 3/4

LT020

Front Neck Drop

1/8

-1/8

2 3/4

2 7/8

3

3 1/8

3 1/4

LT045

Neckline Width - Curved

1/8

-1/8

20 1/4

20 5/8

21

21 3/8

21 7/8

ADHOC

Neck Width (HPS to HPS)

1/8

1/8

5 7/8

6

6 1/8

6 1/4

6 3/8

LT060

Across Shoulder

1/4

-1/4

15 1/4

15 3/4

16 1/4

17

18

LT070

Chest Width (1" Below AH)

3/8

-3/8

39 1/2

40 1/2

41 1/2

43

45

LT085

Bottom Opening/Sweep (J on Detail Page)

3/8

-3/8

19

20

21

22 1/2

24 1/2

LT165

Armhole Width - Curved

1/4

-1/4

19

19 1/2

20

20 3/4

21 3/4

LT175

CB Sleeve Length

1/4

-1/4

34

34 1/4

34 1/2

34 3/4

35 1/4

LT200

Sleeve Opening Width

1/8

-1/8

7 1/2

7 3/4

8

8 1/4

8 3/4

ADHOC

Armhole Drop From HPS

1/8

1/8

10 1/4

10 3/8

10 1/2

10 5/8

10 3/4

ADHOC

Shoulder Drop

1/8

1/8

1

1 1/8

1 1/4

1 3/8

1 1/2

ADHOC

Bicep Girth (1" Below Armhole)

1/8

1/8

6 1/4

6 3/8

6 1/2

6 5/8

6 3/4

ADHOC

Elbow Girth

1/8

1/8

6

6 1/8

6 1/4

6 3/8

6 1/2

ADHOC

Cuff Height

1/8

1/8

3

3

3

3

3

ADHOC

Collar Band Height

1/8

1/8

1

1

1

1

1

ADHOC

HPS to Bottom of Yoke

1/4

1/4

4 5/8

4 5/8

4 5/8

4 5/8

5 1/8

Copyright © 2009-2017 by Gerber Technology. All rights reserved.

Willamette Workroom

WILLAMETTE WORKROOM

WOR K RO O M

Style # Style Name:

SPSU 20424 Buttoned & Vented Tailored Shirt

Season: Date:

Description: Fabric 1:

Tailored shirt with stand-up collar, hidden front placket, and side vents 100% silk ribbed crepe shirting

Updated by: Fabric 2:

FABRICS

Fabric 100% silk ribbed weave shirting

Product Type

142

w

Printed By Keri Yourick @ 12/2/2017 10:54 PM

Yardage

Price

1.75

$

TOTAL FABRIC COST: TRIMS/FINDINGS Trims Interfacing Snaps Thread

Quantity 0.75 11 0.3lbs

TOTAL TRIM: LABOR Cutting Sewing TOTAL LABOR: Rate Shipping Duty

14.90%

Keri Yourick N/A SKETCH:

Cost 11.25 $

19.69

$

19.69

Price Cost $ 0.50 $ $ 0.04 $

S/S 2019 11/26/17

0.38 0.44

$

0.68

$

1.50

Cost $ $

0.35 10.00

$

10.35

Cost 0.43 N/A

TOTAL MANUFACTURING COST:

$

31.96

WILLAMETTE WORKROOM COST:

$

64

Portland Minimum Wage = $11.25 Mark Up % is 50%

Page 1 of 1

Willamette Workroom

143


144

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

145


w

W I L L A M E T T E

Style Design Detail

WILLAMETTE WORKROOM

SPSU30525

Missy

Spring 2019

WOR K RO O M

W I L L A M E T T E

Style Type

Apparel

No of Item(s)

1

Style No

SPSU30525

Description

Cornered Rain Slick

Style Category

Outerwear

Size Range

XS - XL

Size Class

Missy

Garment Wash/Treatment Tech-Pack Due

11/26/2017

Status

In Progress

Design Contact Tech Design Contact Sourcing Contact

Copyright © 2009-2017 by Gerber Technology. All rights reserved.

Willamette Workroom

Style Design Detail

WILLAMETTE WORKROOM

SPSU30525

Missy

Spring 2019

WOR K RO O M

Division

Fashion Merchandising

Style Type

Apparel

Active

Yes

No of Item(s)

1

Created By

Keri Yourick

Style No

SPSU30525

Created Date

11/16/2017

Description

Cornered Rain Slick

Modified By

Keri Yourick

Style Category

Outerwear

Modified Date

11/26/2017

Size Range

XS - XL

Size Class

Missy

SPSU30525

146

w

Garment Wash/Treatment Tech-Pack Due

11/26/2017

Status

In Progress

Design Contact Tech Design Contact Sourcing Contact

Division

Fashion Merchandising

Active

Yes

Created By

Keri Yourick

Created Date

11/16/2017

Modified By

Keri Yourick

Modified Date

11/26/2017

SPSU30525 Printed By Keri Yourick @ 11/27/2017 2:42 AM

Page 1 of 6

Copyright © 2009-2017 by Gerber Technology. All rights reserved.

Printed By Keri Yourick @ 11/27/2017 2:42 AM

Page 2 of 6

Willamette Workroom

147


w

W I L L A M E T T E

Created from LL FACES SS19 Line List - Imperial View Portrait (POM Comments) WILLAMETTE WORKROOM SPSU30525

Missy

Spring 2019

WOR K RO O M

w

W I L L A M E T T E

Style Type

Apparel

No of Item(s)

1

Style No

SPSU30525

Description

Cornered Rain Slick

Style Category

Outerwear

Size Range

XS - XL

Size Class

Missy

Garment Wash/Treatment Tech-Pack Due

11/26/2017

Status

In Progress

Design Contact Tech Design Contact Sourcing Contact

Division

Fashion Merchandising

Active

Yes

Created By

Keri Yourick

Created Date

11/16/2017

Modified By

Keri Yourick

Modified Date

11/26/2017

WILLAMETTE WORKROOM

WOR K RO O M

Style # SPSU 30525 Style Name: Cornered Rain Slick

Women's Outerwear

Size Class

Missy

Sample Size

M

Description

Women's Outerwear Jacket

Size Range

XS - XL

Method-System

Incremental - Imperial

POM

Description / Comments

+Tol

-Tol

XS

S

M

L

XL

LO005

Front Length

1/2

-1/2

32

32 1/2

33

33 1/2

34

LO060

Across Shoulder

1/4

-1/4

16 3/4

17 1/2

18

18 3/4

19 3/4

LO070

Chest Width

3/4

-3/4

41

44

46

49

53

LO085

Bottom Opening

3/4

-3/4

44

47

49

52

56

LO120

Collar Height

1/8

-1/8

2 1/2

2 1/2

2 1/2

2 1/2

2 1/2

LO165

Armhole Width Curved

3/8

-3/8

14 1/2

15 3/4

16 3/4

18

19 1/2

LO175

Sleeve Length

3/8

-3/8

33 1/2

33 3/4

34

34 1/4

34 1/2

LO200

Sleeve Opening Width

1/4

-1/4

13

13 1/2

14

14 1/2

15

LO235

Across Back

1/4

-1/4

14 3/4

15 1/2

16

16 3/4

17 3/4

ADHOC

Across Front

1/4

1/4

14

14 3/4

15 1/4

16

17

ADHOC

Armhole Drop

1/8

1/8

12 1/2

12 3/4

13

13 1/4

13 1/2

ADHOC

Waist Position from HPS

1/2

1/2

19

19 1/2

20

20 1/2

21

ADHOC

Back Length

1/2

1/2

32 1/2

33

33 1/2

34

34 1/2

ADHOC

Neck Width - Open

1/8

1/8

20

20 1/8

20 1/4

20 3/8

20 1/2

ADHOC

CF Zipper Length

1/8

1/8

29

29 1/2

30

30 1/2

31

ADHOC

Center Back Length

1/4

1/4

32 1/2

33

33 1/2

34

34 1/2

ADHOC

Center Back Vent Length

1/8

1/8

6

6

6

6

6

ADHOC

Elbow Width

1/8

1/8

16 1/2

17

17 1/2

18

18 1/2

ADHOC

SLeeve Opening Width

1/8

1/8

14

14 1/2

15

15 1/2

16

S/S 2019 5/25/17

Lightweight water resistant jacket with chest flap, patch Description: pockets, two piece sleeve and CB vent with drawcord Updated by: Fabric 1: 100% nylon taslan Fabric 2: FABRICS

Fabric Shell, nylon taslan

Product Type

Season: Date:

Yardage 2.95

Price Cost $ 5.10 $ 15.05

TOTAL FABRIC COST: TRIMS/FINDINGS Trims Interfacing Zipper Hook & Loop Snap Drawcord

$

Quantity 1 1 0.25 3 1

Price $ $ $ $ $

TOTAL TRIM: LABOR

SKETCH:

15.05

Cost $ $ $ $ $

0.50 3.95 0.41 0.90 0.55

$

6.31

Cost $ 0.40 $ 12.00

Cutting Sewing TOTAL LABOR:

$ Rate

Shipping Duty

0.50 3.95 1.65 0.30 0.55

Keri Yourick none

28.2%

12.40

Cost $ 0.54 N/A

TOTAL MANUFACTURING COST:

$

34.30

WILLAMETTE WORKROOM COST:

$

69

Portland Minimum Wage = $11.25 Mark Up % is 50%

Copyright © 2009-2017 by Gerber Technology. All rights reserved.

148

Willamette Workroom

Printed By Keri Yourick @ 11/27/2017 2:45 AM

Page 1 of 1

Willamette Workroom

149


150

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

151


w

W I L L A M E T T E

WILLAMETTE WORKROOM

Style Design Detail 1BT0029

Missy

Spring 2019

WOR K RO O M

W I L L A M E T T E

Style Type

Apparel

No of Item(s)

1

Style No

1BT0029

Description

Breezy Cut Offs

Style Category

Bottoms

Size Range

XS - XL

Size Class

Missy

Garment Wash/Treatment Tech-Pack Due

12/15/2017

Status

In Progress

Design Contact Tech Design Contact Sourcing Contact

Copyright © 2009-2017 by Gerber Technology. All rights reserved.

Willamette Workroom

WILLAMETTE WORKROOM

Style Design Detail 1BT0029

Missy

Spring 2019

WOR K RO O M

Division

Fashion Merchandising

Style Type

Apparel

Active

Yes

No of Item(s)

1

Created By

Keri Yourick

Style No

1BT0029

Created Date

11/23/2017

Description

Breezy Cut Offs

Modified By

Keri Yourick

Style Category

Bottoms

Modified Date

11/26/2017

Size Range

XS - XL

Size Class

Missy

1BT0029

152

w

Garment Wash/Treatment Tech-Pack Due

12/15/2017

Status

In Progress

Design Contact Tech Design Contact Sourcing Contact

Division

Fashion Merchandising

Active

Yes

Created By

Keri Yourick

Created Date

11/23/2017

Modified By

Keri Yourick

Modified Date

11/26/2017

1BT0029 Printed By Keri Yourick @ 11/27/2017 2:51 AM

Page 1 of 5

Copyright © 2009-2017 by Gerber Technology. All rights reserved.

Printed By Keri Yourick @ 11/27/2017 2:51 AM

Page 2 of 5

Willamette Workroom

153


w

W I L L A M E T T E

- Imperial View Portrait (POM Comments) W I L L A M E T T E W O R K R O O Shorts M 1BT0029

Missy

Spring 2019

WOR K RO O M

w

W I L L A M E T T E

Style Type

Apparel

No of Item(s)

1

Style No

1BT0029

Description

Breezy Cut Offs

Style Category

Bottoms

Size Range

XS - XL

Size Class

Missy

Garment Wash/Treatment Tech-Pack Due

12/15/2017

Status

In Progress

Design Contact Tech Design Contact Sourcing Contact

WILLAMETTE WORKROOM

WOR K RO O M

Style # SPSU 10881 Style Name: Breezy Cutt Offs

Season: Date:

Keri Yourick

High rise tailored shorts with slash pockets, welt pocket, and Description: shaped waistband Fabric 1: 55% hemp/45% cotton plain weave denim

Updated by: Fabric 2:

12/2/2017

FABRICS

Division

Fashion Merchandising

Active

Yes

Created By

Keri Yourick

Created Date

11/23/2017

Modified By Modified Date

Fabric Shell Pocket lining (muslin)

Product Type

Womens Bottoms

Size Class

Womens

Sample Size

M

Description

Bottoms: skirts, pants, shorts

Size Range

XS - XL

Method-System

Incremental - Imperial

POM

Description / Comments

+Tol

-Tol

XS

S

M

L

XL

LB405

Waistband Height

1/8

-1/8

1 5/8

1 5/8

1 5/8

1 5/8

1 5/8

LB410

Waistband Width

3/8

-3/8

28

29

30

31 1/2

33 1/2

LB440

High Hip Width

3/8

-3/8

34 1/2

35 1/2

36 1/2

38

40

LB445

Low Hip Width

3/8

-3/8

36 1/2

37 1/2

38 1/2

40

42

LB455

Thigh Width at Cuttable Seam

1/4

-1/4

20

20 3/4

21 1/2

22 1/2

23 1/2

LB465

Leg Opening

1/8

-1/8

19 3/4

20

20 1/4

20 5/8

21

LB500

Inseam (Long)

3/8

-3/8

6

6

6

6

6

ADHOC

Inseam (Short)

3/8

3/8

3 1/2

3 1/2

3 1/2

3 1/2

3 1/2

LB510

Front Rise

3/8

-3/8

7

7 3/4

8 1/2

9 1/4

10

LB535

Back Rise

3/8

-3/8

10 1/4

11

11 3/4

12 1/2

13 1/4

ADHOC

CF Fly Length

1/8

1/8

4 3/4

4 3/4

4 3/4

4 3/4

4 3/4

ADHOC

Welt Pocket Height

1/8

1/8

1/2

1/2

1/2

1/2

3/4

ADHOC

Welt Pocket Width

1/8

1/8

4 1/2

5

5

5

5 1/2

ADHOC

Front Pocket Opening Length

1/8

1/8

6 1/4

6 1/4

6 1/4

6 1/4

6 3/4

ADHOC

Front Pocket Opening from SS

1/8

1/8

3

3

3

3

3 1/2

ADHOC

Back Dart Length

1/8

1/8

1 1/4

1 1/4

1 1/4

1 1/4

1 1/2

Yardage 1 0.15

TOTAL FABRIC COST: TRIMS/FINDINGS Trims CF zipper

Price/yd Cost $ 8.95 $ 8.95 $ 1.50 $ 0.23 $

Quantity 1

S/S 2019 5/25/17 Keri Yourick 100% cotton (Plain weave, Muslin) SKETCH:

9.18

Price/Unit Cost $ 2.10 $ 2.10

CF hook & bar

1

$

Thread Interfacing

0.3 lbs 0.25

$ $

TOTAL TRIM: LABOR

1.00 $ $ 5.25 $ 0.50 $

1.00 1.58 0.13

$

4.80

Cost $ 0.67 $ 9.00

Cutting Sewing TOTAL LABOR:

$ Rate

Shipping Duty

HTS61046220

14.90%

9.67

Cost $ 1.30 N/A

TOTAL MANUFACTURING COST:

$

24.95

WILLAMETTE WORKROOM COST:

$

50

Portland Minimum Wage = $11.25 Mark Up % is 50%

Copyright © 2009-2017 by Gerber Technology. All rights reserved.

