Page 1

dreamers HERE’S TO THE

ANNUAL REPORT 2017


CONTENTS

4 6 8 10 12

H ERE ’S TO TH E DREAM ERS A DVO C ACY H E R E ’ S TO T H E T H R I V E R S

H E A LT H & H U M A N S E RV I C E S

H E R E ’ S TO T H E OV E R C O M E R S HOUSING

H E R E ’ S TO T H E L E A D E R S E D U C AT I O N

H E R E ’ S TO T H E C H A N G E M A K E R S ECONOMIC DE VELOPMENT

14

MAP OF S E RV ICES

16

LEADERSHIP

17

A DV I SO RY BOA R DS & CO M M I T T E E S

18

PA R T N E R S & S U P P O R T E R S

Cover: Sherlyn is part of our TECHNOLOchicas program, which introduces young Latinas to careers in STEM fields. Right: CPLC Neighborhood Stabilization Director Tom Wilson is one of more than 800 passionate employees who make our impact possible.

2


O U R G R E A T E S T I M P A C T E V E R

MORE THAN

300,560 E M P O W E R E D

L I V E S I N

2 0 1 7

Our theme for 2017 is HERE’S TO THE DREAMERS. This refers to CPLC’s renewed focus on advocacy, particularly for immigrants, who strengthen our nation. But while DACA caught the headlines in 2017, all of our clients are “dreamers” of another kind: they each envision a better life as they work to overcome obstacles on their road to self-empowerment. For many of our clients, part of this dream is giving back by volunteering to help others in need. So thank you for your involvement with CPLC. Your contribution is more than a hand-up. It’s a catalyst for change. It’s the stuff of dreams.

3


ADVOCACY

L I K E M A N Y D A C A R E C I P I E N T S , N E P H TA L I WA S WO R K I N G H A R D TO M A K E A BE T T ER L I F E . B U T T H E C A R D S S E E M E D S TA C K E D A G A I N S T H I M .

dreamers HERE’S TO THE

Since gaining DACA status, Nephtali, who was brought to the US at age 5, got a job working nights at a construction company. Nevermind the physical labor—his $16/hour income was critical to helping the family pay rent. However, with finances tight, and many mouths to feed, he couldn’t scrape together the $500 application fee to renew his DACA status. And the longer he waited, the more likely he would lose his DACA status, and with it his ability to continue working. At the 11th hour, Nephtali received a grant from CPLC which allowed him to submit the application just before the deadline. But as long as Congress refuses to pass a long-term DACA solution, Nephtali’s future, the future of his family, and the future of so many like him remain in limbo. Dreamers, which include DACA recipients as well as most undocumented immigrants 4

brought to the US as minors, represent the reason CPLC’s mission is necessary. Like Nephtali, Dreamers aren’t asking for handouts. They simply long for the opportunity to contribute to what is often the only home they’ve known. However, forces outside their control create barriers which can be insurmountable. In addition to providing grants for DACA renewals, CPLC’s work in civil rights and migrant rights serves to empower Dreamers and people like them. This is only the latest chapter in our advocacy for the underserved, which began in 1969, when we fought overt discrimination against Latinos. Today, we focus on pressing human rights issues facing the regions we serve. While a long-term DACA solution has not yet come to fruition, our progress in the following areas demonstrates our power as a unified community—and a glimpse of what is to come:

H E A LT H C A R E In early 2017, as Congress worked to repeal the Affordable Care Act, CPLC took action. We convened a coalition of 20 national and local organizations, organizing town halls, action alerts, and district meetings to urge our legislators to vote “no.” CPLC hosted press conferences at our headquarters and testified at the State Capitol on healthcare legislation. In the end, Arizona Senator John McCain’s thumbs-down blocked the bill and provided direct validation of our efforts. CIVIL RIGHTS CPLC successfully advocated to shut down Tent City as a vocal member of the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Advisory Boards. We also met with the governor and law enforcement leaders at all levels across Arizona to rebuild relations with the community and shape policy and implementation of SB 1070 to prevent racial profiling.


