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CHICKPEA MAGAZINE SPRING 2013




spring 2013 issue 7 design & content cara livermore sewindie.com sales & shipping bob lawton hooah.tumblr.com marketing annette radziszewski noochandbuch.com recipe development jen mackin oldfamiliarway.com printed by pixel preserve, llc in rochester, new york

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CHICKPEA MAGAZINE SPRING 2013


CHICKPEA MAGAZINE SPRING 2013




06 MARTA DYMEK

jadlonomia.com

24 shelly westerhausen vegetarianventures.com 32 Anna powell Teeter

annapowellteeter.com

34 heather crosby

yumuniverse.com

48 allyson dwyer

veggiebunny.com

48 steven matarazzo

stevenmatarazzo.com

58 eve wolftrand



66 lea kralj jager

nameless-lil.tumblr.com

72 hannah messinger

nothingbutdelicious.blogspot.com

74 Cori Mattli

writtenroots.com

78 alka

wegannerd.blogspot.com CHICKPEA MAGAZINE SPRING 2013


06 EDIBLE FLOWERS 10 CAKE PARTY 24 DIY CLEANERS 32 JUICE 34 NON DAIRY MILKS 48 RE-AWAKE, GARDEN STATE 58 HOMESTYLE SUBSTITUTIONS 66 lil kitchen 72 LEMON GNOCCHI 74 VEGAN IN THE DAIRY STATE 78 SPRING ON A PLATE CHICKPEA MAGAZINE SPRING 2013




recipes & photos by marta dymek jadlonomia.com lettering by cara livermore


ROSE AND COCONUT MOUSSE Put all ingredients into a blender and blend until smooth. Taste and add more agave if you like. Refrigerate for at least 3 hours or until solid, serve with coconut and tiny rose flowers.

CHICKPEA MAGAZINE SPRING 2013

1 cup cashew nuts, soaked for a night 1 cup rice milk 1/2 cup coconut cream 1/4 cup agave syrup 4 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 handfuls rose petals to serve: shredded coconut, tiny roses or rose petals




SPRING BROTH WITH DAISIES Put all veggies and spices to a very big pot. Cover them with cold water and wine, cook a broth for at least 4 hours on low heat. Strain broth, pressing on veggies to extract as much liquid as you can. Season with salt to taste. Serve with plenty of fresh herbs and daisies.

3 carrots, peeled 2 parsley root, peeled 1/2 celery root, peeled 1 fennel bulb, peeled 2 onions, peeled 2 celery stalks 1 leek 5 allspice corns 8 pepper corns 2 bay leaves 1 sprig of lovage (alternative: celery greens) salt scant 1/2 cup (100 ml) dry, white wine 8.5 cups (2 liters) cold water to serve: handful of daisies, freshly chopped parsley and mint

FENNEL, APPLE AND CARNATION SALAD 2 fennel bulbs, trimmed and very thinly sliced 1 apple, very thinly sliced 4 radishes, very thinly sliced 2 celery stalk, very thinly sliced 1 handful carnation flowers 5 tsp (25 ml) olive oil 1/2 tsp rice vinegar pinch of salt and pepper



In a bowl whisk together olive oil with rice. Season it with salt and pepper to taste. Add fennel, radishes, apple and celery. Toss well and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. Serve with carnation flowers on top.

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BROCCOLI AND CHRYSANTHEMUM SALAD 3 broccoli stalks, peeled and sliced with the mandoline 6 chrysanthemum flowers 4 tsp (20 ml) olive oil 3 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice pinch of salt poppy seeds In a bowl whisk together the olive oil with lemon juice and salt. Add broccoli slices, toss very well and leave for at least 1 hour to cool. Serve with chrysanthemum flowers and poppy seeds on top.

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photos & lettering by cara livermore recipes by jen mackin & cara livermore

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Cake Ingredients 1 1/2 cups flour 3/4 cup sugar 1/4 cup Dutch-processed cocoa powder 1 tsp baking soda Heaping pinch salt 1 cup water 1/3 cup canola oil 1 tbsp vinegar 1 tsp vanilla extract

Frosting Ingredients 1 cup vegan margarine 4 cups organic confectioner’s sugar 2 cups vegan marshmallow creme 1-2 tbsp non-dairy milk Vegan graham crackers

Cake Ingredients 4 cups flour 2 tsp baking powder 1 tsp baking soda Pinch salt 1/2 cup ground flax seed 1 1/2 cup water 2/3 cup lemon juice 1 1/2 cup lemon soda (San Pelligrino, sprite, etc.) 1 cup canola oil 1 cup almond (or other non-dairy) milk 1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract Glaze Ingredients 1 1/2 tbsp rosewater 1 1/2 cups organic confectioner’s sugar Splash vanilla extract

CHICKPEA MAGAZINE SPRING 2013

Instructions 1. Whisk together all the cake dry ingredients and wet ingredients in separate bowls. 2. Pour the wet mixture into the dry and gently stir together until combined. (Don’t overmix unless you want a badly textured cake!) 3. Bake for 30 minutes at 350F in a 8-9 inch circular pan, or until a toothpick comes out clean. 4. For the frosting, cream together with a handheld or stand mixer the margarine, powdered sugar, and marshmallow creme until consistent. Pour in the non-dairy milk a little at a time until it’s a creamy thick frosting. 5. To replicate this look, cut the cake into smaller rounds, then stack and gently frost, and coat the outside with crushed graham crackers.

Instructions 1. Vigorously whisk together the flax seed & water until frothy. Whisk in the rest of the wet ingredients. Whisk together the dry ingredients together in a separate bowl. 2. Spray a medium-large Bundt pan with cooking spray and preheat the oven to 350F. 3. Gently stir together the wet & dry ingredients until consistent. Pour into the prepped pan. This batter will rise a good deal, so only fill to 3/4 or a little above 3/4 of the whole pan. We had a very large Bundt pan so it required this recipe, if you have a smaller pan feel free to halve the recipe. 4. Bake the cake for 40 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean and the cake is golden brown. 5. For the glaze, beat together all the ingredients with a handheld or stand mixer until consistent. If it’s too thick for your liking, add a little plain water at a time; if it’s too thin, add more sugar. Serve hot with freshly drizzled glaze.

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Cake Ingredients 1 1/2 cups flour 3/4 cup sugar 1/4 cup matcha powder 1 tsp baking soda pinch salt 1 cup water 1/3 cup oil 1 tbsp vinegar 1 tsp vanilla extract

Frosting Ingredients 1/2 cup vegan margarine 2 cups organic confectioner’s sugar 2 tsp dried citrus zest (lemon, lime, orange) 1-2 tbsp citrus juice (lemon, lime, orange, grapefruit)

Instructions 1. Whisk together the wet ingredients and dry ingredients in separate bowls, then pour the wet into the dry and gently stir together until consistent. 2. To make a thin, tall layer cake as shown, pour the batter into a greased high-sided cookie sheet. Otherwise it can just go into a regular cake pan. 3. For the thin cake, bake at 350F for about ten minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Then cut the layers out with a large biscuit or circular cookie cutter. For a regular cake, bake at 350F for 30 minutes. 4. For the frosting, cream the sugar, margarine, and zest until well combined. Add in the juice a little at a time until the frosting is thick and creamy. You can either buy dried zest, zest some fruit then lay it out to dry for a few hours, or dehydrate it in a machine. It’s mostly important that the frosting doesn’t have too much liquid or it won’t combine correctly and won’t give the tall cake the structure it needs. 5. Frost between each cake layer, making sure that the cake is level as you go. We wouldn’t suggest more than five layers, each layer 1-2 inches high. Decorate the top of the cake with fresh-trimmed flowers and greenery. Serve chilled.

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Instructions 1. Whisk together the wet ingredients and dry ingredients in separate bowls, then pour the wet into the dry and gently stir together until consistent. Fold in the walnuts here if you want them! 2. Bake at 350F for 30 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. 3. For the frosting, start out by blending blueberries until they make a juice consistency. We blended 2 cups of blueberries to get the blender moving, and used the extra juice in a smoothie. :) 4. Cream the margarine and sugar until consistent, then slowly add in the juice until the frosting is thick and creamy. 5. Frost the cake and garnish with fresh blueberries and walnuts.