154

Willamette Workroom

Printed By Keri Yourick @ 12/2/2017 10:41 PM

Page 1 of 1

Willamette Workroom

155


156

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

157


Willamette Workroom Production Calendar PRODUCTION CALENDAR - S/S 2019 AND F/W 2019 JANUARY

FEBRUARY

MARCH

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

WILLAMETTE WORKROOM DEVELOPMENT TIMELINE CALENDAR S/S COLOR & TREND RESEARCH (2018) S/S PRE-PRODUCTION (core clients) All S/S fabrics ordered by 8/15 S/S PRODUCTION CNT'D (as needed)

S/S SMALL BATCH PRODUCTION (core clients)

S/S DELIVERIES (1/2 to 3/1) F/W COLOR & TREND RESEARCH (2018) F/W PRE-PRODUCTION (core clients)

F/W PRE_PRODUCTION (core clients)

All F/W fabrics ordered by 2/15 F/W SMALL BATCH PRODUCTION (core clients)

F/W PRODUCTION CNT'D (as needed) F/W DELIVERIES (7/1 to 9/1)

A LA CARTE SERVICES (all available)

A LA CARTE SERVICES (limited production)

A LA CARTE SERVICES (all available)

A LA CARTE SERVICES (limited production)

2/1 to 4/7: Spring/Summer Color and Trend Research, core clients 3/7 to 10/15: Spring/Summer Pre-Production, Sampling, and as needed small production, core clients 8/1 to 10/7: Fall/Winter Color and Trend Research, core clients 8/15: All fabrics and trims orders must be placed 9/8 - 4/15: Fall/Winter Pre-Production, Sampling, and as needed small production, core clients 10/1 - 12/23: Spring/Summer small batch production, core clients 1/2 to 3/1: Spring/Summer delivery window (Production continues until 3/1 as needed) 2/15: All fabrics and trims orders must be placed 4/1 to 6/30: Fall/Winter small batch production, core clients 7/1 to 9/1: Fall/Winter delivery window (Production continues as needed)

*A la carte services are offered year round, but large production quantities will not be accommodated during peak core client production months October through December, and April through June.

158

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

159


07

Marketing Plan

Double Down Denim Development

»» Brand Overview »» Marketing Strategy »» Website Development »» Marketing Future Growth

160

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

161


Logo Typeface

Willamette Workroom Brand Overview

Raleway Semibold ExtraLight

Texture based on Portland City sewer caps to be replicated in cross hatch stitches on garments or as a distinguishing label feature in future in-house apparel designs.

The logo has been designed to be flexible enough to use in any color story, finish, or out of any manner of materials. The distinguishing mark is the overlapping “wings” at the center of the logo’s W. This overlapping feature will create a strong presence in a multitude of uses.

162

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

163


MARKETING STRATEGY YEAR 1 Maker’s Row

Informational Website

Search Engine Optimization

Business to Business Services Pitch Box

$350/month (Preferred Member)

$2,500 build cost, $50 monthly hosting fee,

$1,350 monthly to pay for Google Search

Budgeted $1,699 twice a year to solicit services to

Monthly fee includes unlimited access to bid

and $300 quarterly for updates.

Engine Optimization services.

primary, secondary, and tertiary target businesses.

on projects for all potential clients as well as a “Preferred Partner” badge on the Maker’s Row website. It also includes the highest search ranking on the site and facilitated introductions to brands.

Having a presence on Maker’s

Row will help aspiring designers and entrepreneurs find required services more quickly and help Willamette Workroom stand out over the competition. Maker’s Row is a website dedicated to helping its members find and connect with factories that can help him or her realize their

The informational website will

Cost: $70 per pitch box shipped to 15 potential Being readily accessible via

clients, twice yearly.

be a resource for any potential client

informational searches by young, start-up

looking to make a quick cost assessment

designers will be Willamette Workrooms’

for a project and/or collection, but

major advantage over other smaller

largely rely on word-of-mouth marketing and

without divulging too much information

sample studios. In conjunction with

networking, Willamette Workroom envisions

that pigeon holes the company into being

networking, potential clients need to

preparing a number of “pitch boxes” twice a

unable to raise the cost of services based

easily find our services on the Internet to

year to give to potential clients. The pitch boxes

on complexity. The informational site will

maximize the ease of finding the desired

will include the following: personalized letter

also clearly delineate all of the services

information. To optimize SEO results, the

to designers including services offered, sewing

that Willamette Workroom can provide to

workroom will maintain a presence on

samples of details relevant to seasonal trends

designers including product categories the

Instagram and Twitter.

and highlighting sample making capabilities

company will not sample or manufacture.

Because the first year will need to

Alabama Chanin

through professional photography, and a brief introduction into trends for the upcoming season

design visions. It will be important that

including fabric swatches, color chips, and mood

Willamette Workroom use its Maker’s

imagery. Trend research will be original research

Row access to the greatest advantage by

conducted by the workroom as well as from

also building an informational website

official trend service providers. These boxes

that helps potential customers understand

will only be used with established networking

the services offered and relative costs.

contacts so as to maintain the intellectual property rights of the original work completed by Willamette Workroom.

Ensell Hall at Premiere Vision September 2017

164

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

165


Networking Events in Portland

Portland Fashion Week is the “Best Indie

Fashion Week” according to major publications TIME Magazine and The Huff Post. It is the only carbon negative fashion week and highlights sustainable designers from the Pacific Northwest and further. Established in 2002, Portland Fashion

Sourcing @ MAGIC shows: Las Vegas, February

To have a working website will

allow Willamette Workroom clients to

in to present in October 2017. A competing fashion opportunity to network the workroom services to emerging brands in the area. Shows happen once a year in October and also feature designs by FashioNXT’s Emerging Designers Contest finalists. Fade to Light, a multidimensional fashion event, is a third runway show that showcases emerging talent in the Portland fashion scene twice a year in February and August. Started in 2012, the show highlights

Portland Fashion Institute. The statement that Portland Fashion Week

makes within the industry supports the vision of Willamette Workroom and offers opportunities to market the workroom’s services to locally based, independent designers. Willamette Workroom

October; Dallas, April.

to readily post client testimonials about

to attend as a retailer (MAGIC) and/

the services and production and ideally

or manufacturer (DG Expo). Willamette

offer an on-line shopping platform to sell

Workroom has budgeted $800 twice per

clients’ products direct-to-consumer. The

year in R&D expenses to attend trade shows.

workroom also envisions in future growth

Magic sees foot traffic of 85,000 people

that an in-house private label collection of

twice per year.

apparel would also be available for direct-to-

consumer shopping.

also network within the industry at larger

These trade shows are free

Willamette Workroom looks to

trade shows such as MAGIC in Las Vegas, A working web-based platform would also

which has a ‘Made in USA’ dedicated area,

allow Willamette Workroom to build a brand

and DG Expo, a fabric and trims trade show

presence across multiple platforms that lead

geared towards emerging designers and

potential clients back to the web page. A

small production runs. By attending trade

carefully curated selection of local and hand

shows, specifically DG Expo, the workroom

crafted items available for purchase would be

has the opportunity to build sourcing

the strongest form of brand ideation.

partner contacts, which will be a competitive advantage to its clients when looking to

needs to keep its finger on the pulse of the Portland designer could be the next great collaboration for

New York, January & August; Miami, March &

through the website. The workroom looks

Care of Clayton Beck, Portland Fashion Week 2015

graduates from The Art Institute of Portland and

fashion community because any new, up-and-coming

& August

communicate to the workroom directly

show, FashioNXT, in Portland also provides ample

Working Website with continual updates

The group cancelled shows in 2016, but returned

presentations. The show consistently promotes

Attend tradeshows twice per year – Sourcing @ MAGIC, DG Expo

DG Expo shows: San Francisco, November;

Week holds runway shows each year in the Fall.

designers that think outside the box for their runway

YEAR 2

partner with a sample partner. If the business Featured designers at Fade to Light August 2017

can offer contacts to reliable, sustainable textile mills, clients may choose Willamette

the business. It will ensure small-batch production

Workroom over others because of the ease of

quantities are met as well as using the development

access to sourcing partners.

services regularly. FashioNXT tickets range $30 for standing to $185 front row per evening, October 2018. Sourcing at MAGIC & DG Expo Sourced from Google Images Images from Portland Fashion Week website

166

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

167


Willamette Workroom Website Development

Informational Website Landing Page

Mobile Compatibility Website Landing Page Maker’s Row Website Landing Page

168

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

169


Marketing Future Growth As Willamette Workroom continues to grow beyond year three, the aim of the company is ultimately combining its business into a vertically integrated supply chain. This means that the company wants to acquire the expertise of textile production and finishing, realistically by merging with an existing textile mill, in addition to development services and manufacturing. The larger growth plan for Willamette Workroom means that a client could truly collaborate with the company to design textiles for small collections, design and sample garment pieces, build the full product line plan for each season, produce the pieces in small quantities, and ultimately distribute the final goods to local boutiques or distribution center. To create its own locally derived supply chain ecosystem is the ultimate sustainability goal for Willamette Workroom. It is the most idealistic picture of what sustainability in the fashion industry looks like, but the workroom is not naĂŻve enough to ignore the market

trends that may inhibit the success of such an ecosystem. The vertical integration will need to occur organically with consumer demand as well. Willamette Workroom also feels that attracting fashion entrepreneurs from outside the PNW region is plausible with this future growth. There may also ultimately be an opportunity to sew a private label, in-house brand, manufacturing for the Willamette Workroom brand as well as select clients. But it would be the ultimate goal to no longer need third-party clients and to instead build the business further as private label. With new opportunities to create, the company would look to expand its sourcing efforts to European trade shows. The private label business would allow for sourcing higher quality, higher price fabrics as a means to elevate the brand image of a business that holds sustainability principles as the core of the business.

Photo (left) taken at Premiere Vision NYC by Sourcing Journal

170

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

171


08

Financial Plan Laure de Sagazon, Paris

»» Start-Up Expenses »» Assortment Plan »» Sales/Stock & Cash Flow »» Profit & Loss »» Future Growth »» Roles, Responsibilities, & Salaries »» Organizational Chart

172

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

173


Financials: Start-Up Expenses As consumers respond more positively to brands with a conscientious brand image, there is real possibility in growing a business that not only consults with brands to build a sustainable brand, but also provides local services to enhance that message.

Technology and Equipment

Leasehold Improvements

Sewing Machines Leasing 6 machines = $356.13/mth

Commercial Contracting

Gravity-Feed Irons & Ironing Boards = $656

Paint & Cleaned Flooring (as is) = $4.00/sq.ft. @

(2) Pacific Steam PSI-E5 $248

1251sq.ft. = $5004

(2) Gravity-Feed ironing board $80

Small Kitchen Upgrade = $1500

Extra Presser Feet $15/set = $60 Other Start-up Expenses Computers & Software

Utilities Deposit $400

(2) iMac Desktop Computers $1100 each = $2200

Insurance, Permits, Office Supplies & Other Supplies

Printer/Copier $450

Muslin $1.69/yard =$169

Microsoft Office 365 $150/user per year = $300

Dot Paper $0.52/yard = $52

Quickbooks for Mac = $300

Pins, Shears, Snips $350 Paper, Pens, Pencils $80

Studio Fixtures

Packing Supplies

(3) Cutting/Pattern Drafting Table $350 each = $1050

Poly Bags $100

Wall Open Shelving Units = $900

Cardboard Boxes $150

Technology, studio equipment like irons and replacement sewing

Hanging Storage Space Fixtures = $450

machine parts, studio fixtures and mannequins, and start up

Fabric Storage = $150

Contingency Reserve $10,000

supplies and expenses total $9,777.

Work Space desks = $350

Working Capital $20,000

To improve cash flow, sewing machines will be leased on a monthly basis with an option to purchase after three years.

(2) Rolling Racks = $160 (4) Mannequins = $1200

Monthly lease will total $357. The first three months of wages, sewing machine lease, rent deposit, and marketing start up are factored into start-up costs totaling $41,309.

Double Down Denim

Clinton Park website

Leasehold Improvements based on studio square footage of 1,251 sq.ft. will total $6,504. Depreciation of studio fixtures, technology and equipment totals $235.50 per month over five years. Contingency reserve of $10,000 and working capital of $20,000 estimated at $30,000 will help to cover the first three months of business. Sewing Machine and Patterns 3

174

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

175


Start-Up Costs and Monthly Depreciation Values Item

Detail

$ Amount

Technology and Equipment

Irons, Ironing Boards, Presser Feet, Computers, Printer, Software

$3,366.00

Studio Fixtures

Drafting Tables, Shelving, Rolling Racks, Mannequins

$4,260.00

Leasehold Improvements (Material & Labor)

Clean Flooring, Paint, Small Kitchen Remodel, Labor

$6,504.00

3 Months

$1,068.39

3 Year Machines Lease

Rent Deposit

3 Months Rent Deposit

$5,629.50

Wages and Salaries

3 Months

Marketing Startup

Website Build, Maker’s Row Membership, Open House, SEO Services

$8,750.00

Opening Inventory

Cost BOM$ Inventory

$20,949.05

Other Start Up Expenses

Permits, Insurance, Utility Deposits, Office Supplies

$1,301.00

Studio Only Start Up Supplies

Muslin, Dot Paper, Shears, Poly Bags, Cardboard Boxes

$850.00

Contingency Reserve

Extra Cash for Unforeseen Expenses and Repairs

$10,000.00

Working Capital

Cash Needed in first months to keep bank funds positive

$20,000.00

Total

$25,860.00

$108,537.94

Production Quantities and Cost of Goods Summary

Depreciate ?