C H I C A N O S P O R L A C AU S A A D VO C ACY 2017 IN REVIEW

20

O RG A N I Z AT I O N S

C O N V E N E D TO D E F E N D T H E A F F O R DA B L E C A R E AC T

20 0

DAC A R E N E WA L S

PA I D F O R BY O U R DAC A G R A N T S P RO G R A M

14 “ K N OW YO U R R I G H T S ” E V E N T S O RG A N I Z E D AC RO S S A R I ZO N A

8

P O L I C E AG E N C I E S

ASSISTED IN REBUILDING C O M M U N I T Y R E L AT I O N S

MIGRANT RIGHTS

HUMAN TR AFFICKING

L EG I S L AT I V E AC T I O N

CPLC hosted a group of Mexican legislators and senators, as well as the migrant community, to discuss migrant rights. As a result, the senators voted to fund Mexican Consulate programs across the country that help protect the migrant community. As part of this program, we have hosted 14 Know Your Rights forums across Arizona.

In 2017, CPLC began working with the Department of Homeland Security and Mexican diplomats to counter human trafficking in Arizona and Mexico. We are currently training CPLC staff to recognize victims of trafficking and contact the police. We are also developing a new program to provide services to former trafficking victims.

CPLC actively supported or opposed over 30 federal and state legislative bills affecting the clients we serve, including education funding, children’s healthcare, affordable housing, and home businesses. CPLC represents the voice of the community, rallying key stakeholders— including elected officials, businesses, and community leaders—to engage. 5


HERE’S TO THE C H I C A N O S P O R L A C AU S A H E A LT H & H U M A N S E R V I C E S 2017 IN REVIEW

6 ,017 FA M I L I E S

S T R E N G T H E N E D T H RO U G H PA R E N T I N G C L A S S E S

4,334

I N D I V I D UA L S

A S S I S T E D W I T H M E N TA L H E A LT H T R E AT M E N T

802

S U RV I VO R S

OF DOMESTIC V I O L E N C E S E RV E D

3 49

SENIORS

PA RT I C I PAT E D I N O U R H E A LT H Y AG I N G P RO G R A M

6


H E A LT H & H U M A N S E R V I C E S

SURVIVING ISN ’ T ENOUGH FOR MARÍ A . S H E ’ S B E E N D O I N G T H AT H E R E N T I R E LIFE. NOW IT’S TIME TO THRIVE. María has survived a lot. Two countries. Three major moves. And two abusive relationships. But when she arrived at CPLC DE COLORES’ Community-Based Program, she was afraid she might not survive much longer. María had recently fled her husband after he nearly killed her. But the only apartment she could afford was run down, rat infested, and within reach of her husband, who continued stalking her. CPLC De Colores’ Community-Based Program fills a critical need for people like María, who are not in a position to move into a domestic violence shelter. Our program empowers clients to come on their terms and decide what services they need and when. María decided to enroll in our legal advocacy program, which helped her get an order of protection and divorce. While we provided support, it was María who made the decisions and put in the legwork to make it happen.

We apply this client-driven approach on a community level. Rather than imposing a one-size-fits-all solution, we bring communities together and help them decide what they need, serving as a resource and advocate—an approach that has brought us national recognition. Because the only lasting change—whether in a community or an individual—comes from within. Once María realized the power she could have over her life, she began to thrive—attending multiple support groups a week and enrolling in other services we offer, including GED, FINANCIAL EDUCATION, and HOUSING. Today, she is in a new apartment, and she is first in line to enroll in De Colores’ new “Promotores” program, where she will mentor survivors recovering from abuse. María still attends support groups at CPLC. But now she is the face of hope for survivors looking to thrive. 7


HERE’S TO THE

HOUSING

AT T H E P E A K O F H E R C A R E E R , G E O R G I A N E V E R I M A G I N E D S H E C O U L D L O S E I T A L L . T O D AY, S H E C A N ’ T BELIE VE HOW WELL SHE’S BOUNCED BACK . As Vice President of Marketing for a local toy company, Georgia was a homeowner in a nice neighborhood and owned and rode horses as an accomplished equestrian.