Instructions 1. Vigorously whisk together the flax seed & water until frothy. Whisk in the rest of the wet ingredients. Whisk together the dry ingredients together in a separate bowl. 2. Gently stir the wet ingredients into the dry. 3. Grease a small Bundt pan. We used three mini-Bundt pans for ours. Be sure not to fill your pan over 3/4 of the total pan or the cake may rise above it. 4. Pour in the batter and bake your cake for 30 minutes at 350F or until a toothpick comes out clean and the cake is golden brown. 5. For the glaze, beat together all the ingredients with a handheld or stand mixer until consistent. If it’s too thick for your liking, add a little water or coconut milk at a time; if it’s too thin, add more sugar. 6. Serve the hot cake with fresh, chilled strawberries and the glaze. CHICKPEA MAGAZINE SPRING 2013

Cake Ingredients 1 3/4 cups flour 3/4 cup sugar 1 tsp baking soda 1/2 tsp salt 1 cup water 1/3 cup oil 1 tbsp vinegar 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 tsp maple extract Optional: 1/4 cup toasted, chopped walnuts Frosting Ingredients 1/2 cup vegan margarine 2 cups organic confectioner’s sugar 2 tbsp freshly blended blueberries or unsweetened blueberry juice

Cake Ingredients 2 cups flour 1 tsp baking powder 1/2 tsp baking soda Pinch salt 1/4 cup ground flax seed 3/4 cup water 1/3 cup lemon soda (San pelligrino, sprite, etc.) 3/4 cup liquid sweetener (maple syrup, agave, etc.) 1/2 cup canola oil 1/2 cup almond (or other non-dairy) milk 1 tsp vanilla extract Glaze Ingredients 1 1/2 cups organic confectioner’s sugar 2 tbsp water or unsweetened coconut milk (we loved the coconut milk!) 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 tsp lemon juice

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PHOTOS & STORY BY SHELLY WESTERHAUSEN LETTERING BY CARA LIVERMORE

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There are probably a few things we can all agree on. We all like to have a clean and fresh smelling house; we probably like to spend as little as possible on mundane things such as cleaning supplies;. and we all are probably into the idea of being able to control what kind of chemicals are being sprayed / dumped all over our belongings. These are just a few just a few of the very good reasons to try making your own all-natural cleaners. If you have never tried making your own cleaner then you are about to be pleasantly surprised by how easy and versatile homemade cleaners can be. They mostly consist of inexpensive products like vinegar, lemon juice, castile soap, and baking soda. They cut down on cleaning clutter since they also can used through the whole house, instead of needing a different product for each room. They are also better for the environment because making your own means you skip the packaging, no testing on animals, and no by products made by the oil industry. Let’s start with the basics. Here is a little cheat sheet for the most common DIY cleaner ingredients and what their purposes are: Vinegar - grease cutter, cleanser, deodorizer Salt - disinfectant Citrus juice - grease cutter, cleanser, deodorizer Canola or mineral oil - wood conditioner Hydrogen peroxide - disinfectant

Non-clorine bleach (use in place of vinegar for those tough spots) Borax - Natural mineral disinfectant Castile Soap - cleanser, disinfectant Essential Oils - deodorizer

In addition to stocking your DIY cleaning kit with these things, you may want to designate a few kitchen supplies as strictly ‘cleaning supply tools’. This should include a set of measuring cups, a few spray bottles, saucepan, mixing bowl, funnel and metal spoon. Although this is not mandatory, it does give peace of mine to know you are not mixing your baking supplies with any sort of cleaning products. If you don’t have the space or money for an extra set of these, just make sure you clean the utensils VERY well before sticking back in your kitchen. Let’s tackle a few of these less-common ingredients. Castile Soap. It’s a vegetable based soap that is gentle on our on skin and on the earth. It’s extremely versatile and can be used to clean pretty much anything. It’s also cheap, vegan, and easily accessible. What is Borax? Well, first off, Borax IS NOT boric acid (this can sometimes be confused in conversations online or in articles). It is born mineral and salt that is mined from the ground. It’s also probably what most of your grandmothers used to clean their clothes and house back in the day. So, why re-unite with an old cleaning product when we have all these ‘advances’ in cleaning supplies? Because the advances in cleaning supplies we made that kill all those pesky germs actually backfired on us. Instead of killing them to protect us, they created “super-germs” that we must then use even more toxic cleaners to get rid of. And on top of that, the products in these cleaners have not been tested over long periods of time so we could be harming ourselves more than helping. How backwards is that? Anyhow, enough doom and gloom. Let’s get to cleaning! Here are a few simple recipes that I like to use in my home but feel free to do your own resource research and you will discover hundreds of cleaner recipes for any type of cleaner need.

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ALL PURPOSE CLEANER 1 tsp castile soap 1 tsp borax 2 tbsp vinegar 2 cups hot water tea tree oil Combine everything in a spray bottle. Done!

Dish Soap 2 cups castile soap Essential oils of your choice 1/2 cup lemon juice 1/2 cup warm water Mix the castile and warm water. Then add in the lemon juice and essential oils.

Toilet Cleaner

.

1/2 cup baking soda 1/4 cup vinegar tea tree oil Combine and pour into toilet. Scrub with a toilet brush and flush to rinse.

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Air Fresheners Air Fresheners: This one is super fun. All you do is combine your favorite spices, fruits, herbs, or tea with purified water. Simmer in a small saucepan and add more water has needed. If you want to scent a room that is far away from the kitchen then bring the mixture to a boil and bring mixture into that room until all the steam has evaporated. Keep mixture in a sealed container in the fridge for up to a week (and use as many times as you’d like). Here are a few of my favorite combinations: Orange + Cinnamon Lime + Vanilla Beans Lavender + Lemon + Peppercorn Not a recipe but my FAVORITE DIY air fresheners are house plants! You would be amazed at all the benefits of house plants. Plants help purify the air by using up the stale carbon dioxide that we breathe out and releasing fresh oxygen. They also help to reduce your risk of getting a cold, headache, and congestion since plants are known to decrease dust and increase humidity. Lastly, they can make your house feel cozy and can give you a sense of well being which can lead to lower stress levels.

Bathroom Sink & Tub Cleaner 1 Grapefruit (really any citrus will do but a grapefruit is so big that it gets the most accomplished in the shortest amount of time) Coarse Salt Slice grapefruit in half. Sprinkle the grapefruit half with salt and rub along the bathtub or sink. Slowly squeeze the citrus so the juice comes out as you clean. Apply more salt on the citrus as needed. 1 grapefruit should be able to clean your entire bathroom! (minus the toilet)

Looking to dig more into homemade cleaners? Here are some wonderful references: Make Your Place by Raleigh Briggs (Zine) Modern Homestead by Renee Wilkinson (Book) Naturally Clean by Jeffrey Hollender (Book)

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STORY & PHOTOS BY ANNA POWELL TEETER LETTERING BY CARA LIVERMORE A hardy glass of juice can serve as the perfect companion to any meal. Rich with vitamins and nutrients, juice composed of fruits and vegetables can also provide a satisfying snack. This specific juice recipe includes hints of morning, but can be consumed and enjoyed at any time of day. Although this combination of produce will leave the palate quite satisfied, this recipe welcomes creativity and additional fruits and vegetables of choice.

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CHICKPEA MAGAZINE SPRING 2013


Ingredients One carrot One grapefruit One kiwi One half strawberry papaya One mango One pomegranate’s seeds One cucumber One half cup of blueberries

Instructions 1. Clean all produce. 2. Skin the following items: carrot, grapefruit, and kiwi. 3. Cut the strawberry papaya in half. Scoop the seeds out with a spoon and cut out the pink fruit. 4. Cut the mango in half around the pit. Remove the pit and carve the fruit out from the peel. 5. Begin to cut the pomegranate and remove the seeds as you go. Be cautious as these seeds are very juicy and have a tendency to spray, then proceed to stain. 6. Depending on the size of your juicer, some items may need to be cut in half or fourths to accurately fit. 7. Juice all items. 8. Stir the juice and add approximately five ice cubes. The juicing process has a tendency to make the juice warm, but it tastes much more delightful when chilled.

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STORY & PHOTOS BY HEATHER CROSBY

There truly are infinite possibilities when it comes to a plant-based diet, and milk alternatives are no exception. While more and more pre-packaged options are hitting grocery store shelves these days for non-dairy milks, nothing tastes as delicious, offers as much variety, or packs the additive/preservative-free and nutrient-rich punch that homemade milks do. Using one simple ingredient and water, you can create multiple flavors by sprouting, toasting or adding in natural sweeteners, fruit, even herbs. Best of all, many of these recipes take all of five minutes to make. You’ll never buy milk from the store again.

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All recipes are gluten-free. Just make sure if preparing oat milk, that you use gluten-free oats from a trusted source, and that your vanilla extract and cocoa are gluten-free. Tools: Nut milk bag or cheesecloth* Blender Recycled glass jars for storage * I own one nut milk bag and about 20 scraps of cheesecloth that I cut up from one purchase. You can definitely hand wash, machine wash and re-use these guys for years. Ingredients: Individual to each recipe, but try to buy everything organic.

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Basic steps for all (unless otherwise specified): 1. Soak: soaking is necessary to release enzyme inhibitors and improve nutrient digestion/assimilation. I have indicated below, what to do with particular ingredients, what they taste like, how long to soak for each and what add-ins would take these milks to the next level of deliciousness. Do not use your soak water for milk, all of your enzyme inhibitors are in here, so use fresh water. 2. Or Toast: while soaking is optimal from a nutrition standpoint, toasting also brings out incredible flavor. When toasting any ingredients, use raw, unsoaked ingredients to toast. The dryness is what brings out that toasted flavor, and you won’t get that with pre-soaked, hydrated ingredients. 3. Rinse: rinse soaked ingredients well. 4. Blend together: using your highest setting, blend with water until as smooth as possible.