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

Monthly # Months of Depreciation Useful Life Expense 60

60

60

$56.10

$71.00

$108.40

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

$235.50

COG/Unit

Units of Production

SHORTS

$30.00

60

$1,800.00

SHORTS

$27.50

90

$2,475.00

SHORTS

$25.00

120

$3,000.00

S/S TOP

$17.50

45

$787.50

S/S TOP

$16.50

75

$1,237.50

S/S TOP

$15.50

150

$2,325.00

DRESS

$30.00

30

$900.00

DRESS

$27.50

50

$1,375.00

DRESS

$25.00

75

$1,875.00

PANTS

$32.50

60

$1,950.00

PANTS

$30.00

90

$2,700.00

PANTS

$27.50

120

$3,300.00

L/S TAILORED TOP

$30.00

45

$1,350.00

L/S TAILORED TOP

$25.00

75

$1,875.00

L/S TAILORED TOP

$20.00

150

$3,000.00

JACKET

$40.00

100

$4,000.00

JACKET

$37.50

150

$5,625.00

JACKET

$35.00

200

$7,000.00

C&S KNIT

$11.50

60

$690.00

C&S KNIT

$11.00

150

$1,650.00

C&S KNIT

$10.50

300

$3,150.00

C&S HVY KNIT

$18.50

60

$1,110.00

C&S HVY KNIT

$17.50

150

$2,625.00

C&S HVY KNIT

$16.00

300

$4,800.00

DENIM

$49.00

90

$4,410.00

DENIM

$47.50

180

$8,550.00

DENIM

$46.00

300

$13,800.00

3275

$87,360.00

Product Category

TOTAL

176

Willamette Workroom

Total COGs

Willamette Workroom

177


Assortment Plan Quote from Steven Heard, Clinton Park Interview

�

Selling clothing has changed. The product is the souvenir of the [shopping] experience. It is all about the story, especially if you are manufacturing yourself.�

T

Elizabeth Suzann Studio

The business assortment plan for Willamette Workroom makes the assumption that the

Projected annual sales for all services,

business will collaborate with three different

including a la carte and full-package clients,

fashion brands in a calendar year, ranging in

totals $107,005.

size of desired production quantities from small to medium to large. In one calendar

Production will makeup 62% of total sales

year, each designer will likely only produce

with services being 38% of sales while all

seasonal spring and fall collections, i.e. two

sales total $281,725.

collections per year. While the production quantities will change and are only

The largest product categories in production

guesstimates, showing financial projections

are projected to be bottoms followed by cut

for three different production quantities

and sew knitwear.

helps put into context how much production needs to happen to help the business be Imogene + Willie, Nashville, Tennessee

successful. Product categories for spring season

Northwest influence the businesses decision

Projected hours of consultation for difficult designs or

production include shorts, short sleeve tops,

that jackets and denim will be essential, year-

with a la carte clients range from small (8 hours) to large,

dresses, and cut and sew knits.

round product categories.

full year (96 hours) sessions.

Product categories for fall season production

All services will occur year-round and include

Projected annual production units equals 3275 units in

include pants, long sleeved tailored tops, and

seasonal consultations with each brand,

all product categories.

cut and sew heavyweight knits.

patterns, fit sessions, sampling, sourcing

Seasonal weather patterns in the Pacific

assistance hours, and full specification

Based on COG and a 50% Initial Mark Up, the business

package building.

projects annual sales dollars of production to be $174,720.

178

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

179


Unit Percent to Total Units

Percent of Wholesale to Total Wholesale

Total Production

%

Total Consultation

%

Total Sales

$174,720.00

62%

$107,005.00

38%

$281,725.00

Total Units

Unit % to Total

Total COG

Total Wholesale

Wholesale % to total

Average $

TOPS

540

14.22%

$10,575.00

$23,850.00

7.5%

$44.17

BOTTOMS

1110

29.23%

$41,985.00

$83,970.00

29.8%

$75.65

DRESSES

155

4.08%

$4,150.00

$8,300.00

2.9%

$53.55

KNITWEAR

1020

26.86%

$14,025.00

$28,050.00

10%

$27.50

OUTERWEAR

450

11.85%

$16,625.00

$33,250.00

11.8%

$73.89

CONSULTING 8 HRS

5

0.13%

$3,200.00

1.1%

$640.00

CONSULTING 16 HRS

3

0.08%

$3,840.00

1.4%

$1,280.00

CONSULTING 24 HRS

2

0.05%

$3,840.00

1.4%

$1,920.00

CONSULTING (FULL YEAR) NEW SEASON START CONSULTATION

3

0.08%

$23,040.00

8.1%

$7,680.00

6

0.16%

$480.00

0.17%

$80.00

FIRST PATTERN

72

1.90%

$8,640.00

3.1%

$120.00

FIRST FIT SESSION

72

1.90%

$4,320.00

1.5%

$60.00

SECOND PATTERN

72

1.90%

$6,120.00

2.2%

$85.00

SAMPLE & FINAL FITTING

72

1.90%

$14,400.00

5.1%

$200.00

ADDITIONAL SAMPLE(S)

18

0.47%

$3,150.00

1.1%

$175.00

SOURCING ASSISTANCE

100

2.63%

$7,500.00

2.7%

$75.00

FULL SPECIFICATION PACK

72

1.90%

$21,600.00

7.7%

$300.00

BRAND DEVELOPMENT

25

0.66%

3797

100%

$6,875.00

2.4%

$275.00

Class

Total

180

Willamette Workroom

$87,360

$281,725

100.0%

$74.20

Willamette Workroom

181


Sales Flow

The average cumulative net cash flow for Year 1

steady at 48.6% if projected growth is achieved.

totals $66,836. Assuming all start-up funds are obtained, the

35000

12%

30000

10%

Projected sales for year 2 are $309,898.

8%

Projected sales for year 3 are $356,382.

6%

Production loss has been factored in as a Markdown,

25000 20000 15000

5000

2%

0

0%

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL Series1

MAR $22,315 8%

business should start with positive monthly net

APR $18,319 7%

MAY $21,619 8%

JUN $22,073 8%

JUL $29,612 11%

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

cash of $70,240. This will be important because

with year 1 assuming 1% loss at $1,747 and

4%

10000

FEB $28,168 10%

Gross Margin percent for Year 2 and Year 3 remain

the company will have negative working cash in the months prior to large production orders.

decreasing to 0.8% in year 2 at $1,711 and 0.7% in

Year 1 will end with negative monthly working cash

year 3 at $1,871.

of -$27,476. Year 2 will begin with positive cumulative net cash in February of $63,713.

Series2 AUG $28,370 10%

SEP $21,882 8%

OCT $17,769 6%

NOV $20,983 7%

DEC $21,408 8%

JAN $29,207 10%

Financials: Sales/Stock & Cash Flow

P

Production numbers are expected to fluctuate within more normal fashion cycle calendar months with heavy production occurring in November and December for spring season launches and May and June for Fall collections. Services are expected to be a larger percentage of monthly sales in between heavy

Feb - Yr 1

Mar - Yr 1

Jan - Yr 1

Yr 1

$2,055

$289

$2,921

$2,219

-$3,348

-$124

-$4,630

$24,466

Less: Shrink and MDs (cost)

$154

$122

$160

$1,542

Plus: Depreciation Expense

$236

$236

$236

$2,826

Less: Principal Payments

$543

$543

$543

$6,512

-$27,476

Jan - Yr 0 Startup Loan/Personal $$

$108,538

Less: Start-up Capital Expenditures

$17,349

Equals: Available Start-up $$

$91,189

Profit or <Loss> (GM$-Expenses)

Less: Monthly Incr. of Inv (at Cost)

$20,949

production months, July/August and January/February. Equals: Monthly Working Cash

-$20,949

$4,941

-$16

$7,084

Equals: Monthly Net Cash

$70,240

$4,941

-$16

$7,084

Cumulative Net Cash

$70,240

$75,181

$75,165

$63,713

Projected Year 1 sales equal $281,725. Gross Margin in year 1 totals $192,122 or 68.2% Growth is projected at 10% going into year 2 and 15% into year 3, which takes into consideration fulfilling more a la carte services and/or increasing production quantities with current full-package brands.

182

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

183


Financials: Profit & Loss Year 1 expenses total $186,988, or 66.4% of sales. Largest expense is labor totaling $103,440, or 36.7% of net sales. Marketing budget is second totaling $28,798,

Marketing Expenses Calendar Feb

Website Build, Maintenance & Hosting

$2,550

Marketing Calendar

Grand Opening Open House

$1,000

Major marketing expenses consist of the monthly cost of

WW Service Pitch Box

maintaining high SEO results.

Maker’s Row presence SEO Services

Monthly charge for a factory on Maker’s Row is $350 for

Building the website will require money up front in month 1

Rent is third totaling $22,518, or 8% of net

plus monthly hosting fee thereafter. Twice per year, Willamette Workroom will put together pitch

Gross Margin dollars for services and production equals $192,122.

boxes for perspective clients as a way to market the level of quality they can expect. These boxes will include studio images, examples of prior work, sewn samples, and offer a

Projected profit of 0.8% by end of year 1, only given all estimates are correct.

free consultation session to learn what the factory can do for them.

$50

Jun

Jul

$350

$50

Aug

$50

Sep

$350

Oct

$50

$50

$100,000.00

$80,000.00

$60,000.00

$40,000.00 $28,798.00 $22,518.00

$20,000.00 $11,260.00

Jan

$350

$50

Total

$50 $4,000.00 $1,000

$1,699

$1,699

$3,398

$350

$350

$350

$350

$350

$350

$350

$350

$350

$350

$350

$350

$4,200

$1,350 $5,250

$1,350 $1,750

$1,350 $1,750

$1,350 $2,050

$1,350 $1,750

$1,350 $3,449

$1,350 $2,050

$1,350 $1,750

$1,350 $1,750

$1,350 $2,050

$1,350 $1,750

$1,350 $3,449

$16,200 $28,798

Loan

Labor Expenses

Loan amount requested equals 30% of start-up costs

The cost of labor is the most expensive expense for

that total $108,537.94.

Willamette Workroom. The company hopes to hire

Loan requested totals $32,561.38 with an annual interest

both one full time and one part time assistant within

rate of 3.6%.

the three years of business. Any additional hires will be

Paid off over five years.

compensated from “Hourly Wage.”

Additional equity needed equals $75,978 to be pulled Labor costs required for production quantities will only

from personal funds and/or angel investors.

$6,674.00 $805.00

$3,891.00

$3,060.00

$1,873.00

TASK CONSULTING 8 HRS CONSULTING 16 HRS CONSULTING 24 HRS CONSULTING (FULL YEAR) NEW SEASON START CONSULTATION SOURCING ASSISTANCE BRAND DEVELOPMENT

EMPLOYEE Keri Keri Keri Keri Keri Keri Keri

HOURS

FIRST PATTERN FIRST FIT SESSION FIRST FIT SESSION SECOND PATTERN SAMPLE & FINAL FITTING FINAL FITTING ADDITIONAL SAMPLE(S) FULL SPECIFICATION PACK FULL TIME STUDIO HELP PART TIME STUDIO HELP

Keri Keri Keri Keri Keri Keri Keri Keri F/T Assistant P/T Assistant

8 16 24 96 4 100 25

40 20

HOURLY WAGE TOTAL # Trans $32.00 $256.00 $32.00 $512.00 $32.00 $768.00 $30.00 $2,880.00 $32.00 $128.00 $30.00 $3,000.00 $110.00 $2,750.00 $48.00 $24.00 $11.25 $34.00 $80.00 $11.25 $70.00 $120.00 $13.00 $11.25

$520.00 $225.00

TOTAL WAGE

5 3 2 3 6 6 3

Total Wage $1,280.00 $1,536.00 $1,536.00 $8,640.00 $768.00 $18,000.00 $8,250.00

72 72 72 72 72 72 36 72 50 50

$3,456.00 $1,728.00 $810.00 $2,448.00 $5,760.00 $810.00 $2,520.00 $8,640.00 $26,000.00 $11,250.00 $103,432.00

Annual Wages/Employee

Willamette Workroom

Dec

Cost of Labor

$106,356.00 $103,440.00

184

Nov

(See page 95)

$120,000.00

$0.00

$50

May

be factored into the cost of labor in the garment costing.

Business Expenses

$3,980.00

TOTAL

Apr

all-access.

or 10.2% of net sales. sales.