CHICKPEA MAGAZINE SPRING 2013

5. Strain & squeeze: using your nut milk bag, or a cheesecloth, draped over a bowl or large glass, pour blended contents through fabric. To aid straining, squeeze by twisting from the top down. 6. Storage: store milk in an airtight container. Pour into recycled glass jars and seal with lid. Just give them a shake before serving. Since there are no fillers or preservatives used, the contents may naturally settle. 7. Add-ins: You can sweeten to taste, or blend/stir in any of the add-in suggestions listed later. I recommend trying these milks unsweetened first, so you can detect the differences in taste to see what you like best, and if you need any sweetener at all. All of the following milks can add in this mixture for enhanced flavor: 1/4 tsp vanilla extract, 2 tsp grade B maple syrup and pinch of fine ground sea salt.

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Almonds: Almonds are some of the most alkaliz-

ing nuts around, and they have cholesterol lowering effects. They’re also loaded with antioxidant powerful vitamin E, immune-supporting magnesium and the electrolyte potassium, too. 1/2 cup raw almonds 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) Soak time: 8-12 hours Steps: prepare either soaked almonds (8-12 hours) or toasted almonds (7 minutes at 350°F). Blend together and strain through cheesecloth. Serve chilled, room temp or warm. Taste/consistency: toasted makes a rich almond flavor and raw is a creamy, neutral flavor that almost everyone loves. This is a tasty non-dairy milk for beginners as it is delicious without sweetening and can be enjoyed on its own. Make it fancy: add cardamom and cocoa.

Brazil Nuts: Help to promote heart health, offer

up a solid serving of magnesium, and are packed with beneficial selenium (774% of RDA) which is essential for immune support and thyroid function. 1/2 cup raw Brazil nuts 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) No soaking Steps: no need to soak Brazil nuts because they don’t have any (or very little) enzyme inhibitors, but you can toast them (7 minutes at 350°F). Blend together and strain through cheesecloth (you way want to strain twice). Serve chilled, room temp or warm. This is hands-down one of my favorite milks for cereal, smoothies and tea. Store in the fridge, these guys tend to go rancid easily. Fresh Brazil nuts should be ivory, not yellow. Taste/consistency: creamy, rich, unique Brazil nut flavor. Beautiful white milk. This is a tasty non-dairy milk for beginners as it is delicious without sweetening and can be enjoyed on its own. Texturally, it is the most like traditional whole dairy milk— very creamy.

Amaranth:

Amaranth contains more protein than any other gluten-free grain. Food scientists consider the protein content of amaranth of high “biological value,” similar to the proteins found in cow’s milk. This means that amaranth contains an excellent combination of essential amino acids and is well absorbed in the intestinal tract. It’s full of calcium, magnesium, fiber and iron. 1/2 cup raw amaranth (soaked about 4 hours in pure water) 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) Soak time: 6-8 hours Steps: prepare either soaked amaranth (8-12 hours) or toasted amaranth (5 minutes at 350°F) or popped (get instruction here). You will have to rinse any soaked amaranth through a cheesecloth, since they are so tiny. Blend together and strain the milk through the cheesecloth. Serve chilled, room temp or warm. Taste/consistency: popped or toasted tastes a little like liquid popcorn. Very unique, nutty flavor. Make it fancy: blend with 2 tsp sucanat, 1/4 tsp vanilla extract and a pinch of fine ground sea salt for a “caramel corn” treat. Use that same combo but with molasses instead of sucanat for “Cracker Jack” flavor. Or serve blended with fresh lime juice, agave, a drop of vanilla and a pinch of cayenne. Or maple syrup, cocoa, 1/8 tsp cinnamon and a pinch of cayenne for a rich, Mexican treat.

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Make it fancy: Add cardamom and cocoa. Or orange zest, a bit of orange juice, agave, and vanilla extract. Mixed berries blended in are also amazing.

Brown Rice: Great source of trace mineral manganese, and good source of selenium and magnesium.

1/2 cup cooked brown rice 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) No soaking necessary, but you can for 6-8 hours Steps: I like to toast rice (without any oil) in a pot, stirring occasionally over medium-high heat for about 7 minutes before adding water and cooking. Blend together cooked rice and water and strain through cheesecloth. You may have to strain twice. This is a good milk for add-ins like cocoa or liquid sweeteners, since on it’s own, I find it a bit on the starchy side. Taste/consistency: creamy in a starchy way, with a mild, almost undetectable grittiness. Very mild, toasted brown rice flavor. Make it fancy: 1/4 tsp cinnamon, 1/4 tsp vanilla extract, agave and rosewater to taste. Or 1/4 tsp cinnamon, pinch cayenne, agave, 1/4 tsp vanilla extract and 2 tsp cocoa.

CHICKPEA MAGAZINE SPRING 2013


Buckwheat: Buckwheat is gluten-free, a good source

of protein, it contains eight essential amino acids and is known to balance mood & mind clarity. It even provides calcium, manganese and vitamins B and E. 1/2 cup raw, hulled buckwheat groats—sprouted or toasted 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) Soak time: 8 hours Steps: you can use raw, sprouted buckwheat or toasted for milk, but I don’t recommend cooked—you’ll get a gooey, gel-like texture. Toast buckwheat (7-10 minutes at 350°F). Blend soaked or toasted buckwheat together with water and strain through cheesecloth. Serve chilled.

Young Thai Coconut:

Helps prevent heart disease, contains anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties, promotes weight maintenance and coconut water is a natural isotonic beverage filled with electrolytes. Coconut meat is also an excellent source of medium chain fatty acids, protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals. Meat from 1 young Thai coconut (not to be confused with mature coconut) Water from 1 young Thai coconut No soaking Steps: blend together ingredients and add a bit more pure water if you need to, to reach desired consistency.

Taste/consistency: raw, sprouted buckwheat milk tastes, fresh, light and delicious with a hint of grassy-in-a-sunny-way. A very fine grit. Toasting definitely brings out the unique flavor of buckwheat—cereal-like. This would be a great milk for add-ins or as a smoothie base.

Taste/consistency: very creamy, delicious, unique Thai coconut flavor. When used in heated recipes like soups the coconut flavor is more undetectable.

Make it fancy: Add cardamom, maple syrup and cocoa. Mixed berries blended in are also amazing—try blackberries and add a bit of fresh thyme, maybe lemon juice and a liquid sweetener.

Make it fancy: add cardamom and cocoa. Or orange zest, a bit of orange juice, agave, and vanilla extract. Mixed berries blended in are also amazing.

Cashews: Approximately 75% of their unsaturated fatty

Unsulphured Shredded Coconut:Helps prevent heart disease,

acid content is oleic acid—heart-healthy monounsaturated fat. Studies of diabetic patients show that monounsaturated fat, when added to a low-fat diet, can help to reduce high triglyceride levels. Everyone knows that calcium is necessary for strong bones, but magnesium is also vital for healthy bones—and cashews are a great source. 1/2 cup raw cashews, soaked 2-4 hours 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) Soak time: 2-4 hours Steps: blend together ingredients and strain through cheesecloth (although straining is optional since cashews blend so well). Serve chilled, room temp or warm. This is hands-down one of my go-to milks for recipes like soups and puddings. Taste/consistency: very creamy, almost buttery neutral flavor, great for add-ins and use in sweet and savory recipes. Make it fancy: add cardamom, cayenne and cocoa. Or orange zest, a bit of orange juice, agave, and vanilla extract. Mixed berries blended in are also amazing.

CHICKPEA MAGAZINE SPRING 2013

contains anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties. Coconut meat is also an excellent source of medium chain fatty acids, protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals. 1/2 cup unsulphured shredded coconut 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) Soak time: you can soak about 2 hours to soften Steps: Blend together soaked, raw or toasted ingredients and strain. For incredible flavor, toast coconut in an oven set to 350°F for 3 minutes before blending. Taste/consistency: delicious undeniable coconut flavor for toasted, a bit more subtle in un-toasted. Make it fancy: Add cardamom and cocoa. Or orange zest, a bit of orange juice, agave and vanilla extract. Mixed berries = delish.

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Hazelnuts: Hazelnuts are loaded with key minerals like

Macadamia Nuts:

1/2 cup raw hazelnuts (a.k.a. filberts) 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) No soaking

1/2 cup raw macadamias 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) No soaking

Steps: no need to soak hazelnuts because they don’t have any (or very little) enzyme inhibitors, but you can toast them (7 minutes at 350°F) for incredible flavor. Blend together soaked or toasted and strain through cheesecloth. Serve chilled, room temp or warm. This is one of my favorite milks for cereal, smoothies and tea—divine.

Steps: no need to soak macadamia nuts because they don’t have enzyme inhibitors. Blend together and strain through cheesecloth (you may want to strain twice). Serve chilled, room temp or warm. This is one of my favorite milks for cereal, smoothies and tea.

magnesium, phosphorous, zinc, copper, iron, manganese, calcium and selenium. Whew. They also provide vitamin K, potassium and vitamin E.

Taste/consistency: creamy, rich, unique hazelnut flavor. Beautiful white milk. This is a tasty non-dairy milk for beginners, as it is delicious without sweetening and can be enjoyed on its own. My pal Marta was over tasting with me one day, and said that toasted hazelnut milk was “off the freaking hook.” I can’t think of a more accurate description. Make it fancy: add cardamom and cocoa. Or orange zest, a bit of orange juice, agave and vanilla extract. Mixed berries blended in are also amazing. Serve warm with mint leaves and agave. Serve warm with fresh thyme, agave and vanilla.

Hemp Seed: Hemp protein contains all 21 known amino ac-

ids (complete protein), including the 9 essential ones that adult bodies cannot produce. Hemp seeds are considered by leading researchers and medical doctors, to be one of the most nutritious food sources on the planet. Shelled hemp seed is 33% pure digestible protein and rich in iron and vitamin E (3x the amount in flax) as well as omega-3 and GLA. 1/2 cup raw hemp seed (a.k.a. hemp nut) 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) No soaking Steps: no need to soak hemp seeds, just blend together and strain through cheesecloth, although this is an optional step since they blend up nicely. Serve chilled or room temp. Store hemp seed in the fridge or freezer, they are loaded with fragile essential fatty acids and can go rancid easily. Taste/consistency: looks a tad like a sesame seed and has a delicious, buttery, nutty flavor similar to that of a pine nut or sunflower seed. Very creamy, unique, pale green milk. Make it fancy: add cardamom and cocoa. Mixed berries blended in alone, or with cocoa and maple syrup are divine options as well. I love this milk blended with blueberries.

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A good source of vitamins like thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6 and pantothenic acid. Also rich in minerals like manganese, calcium and potassium.

Taste/consistency: creamy, rich, buttery flavor. Beautiful white milk. This is a tasty non-dairy milk for beginners as it is delicious without sweetening and can be enjoyed on its own. Make it fancy: add lime zest, agave and vanilla extract. Mixed berries blended in are also amazing. Cocoa powder, vanilla extract and maple syrup make for an incredible, rich dessert milk.

Millet:

Millet contains a range of beneficial phytochemicals (a.k.a. phytonutrients) and is known to reduce the incidence of stomach ulcers, protect against cardiovascular disease, diabetes and even help protect against childhood asthma. 1/2 cup millet (sprouted, cooked or toasted) 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) Soak time: 8-12 hours Steps: Blend together and strain through cheesecloth. Serve chilled, room temp or warm. Taste/consistency: nutty, almost corn-like in flavor, touch of bitterness (but went away after a day). Lovely taste when sweetened. Make it fancy: agave, a pinch of cayenne and fresh lime juice and a pinch of fine ground sea salt is delicious. You can also enjoy it with fresh lemon juice, agave, vanilla extract and a pinch of fine ground sea salt.

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Oats: A good source of fiber (soluble and insoluble), oats are also one of the best sources of compounds called tocotrienols. These are antioxidants which together with tocopherols form vitamin E. The tocotrienols inhibit cholesterol synthesis and have been found to lower blood cholesterol. 1/2 cup raw, gluten-free oats 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) No soaking Steps: you can toast your oats (7-10 minutes at 350°F) or use them raw (no soaking). Blend together raw or toasted and strain through cheesecloth (you may want to strain twice). Serve chilled, room temp or warm. Taste/consistency: oat-y but neutral enough, a bit starchy, fine grain texture. Makes a good base for addins like sweeteners and cinnamon. Make it fancy: 1/4 tsp cinnamon, 1/4 tsp vanilla extract, agave and rosewater to taste. Or 1/4 tsp cinnamon, pinch cayenne, agave, 1/4 tsp vanilla extract and 2 tsp cocoa.

Pine Nuts: Pine nuts are a good source of

iron, magnesium, potassium and protein. And they are the only source of pinoleic acid which helps stimulate hormones that suppress appetite. They are also protectors of the heart since they are high in oleic acid. 1/2 cup raw pine nuts 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) No soaking Steps: no need to soak pine nuts, but you can toast them (7 minutes at 350°F). Blend together raw or toasted, and strain through cheesecloth. Serve chilled. Taste/consistency: beautiful white milk, creamy, buttery, pine-y and a smidge bitter. Delicious with sweetening and toasted. Make it fancy: add cardamom, agave, cinnamon and cocoa.

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Poppy Seeds: This milk is especially

good for treating inflammation, joint pain and insomnia thanks to their beneficial amounts of magnesium and calcium. 1/3 cup poppy seeds 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) Soak time: 4-5 hours Steps: blend together and strain through cheesecloth—you will have to rinse soaked poppy seeds through a cheesecloth, too, since they are so tiny. Serve chilled, room temp or warm. Taste/consistency: beautiful pale purple milk, creamy, light, fresh and delicious. Make it fancy: add cardamom and cocoa. Or orange zest, a bit of orange juice, agave and vanilla extract. Mixed berries blended in are also amazing.

Quinoa: Quinoa—not as a grain, but a seed from the goosewort plant (cousin of spinach and chard)— is a complete protein source and also high in magnesium. 1/2 cup sprouted, toasted or cooked quinoa 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) Soak time: 8-12 hours Steps: ideally, you will soak and either sprout, or cook quinoa for this milk. You can also toast it (7 minutes at 350°F). Blend together and strain through cheesecloth. Serve chilled, room temp or warm. Taste/consistency: uncooked quinoa has a strong grassy flavor that is either loved or detested by those that try it. I prefer to sprout and then cook the grain for this milk because I lean towards the former. It’s worth a try though, because this milk is tasty with add-ins like maple syrup and cocoa. Make it fancy: add cardamom and cocoa. Mixed berries blended in are also tasty.

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Sesame Seeds: Not only are sesame seeds

a very good source of manganese and copper, but they are also a good source of calcium, magnesium, iron, phosphorus, vitamin B1, zinc and dietary fiber. 1/2 cup raw sesame seeds 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) Soak time: 6-8 hours Steps: blend together soaked or toasted (7 minutes at 350°F) seeds and strain through cheesecloth. Serve chilled, room temp or warm. Taste/consistency: delicious toasted sesame flavor, rich, creamy milk. Make it fancy: Add cardamom and cocoa. Or orange zest, a bit of orange juice, agave and vanilla extract. Mixed berries blended in are also amazing.

Sunflower Seeds: Supplying sig-

nificant amounts of vitamin E, magnesium and selenium, sunflower seeds are also loaded with phytosterols, which are compounds found in plants that have a chemical structure very similar to cholesterol. When present in the diet in sufficient amounts, phytosterols are believed to reduce blood levels of cholesterol, enhance the immune response and decrease risk of certain cancers. 1/2 cup raw sunflower seeds 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) Soak time: 4-6 hours Steps: you can toast seeds for extra flavor (7 minutes at 350°F). Blend together soaked or toasted and strain through cheesecloth. Serve chilled, room temp or warm. Taste/consistency: fresh mildly green, floral (almost undetectable), creamy taste—like pure sunshine. Make it fancy: add cardamom and cocoa. Or orange zest, a bit of orange juice, agave and vanilla extract. Mixed berries blended in are also amazing.

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Walnuts: Walnuts have more antioxidants—

and better-quality antioxidants—than most popular nuts. They are loaded with vitamin E, they can lower cholesterol, reduce the oxidative stress caused by the free radicals, and decrease unhealthy inflammation. And listen up fellas, walnuts could improve sperm quality. 1/2 cup raw walnuts 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) Soak time: 8-12 hours Steps: you can toast walnuts for extra flavor (7 minutes at 350°F). Blend together soaked or toasted and strain through cheesecloth. Serve chilled, room temp or warm. Taste/consistency: earthy, very walnut-y flavor when toasted, creamy, subtle grit. Raw walnut milk is a bit more mild, but creamy and a pale, pale purple. Make it fancy: add cardamom and cocoa. Or orange zest, a bit of orange juice, agave and vanilla extract. Mixed berries blended in are also amazing.

Pecans: A good source of protein and rich in vi-

tamin E, pecans are a natural antioxidant (reducing risks of cancer and heart disease). They contain monounsaturated fatty acids, the type of heart-healthy fat (lowering bad LDL cholesterol and raising good HDL cholesterol), and pecans are also a good source of folic acid, niacin, magnesium, selenium and zinc. 1/2 cup raw pecans 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) Soak time: 8-12 hours Steps: you can toast pecans for extra flavor (7 minutes at 350°F). Blend together soaked or toasted and strain through cheesecloth. Serve chilled, room temp or warm. This is one of my favorite milks for cereal, smoothies and tea, especially in the winter months. Taste/consistency: toasted is a rich, pecan-y flavor and raw is more mild—both are creamy and delicious. Make it fancy: blend in maple syrup and cocoa for the best chocolate milk you ever had.

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Pumpkin Seeds: Also known as “pepitas”, pumpkin seeds are a good source of essential fatty acids, protein and the essential minerals iron, zinc, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, copper and potassium. The oil and seeds are used to treat enlarged prostate, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Interstitial Cystitis and various digestive ailments. The high tryptophan content makes the pepita of interest to researchers studying the treatment of anxiety disorders, too. 1/2 cup raw pumpkin seeds 2 cups pure water (use coconut water for extra sweetness and electrolytes) Soak time: 6-8 hours Steps: you can toast pepitas (7 minutes at 350°F) for a more “popcorn-y” flavor. Blend together soaked or toasted and strain through cheesecloth. Serve chilled, room temp or warm. Taste/consistency: toasted is unique, rich flavor while soaked is a bit more mild, but still uniquely pepita. Creamy, beautiful pale green milk. Make it fancy: Add cardamom and cocoa. Or orange zest, a bit of orange juice, lime juice, agave and vanilla extract. Delicious with just a sweetener and lime, too.