Mar

Keri Assistant P/T Assistant

MONTHLY $8,619.33 $66,182.00 $26,000.00 $11,250.00

Willamette Workroom

185


Profit & Loss Statement Fixed or

Feb-Yr1

Variable

Net Sales

Mar-Yr1

$28,168

Apr-Yr1

$22,315

May-Yr1

$18,319

$21,619

Jun-Yr1

Aug-Yr1

Jul-Yr1

$22,073

Sep-Yr1

Oct-Yr1

Nov-Yr1

Dec-Yr1

Jan-Yr1

Yr1 Total

%/Sls

$29,612

$28,370

$21,882

$17,769

$20,983

$21,408

$29,207

$281,725

100.0%

$6,730

$6,266

$7,348

$7,562

$8,276

$89,603

31.8%

COGS

$7,218

$7,151

$6,799

$7,965

$8,207

$8,668

$7,414

Merchandise GM$

$20,950

$15,164

$11,520

$13,654

$13,866

$20,943

$20,956

$15,152

$11,504

$13,635

$13,846

$20,931

$192,122

68.2%

Research & Development

$100

$100

$100

$100

$100

$795

$100

$100

$100

$100

$100

$795

$2,590

0.9%

Merch. GM w/ R&D

$20,850

$15,064

$11,420

$13,554

$13,766

$20,148

$20,856

$15,052

$11,404

$13,535

$13,746

$20,136

$189,532

67.3%

Wages

$8,620

$8,620

$8,620

$8,620

$8,620

$8,620

$8,620

$8,620

$8,620

$8,620

$8,620

$8,620

$103,440

36.7%

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

0.0%

F F

Commissions

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

F

Rent

$1,876.50

$1,876.50

$1,876.50

$1,876.50

$1,876.50

$1,876.50

$1,876.50

$1,876.50

$1,876.50

$1,876.50

$1,876.50

$1,876.50

$22,518

8.0%

V

Marketing Expense

$5,250

$1,750

$1,750

$2,050

$1,750

$3,449

$2,050

$1,750

$1,750

$2,050

$1,750

$3,449

$28,798

10.2%

$695

$1,390

0.5%

Travel expense F

Health Insurance

$695 $243

$243

$243

$243

$243

$243

$243

$243

$243

$243

$243

$243

$2,916

1.0%

$400

$400

$400

$400

$400

$4,800

1.7%

$685

0.2%

F

Insurance

$400

$400

$400

$400

$400

$400

$400

F

Accounting/Books

$300

$35

$35

$35

$35

$35

$35

$35

$35

$35

$35

$35

V

Banking

$9.99

$9.99

$9.99

$9.99

$9.99

$9.99

$9.99

$9.99

$9.99

$9.99

$9.99

$9.99

$120

0.0%

$86

$85

$83

$81

$80

$1,065

0.4%

V

Interest Expense

$98

$96

$94

$93

$91

$90

$88

F

Depreciation

$236

$236

$236

$236

$236

$236

$236

$236

$236

$236

$236

$236

$2,826

1.0%

$420

$420

$500

$500

$420

$5,360

1.9%

F

Utilities & Security

$420

$420

$420

$500

$500

$420

$420

F

WiFi & Telephone

$275

$75

$75

$75

$75

$75

$75

$75

$75

$75

$75

$75

$1,100

0.4%

Muslin/Dot Paper/Tag Paper

$175

$175

$175

$175

$175

$175

$175

$175

$175

$175

$175

$175

$2,100

0.7%

$80

$80

$80

$80

$80

$960

0.3%

V

General Office Supplies

$80

$80

$80

$80

$80

$80

$80

Machine Lease

$356.13

$356.13

$356.13

$356.13

$356.13

$356.13

$356.13

$356.13

$356.13

$356.13

$356.13

$356.13

$4,274

1.5%

$200

$200

$200

$200

$200

$2,400

0.9%

F

Misc. Repairs et al

$200

$200

$200

$200

$200

$200

$200

V

Credit Card Transaction Fee

$187

$148

$122

$144

$147

$197

$189

$146

$118

$140

$142

$194

$1,873

0.7%

Shrinkage

$69

$55

$45

$53

$54

$72

$69

$53

$43

$51

$52

$71

$689

0.2%

Total Expense

$18,795

$14,775

$14,737

$15,146

$14,848

$17,229

$15,122

$14,761

$14,722

$15,130

$14,832

$17,216

$187,313

66.5%

Profit/Loss

$2,055

$289

-$3,317

-$1,591

-$1,082

$2,919

$5,734

$290

-$3,319

-$1,595

-$1,086

$2,921

$2,219

0.8%

Credit Card Trans Fee rate

1.75%

$12,105

$146,045

51.8%

186

Fixed Expenses

$12,570

$12,105

$12,105

$12,185

$12,185

$12,105

$12,105

$12,105

$12,105

$12,185

$12,185

Variable Expenses

$5,625

$2,084

$2,056

$2,377

$2,078

$4,520

$2,417

$2,072

$2,043

$2,363

$2,064

$4,508

$34,206

12.1%

Total Variable exp + COG $

$12,843

$9,235

$8,855

$10,341

$10,285

$13,189

$9,831

$8,802

$8,309

$9,710

$9,626

$12,784

$123,809

43.9%

Contribution Margin $

$15,325

$13,080

$9,464

$11,278

$11,788

$16,423

$18,539

$13,080

$9,461

$11,273

$11,783

$16,423

$157,916

Contribution Margin %

54.41%

58.62%

51.66%

52.17%

53.41%

55.46%

65.35%

59.78%

53.24%

53.72%

55.04%

56.23%

56.05%

BreakEven$ Volume

$23,104

$20,652

$23,431

$23,359

$22,816

$21,826

$18,524

$20,251

$22,736

$22,681

$22,139

$21,527

$260,547

BreakEven Sales per day

$1,281

$688

$781

$779

$761

$728

$617

$675

$758

$756

$738

$718

$9,279

BreakEven Sales per hour

$128

$69

$78

$78

$76

$73

$62

$68

$76

$76

$74

$72

$928

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

187


Financials: Future Growth

Quarterly Sales, Year 2

Three Year Sales Summary Year 1

BOM

$40,980

Year 2

$47,860

Year 3

Q1-Yr2

Q2-Yr2

Q3-Yr2

Q4-Yr2

Yr2 Total

$47,860

$64,348

$65,050

$62,695

$75,682

$80,634

$74,823

$78,759

$309,898

$38,902

$41,448

$38,461

$40,484

$159,294

$36,780

$39,186

$36,362

$38,275

$150,603

48.6%

48.6%

48.6%

48.6%

48.6%

$92,965

$82,185

$73,255

$92,340

$340,745

$45,441

$40,172

$35,807

$45,136

$166,556

$64,348

$65,050

$62,695

$75,447

$49,261

$69,417

$59,326

$73,377

$75,447

Net Sales

$281,725

$309,898

$356,382

Wholesale

$332,741

$340,745

$348,449

EOM

$47,860

$75,447

$63,861

Avg Inv

$43,660

$63,080

$62,354

Turn

6.45

4.91

5.72

188

$40,980

making money for the business through its small batch manufacturing service. The cost of labor to produce the goods gets absorbed into each garmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actual cost of goods. In this way, Willamette Workroom covers its overhead in manufacturing with the costs associated with the design and development of each style. It is imperative that the workroom ensure equal amounts of pre-production and development with this income structure to make

$63,080

1.16

1.26

1.07

4.91

Financial growth into year five projects that

manufacturing for clients becomes a steadily smaller proportion of the business income, and instead can

Quarterly Sales, Year 1

BOM Inventory

Workroomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business structure relies largely on

sure operating expenses are being met.

1.54

Q1-Yr1

During the first three years, Willamette

be replaced with in-house, private label production Q2-Yr1

$45,483

Q3-Yr1

$40,200

Q4-Yr1

Yr1 Total

whereby the mark up for selling the goods directly to

Quarterly Sales, Year 3

consumers goes back into the overhead expenses for

Q1-Yr3

Q2-Yr3

Q3-Yr3

Q4-Yr3

$75,447

$55,270

$63,568

$53,625

Yr3 Total

$43,777

manufacturing as well as begins to cover labor and expenses for the pre-production work. The business will not be able to completely negate having clients use its services until the in-house line allows for that

Total Net Sales

$68,801

$73,304

$68,021

$71,599

$281,725

COGS

$21,167

$24,840

$20,410

$23,186

$89,603

$87,034

$92,729

$86,047

$90,572

$356,382

GM$

$47,634

$48,464

$47,611

$48,413

$192,122

$44,725

$47,652

$44,218

$46,544

$183,139

GM%

69.2%

66.1%

70.0%

67.6%

68.2%

$42,308

$45,077

$41,829

$44,029

$173,243

also include the mark up on manufacturing and

48.6%

48.6%

48.6%

48.6%

48.6%

Wholesale

$115,054

$68,842

$72,361

$76,483

$332,741

COGS

$46,166

$20,811

$23,558

$39,294

$129,829

EOM Inventory

$45,483

$40,200

$43,777

$47,860

BOM/Avg Inventory

$38,771

$47,490

$37,282

$50,583

Turn

1.77

1.54

1.82

1.42

Willamette Workroom

change in the business structure. The future financial growth will ultimately

selling fabric from the planned vertically integrated mill that is the key to furthering its sustainability

$67,749

$101,978

$76,986

$101,736

$348,449

goals. The challenge for the mill to prove successful

$33,116

$49,847

$37,631

$49,729

$170,321

will be demand for higher-priced fabrics made in America.

$55,270

$63,568

$53,625

$63,861

$43,660

$58,160

$64,392

$54,094

$63,524

$62,354

6.45

1.50

1.44

1.59

1.43

5.72

Willamette Workroom

189


COMPANY ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES

C

CREATIVE DIRECTOR | Keri Yourick Job Functions: Manage Day to Day operations including opening/closing studio

A

First Point of contact with clients Large number of hours spent consulting and working with brands to build collections throughout development process Create patterns and samples for clients Lead sales person Brand consultation with all current and prospective clients to ensure environmental viability Work with assistant to develop tech packs for all product Salary: $40,182 per year (without P/T sample coordinator)

ASSISTANT TO THE CREATIVE DIRECTOR (F/T) Job Functions: Follow Up point of contact for clients in

S

SAMPLE COORDINATOR (P/T)

regards to development progress

Job Functions:

Attend all fit sessions, assist director with

Track and manage all samples coming

sampling, patternmaking

from the studio to clients

Point person to outsource grading, marker

Seasonal production help when needed

making

Assist all team members when requested

Assist director in developing tech packs

Pay Rate: $11.25/hour ($11,250 per year)

Creative Director

Assistant to the Creative Director Sample Coordinator

for all product Shift lead and point person during high production season Maintain machines and notify of repairs when needed Salary: $26,000 per year

C

CONTRACT SEWERS Job Functions: Operate sewing line during peak seasonal production months

*wages for F/T assistant and P/T coordinator will be paid from the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hourly billing rate

Broad skill set to work a number of

Contract Sewers

machines Troubleshoot machinery issues, when applicable Pay Rate: $11.25/hour, paid in COGs for each garment

190

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

191


Appendix

W

W ILLAMET T E

192

Willamette Workroom

WO R K RO O M

Willamette Workroom

193


Assortment Plan Season

Class

Vendor

Item

Color

Sizes

Service/Wholesale Projected SEASON Projected annual $$ Prices sales unit sales

COG

SPRING

SHORTS

Willamette Workroom

SMALLEST RUN - SHORTS

MAX 3 COLORS

7 SIZES MAX

$30.00

$60.00

60

$3,600.00

SPRING

SHORTS

Willamette Workroom

MEDIUM RUN - SHORTS

MAX 3 COLORS

7 SIZES MAX

$27.50

$55.00

90

$4,950.00

SPRING

SHORTS

Willamette Workroom

LARGEST RUN - SHORTS

MAX 3 COLORS

7 SIZES MAX

$25.00

$50.00

120

$6,000.00

SPRING

S/S TOP

Willamette Workroom

SMALLEST RUN - S/S TOPS

MAX 3 COLORS

5 SIZES MAX

$17.50

$35.00

45

$1,575.00

SPRING

S/S TOP

Willamette Workroom

MEDIUM RUN - S/S TOPS

MAX 3 COLORS

5 SIZES MAX

$16.50

$33.00

75

$2,475.00

SPRING

S/S TOP

Willamette Workroom

LARGEST RUN - S/S TOPS

MAX 3 COLORS

5 SIZES MAX

$15.50

$31.00

150

$4,650.00

SPRING

DRESS

Willamette Workroom

SMALLEST RUN - DRESS

MAX 3 COLORS

5 SIZES MAX

$30.00

$60.00

30

$1,800.00

SPRING

DRESS

Willamette Workroom

MEDIUM RUN - DRESS

MAX 3 COLORS

5 SIZES MAX

$27.50

$55.00

50

$2,750.00

SPRING

DRESS

Willamette Workroom

LARGEST RUN - DRESS

MAX 3 COLORS

5 SIZES MAX

$25.00

$50.00

75

$3,750.00

60

$3,900.00

FALL

PANTS

Willamette Workroom

SMALLEST RUN - PANTS

MAX 3 COLORS

7 SIZES MAX

$32.50

$65.00

FALL

PANTS

Willamette Workroom

MEDIUM RUN - PANTS

MAX 3 COLORS

7 SIZES MAX

$30.00

$60.00

90

$5,400.00

FALL

PANTS

Willamette Workroom

LARGEST RUN - PANTS

MAX 3 COLORS

7 SIZES MAX

$27.50

$55.00

120

$6,600.00

FALL

L/S TAILORED TOP

Willamette Workroom

SMALLEST RUN - L/S TOP

MAX 3 COLORS

5 SIZES MAX

$30.00

$60.00

45

$2,700.00

FALL

L/S TAILORED TOP

Willamette Workroom

MEDIUM RUN - L/S TOP

MAX 3 COLORS

5 SIZES MAX

$25.00

$50.00

75

$3,750.00 $6,000.00

FALL

L/S TAILORED TOP

Willamette Workroom

LARGEST RUN - L/S TOP

MAXt3 COLORS

5 SIZES MAX

$20.00

$40.00

150

ESSENTIALS

JACKET

Willamette Workroom

SMALLEST RUN - JACKET

MAX 3 COLORS

5 SIZES MAX

$40.00

$80.00

100

$8,000.00

ESSENTIALS

JACKET

Willamette Workroom

MEDIUM RUN - JACKET

MAX 3 COLORS

5 SIZES MAX

$37.50

$75.00

150

$11,250.00

ESSENTIALS

JACKET

Willamette Workroom

LARGEST RUN - JACKET

MAX 3 COLORS

5 SIZES MAX

$35.00

$70.00

200

$14,000.00

SPRING

C&S KNIT

Willamette Workroom

SMALLEST RUN - C&S KNIT

MAX 3 COLORS

5 SIZES MAX

$11.50

$23.00

60

$1,380.00

SPRING

C&S KNIT

Willamette Workroom

MEDIUM RUN - C&S KNIT

MAX 3 COLORS

5 SIZES MAX

$11.00

$22.00

150

$3,300.00

SPRING

C&S KNIT

Willamette Workroom

LARGEST RUN - C&S KNIT

MAX 3 COLORS

5 SIZES MAX

$10.50

$21.00

300

$6,300.00

FALL

C&S HVY KNIT

Willamette Workroom

SMALLEST RUN - C&S HVY KNIT

MAX 3 COLORS

5 SIZES MAX

$18.50

$37.00

60

$2,220.00

FALL

C&S HVY KNIT

Willamette Workroom

MEDIUM RUN - C&S HVY KNIT

MAX 3 COLORS

5 SIZES MAX

$17.50

$35.00

150

$5,250.00

FALL

C&S HVY KNIT

Willamette Workroom

LARGEST RUN - C&S HVY KNIT

MAX 3 COLORS

5 SIZES MAX

$16.00

$32.00

300

$9,600.00

ESSENTIALS

DENIM

Willamette Workroom

SMALLEST RUN - DENIM

RIGID

8 SIZES MAX

$49.00

$98.00

90

$8,820.00

ESSENTIALS

DENIM

Willamette Workroom

MEDIUM RUN - DENIM

RIGID

8 SIZES MAX

$47.50

$95.00

180

$17,100.00

ESSENTIALS

DENIM

Willamette Workroom

LARGEST RUN - DENIM

RIGID

8 SIZES MAX

$46.00

$92.00

300

$27,600.00

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom

NEW SEASON START CONSULTATION

HOURLY

$0.00

$80.00

6

$480.00

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom

FIRST PATTERN + FIT BLOCK

HOURLY

$0.00

$120.00

72

$8,640.00

$60.00

72

$4,320.00

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom

FIT SESSIONS, as needed

HOURLY

$0.00

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom

PATTERN DRAFT UPDATES

HOURLY

$0.00

$85.00

72

$6,120.00

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom

FINALIZED SAMPLE, FITTING, PATTERN

BASED ON DIFFICULTY

$0.00

$200.00

72

$14,400.00

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom

ADDITIONAL SAMPLE(S)

IF NEEDED

$0.00

$175.00

18

$3,150.00

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom

SOURCING ASSISTANCE

HOURLY

$0.00

$75.00

100

$7,500.00

PER STYLE

$0.00

$300.00

72

$21,600.00

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom

FULL SPECIFICATION PACK

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom

SUSTAINABLE BRAND DEVELOPMENT

HOURLY

$0.00

$275.00

25

$6,875.00

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom

CONSULTATION (REASONS VARY)

8 hours

HOURLY

$0.00

$640.00

5

$3,200.00

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom

CONSULTATION (REASONS VARY)

16 hours

HOURLY

$0.00

$1,280.00

3

$3,840.00

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom

CONSULTATION (REASONS VARY)

24 hours

HOURLY

$0.00

$1,920.00

2

$3,840.00

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom

CONSULTATION (REASONS VARY)

Yearly 96 hours

HOURLY

$0.00

$7,680.00

3

$23,040.00

$719.50

$14,329.00

3,797

$281,725.00

Totals

194

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

195


Season

Class

Min Units

Vendor Min COG

ItemUnits Min Service/Wholesale Price Opening

SPRING

SHORTS

Willamette Workroom 10

$300

SPRING

SHORTS

Willamette Workroom 50

SPRING

SHORTS

SPRING

Opening COG

Opening Retail

Feb Units

Feb COGS

Feb Retail

Mar Units

Mar COGS

Mar Retail

Apr Units

Apr COGS

Apr Retail

SMALLEST RUN - SHORTS $600

4

$126

$252

4

$126

$252

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

$1,375

MEDIUM RUN - SHORTS $2,750

6

$173

$347

6

$173

$347

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

Willamette Workroom 100

$2,500

LARGEST RUN - SHORTS $5,000

8

$210

$420

8

$210

$420

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

S/S TOP

Willamette Workroom 10

$175

SMALLEST RUN - S/S TOPS $350

3

$55

$110

3

$55

$110

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

SPRING

S/S TOP

Willamette Workroom 50

$825

MEDIUM RUN - S/S TOPS $1,650

5

$87

$173

5

$87

$173

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

SPRING

S/S TOP

Willamette Workroom 100

$1,550

LARGEST RUN - S/S TOPS $3,100

11

$163

$326

11

$163

$326

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

SPRING

DRESS

Willamette Workroom 10

$300

SMALLEST RUN - DRESS $600

2

$63

$126

2

$63

$126

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

SPRING

DRESS

Willamette Workroom 50

$1,375

MEDIUM RUN - DRESS $2,750

4

$96

$193

4

$96

$193

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

SPRING

DRESS

Willamette Workroom 75

$1,875

LARGEST RUN - DRESS $3,750

5

$131

$263

5

$131

$263

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

FALL

PANTS

Willamette Workroom 10

$325

SMALLEST RUN - PANTS $650

20

$663

$1,326

0

$0

$0

9

$293

$585

11

$371

$741

FALL

PANTS

Willamette Workroom 50

$1,500

MEDIUM RUN - PANTS $3,000

31

$918

$1,836

0

$0

$0

14

$405

$810

17

$513

$1,026

FALL

PANTS

Willamette Workroom 100

$2,750

LARGEST RUN - PANTS $5,500

41

$1,122

$2,244

0

$0

$0

18

$495

$990

23

$627

$1,254

FALL

L/S TAILORED TOP Willamette Workroom 10

$350

SMALLEST RUN - L/S TOP $600

15

$536

$918

0

$0

$0

7

$236

$405

9

$299

$513

FALL

L/S TAILORED TOP Willamette Workroom 50

$1,500

MEDIUM RUN - L/S TOP $2,500

26

$765

$1,275

0

$0

$0

11

$338

$563

14

$428

$713

FALL

L/S TAILORED TOP Willamette Workroom 100

$2,500

LARGEST RUN - L/S TOP $4,000

51

$1,275

$2,040

0

$0

$0

23

$563

$900

29

$713

$1,140

ESSENTIALS

JACKET

Willamette Workroom 30

$1,200

SMALLEST RUN - JACKET $2,400

26

$1,040

$2,080

13

$520

$1,040

8

$320

$640

5

$200

$400

ESSENTIALS

JACKET

Willamette Workroom 50

$1,875

MEDIUM RUN - JACKET $3,750

39

$1,463

$2,925

20

$731

$1,463

12

$450

$900

8

$281

$563

ESSENTIALS

JACKET

Willamette Workroom 100

$3,500

LARGEST RUN - JACKET $7,000

52

$1,820

$3,640

26

$910

$1,820

16

$560

$1,120

10

$350

$700

SPRING

C&S KNIT

Willamette Workroom 10

$115

SMALLEST RUN - C&S KNIT $230

4

$48

$97

4

$48

$97

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

SPRING

C&S KNIT

50 Willamette Workroom

$550

$1,100 MEDIUM RUN - C&S KNIT

11

$116

$231

11

$116

$231

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

SPRING

C&S KNIT

100 Willamette Workroom

$1,050

$2,100 LARGEST RUN - C&S KNIT

21

$221

$441

21

$221

$441

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

FALL

C&S HVY KNIT

10 Willamette Workroom

$185

$370 SMALLEST RUN - C&S HVY KNIT20

$377

$755

0

$0

$0

9

$167

$333

11

$211

$422

FALL

C&S HVY KNIT

50 Willamette Workroom

$875

$1,750 MEDIUM RUN - C&S HVY KNIT 51

$893

$1,785

0

$0

$0

23

$394

$788

29

$499

$998

FALL

C&S HVY KNIT

100 Willamette Workroom

$1,600

$3,200 LARGEST RUN - C&S HVY KNIT102

$1,632

$3,264

0

$0

$0

45

$720

$1,440

57

$912

$1,824

ESSENTIALS

DENIM

30 Willamette Workroom

$1,470

$2,940 SMALLEST RUN - DENIM

23

$1,147

$2,293

12

$573

$1,147

7

$353

$706

5

$221

$441

ESSENTIALS

DENIM

50 Willamette Workroom

$2,375

$4,750 MEDIUM RUN - DENIM

47

$2,223

$4,446

23

$1,112

$2,223

14

$684

$1,368

9

$428

$855

ESSENTIALS

DENIM

100 Willamette Workroom

$4,600

$9,200 LARGEST RUN - DENIM

78

$3,588

$7,176

39

$1,794

$3,588

24

$1,104

$2,208

15

$690

$1,380

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

6 Willamette Workroom

$0

0 NEW SEASON $480 START CONSULTATION

$0

$0

1

$0

$62

0

$0

$38

0

$0

$24

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

72 Willamette Workroom

$0

$8,640 FIRST PATTERN + FIT BLOCK

0

$0

$0

9

$0

$1,123

6

$0

$691

4

$0

$432

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

72 Willamette Workroom

$0

$4,320 FIT SESSIONS, as needed

0

$0

$0

9

$0

$562

6

$0

$346

4

$0

$216

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

72 Willamette Workroom

$0

$6,120 PATTERN DRAFT UPDATES

0

$0

$0

9

$0

$796

6

$0

$490

4

$0

$306

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

72 Willamette Workroom

$0

$14,400 FITTING, PATTERN 0 FINALIZED SAMPLE,

$0

$0

9

$0

$1,872

6

$0

$1,152

4

$0

$720

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

$0 ADDITIONAL SAMPLE(S)

0

$0

$0

2

$0

$410

1

$0

$252

1

$0

$158

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

$0 SOURCING ASSISTANCE

0

$0

$0

13

$0

$975

8

$0

$600

5

$0

$375

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

72 Willamette Workroom

$0

$21,600 PACK FULL SPECIFICATION

0

$0

$0

9

$0

$2,808

6

$0

$1,728

4

$0

$1,080

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

$0 0 SUSTAINABLE BRAND DEVELOPMENT

$0

$0

3

$0

$894

2

$0

$550

1

$0

$344

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

$0 CONSULTATION (REASONS VARY)0

$0

$0

1

$0

$416

0

$0

$256

0

$0

$160

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

$0 CONSULTATION (REASONS VARY)0

$0

$0

0

$0

$499

0

$0

$307

0

$0

$192

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

$0 CONSULTATION (REASONS VARY)0

$0

$0

0

$0

$499

0

$0

$307

0

$0

$192

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

$0 CONSULTATION (REASONS VARY)0

$0

$0

0

$0

$2,995

0

$0

$1,843

0

$0

$1,152

$0

707

$20,949

$40,980

285

$7,129

$28,168

281

$7,080

$22,315

277

$6,741

$18,319

Totals

196

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

197


Season

Class

May Units

May COGS Vendor

May Retail

Jun Units Item

Jun COGS

Jun Retail

Jul Units

Jul COGS

Jul Retail

Aug Units

Aug COGS

Aug Retail

Sep Units

Sep COGS

Sep Retail

SPRING

SHORTS

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

$0 RUN - SHORTS 0 SMALLEST

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

9

$270

$540

SPRING

SHORTS

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

MEDIUM$0RUN - SHORTS 0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

14

$371

$743

SPRING

SHORTS

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

LARGEST$0RUN - SHORTS 0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

18

$450

$900

SPRING

S/S TOP

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

$0 RUN - S/S TOPS0 SMALLEST

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

7

$118

$236

SPRING

S/S TOP

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

MEDIUM$0RUN - S/S TOPS 0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

11

$186

$371

SPRING

S/S TOP

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

LARGEST$0RUN - S/S TOPS 0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

23

$349

$698

SPRING

DRESS

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

$0 RUN - DRESS SMALLEST

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

5

$135

$270

SPRING

DRESS

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

MEDIUM$0RUN - DRESS

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

8

$206

$413

SPRING

DRESS

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

LARGEST$0RUN - DRESS

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

11

$281

$563

FALL

PANTS

13 Willamette Workroom

$429

$858 RUN - PANTS 14 SMALLEST

$449

$897

8

$273

$546

4

$137

$273

0

$0

$0

FALL

PANTS

20 Willamette Workroom

$594

$1,188 MEDIUM RUN - PANTS

21

$621

$1,242

13

$378

$756

6

$189

$378

0

$0

$0

FALL

PANTS

26 Willamette Workroom

$726

$1,452 LARGEST RUN - PANTS

28

$759

$1,518

17

$462

$924

8

$231

$462

0

$0

$0

FALL

10 L/S TAILORED TOP Willamette Workroom

$347

$594 RUN - L/S TOP10 SMALLEST

$362

$621

6

$221

$378

3

$110

$189

0

$0

$0

FALL

17 L/S TAILORED TOP Willamette Workroom

$495

$825 MEDIUM RUN - L/S TOP 17

$518

$863

11

$315

$525

5

$158

$263

0

$0

$0

FALL

33 L/S TAILORED TOP Willamette Workroom

$825

$1,320 LARGEST RUN - L/S TOP 35

$863

$1,380

21

$525

$840

11

$263

$420

0

$0

$0

ESSENTIALS

JACKET

6 Willamette Workroom

$240

$480 RUN - JACKET 6 SMALLEST

$240

$480

12

$480

$960

13

$520

$1,040

8

$320

$640

ESSENTIALS

JACKET

9 Willamette Workroom

$338

$675 MEDIUM RUN - JACKET

9

$338

$675

18

$675

$1,350

20

$731

$1,463

12

$450

$900

ESSENTIALS

JACKET

12 Willamette Workroom

$420

$840 LARGEST RUN - JACKET 12

$420

$840

24

$840

$1,680

26

$910

$1,820

16

$560

$1,120

SPRING

C&S KNIT

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

$0 RUN - C&S KNIT0 SMALLEST

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

9

$104

$207

SPRING

C&S KNIT

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

MEDIUM$0RUN - C&S KNIT 0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

23

$248

$495

SPRING

C&S KNIT

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

LARGEST$0RUN - C&S KNIT 0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

45

$473

$945

FALL

C&S HVY KNIT

13 Willamette Workroom

$244

$255

$511

8

$155

$311

4

$78

$155

0

$0

$0

$488 RUN - C&S HVY 14KNIT SMALLEST

FALL

C&S HVY KNIT

33 Willamette Workroom

$578

$1,155 MEDIUM RUN - C&S HVY35 KNIT

$604

$1,208

21

$368

$735

11

$184

$368

0

$0

$0

FALL

C&S HVY KNIT

66 Willamette Workroom

$1,056

$2,112 LARGEST RUN - C&S HVY69 KNIT

$1,104

$2,208

42

$672

$1,344

21

$336

$672

0

$0

$0

ESSENTIALS

DENIM

5 Willamette Workroom

$265

$529 RUN - DENIM 5 SMALLEST

$265

$529

11

$529

$1,058

12

$573

$1,147

7

$353

$706

ESSENTIALS

DENIM

11 Willamette Workroom

$513

$1,026 MEDIUM RUN - DENIM 11

$513

$1,026

22

$1,026

$2,052

23

$1,112

$2,223

14

$684

$1,368

ESSENTIALS

DENIM

18 Willamette Workroom

$828

$1,656 LARGEST RUN - DENIM 18

$828

$1,656

36

$1,656

$3,312

39

$1,794

$3,588

24

$1,104

$2,208

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

$29 0 NEW SEASON START CONSULTATION

$0

$29

1

$0

$58

1

$0

$62

0

$0

$38

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

4 Willamette Workroom

$0

4 FIRST $518 PATTERN + FIT BLOCK

$0

$518

9

$0

$1,037

9

$0

$1,123

6

$0

$691

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

4 Willamette Workroom

$0

$259 FIT SESSIONS, as needed

4

$0

$259

9

$0

$518

9

$0

$562

6

$0

$346

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

4 Willamette Workroom

$0

$367DRAFT UPDATES4 PATTERN

$0

$367

9

$0

$734

9

$0

$796

6

$0

$490

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

4 Willamette Workroom

$0

$864 SAMPLE, FITTING, 4 PATTERN FINALIZED

$0

$864

9

$0

$1,728

9

$0

$1,872

6

$0

$1,152

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

1 Willamette Workroom

$0

$189 SAMPLE(S) 1 ADDITIONAL

$0

$189

2

$0

$378

2

$0

$410

1

$0

$252

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

6 Willamette Workroom

$0

$450 ASSISTANCE SOURCING

$0

$450

12

$0

$900

13

$0

$975

8

$0

$600

6

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

4 Willamette Workroom

$0

FULL$1,296 SPECIFICATION PACK4

$0

$1,296

9

$0

$2,592

9

$0

$2,808

6

$0

$1,728

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

2 Willamette Workroom

$0

$413 2 SUSTAINABLE BRAND DEVELOPMENT

$0

$413

3

$0

$825

3

$0

$894

2

$0

$550

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

$192 CONSULTATION (REASONS0VARY)