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Nut & Seed Butters:

You can use 1 tbsp of nut/seed butter like pumpkin seed, almond, tahini or cashew per 1 cup water. Just blend, and most times, straining isn’t necessary.

Sweeteners to try:

Sucanat Molasses Maple Syrup Brown Rice Syrup Dates (blended with almond milk makes a great foam for Rooibos Chai Tea)

Add-ins to try:

Maca Chia Berries (blend) Pomegranate juice Lemon zest (blend) Orange juice (try blood orange) Orange zest (blend) Lavender (blend) Rosewater Lemon juice (try Meyer lemon, too) Lemon zest (blend) Lime juice Lime zest (blend) Cinnamon Cardamom Nutmeg Vanilla Bean or extract Cocoa (serve warm for hot cocoa) Cayenne Turmeric Fresh mint (blend) Fresh thyme  (blend) Chia seed (add post blend, they will plumpen like tapioca pearls)

Add-in combos to try on all:

Cocoa & Cayenne Cocoa, Vanilla & Cayenne Sweetener, Lemon & Lavender Vanilla & Orange Juice Vanilla & Rosewater Vanilla, Cinnamon & Rosewater Sweetener & Cayenne Cinnamon, Vanilla & Cardamom Cinnamon, Vanilla & Nutmeg Vanilla & Strawberry Vanilla & Raspberry Vanilla, Lemon & Blackberry Vanilla & Blueberry Fresh Thyme & Mint Rosemary, Lemon & Vanilla Vanilla & Thyme Vanilla, Strawberry & Basil Vanilla, Blueberry & Thyme


Make a cereal

1/2 cup pulp 2 tsp maple syrup 1 tsp unrefined coconut oil 1/8 tsp fine ground sea salt Stir together all ingredients and spread onto a parchmentlined cookie sheet. You can take the rustic route and just spread cereal about 1/4” high in no shape at all (and break with hands apart post-baking), or use a silicone spatula or knife to shape a rectangle. Take the sculpting that much further by laying a knife into your cereal vertically and then horizontally to create precut shapes that you can release once baked. Bake at 350°F for 20 minutes, then flip and bake for another 10 minutes. I flip by placing a piece of parchment on top of baked cereal, then flip. You can also dehydrate for 6-8 hours, or until dry, to maintain more beneficial enzymes. Add-ins: before baking, add 1 tbsp cocoa for a chocolate-y cereal, or add 1/4 tsp cinnamon and 1/8 tsp cardamom for a spiced cereal. Minced ginger is delicious with cardamom and orange zest, too. Fold-ins: add some gluten-free crisp brown rice, gluten-free oats, sprouted, dehydrated buckwheat and dried fruit like unsulphured blueberries, currants, cherries, cranberries, apples, strawberries, pineapple or mango for a healthy unboxed cereal. Store in an airtight glass container in the pantry or fridge. You will notice that you will become satisfied with a smaller bowl of cereal that you may be used to. This is because you are feeding your body maximum nutrients, so it will say “I’m full” sooner than it would with a processed box cereal. These are delicious without milk, too. Add them to trail mixes, or munch on them plain.

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MAKE CRACKERS

1/2 cup pulp 1 tsp unrefined coconut oil 1/8 tsp fine ground sea salt Stir together all ingredients and spread onto a parchment-lined cookie sheet. You can take the rustic route and just spread about 1/4” high in no shape at all, or use a silicone spatula or knife to shape a rectangle. Lay a knife into your rectangle vertically and then horizontally to create pre-cut shapes that you can release once baked. No patience for that? Just break up with your hands post-baking. Bake at 350°F for 20 minutes, then flip and bake for another 10 minutes. You can also dehydrate for 6-8 hours, or until dry, to maintain more beneficial enzymes. Add-ins: before baking, add any combination of fresh, chopped thyme, sage, rosemary, basil, oregano, marjoram and/or lavendar. Try folding in 1/4 tsp minced garlic and/or 1 tsp onion. Or add some cumin and coriander. Experiment and have fun! Fold-ins: golden raisins and pecans (especially tasty with rosemary and/or thyme). Crumble on top of salads for crunch and protein. Enjoy with a bit of unrefined coconut oil and a pinch of sea salt for a snack. Top with Cashew Cheese spread—yum. Store in an airtight glass container in the pantry or fridge

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RE-AW Written by Allyson Dwyer Photos by Steven Matarazzo LETTERING BY CARA LIVERMORE

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WAKE,

Over the past few years, as I’ve grown from being a vegetarian to a vegan, I’ve found out that my old home state of New Jersey has been growing along with me. As I learn about myself and veganism, I am becoming more endeared to my own home state. Both myself and New Jersey are waking up.

New Jersey sleeps when it is winter. And those who live within it sleep as well. We dream of the sun staying longer and thawing out the grass from under the thick, wet walls of snow. In the winter, the sand of the beach is cold; the boardwalk is draped in fog. But we still wait for the sun, because that is when the Garden State reawakens. Winter came sooner this past year. The storm Sandy swept in and collapsed right above us, leaving everyone in the state feeling powerless and stressed and most of all, tired. The storm took autumn along with it. Branches were stripped of their red and gold leaves, and the sky became a permanent gray. Since that time, the state has been in a trance. This sleepy feeling can be sensed in the streets, and in the parks, and on the shorelines. We usually sleep during winter in New Jersey, but never before had we slept like this. Never before had we all also felt so similar at the same moment, in some unifying experience. During these past few winter months of my home state, a bond has been forming. What I learned was this home of mine, this small and overlooked state, was hiding a lot of its personality. New Jersey was not screaming to be heard, but waiting, patiently, to be noticed. I had never even given it the chance, but as I grew through years of work and commuting to college in New York and tracing all corners of the state, I began to take notice. And those little things made me happier than I realized: the way the sun sets over the Garden State parkway on the drive back home, the intersection of the roads and a NJ Transit train as it runs through a small, bellowing town. How, in the span of one day I could eat breakfast in Montclair, go apple picking on a windy farm in Freehold and be in a bar in Asbury Park with friends by evening. Only in this state can such a ribbon of experiences occur. Winter has been sleepy and cold, and we’ve had to rebuild because of a massive storm. When the snow melts away, and the beaches thaw off, and the boardwalks are stronger and glowing, the state will wake up. New Jersey will wake up and be brand new.

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CENTRAL NEW JERSEY I owe a lot of my reawakened love for my home state to being vegan. Right before I left New Jersey for school I became vegetarian, and through years of thinking and talking to other vegans, and visiting Safe Haven Animal Sanctuary in New York, I decided to completely embrace veganism. I had come back from New York to live in New Jersey and commute to school, and my change in perception of animals was almost parallel. As I grew through school and work, so did I in my revelations in what it means to be vegan. This revelation slowly crept up over me when I began spending more time in different parts of the state. Central New Jersey is where I grew up. Like all beginnings, central New Jersey is a blank canvas. The area is known for its farmlands, which, although hard to come by as years go by, can still be found sitting quietly down long stretches of NJ roads. During the winter they are just open spaces, but in summer they become alive with both beautiful plants and pockets of people. Driving across central New Jersey, towns fade in and out, and that same blankness makes some towns indistinguishable. Looking closer, each town holds a secret charm, almost as if on purpose. Drive off of any major highway and you may find yourself on a small street, with new things to explore. These new places and new explorations are the life blood of the state. Small on a map, look deep and you will find something that speaks to you. For me, it is my veganism which opens up these experiences and conversations. I see reflections of my interests in places like Matawan, where there are wonderful little shops like the vegan bakery, Papa Ganache, and a Loving Hut (of all towns in NJ, they chose tiny Matawan). In New Brunswick, there is George Street Co-op with Namaste CafĂŠ just upstairs, and in the Princeton/Hillsborough area there are warm shops such as Spoon & Sprout CafĂŠ, and the sorbet at the Bent Spoon, which makes its creations with New Jersey based local produce, such as tomatoes, pumpkins, peaches and blueberries. These are places which stay open all year round in New Jersey, and spark small gatherings of like minded people.