$0

$192

1

$0

$384

1

$0

$416

0

$0

$256

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

$230 CONSULTATION (REASONS0VARY)

$0

$230

0

$0

$461

0

$0

$499

0

$0

$307

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

$230 CONSULTATION (REASONS0VARY)

$0

$230

0

$0

$461

0

$0

$499

0

$0

$307

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

0 Willamette Workroom

$0

$1,382 CONSULTATION (REASONS0VARY)

Totals

198

Willamette Workroom

324

$7,896

$21,619

334

$0

$1,382

0

$0

$2,765

0

$0

$2,995

0

$0

$1,843

$8,137

$22,073

332

$8,575

$29,612

274

$7,324

$28,370

304

$6,661

$21,882

Willamette Workroom

199


Season

Class

Oct Units

Vendor Oct COGS

SPRING

SHORTS

Willamette Workroom 11

SPRING

SHORTS

Willamette Workroom 17

SPRING

SHORTS

SPRING

Oct Retail

Nov Units

Item Nov COGS

Nov Retail

Dec Units

Dec COGS

Dec Retail

Jan Units

Jan COGS

Jan Retail

Total Units

$342

SMALLEST $684 RUN - SHORTS 13

$396

$792

14

$414

$828

8

$252

$504

$470

MEDIUM $941RUN - SHORTS 20

$545

$1,089

21

$569

$1,139

13

$347

Willamette Workroom 23

$570

LARGEST $1,140RUN - SHORTS 26

$660

$1,320

28

$690

$1,380

17

$420

S/S TOP

Willamette Workroom 9

$150

SMALLEST $299 RUN - S/S TOPS 10

$173

$347

10

$181

$362

6

SPRING

S/S TOP

Willamette Workroom 14

$235

MEDIUM $470RUN - S/S TOPS 17

$272

$545

17

$285

$569

11

SPRING

S/S TOP

Willamette Workroom 29

$442

LARGEST $884RUN - S/S TOPS 33

$512

$1,023

35

$535

$1,070

SPRING

DRESS

Willamette Workroom 6

$171

SMALLEST $342 RUN - DRESS7

$198

$396

7

$207

SPRING

DRESS

Willamette Workroom 10

$261

MEDIUM $523RUN - DRESS11

$303

$605

12

$316

SPRING

DRESS

Willamette Workroom 14

$356

LARGEST $713RUN - DRESS17

$413

$825

17

FALL

PANTS

Willamette Workroom 0

$0

SMALLEST $0 RUN - PANTS0

$0

$0

0

FALL

PANTS

Willamette Workroom 0

$0

MEDIUM $0RUN - PANTS 0

$0

$0

FALL

PANTS

Willamette Workroom 0

$0

LARGEST $0RUN - PANTS 0

$0

$0

FALL

L/S TAILORED TOP Willamette Workroom 0

$0

SMALLEST $0 RUN - L/S TOP 0

$0

$0

FALL

L/S TAILORED TOP Willamette Workroom 0

$0

MEDIUM $0RUN - L/S TOP0

$0

FALL

L/S TAILORED TOP Willamette Workroom 0

$0

LARGEST $0RUN - L/S TOP0

ESSENTIALS

JACKET

Willamette Workroom 5

ESSENTIALS

JACKET

Willamette Workroom 8

ESSENTIALS

JACKET

SPRING

Total COGS

Total Retail

60

$1,800

$3,600

$693

90

$2,475

$4,950

$840

120

$3,000

$6,000

$110

$221

45

$788

$1,575

$173

$347

75

$1,238

$2,475

21

$326

$651

150

$2,325

$4,650

$414

4

$126

$252

30

$900

$1,800

$633

7

$193

$385

50

$1,375

$2,750

$431

$863

11

$263

$525

75

$1,875

$3,750

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

60

$1,950

$3,900

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

90

$2,700

$5,400

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

120

$3,300

$6,600

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

45

$1,575

$2,700

$0

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

75

$2,250

$3,750

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

150

$3,750

$6,000

$200

SMALLEST $400 RUN - JACKET 6

$240

$480

6

$240

$480

12

$480

$960

100

$4,000

$8,000

$281

MEDIUM $563RUN - JACKET9

$338

$675

9

$338

$675

18

$675

$1,350

150

$5,625

$11,250

Willamette Workroom 10

$350

LARGEST $700RUN - JACKET 12

$420

$840

12

$420

$840

24

$840

$1,680

200

$7,000

$14,000

C&S KNIT

Willamette Workroom 11

$131

SMALLEST $262 RUN - C&S KNIT 13

$152

$304

14

$159

$317

8

$97

$193

60

$690

$1,380

SPRING

C&S KNIT

Willamette Workroom 29

$314

MEDIUM $627RUN - C&S KNIT 33

$363

$726

35

$380

$759

21

$231

$462

150

$1,650

$3,300

SPRING

C&S KNIT

Willamette Workroom 57

$599

LARGEST $1,197RUN - C&S KNIT 66

$693

$1,386

69

$725

$1,449

42

$441

$882

300

$3,150

$6,300

FALL

C&S HVY KNIT

Willamette Workroom 0

$0

SMALLEST $0 RUN - C&S HVY 0 KNIT

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

60

$1,110

$2,220

FALL

C&S HVY KNIT

Willamette Workroom 0

$0

MEDIUM $0RUN - C&S HVY 0 KNIT

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

150

$2,625

$5,250

FALL

C&S HVY KNIT

Willamette Workroom 0

$0

LARGEST $0RUN - C&S HVY 0 KNIT

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

0

$0

$0

300

$4,800

$9,600

ESSENTIALS

DENIM

Willamette Workroom 5

$221

SMALLEST $441 RUN - DENIM 5

$265

$529

5

$265

$529

11

$529

$1,058

90

$4,410

$8,820

ESSENTIALS

DENIM

Willamette Workroom 9

$428

MEDIUM $855RUN - DENIM11

$513

$1,026

11

$513

$1,026

22

$1,026

$2,052

180

$8,550

$17,100

ESSENTIALS

DENIM

Willamette Workroom 15

$690

LARGEST $1,380RUN - DENIM18

$828

$1,656

18

$828

$1,656

36

$1,656

$3,312

300

$13,800

$27,600

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom 0

$0

NEW SEASON START CONSULTATION $24 0

$0

$29

0

$0

$29

1

$0

$58

6

$0

$480

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom 4

$0

FIRST$432 PATTERN + FIT BLOCK 4

$0

$518

4

$0

$518

9

$0

$1,037

72

$0

$8,640

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom 4

$0

FIT SESSIONS, as needed4 $216

$0

$259

4

$0

$259

9

$0

$518

72

$0

$4,320

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom 4

$0

PATTERN $306DRAFT UPDATES 4

$0

$367

4

$0

$367

9

$0

$734

72

$0

$6,120

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom 4

$0

FINALIZED PATTERN $720 SAMPLE, FITTING, 4

$0

$864

4

$0

$864

9

$0

$1,728

72

$0

$14,400

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom 1

$0

ADDITIONAL SAMPLE(S)1 $158

$0

$189

1

$0

$189

2

$0

$378

18

$0

$3,150

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom 5

$0

SOURCING $375 ASSISTANCE6

$0

$450

6

$0

$450

12

$0

$900

100

$0

$7,500

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom 4

$0

FULL SPECIFICATION PACK $1,080 4

$0

$1,296

4

$0

$1,296

9

$0

$2,592

72

$0

$21,600

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom 1

$0

SUSTAINABLE BRAND DEVELOPMENT $344 2

$0

$413

2

$0

$413

3

$0

$825

25

$0

$6,875

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom 0

$0

CONSULTATION (REASONS $160 0 VARY)

$0

$192

0

$0

$192

1

$0

$384

5

$0

$3,200

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom 0

$0

CONSULTATION (REASONS $192 0 VARY)

$0

$230

0

$0

$230

0

$0

$461

3

$0

$3,840

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom 0

$0

CONSULTATION (REASONS $192 0 VARY)

$0

$230

0

$0

$230

0

$0

$461

2

$0

$3,840

ESSENTIALS

SERVICES

Willamette Workroom 0

$0

CONSULTATION (REASONS $1,152 0 VARY)

$0

$1,382

0

$0

$1,382

0

$0

$2,765

3

$0

$23,040

$7,281

$20,983

370

$7,494

$21,408

354

$8,183

$29,207

3,797

$88,710

$281,725

Totals

200

Willamette Workroom

306

$6,210

$17,769

358

Willamette Workroom

201


Primary Research Interview Q&A

Charlie Cronk – Currently Professor at Academy of

What were the biggest challenges that you encountered

Art University – Head of Product Development for

during the development and production processes?

local high-end outdoor apparel company

The largest problem was SAMPLING. Meeting

23 November 2016 – One on one interview

the minimums on fabric and trim quantities as well as MOQ for manufacturing apparel as well.

Are you wholesaling or retailing your collections or

It is a big challenge just getting a foot in the door

both? Charlie Cronk no longer works for the high-

with manufacturers, but once the brand built a

end outerwear company where he was the Head of

relationship, the MOQs were more accessible and

Product Development. He is currently a professor at

fees for not meeting minimums were lessened.

the Academy of Art University. Are there any services you wish that your design and Who are your clients? Private label brand John Sun – Co-founder for an international sourcing firm (not apparel exclusive)

How to keep cash flowing, payment for services

How many collections/year do you design? The line would be released in season, but selling DTC allowed

16 November 2016 – One on one interview

Alternative manufacturing scenarios for small brands

the brand to not follow a traditional fashion calendar

Dilemmas in the Fashion & Manufacturing Industry

LA factories have lower minimums than China, more

How many years have you been in business? Company

accessible, not necessarily cheaper (labor @ $10-$15)

started five years ago in San Francisco

Sourcing

Where do you currently produce your collections?

Start-Ups = manufacturing & cash flow Typically only have $5,000-$10,000 max to begin a product line Start-up brand that has scaled up making hundreds of garments typically only has 40-50% margins Idealistically want to be making thousands of garments at 50-60% margins If business plan is a Sew Shop only, then need to keep the sewers busy with work Contracting sewers only as needed won’t keep them around to work Specialty sew shops that excel at making one item are always booked, and prices are high Logistics to be mindful of: If hiring sewers, business needs to keep them employed and busy

Problem working with small designers = meeting minimums on fabric purchases (typically 1000m) Sourcing from jobbers with existing fabric an option –But once the fabric runs out, not available to reorder, out of stock product for customers

Manufacturing started in Vancouver, Canada – also worked with manufacturers in the Bay Area. Moving into new product categories required the brand to move out of Vancouver because of the factory’s capabilities. How important is local production or outsourcing services to your business plan? For the brand it was

Possible Solutions for Willamette Workroom to have

important to remain ‘Made in the USA,’ but it was also

Competitive Advantage:

a safeguard to not have “all our eggs in one basket” so it was necessary to use several manufacturing

MOQ solutions - Stocking PFD fabrics (example – 10

and sourcing partners. Working prior with overseas

best, widely used)

suppliers the biggest challenges were the time

Fabrics - shirting, bottom weight twill weave, denim, heavy weight/utility canvas, then garment dye (but will need partner supplier) Example: to make 30 pcs in each of four colors, gives advantage of flexibility to designer Labor solutions – tapping into the Hispanic and Asian immigrant population with sewing skills that are out

change, the distance for travel time, and language barriers. For your latest collection, how long did the design, development, sampling, and production process take? When starting the brand, initial design and development took 6 months, but as the brand grew and built a product base, development took closer to 3 months.

production partners offered that were not offered? Or that you had to obtain from another business? (After mentioning the comment by John Sun to carry PFD fabric) Having fabric on-hand to help meet minimums would have been a great advantage. What was the most expensive and/or time consuming part of the development and production process? Sampling. Working with the factory in Vancouver became problematic because their quoted lead times for sampling of 3 to 4 weeks began turning into 12 weeks to receive samples. As a small brand, when a larger production order came in, our projects were pushed to a lower priority. What knowledge and experience did you value most from your production and/or supply partners? When the brand moved to manufacturing closer to SF, we valued the experience of those with specialty skills in outdoor apparel product. Having little experience in outwear (having worked in ready to wear) it was helpful having suppliers with knowledge of technical fabrics. It was a learning curve to learn construction for technical outerwear. Are sustainability claims important to your company or brand image? If so, which have you found to be the most relevant to your target customer? It was always more costly, but if the brand had the option of then we would source sustainable fabrics like recycled polyester and organic cotton. In the early days of the brand this was the only product available to source

of work/not sewing

202

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

203


that was sustainable. Today, especially in Europe,

us busy as well. It is difficult working with larger

Does your business find that sustainability issues are

Brittany Weltner – Founder | CEO of Jomper –

suppliers offer sustainability options coupled with

brands because of their conflicts with our operating

important to your clients and/or for your business? No.

San Francisco, CA

their other product offerings. It is becoming more

procedures compared to their already established

Though for in-house lines, some fabric is made in the

Answers Supplied via Email – 13 December 2016

common to find.

business practices.

USA. Are you wholesaling or retailing your collections or both?

If you could find the ideal development and sourcing

What are the most common or requested services from

Do you offer sourcing services? If no, why not? We have

Right now retail - but ideally we’ll develop wholesale

partner to do business with, what kind of partner would

clients? Design? Technical? Production? Typically new

contacts that we’ve acquired by going to LA Textile

partnerships.

they be and what type of services would they offer? If a

clients need help from A to Z. They come in with a

shows if the client needs sourcing help.

manufacturers did not have MOQs on production, or

sketch and a grand vision.

offered small batch production to test new product

Who are your clients? Anyone who buys a Jomper. Do you connect your clients with a manufacturer once

Our target is 20-40 yr. old female influencers in San Francisco.

in the market for reliability, durability. There is no dye

What is an average production run for your clients? We

the product is developed? Or does your business also

sublimation equipment available locally which would

have production minimums of 10 to accommodate

produce the collections? Our manufacturing business

have been a huge advantage for our brand.

all small designers. Working with small designers

can make several hundred pieces.

Do you attend trade shows to promote your line? To find new suppliers? We attended Magic Sourcing last year

keeps our production team busy even during the off  

months, which is good for our business.

Other thoughts?

& found our factory partner Lafayette, in Colombia.

Alex Snyder – Creative Director at

Does your business specialize in a specific product

Acknowledge where the jobs need to be in your

How many collections/year do you design? Since we’re

The DNA Group, San Francisco

category or a wide range of categories dependent

business, don’t try to do it all because it will help in

a startup we’ve only done 1 collection so far. We’ll

Group trip to facility plus Q+A (one hour)

on the project? Are there product categories most

the long run

roll our new colors next season, and rompers the

29 November 2016

commonly requested? We are the last fine fabric silk manufacturer in the Bay Area.

How long has your business been established? The DNA Group was established in San Francisco after

What are the biggest challenges you face while working

acquiring a 40 year old lingerie line and manufacturer

with companies and/or independent designers?

3 years ago.

Timelines are always delicate and communication is constant. Sometimes as the manufacturer you

season after. Ideally we’ll do 10 new pieces each Investing in Optitex 3D prototyping technology has streamlined a lot of the process and requires less labor

much as a Mercedes

request form? Phone? Do you attend trade shows or

if timelines are not realistic. We had a client order

other sourcing events? Potential customers are very

sample yardage from Japan that took 60 days, which

resourceful and find what they want on-line. We have

became problematic. Clients starting a new brand do

attended MAGIC in the past, but for our business

not always understand that it is expensive to start a

model, tradeshows are becoming less relevant and

Our facility runs hourly, not per piece – uncertainties

label (6 figures +) and e-commerce feels like everyone

too costly.

are more manageable as a small team

is doing it now. The political climate (i.e. election of

proprietary website, Maker’s Row What is the size of clients you typically work with? Small & independent? Or Medium to large? Other? We work with all designers helping them from A to Z when

have a great factory called National Apparel. We’ve developed a good face-to-face relationship with

makes your business better

them, and they are literally a five-minute walk from

Our in-house label also reflects the sewing

industry are pulling out of the February tradeshow

capabilities of our production team

have begun working on contingency plans. December and the first quarter are “4 months of hell” in manufacturing – it is not always sure the money is coming in.

Where do you currently produce your collections? We

Don’t just do what you want in business, do what

Trump) has made us all very unsure and many in the calendar because of that market uncertainty. We

2 years.

people – it was a one year learning curve and cost as

have to dictate the timeline to stay on schedule, and

to potential customers? Social media presence,

How many years have you been in business? First year! However, I’ve been ideating and testing this idea for

We have gotten quicker, more efficient with less

How do clients find your business? Email? Online

How do you promote the business to reach out

season (5 jumpsuits & 5 rompers)

During the prototyping stage, it is important to always keep in mind the end production so that construction is easy and effective

our office! Chubbies started out with them - so we trust their quality. How important is local production or outsourcing services to your business plan? Local is key for product development. We tried to produce the garments abroad in Colombia, but the lead time takes too long to see the samples. Local is king when you’re starting out because you have more control of the product and can iterate the designs quicker!

producing a line. The majority of clients typically have

If you outsourced design and/or development and

no design background and come to us with sketches

production, why did you choose to do so? We did all

of ideas. We have numerous in-house lines that keep

of the design in house because I’m the designer. We

204

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

205


outsourced the website to an advertising agency

design = things people use!

in India (I had the connection from StartUpHouse

What was the most expensive and/or time consuming

Bridget Trimble –

part of the development and production process?

Owner and Designer at Trim & Tailor

& trust Ammet would deliver on this super custom

What were the biggest challenges that you encountered

Paying the seamstress for prototypes (we made about

Answers supplied via email – 13 December 2016

website. I also studied abroad in India - so it holds a

during the development and production processes?

20 prototypes so far)...and then paying factory for

special place in my heart… I did my first headstand

T I M E… learning takes time. If I went through a

samples… we’ve made 4 samples with 2 different

Are you wholesaling or retailing your collections or both?

in front of the Taj Mahal - and my shirt flew up - so I

service like “Maker’s Row” I wouldn’t have learned as

factories. Lafayette (the Colombia factory made our

Both, we created a website to sell directly to our

tucked it in… years later I had the same problem… my

much… it would have been handed to me … and I saw

samples for FREE which is unheard of - but they

customers and we are in the process of meeting with

shirt kept flying up in yoga… and I thought - I really

more value in finding things out by learning.

believe in our product so much and believe we’ll

boutiques to sell wholesale for SS17.

need to solve this - what about a yoga onesie - and BOOM JOMPER was born… (I totally just rambled but the story is important, mainly because the point is - relationships are important. Business is all about

Are there any services you wish that your design and production partners offered that were not offered? Or that you had to obtain from another business? Ideally

make big orders in the future. I can’t say the same for National Apparel - but they also pay San Francisco rent so no hard feelings! ;)

Who are your clients? Our customers range from women 25-65 in age. Do you attend trade shows to promote your line? To

you have everything in house so you can iterate

What knowledge and experience did you value most

quicker. We’re building a team in-house so we can

from your production and/or supply partners? They

own this process and not have to export any product

forced me to do things the correct way – i.e. I tried

Did you consider local development and production

development services. That’s how companies scale

to hand over patterns from our seamstress and not a

before outsourcing? I did… but there are not really

better. I learned this while working at F’real (it’s a

professional patternmaker… and the garment came

textile factories in the US… (that I know about)... I

milkshake vending machine company) I was the lead

out totally wrong… do things the right way first (to

looked into LA, but LA just sources their material

designer - splitting time between brand marketing

the best of your knowledge) and you’ll be better off.

from China… I talked to China… but they are hard

and product design with the engineers… Basically we

Fast & wrong is a bad product. Take time to make the

to communicate with unless you go there yourself,

were developing like 5 different products at once… it

product the right way & it will be better quality. So

How many years have you been in business? Less than

which is expensive… We chose to work with

was crazy - all I could think about was how do we get

overall I’m grateful for all of these partners.

video games on the milkshake vending machines… we

one year.

Lafayette because they make incredible athletic textiles… they are a textile factory and manufacturer.

made some video games… but the CEO kept saying

Are sustainability claims important to your company or

Where do you currently produce your collections?

We saw them as a long-term partner who could make

“make the people take selfies”... yikes I can’t even talk

brand image? If so, which have you found to be the most

The protos, patterns, fabric selections and grading

new materials for us as we grow. ALSO - it’s only a

about it without getting emotional so I’ll switch to

relevant to your target customer? I believe everything

are produced in Bozeman, MT. We then ship this

3-hour time difference from CALI!

business objectives…

should be sustainable. I don’t think it’s a point of

information to China to produce our bulk shipments.

working with people you trust who can deliver great products.

find new suppliers? We have not attended yet, but would like to attend starting next Fall once we have established the brand. How many collections/year do you design? We will design a Spring/Summer line and a Fall/Winter line each year.

difference anymore for a company to be “sustainable” For your latest collection, how long did the design,

The company was scaling from a 100 million dollar

- therefore we choose not to focus on it in our

How important is local production or outsourcing

development, sampling, and production process

company > billion dollar company - everything was

branding. I don’t think it’s important for customers

services to your business plan? Currently I am playing

take? Oh jeez… 6 months because it’s the first time

moving so quickly I kept saying - we need more

to know “how the product is made” they just need to

every role in the company, but in order to grow as I

I’m doing fashion design, product development &

engineers and designers in house to do this well…

understand how they can use the product to make

would hope we will need to bring on additional team

production. Luckily after I finished this process -

but no one would listen to me because I was just a

their lives better!

members.

my business partner came on board to solidify the

lead designer… they brought on a creative director

operations and make it a seamless supply chain that

who was awesome… but I hate to say this - when I

If you could find the ideal development and sourcing

Did you consider local development and production

is self-sustaining and set up correctly for scaling.

left the communication between the marketing and

partner to do business with, what kind of partner would

before outsourcing? All done in house.

engineering teams died. I quit to start Jomper. I had

they be and what type of services would they offer? A

How many different supply partners did you work with

learned what I needed to learn from an operations

partner you trust & can grow with - it all comes down

to produce the latest collection? Oh wow - around 20

and creative perspective. I’m not bashing F’real- they

to basic relationship skills.

for sure… I did a lot of testing… and I’m including

have a great product & vision… but most companies

production of our website - because I consider the

fail at scaling because the leadership doesn’t

e-commerce site & overall “digital experience” just

understand seamless project management between

as much our product as the Jomper itself. Product

engineers & marketing. =)

206

Willamette Workroom

For your latest collection, how long did the design, development, sampling, and production process take? 9 months from first pattern to production. How many different supply partners did you work with to produce the latest collection? 3 different partners for the latest collection.

Willamette Workroom

207


What were the biggest challenges that you encountered

The conversation led to discussing important aspects

Issue in Portland is access to machine repair services

during the development and production processes? I

of the manufacturing industry, the machinery, and

(may need to be an in-house resource).

wanted to produce our bulk shipment in the US, but

marketing strategies. THOUGHTS ON MARKETING

we could not find the right partner for this collection that would take our target order quantity and quality at our target costs.

THOUGHTS ON MANUFACTURING Selling clothes has changed, making a product for The company relies on only stocking raw materials,

$10 and selling for $40 is not a viable marketing

What was the most expensive and/or time consuming

which are typically off-priced goods (meaning not

strategy for the market today.

part of the development and production process?

bought new from suppliers).

Working with overseas partners you must pay higher shipping rates and duties to bring in shipments from overseas to the US. What knowledge and experience did you value most from your production and/or supply partners? The knowledge I gained was to not ever assume your supply partner will do something that you think they will do. An example, you must always supply all copy you want on the garments and proof all labels, never assume it will be correct as English is not our supplier’s first language. Are sustainability claims important to your company or brand image? If so, which have you found to be the most relevant to your target customer? We have been very consistent in our logo and message for the type of service and garments we designed for our consumer. If you could find the ideal development and sourcing partner to do business with, what kind of partner would they be and what type of services would they offer? It would be wonderful to find a partner overseas to ensure quality control on the factory production floor before the garments would exit the factory.

There is a steep learning curve, so get good at Heard manufactures in a modular method known as

something and market THE STORY.

“lean manufacturing.” It’s all about the story, especially if, as a designer, you A modular system begins with cutting pattern pieces

are manufacturing yourself.

in bulk at the cutting table, from there patterns are kitted out, that is pieces are put into kits by size, then

Sell retail, not wholesale – manufacturing in Portland,

fed one by one through the sewing line. This means

selling for $500 as Made in Portland allows company

that after a size is sewn, it can be shipped out to

to make margins and pay manufacturing team

customers. The production line at Clinton Park has

$15/hour.

capabilities to sew 3-12 jackets at a time depending on complexity. Large-scale production factories, especially those overseas, manufacture in a “push bundle” system –

“The product is the souvenir of the experience.” Clinton Park San Francisco Source: Google Images

each machine has an operator that sews one seam on every garment before being sent to the next operator to sew the next component. Lean manufacturing is advantageous if changes need to be implemented once production has already begun without too much loss of materials. “Lean makes sense” – lean manufacturers are very nimble. Going modular allows the business to pay living wages, but the products have to be expensive.

Steven Heard – Owner and Founder, Clinton Park manufacturer One on one interview - 22 September 2017 Steven has worked in the Bay Area fashion industry

Fewer people = fewer machines = paying higher wages. Buy used equipment.

for 30 years and currently working on a project of

“There is huge demand for small batch

customized jackets for a Portland-based designer.

manufacturing.”

208

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

209


Works Cited Abnett, Kate. “Does Reshoring Fashion Manufacturing Make Sense?” Business of Fashion. 9 March 2016. Web. 11 October 2016. Advancing Sustainable Materials Management: Facts and Figures 2013. Environmental Protection Agency. June 2015. Web. 9 October 2016. <https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2015-09/documents/2013_advncng_smm_ rpt.pdf>. Andjelic, Ana. “Fashion Brands, Long Focused on Excess, Are Finally Waking Up to Sustainability: Can Eco-friendly Startups Shift Industry Values?” Adweek. 20 May 2016. Web. 11 October 2016.

com/blog/2016/04/what-is-the-maker-movement/#. Donaldson, Tara. “The Current Sourcing Model is Inherently Unsustainable.” Sourcing Journal Online. 5 October 2016. Web. 10 October 2016. Donaldson, Tara. “This is the ‘New Normal’ in Apparel Sourcing.” Sourcing Journal Online. 21 Sept 2016. Web. 14 September 2016. < https://0-sourcingjournalonline.com.library.academyart.edu/new-normal-apparel-sourcing/>. Donaldson, Tara. “USFIA Benchmarking Study Highlights Trending Sourcing Strategies, Cost Concerns and the ‘China Plus Many’ Model.” Sourcing Journal Online. 22 June 2016. Web. 10 October 2016. < https://0sourcingjournalonline.com.library.academyart.edu/usfia-benchmarking-study-highlights-trending-sourcingstrategies-cost-concerns-and-the-china-plus-many-model-td/>.

Bajarin, Tim. “Why the Maker Movement is Important to America’s Future.” Time Magazine. 19 May 2014. Web. 9 October 2016. < http://time.com/104210/maker-faire-maker-movement/>.

Ehrenfeld, Dr. John. “Sustainability by Design and Flourishing – Keynote Speech.” Youtube, Centre for Industrial Sustainability, 1 October 2013, https://youtu.be/bHK7sAUOehM.

Baugh, Gail. The Fashion Designer’s Textile Directory. New York: Barron’s Educational Series, Inc., 2011. Print. Factory 45. Web. 15 November 2016. <http://factory45.co>. Beck, Byron. “Handmade in Portland Means Local Love for Small Businesses.” Townsquared Online. 1 September 2016. Blog. 8 November 2016. <https://townsquared.com/blog/2016/09/handmade-in-pdx/>.

“Faires Around the World.” Maker Faire, Maker Media, Inc., n.d. Web. 21 September 2016. <http://makerfaire.com/ map/>.

Biz2Credit. “Biz2Credit Identifies 2014’s Best Small Business Cities in America.” 12 May 2014. Web. 8 November 2016. <http://www.biz2credit.com/research-reports/2014-best-small-business-cities-in-america>.