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Closest in central Jersey to where I grew up (the tiny but beautiful Leonardo), is the town of Red Bank, a town known for its lovely red brick sidewalks and illustrated building facades. Many little shops have come and gone in this town that sits along the Navesink River. When I was younger, I didn’t pay much attention to the importance of these places that give towns their character. In the last few years, vegan friendly restaurants such as Good Karma Café, a compact restaurant that is still able to hold within it vibrant colors and smells, have opened, and reminded me of what gives Red Bank its charm. Good Karma has sparked a lot of interest and discussion in veganism, as I have I run into friends on the streets who say how much they love the place, even if they themselves aren’t vegan. To me, Good Karma has brought back a sense of community to a town that often loses its most original shops to bigger, commercial things. In the parking lot of the Galleria, by a set of NJ transit train tracks, is where the Cinnamon Snail parks every Sunday. Originally only at the farmer’s market in the Summer and Fall, the demand for Cinnamon Snail in the area was so high, that the food truck was able to make a deal and stay parked there yearlong on Sundays. On a typical summer’s day at the farmer’s market, the line stretches from the truck to the middle of the market. Vegans and non-vegans alike have given the truck praise because of its innovative take on vegan cuisine and their outstanding baked goods, such as crème brulee donuts, peanut butter cheesecake brownies, raspberry danishes, and their signature Cinnamon Snail cinnamon bun. But again, it is not just the food that makes this truck a special addition to Red Bank. The truck is run by Adam Sorbel, a New York City native who moved to New Jersey twelve years ago, and turned to veganism around the time his daughter was born, eleven years ago. His reasoning was he wanted to raise his daughter ethically and with a perspective of kindness towards animals. Through his dedication to serving vegan food in New Jersey and New York, both through innovation and passion, Adam has propelled veganism to something more than mere consumption. At the Cinnamon Snail on a wintry day, there will always be a line of dedicated people waiting to place an order. They come back, but it isn’t just for the food. The scene at the truck is infectious, like a bright spark through the foggy, dreary day. Standing in line together, you feel a connection of like minded friends who may not speak but know and think the same things.

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NORTH JERSEY Driving up on the NJ Turnpike, you will see the skyscrapers of three cities: Newark, Jersey City, and New York City. Driving on I-287 North, you may see the landscape change from flat grassy lands to shimmering, rocky cliffs and thick forests. At any moment in North Jersey, you feel like you are a great protagonist standing amongst a bigger scene of something quite unreal and unexpected. The landscape is dramatic as it can easily blend from nature to cityscape in just a few miles drive. Unlike the central and shore areas of New Jersey, the northern area of the state pushes through the winter by living alongside it. Towns like Montclair and Rutherford feel like sections of Manhattan, removed and placed into New Jersey. The feeling becomes stronger when you realize that these towns are a short train ride away from the city, and that from some high points in Rutherford, you can see a unique and shimmering view of the city. The view is seamless and you forget that there is even a geography to the area, rather just one scene that blends from one into the next. Montclair is a town full of little charming surprises, such as the Ethiopian restaurant Mesob., and the Chinese vegan restaurant Veggie Heaven (which can also be found in Denville and Teaneck, two very different towns in geography and look). Veggie Heaven is widely known for being the go-to spot for good vegetarian-friendly Chinese food by vegans and non-vegans alike. I found out about Veggie Heaven from my boyfriend who, at the time, didn’t eat meat. From then on it became a place of great nostalgia for both of us.

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These memories make up a unique perspective of North New Jersey that belongs only to us, but I know others feel some similar connection in their own way. In a town like Rutherford, you wouldn’t expect the kinds of vegan-friendly surprises that you find in Montclair. A town known for its many sports stadiums and Medieval Times, you would never realize they do have their town center, their own pulsing, thriving heart with independent shops that welcome you in on a brisk afternoon. Of all the towns in New Jersey, it holds one of the best vegan cupcake places in possibly the country, a small shop called Sweet Avenue Bakeshop, which has been run by Danielle and Jack Vance since August of 2007. Inside this compact shop, you are met with shimmering decorations and pink walls and cupcake paintings. The cupcakes themselves look like tiny cartoons that have become tangible. This small shop exhibits creativity and color, but also community and spirit. Sweet Avenue Bakeshop is also known for their annual Cupcake Fest, which they hold every June to benefit a local animal shelter in Bloomfield. Along the front of the window, you will find flyers to help benefit such places as the For The Animals Sanctuary, a small farm animal sanctuary founded by Debbie Kowalski in Blairstown. For The Animals is home to many resident cows, such as Amy, Benjamin, Grace, Herbie and Kevina, and many resident goats, chickens, and pigs. I would have never found out about such wonderful organization had I not seen the flyer for it in the shop. These tiny visits and moments of discovery lead to even more discoveries. In such a small state, many beautiful things are happening, whether we notice or not.

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JERSEY SHORE In winter the sand on the shore is cold and wet, and feels almost as if, without the sun, unfed. The cold builds a barrier between the street and the beach, and to even try and stand by the ocean is all but impossible save for a few minutes. But those few minutes bring a lot of joy. Those moments give you a chance to reunite with the sea, and the waves, which feel like home most of the year, but feel so far away when the cold sets it. The one thing we want more than anything, while New Jersey sleeps, is to pretend that we can still be at the beach, and somehow again feel the outside world. The shore towns are the ones which sleep the deepest while waiting for the warm weather to return. However some towns along the Jersey shore find a way to live alongside the cold ocean. Asbury Park is a small town with a lively heart. The boardwalk may be quiet during the day, but at night in the town, restaurants and shops and bars stay awake and pulse with energy saved from the summer. The town has been growing in the past decade, slowly rebuilding itself. Asbury has always been known for its music scene, which still thrives today in small bars and venues. It may even be the music that has pushed its blood flow through the years, and through every winter into summer. Asbury is eclectic and so are its residents, so its no surprise that as new places open, they consider the rise of veganism. Many places have added vegan friendly items to their restaurants, which encourages others to do the same.

Some places, such as The Twisted Tree Cafe, have been around for a long time and become a fixture on Cookman Avenue for their vegan food. Down the road from Asbury is the town of Belmar, home to another vegan fixture on the Jersey Shore, Kaya’s Kitchen, which has been in business for eight years. To make the drive along the shore even more beautiful for a vegan, the ambitious cafe restaurant From Seed To Sprout just opened. On Long Beach Island is the restaurant Livin’ On The Veg, operated by Lauren and Rob Ramos since 2005. Though hit hard by Hurricane Sandy, they have been rebuilding, and once done, will be back to serving vegan friendly food by the shore. They will be back within the landscape of this stretch of Shore, which gives New Jersey much of its personality. The winter may keep the Shore from showing its full personality, but still, in the winter, there is something there, something that makes the ocean and the beach seem even more special. It could be very well be because in the winter, these places continue to be dedicated to their local communities. It could be that without them, the streets really would be quiet, and there’d be no need to leave our homes. It could be as well that we just cannot help ourselves from seeing the beauty of the state we live in, even on the coldest days, because seeing it is better than staying asleep.

Four years ago, I left my home of Leonardo, by the shore, to go to school in New York City. However something brought me back. As my mind awoke to new ideas, to a change in thought that led me to feel as connected as I do to not just animals but people and all my surroundings, I started to realize that nothing can bring more love than being thankful. Thankful to where I came from, thankful for the place that causes my thoughts, and thankful to the people around me who persist in living out those ideals. I can only hope I can match them in dedication someday.

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STORY & PHOTOS BY EVE WOLFTRAND LETTERING BY CARA LIVERMORE

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Part of my stepping into veganism over a number of years has been finding the standard meals that can be put together quickly; more than just being comfort food, they are a part of home. I found that the best way to get started was looking at things I craved from my childhood and seeing what substitutions could be used to get the same satisfaction as I remembered. In turn, it was possible to bring in parts of home for my husband and friends. Here are a few favorites that make it to our table on a regular basis, and how they got there in the first place.

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I often joke that veganizing these pancakes was a pre-requisite for my husband Mikey and I moving in together, which is a sort of half-truth. Did he say, “I’ll only move in with you if you veganize my mom’s pancakes?” Yes. Would he have moved in with me anyway? Probably. Did the pancakes help? Most definitely. Ingredients 1 teaspoon rice vinegar 2 cups + 4 tablespoons soy or coconut milk brought to room temperature 2 tablespoons margarine, melted ---2 cups all purpose flour* 2 tablespoons sugar 3 teaspoons ener-g egg replacer** 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon salt oil or margarine for the pan Instructions 1. In a bowl or liquid measure, combine the vinegar and soy milk (no need to stir) and set aside. This will thicken and curdle slightly, turning into buttermilk. 2. In a large bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, egg replacer, baking soda and salt. 3. Combine the buttermilk with the margarine and add to dry mix. 4. Fold the ingredients together, only stirring 5 or 6 times, allowing it to be lumpy. Set aside while the pan or griddle heats up to medium-low, and give another it another 2 or 3 stirs. 5. Pour out 1/3 cup at a time onto the griddle (small lumps are ok.) *I sometimes swap out a cup of AP flour for whole wheat pastry flour if you so desire. **Two flax “eggs” also work well here. Just leave out the egg replacer and 4 tablespoons of soymilk, and combine the flax eggs with other liquids. See cornbread for recipe.