Farra, Emily. “3 Designers Who Are Making It Easy (and Chic!) to Shop Sustainable.” Vogue. 8 April 2016. Web. 11 April 2016. < http://www.vogue.com/13424418/best-sustainable-fashion-designers-zady-datura-

Bonetto, Lauren. “The Ethical Consumer – US – July 2015.” Mintel Academic, Mintel Group Ltd., July 2015, http://0academic.mintel.com.library.academyart.edu/display/716584/. Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2016-17 Edition, Fashion

plyknits/?mbid=nl_041116_Daily_VR&CNDID=30858562&spMailingID=12846609&spUserID=MTE0MDEzMjQy OTg5S0&spJobID=723298125&spReportId=NzIzMjk4MTI1S0>. Fletcher, Kate & Lynda Grose. Fashion and Sustainability: Design for Change. London: Laurence King, 2012. Print.

Designers. Web. 27 November 2016. <http://www.bls.gov/ooh/arts-and-design/fashion-designers.htm>. Friedman, Thomas L. The World is Flat 3.0: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century. New York: Picador, 2007. Bureau of Labor Statistics. “Employment, Hours, and Earnings from the Current Employment Statistics survey.” US

eBook.

Department of Labor. Web. 20 November 2016. <http://data.bls.gov/pdq/SurveyOutputServlet>. Good Clothing Company. Web. 15 November 2016. <http://www.goodclothingcompany.com>. Bureau of Labor Statistics. “Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.” US Department of Labor. Web. 20 November 2016. <http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes_stru.htm#27-0000>.

Goodman, Peter S. “More Wealth, More Jobs, but Not for Everyone: What Fuels the Backlash on Trade.” The New York Times Online. 28 September 2016. Web. 4 October 2016. <http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/29/

Bureau of Labor Statistics. Industries at a Glance: Apparel Manufacturing: NAICS 315 <http://www.bls.gov/iag/tgs/ iag315.htm#iag315bdmcew.f.P>. Business Oregon. Economic Analysis. 2016. Web. 8 November 2016. <http://www.oregon4biz.com/EconomicAnalysis/>. Cooper, Anna Marie. “Portland Apparel Development Center – Manufacturing Clothing in Oregon.” Rogue:Minx Online. 22 September 2014. Web. 8 November 2016. <https://rogueminx.com/blogs/in-the-limbs/15455213-

business/economy/more-wealth-more-jobs-but-not-for-everyone-what-fuels-the-backlash-on-trade.html?em_ pos=large&emc=edit_nn_20160929&nl=morning-briefing&nlid=71789079&_r=1>. Grose, Lynda. “Fashion as Material.” Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion. (pp.223-233). Oxfordshire and New York: Routledge, 2015. Print. Hackett, Lewis. Industrial Revolution. 1992. Accessed online 21 Sept 2016 < http://history-world.org/Industrial%20 Intro.htm>.

portland-apparel-development-center-manufacturing-clothing-in-oregon>. IBISWorld. “Global Apparel Manufacturing: Market Research Report. August 2016. Web. 13 November 2016. <http:// Delossantos, Karl. “What is the Maker’s Movement?” Maker’s Row, Maker’s Row, Inc., 13 April 2016, http://makersrow.

210

Willamette Workroom

www.ibisworld.com/industry/global/global-apparel-manufacturing.html>

Willamette Workroom

211


IBISWorld. Cut and Sew Manufacturers in the US: Market Research Report – NAICS 31521 (snapshot) <http://www. ibisworld.com/industry/default.aspx?indid=339>. JLD-Studios. Web. 15 November 2016. <http://www.jld-studios.com>.

Reed, Anna. “Three Challenges of Garment Production in Portland.” Neighborhood Notes Online. 13 June 2011. Web. 8 November 2016. <https://townsquared.com/blog/2016/09/handmade-in-pdx/>. Scarano, Genevieve. “Sweatshops: Unsavory Necessities for Developing Nations’ Economies?” Sourcing Journal Online. 10 October 2016. Web. 10 October 2016.

Keiser, Sandra & Garner, M. Beyond Design: The Synergy of Apparel Product Development. (3rd Ed.) London and New York: Fairchild Books, 2012. Print.

Segran, Elizabeth. “Why Clothing Startups Are Returning to American Factories.” Fast Company. 16 March 2016. Web. 4 October 2016. < https://www.fastcompany.com/3057738/most-creative-people/why-clothing-startups-are-

Levi Strauss & Co. The Lifecycle of a Jean: Understanding the Environmental Impact of a Pair of Levi’s 501 Jeans.

returning-to-american-factories>.

2015. Web. 9 October 2016. < http://levistrauss.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Full-LCA-Results-DeckFINAL.pdf>.

Sewn Goods. Web. 15 November 2016. <http://www.sewngoods.com>.

Maker’s Row. “10 American Small Batch Manufacturers.” Maker’s Row Online Blog. Makersrow.com. 15 June 2015.

Sherman, Lauren. “DTC Labels Sharpen their Brands.” Business of Fashion Online. 3 July 2016. Web. 15 November

Web. 4 October 2016. <http://makersrow.com/blog/2015/06/10-american-small-batch-manufacturers/>.

2016. <https://www.businessoffashion.com/articles/intelligence/direct-to-consumer-labels-sharpen-theirbrands>.

Maloney, C. The Economic Impact of the Fashion Industry. 6 Feb 2015. Web. 28 September 2016. <https://maloney. house.gov/sites/maloney.house.gov/files/documents/The%20Economic%20Impact%20of%20the%20Fashion%20 Industry%20--%20JEC%20report%20FINAL.pdf>. McDonough, William & Michael Braungart. Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things. New York: North Point Press, 2002. Print. “Nation of Makers.” The White House, President Barack Obama. Web. 1 August 2016. <https://www.whitehouse.gov/ nation-of-makers>. Nielsen. The Sustainability Imperative: New Insights on Consumer Expectations. Global Sustainability Report. October 2015. Web. 11 October 2016. <http://www.nielsen.com/content/dam/nielsenglobal/dk/docs/global-

So, Shin. “Thinking Global.” GLA637 Industrial Design in a Globalized World. Academy of Art University, San Francisco. 20 June 2016. Online Coursework. Statista. “Facts on the US Apparel Market.” Web. 20 November 2016. <https://www.statista.com/topics/965/apparelmarket-in-the-us/>. Sustainability Guidebook. Levi Strauss & Co. December 2013. Web. 9 October 2016. < http://lsco.s3.amazonaws.com/ wp-content/uploads/2014/01/LSCO-Sustainability-Guidebook-2013-_-December.pdf>. Thackara, John. “A Whole New Cloth: Politics and the Fashion System.” Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion. Oxfordshire and New York: Routledge, 2015. Print.

sustainability-report-oct-2015.pdf>. The Textile Hive. Webpage. 2016. Web. 8 November 2016. < http://textilehive.com/pages/the-collection>. Office of Textiles and Apparel. Textile and Apparel Trade Balance Report – General Imports (FTA). Web. 21 September 2016. < http://otexa.trade.gov/tbrimp_fta.htm>

The World Bank. “Apparel Manufacturing has Potential to Create 1.2 Million New Jobs.” 28 April 2016. Press Release. 13 November 2016. <http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2016/04/28/apparel-manufacturing-

Office of Textiles and Apparel. Textile and Apparel Trade Balance Report – General Exports (FTA). Web. 21 September

has-potential-to-create-1point2-million-new-jobs-world-bank-report>.

2016. < http://otexa.trade.gov/tbrexp_fta.htm> The World Fact Book. Central Intelligence Agency. Web. 14 September 2016. <https://www.cia.gov/library/ Pasquarelli, Adrianne. “Apparel Manufacturing Picks Up in the U.S.” Crain’s New York. 15 December 2014. Web. 28

publications/the-world-factbook/geos/us.html>.

September 2016. <http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/20141215/RETAIL_APPAREL/141219903/apparelmanufacturing-picks-up-in-the-u-s>.

Travel Portland. Visitor’s Guide. 2016 – 2017. Web. 8 November 2016. <https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/content_li nk/0LJRVwfwZ49SOLifPl5CwYdBYzwdi94UhrBYZKHMbKhua0dDfbfKJq9Qeyp3aQ72/file>.

Portland Apparel Lab at ADX. Indiegogo. Web. 15 November 2016. <https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/portlandapparel-lab-at-adx-fashion#/>.

United Nations Commission on Environment and Development. Our Common Future. March 1987. Web. 9 October 2016. <http://www.un-documents.net/our-common-future.pdf>.

Rasul, Sumeera. “7 Ways Independent Fashion Designers Can Beat Fast Fashion Giants.” Brooklyn Fashion + Design Incubator. Pratt Institute. 13 May 2015. Web. 28 November 2016. <https://bkaccelerator.com/7-waysindependent-fashion-designers-can-beat-fast-fashion-giants/>.

212

Willamette Workroom

United States Census Bureau. Quick Facts: Portland city, Oregon. 2015. Web. 8 November 2016. <http://www.census. gov/quickfacts/table/PST045215/4159000>.

Willamette Workroom

213


USFIA. “US Fashion Industry Benchmark Report 2016.” Web. 18 November 2016. <http://www.usfashionindustry.

Faser. Digital Image. SourcingJournal.com. Published 28 September 2017.

com/pdf_files/USFIA-2016-Fashion-Industry-Benchmarking-Study.pdf>. Hanging Patterns 1. Digital Image. Lauredesagazon.com. Accessed 12 September 2017. WGSN. Future Consumer 2018. Consumer Forecast. February 2016. Web. 9 October 2016. Imogene and Willie 1. Digital Image. Imogeneandwillie.com. Accessed 12 September 2017. WGSN. The Circular Economy. Lifestyle Futures 2016. Web. 13 Sept 2016. Manufacturing 1. Digital Image. Businessoffashion.com. Inside a Moroccan Factory that Supplies Denim Products to White, Philip, et al. Okala Practitioner. Phoenix: Okala Team, 2013. Print. Wolk, David. “Keeping Portland Weird.” Slate Online. 15 October 2014. Web. 8 November 2016. <http://www.slate.

Inditex. Accessed 21 October 2017. Matthew Nager Photography 1. Digital Image. Mattnager.com. Accessed 19 October 2017.

com/articles/business/buy_a_small_business/2014/10/small_business_in_portland_oregon_it_s_a_fantastic_ Measuring Tape 1. Digital Image. Villagetailor.com. Accessed 23 October 2017.

place_to_set_up_or_buy.html>. Worldwide Responsible Accredited Production. Certified Facility List. 2016. Web. October 2016. <http://www. wrapcompliance.org/en/wrap-facilities-worldwide>.

Cited Images Alabama Chanin 1. Digital Image. Alabamachanin.com/the-factory. Accessed 10 July 2017. Alabama Chanin 2. Digital Image. Alabamachanin.com/the-factory. Accessed 10 July 2017. Alabama Chanin 3. Digital Image. Alabamachanin.com/the-factory. Accessed 12 September 2017. Alabama Chanin 4. Digital Image. Alabamachanin.com/building-14. The School of Making Essential Sewing Tools Notions Kit. Accessed 12 September 2017. Alabama Chanin 5. Digital Image. Instagram.com/alabamachanin. Accessed 12 September 2017. Alabama Chanin 6. Digital Image. Alabamachanin.com/the-school-of-making. Accessed 12 September 2017. Alabama Chanin 7. Digital Image. Alabamachanin.com/the-school-of-making. Accessed 12 September 2017. Alabama Chanin 8. Digital Image. Alabamachanin.com/the-factory. Accessed 12 September 2017. China Daily 1. Digital Image. Chinadaily.com.cn. Accessed 19 October 2017. Clinton Park. Digital Images. All images available by clintonpark.com. Accessed 21 October 2017. Double Down Denim 1. Digital Image. Instagram.com/rivigoods. Accessed 12 September 2017.

Pablo-29. Digital Image. Sustainabilityportal.net. Accessed 19 October 2017. Quick Study 1. Digital Image. Instagram.com/quickstudy. Accessed 26 September 2017. Raleigh Denim 1. Digital Image. Raleighdenimworkshop.com. Accessed 19 July 2017. Raleigh Denim 2. Digital Image. Raleighdenimworkshop.com. Accessed 12 September 2017. Rivi Goods 1. Digital Image. Instagram.com/rivigoods. Accessed 10 May 2017. Sewing Machine and Patterns 1. Digital Image. Pinterest.com/sewing_studio. Accessed 12 September 2017. Sewing Machine and Patterns 2. Digital Image. Pinterest.com/sewing_studio. Accessed 12 September 2017. Sewing Machine and Patterns 3. Digital Image. Pinterest.com/sewing_studio. Accessed 12 September 2017. Sourcing Journal 1. Digital Image. Soucingjournal.com. Accessed 21 October 2017. Studio Inspiration 3. Digital Image. Damirdoma.com. 21 October 2017. Studio Inspiration 4. Digital Image. Pinterest.com/Sewing_studio. Accessed 12 September 2017. Studio Space Inspiration 1. Digital Image. Elizabethsuzann.com. Accessed 12 September 2017. Studio Space Inspiration 2. Digital Image. Hackwithdesignhouse.com. Accessed 21 November 2017. Travel Portland 1. Digital Image. Travelportland.com. Accessed 26 September 2017.

Double Down Denim 2. Digital Image. Instagram.com/rivigoods. Accessed 12 September 2017. Fabric 1. Digital Image. Pinterest.com/fabric_rolls. Accessed 21 October 2017. Fabric 2. Digital Image. Indiesource.com. Accessed 21 October 2017.

214

Willamette Workroom

Willamette Workroom

215


W

W I L L A M E T T E

W O R K R O O M

Willamette Workroom was founded on the philosophy of giving back to designers the creative expression lost because of pressures to outsource cheaper labor and materials. We look to eliminate the prohibitive barriers that young fashion businesses encounter while producing collections within the constraints of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s globalized fashion industry. Cooperatively with our clients, Willamette Workroom is changing an industry that has lost sight of the importance of self-identification and individual expression through clothing choices. Bringing garment development back to the U.S. gives designers more opportunity to remain involved in the editing process, and will have positive effects for the brand. In doing this, we are changing how the fashion industry conducts business. When clothing fits better and visually resonates on a personal level with consumers, only then can we change the conversation towards doing better as an industry.

w w w. m akers row. co m/t h e- wo rk ro o m

Keri yourick mfa fsh pd 04294172  
Keri yourick mfa fsh pd 04294172  
Advertisement