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Growing-up in a kosher home, the chili my siblings and I grew up craving was already vegan, though at the time it was mostly a vehicle for piles of shredded cheese and dipping cornbread. Mom was more than happy to give in to our weekly requests, as this recipe is perfect for adding in whatever veggies need to be used up in your fridge or freezer, and you can substitute fresh for canned with many of the items depending on what’s at hand. Chili Instructions 1. In a large pot, heat oil on low, add onion and green pepper, cook until onion is almost translucent. 2. Add garlic and jalapeño if using, and cook for another 2 minutes before tossing in the tomatoes and beans. Bring to a boil on medium-high. 3. Once boiling, add all other ingredients and simmer, covered, for 15-20 minutes. 4.Serve with a dollop of vegan sour cream or plain yogurt. Cornbread Instructions 1. Preheat oven to 400°F. 2. In a small bowl, combine 1 tbsp flax meal with 3 tbsp water. Set aside for at least 5 minutes. 3. In a large mixing bowl, sift together flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder and salt. Add milk, flax egg, and margarine, mix until combined. Spread out evenly into a greased 8x8 pan. 4. Bake for 30-40 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean.

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Chili Ingredients 2 tbsp olive oil 1 large onion, diced 1 green bell pepper, diced 2-3 cloves garlic, minced 1 28oz can crushed tomatoes 1 28oz can diced tomatoes, or roughly chopped tomatoes of your choice (I used leftover frozen cherry tomatoes) 1 16oz can black beans 1 16oz can kidney beans 1 cup corn, fresh or frozen 1 tsp tabasco or ½ jalapeño pepper, minced ¼ tsp chili powder 1 tbsp dried oregano ¼ tsp ground cumin Cornbread I know I’m biased, but this cornbread is hands-down my all-time favorite. Not overly sweet or sticky like some breads, just fluffy, delicious and slightly crispy on the outside. It also happens to be easy to throw together. 1¼ cup all-purpose flour ¾ cup medium grind cornmeal 4 tbsp sugar 3 tsp baking powder 1 tsp salt 1 cup soy or almond milk 1 flax egg, prepared (see instructions) 3 tbsp margarine, melted

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When I first started dabbling with vegan baking in college, I was also trying to cut out chocolate and caffeine in my diet. I had found some carob products I liked, but wanted something that satisfied my deep desire for cake. These devil dogs are luscious, and made their way into frequent rotation at the request of friends. I have since made them with cocoa powder, but consensus is that the carob version is the tastiest. Batter Ingredients 2 cups all-purpose flour ½ cup carob powder ½ tsp salt ½ tsp baking powder ½ tsp baking soda ½ cup shortening 1 cup soy or almond milk 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 ener-g egg, prepared

Filling Ingredients 1/3 cup evaporated soymilk (see below) 2/3 cup shortening ½ cup sugar 1 tsp vanilla extract

Instructions 1. Preheat oven to 425°F 2. In a large mixing bowl, sift together the flour, carob powder, salt, baking powder, and baking soda. Add the shortening, milk, vanilla and ener-G egg and mix until everything is just incorporated. 3. Scoop out batter about 2 tablespoons at a time onto a greased cookie sheet, 2-3 inches apart. If you have a disher, it will save you time by making your cookies the same size for when you sandwich them. Bake for 5-8 minutes, placing them on a rack to cool completely. 4. To make the evaporated soymilk, put 2/3 cup soymilk in a small sauce pan. On mediumhigh heat, whisk continuously until the liquid measures half its original amount (about 10 minutes.) 5. In a large mixing bowl, combine the evaporated soymilk, shortening, sugar, and vanilla. Mix with an electric beater starting on low, slowly working up to high speed. Blend on high speed for 5 minutes until all of the sugar is dissolved and the filling is fluffy. 6. To finish the devil dogs, sandwich 2 cookies together with a hefty amount of filling.

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comic by lea kralj jager

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STORY & PHOTO BY HANNAH MESSINGER LETTERING BY CARA LIVERMORE

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There is an unnamed season during which it seems as if the whole of Nature is between sleep and wakefulness. Neither Spring nor Winter, neither warm nor cold, these weeks are drawn out and I grow tired of eating roots and bulbs and anything else that makes its home in the ground. The first signs of life above ground are both exciting and enticing: English peas, pregnant and ready to pop, or ramps, their toes still covered in dirt, or fiddleheads, tightly wound. Spring’s earliest fruits come at a high cost, often too high to justify making an entire meal out of them. The best way to stretch and enjoy these costly vegetables is to mix them with handmade lemon gnocchi. A pat of butter and a handful of herbs brings everything together for a simple and gratifying meal. Special equipment: Lemon Gnocchi Ingredients microplane zester 2 small/medium potatoes small cookie scoop (optional) scant 1 cup all-purpose flour zest and juice of 1 meyer lemon Pictured with a handful of English 1/2 cup vegan parmesan* peas and a few leaves of mint. 1 tbsp good olive oil 1 tsp kosher salt *You can buy this at stores like Whole Foods or make your own by grinding raw cashews with nutritional yeast and salt to taste. The night before: Preheat oven to 400. Peel potatoes. Bathe them in olive oil and dust with coarse salt. Wrap them in foil and roast whole until fork tender. Refrigerate overnight. The day of: Set a large pot of water on the stove to boil. Meanwhile, grate potatoes on microplane until you have 2 cups of meal. Mix by hand with all other ingredients until dough forms, picking out any imposing potato lumps. When water is at a rolling boil, salt it generously. At this point, you can either scoop and drop rough pieces of dough, which will taste every bit as delicious as the alternative method of scooping pieces and rolling them between your palms to form balls. Gnocchi like to cook quickly and commodiously; if your pot isn’t quite large enough, cook gnocchi in batches. After two to three minutes, your gnocchi will let you know they are done by floating. Cooked gnocchi will keep in an airtight container in your fridge for up to a week. When you are ready to eat them, heat a large pan over medium low and melt a large spoonful of vegan butter in it. Toss your gnocchi gently until they are just beginning to blush with color. Remove gnocchi from pan, tossing your vegetables into the same pan for just a moment to heat them through and give them a glossy coat of oil. Top everything with fresh herbs, plus a squeeze of lemon and a bit of Parmesan, if desired. CHICKPEA MAGAZINE SPRING 2013

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story by Cori Mattli lettering by cara livermore

It was a rather unimportant day for me at twelve years old, when sitting down to eat with my family that evening, I passively rejected the meatloaf. “What are you, a vegetarian?” my dad asked indignantly. Well yes, my twelve-year-old self thought. That’s exactly what I am. And that was that. There were no months of deep analytical synthesis, over the exploitation of animals in our industrialized agricultural system, or a post-colonial feminist dissection of the sexual politics of meat and dairy. I was twelve, for goodness sake. My life was largely influenced by the pro-vegetarian subtleties in The Simpsons and the neon animal illustrations of Lisa Frank. I knew that meat came from animals, and I liked animals. I’d never met any cows or sheep or chickens at that point, but I had fallen in love with a sometimes nasty and always lazy fat cat my mom had adopted before I was born and named “Vicious.” And meatloaf really wasn’t that appetizing anyway. It was as simple as that.

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It wasn’t until college that I found a hive of like-minded vegetarians. It was a small, environmentally focused liberal arts school in Northern Wisconsin, offering perfectly edible vegetarian options in the cafeteria, including vegan peanut butter sugar cookies, which I could down four at a time. It seemed that every other person I met was a fellow “veggie” and here, I met the first people who identified as vegan, people who unknowingly planted seeds of veganism in me. There is a contentment that comes with being in a veggie-supportive community. I could count on soy burgers grilled at barbecues. I had others to commiserate with over the sparingly listed veggie options at local restaurants. I always knew the potlucks would have more than enough potato-based casseroles. But more than that, there was a general understanding, something unspoken that legitimized my existence as a non-animal-eating human. But then college ended. And I started noticing a new trend: people were eating meat again. I traveled back up north a few years ago and stayed with a friend of mine in a rambunctious house with other visitors. One morning, we were rummaging in the kitchen for breakfast foods and after I turned down bacon or ham or whatever breakfast meat someone decided to fry up, they looked at me and said innocently, “Oh, you’re a vegetarian? I didn’t know people where still doing that.” Just a few years later, and it was like people were morphing into my 75-year-old grandma, incredulously surprised when this “vegetarian thing” wasn’t just a phase.

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Was it a phase? For many people, to my surprise, it was. But for me it wasn’t. In fact, I was swimming deeper into the vegetarian lifestyle as many of my friends were jumping out of the pool. Almost four years out of college, and I’ve taken the plunge into veganism. This time, my diet change wasn’t inspired by illustrations of purple dolphins against a rainbow backsplash. It was a slow, guttural, painfully analytical metamorphosis. Wisconsin is not a easy place to be vegan. In 2011, Wisconsin produced 2.9 billion pounds of cheese. Each year, 2.3 billion pounds of beef are processed for market and Wisconsin is in the top three leading states for deer hunting. When people visit, it is customary to bring them to local brewery where you buy them a hearty stout beer, a glistening cheeseburger and an appetizer of beer-battered, deep fried cheese curds with ranch dressing. Even in the liberal city of Madison, the idea of meat-and-cheese-eating “locavorism” has trumped veganism. I reached out to other Wisconsinites who had decided to go back to eating meat or dairy after years of vegetarianism or veganism because I thought there was a possibility that they knew something that I did not, and because I was mourning the disappearance of my “veggie” community. These were people I respected, people who studied ecological systems, social justice and sustainability, people who lived their values. I was curious: What did they know that I did not? I wanted to process every moral dilemma, every philosophical quandary about veganism beforehand, because I knew for me, it would not just be a phase, it would be forever. I asked for answers from friends. I searched for testimonials. People go back to eating meat and dairy for a plethora of different reasons, all personal and specific to each one of them. Some did not feel they had enough energy from a diet of plants and dairy alone.

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Some travelled outside the U.S., and engaged in local customs out of respect and curiosity, which included eating meat. Some wanted to know if they had the oomph to kill animals themselves, and found that they could. I could imagine many more reasons people go back to eating meat or dairy: living in a food desert, without practical access to vegan foods; not being able to afford spending money on fresh salad greens, when you can buy a month’s worth of lunch meat instead; or perhaps choosing to hunt deer instead of relying on food stamps, so that you could feed your family off local, fresh meat. But, none of this gave me enough pause to rethink my decision, in the position that I was in. Our food system is complex and dysfunctional. When we talk about restructuring it, it’s true we need to establish more of a local dependence on our food. We need to preserve our traditions, history and culture that is expressed through the food we eat. We need to ensure that there is enough variety in our foods that people’s nutritional needs are met, in this growing era of food allergies and nutritional deficiencies. Locavorism is one of the simpler answers to keeping our traditions, re-connecting with how our food is grown and living more sustainably. (Although there is more and more evidence that miles travelled is not a good gauge for how sustainable your food is.) But what is missing from most locavore conversations is the role animal welfare plays in a sustainable food system and the question of exploiting animals for food.

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I decided that I wouldn’t eat food that came from animals, unless I took full responsibility for how those animals were treated, and what happened to them in the end. For me, it was simpler to give up dairy and eggs altogether. Every couple months or so, my partner and I drive out from the city into the dark and rivery roads of the country. We go to visit the farm that he grew up on. The land there is beautiful; hilly and arid. Not suitable for growing vegetables. His mom, Bonnie, raises grass instead and feeds up to 25 organic beef cattle and 200 organic sheep off it. She tells me, “If they weren’t raised for meat, they wouldn’t get the chance to live.” In some ways, they have a very peaceful life. It is certainly the luck of the draw if you are a beef cow to be born on a farm like this. I would call it the most respectable way to raise meat. And yet... I know my own muscles. I don’t have to hold a cleaver in my hand to know I couldn’t kill an animal for its meat. I don’t even like being on the farm the day that the truck comes. This is the truck that brings them to the slaughterhouse, where workers kill animals in a routine, methodical manner. Slaughterhouse workers tend to be people who don’t have many other options, and the working conditions are often dangerous. Studies show that there is a high correlation with slaughterhouse work and post traumatic stress disorder, severe anxiety, drug and alcohol abuse and domestic violence. Workers become desensitized to violence. I don’t want to export the responsibility of killing animals onto someone else. That is much too large of a burden.

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People love to hate on vegans. However, I wanted to come to veganism with the understanding that not all people are like me. There are so many levels of rationalization when it comes to our choices as consumers. There are so many ways to spin the dial, so many stories that could be told. I give credit to people who have gone down the rabbit hole of food choices, even if they ended up in a different wonderland than me. After all, food is a sensitive thing. It is a part of our collective history, our culture and our relationship to each other. We swallow proteins, starches and fats and they turn in our stomachs, slowly becoming a part of us, entering our blood stream, our bones. In the end, our food is as relatable as family. It is blood. Colleen Patrick-Goudreau, vegan advocate and writer, talks about a sense of peace and calm that comes over you once you become vegan. For me, after the haggard process of deciding whether it was a commitment I could make, one that I could defend in all the complexities of our food system and culture, a wave of simplicity washed over me. I was no longer tortured with the decision of whether my dairy or eggs came from a “good” place. I didn’t have to complicate my grocery trips with never-ending rationalizations over cheese. It is a simplicity that I remember from childhood, something visceral and animal-like, evoked from choosing a path of empathy. I will miss having a community with dozens of vegetarians and vegans by my side, but if there is one thing I know for sure, my twelve-year-old self would be proud.

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STORY & PHOTOS BY WEGAN NERD LETTERING BY CARA LIVERMORE Spring is associated with hope, a new beginning, a fresh start. The whole world is waking up from a heavy cold sleep, preparing for warmer days. We take long walks on the first sunny day of the year, searching for the first signs of spring under mounds of snow. I propose to start looking for spring on our plates as well. Spring is not only one of the most beautiful seasons of the year. For gourmands it is also the time of first early vegetables and herbs. Let’s say hello to radish, cucumber, lettuce, tomatoes, carrots, spinach, parsley. Let’s begin the adventure of cooking local, fresh products and making delicious, colorful, simple dish that are small pleasures for our palates and minds. If you miss the gentle sun and breathing in greenery all around you, I hope this spread of my recipes will soothe your longing. Start your day with a colorful, delicious breakfast. At night, bake wheat baguettes. In the morning break them with a theatrical gesture, add fresh radish and homemade pesto and bite with a big dose of joy. Feel the spring in your mouth! The rest of the your day will be sunny and cheerful.


wheat baguette Ingredients 1 tbsp (20g) of wet (fresh/cake) yeast 3 1/8 cup (400g) flour pinch of sugar 1 teaspoon sea salt 1 1/4 cup (300ml) warm water a few tablespoons of olive oil sesame / black cumin / sunflower / homemade pesto Instructions 1. At the beginning “wake up� the yeast. Crumble them into a large bowl. Sprinkle with sugar, one spoon of flour and sprinkle with one spoon warm water. Cover with a cloth and let stand for 15 minutes. 2. After that time add the flour and water. Add salt and begin to knead. 3. Again, cover with a cloth and leave in a warm place for about 12 hours. The dough should grow wonderfully. Then knead again to remove excess air from the dough. 4. Add a few tablespoons of olive oil and knead until soft and elastic. If the dough is too much sticky add a little bit of flour. 5. Tearing off pieces of dough, roll and formed into elegant baguette. 6. Place on a baking tray sprinkled with flour. Cover with a cloth and leave for 30 minutes. 7. Set the oven to 200 C/ 390 F. Brush baguette with olive oil and sprinkle with sesame seeds or black cumin. You can also coat them with homemade pesto. Score gently with the knife, sprinkle lightly with flour and place in the preheated oven. Bake until brown.

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white beans, spinach & parsley This is for those who like to eat filling and nutritious breakfast. White beans and spinach create the perfect couple. Parsley and coriander complement them with their lovely aromas. Ingredients 1 cup white beans, soaked overnight a bunch of fresh spinach a few leaves coriander small white onion a bunch fresh parsley 3 cloves of garlic olive oil salt Instructions 1. Cook the white beans until soft. 2. Chop the onions and add to a hot pan with olive oil. 3. Chop spinach, parsley and coriander and add to the onions. Add chopped garlic. Add salt to taste and simmer about 3 minutes. 4. Add the cooked beans. If everything is too dry, add a few tablespoons of water. Before serving, sprinkle with olive oil.

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green fresh pesto This is one of my favorite homemade pestos. It is very fresh and delicate in taste. Don’t forget to use lemon juice, which makes the color so intense! Use for bread, pasta, dip for vegetables or eat with your finger. Ingredients radishes leaves arugula parsley a few coriander leaves 2 cloves of garlic juice of half a lemon salt a lot of olive oil

Instructions Add everything to the food processor or use blender. Add a pinch of salt to taste, and a lot of olive oil. Mix it. It is amazing! Use for bread, pasta, dip for vegetable or eat with your finger.

fresh radish salad Maybe it looks simple but I think that the radish is the queen of a vegan spring salad. It’s tasty to eat and looks nice on piece of toast. Ingredients a couple medium radishes juice from half lime 2 tablespoon of olive oil a few leaves parsley salt

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Instructions Slice the radishes into thin layers. Transfer to a bowl. Sprinkle with lime juice. Pour olive oil and add a pinch of salt. At the end add parsley leaves on a salad.

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roasted cherry tomatoes Try to find young local cherry tomatoes. Bake them and use a lot of good balsamic vinegar. I promise that will be your favorite dish for breakfast. It is very aromatic, and looks amazing. Take it away for work or picnic with your friends. Ingredients 1 heaping cup (250g) cherry tomatoes 1 small red onion 1/2 cup good black olives 3 tbsp balsamic vinegar 6 tbsp olive oil handful of arugula salt and pepper Instructions 1. Preheat the oven to 180 C /350 F. Prepare a baking sheet/plate/tray by covering it in parchment paper. 2. Tomatoes cut into half. Peel and chop the onion. Toss the vegetables in the pan and generously sprinkle on olive oil. Bake for 15 minutes. 3. Wash the arugula, dry and place on a plate. Add roasted tomatoes, and pour on the cooked juice of the tomatoes. Cut the olives in halves and add to tomatoes. Add a pinch of salt and pepper. Spoon balsamic vinegar over the tomatoes. Enjoy!

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PAGES Thanks for reading! See more from us at chickpeamagazine.com

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spring 2013