After bouncing around on a few friends’ couches, Georgia finally ended up in a transitional housing facility in Phoenix. This turned out to be the scariest circumstance of However, she did not realize that she was living all, rampant with drugs and violence. with undiagnosed Bipolar Disorder. Georgia felt totally alone and, at times, suicidal. That’s when her case manager As stress levels at work rose, Georgia’s connected her with Chicanos Por La mental health declined. When she sought Causa’s HOUSING FIRST program. professional help, her high-priced psychiatrist seemed more interested in her money than her recovery. He prescribed a combination of drugs which had a devastating effect on her personality. As a result, her relationship with her boyfriend ended, as did her career.

When her disability ran out, Georgia found herself without income or a support system. She tried going back to work but was still not able to hold on to a job. In desperation, she began selling possessions to stay afloat, but that could only last so long.

8

Housing First is grounded on the principle that permanent, stable housing is the foundation for success. It puts individuals experiencing homelessness into subsidized housing with no strings attached, and it provides additional resources which clients can choose to utilize when they are ready.

When Georgia stepped onto the grounds of her new apartment complex, she was shocked. Tall trees, lush grass, and warm brick contrasted sharply with the seedy housing facility she had just left. She entered her new apartment with only a few paintings she’d held on to. That was the beginning of her ascent.

Now with a new psychiatrist, Georgia was able to wean herself off all antipsychotic drugs. She became an active member of the local church. She earned credentials to sell insurance and re-entered the workforce. And she reconnected with her old boyfriend, who is now her fiancé. When Georgia first moved into her Housing First apartment, she wrote down a list of goals that seemed impossible: Get off Medicaid. Get off food stamps. Get a car. Today, she has accomplished them all and more. She no longer receives any subsidies for her rent or utilities, and she is moving out of her original apartment into a larger unit. At one time, she may have been down, but Georgia is most certainly not out. She has overcome.


C H I C A N O S P O R L A C AU S A HOUSING 2017 IN REVIEW

3,471

RESIDENTS

C A L L C P LC M U LT I - FA M I LY P RO P E RT I E S H O M E

20 6

H O M EOW N E R S & TENANTS

AVO I D E D F O R E C L O S U R E OR EVICTION

35

FA M I L I E S

L I V E I N C P L C S I N G L EFA M I LY H O M E S

9


C H I C A N O S P O R L A C AU S A E D U C AT I O N 2017 IN REVIEW

E D U C AT I O N

W HEN F R A NCISCO C A ME TO CPLC , COL L EGE WA SN ’ T A N

1,117 CHILDREN

P R E PA R E D F O R S C H O O L AT O U R H E A D S TA RT C E N T E R S

79 0

YO U T H

E N R I C H E D AT O U R COMMUNIT Y CENTER

3 38

STUDENTS

AT T E N D E D C P L C COMMUNIT Y SCHOOLS

54

FULL SCHOL ARSHIPS

AWA R D E D T O C O L L E G E S T U D E N T S

HERE’S TO THE

10

O P T I O N . T O D AY, H E ’ S E A R N E D H I S D E G R E E A N D I S R E A DY TO GI V E BACK .


In high school, Francisco attended the CPLC COMMUNIT Y CENTER’S teen program, which prepares low-income youth to become leaders through community service.

But that’s just the beginning of the story.

However, when a staff member asked Francisco about his college plans, he replied that he couldn’t afford to attend.

Now that Francisco has completed his education, he is ready to move on to a career as a Pharmacist—and come back to the CPLC Community Center as a volunteer to help today’s youth get excited about STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math).

CPLC staff provided the training Francisco needed to apply for scholarships and grants. As a result, Francisco received enough funding to attend ASU, where he earned degrees in microbiology and biochemistry.

Latinos and minorities are vastly underrepresented in STEM fields, and many young Latinos do not have a role model in a STEM career. Francisco is just one small piece of our efforts to change that.

Many of our students grow up with the perception that their math skills are not strong enough to pursue a STEM career. We show them that couldn’t be further from the truth by hosting hands-on, fun STEM activities where they’re more focused on building a robot or a video game than “doing math.” By making STEM approachable, we help students build confidence in their abilities. And if they are confident about themselves at a young age, they’re much more likely to succeed in the future.

11


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

M O S T P E O P L E TA K E M O V I E T H E AT R E S F O R G R A N T E D . MOCT E ZU M A ESPA R Z A NE V ER H A S . It was a Spanish-language movie theatre near his home in East LA that fueled Moctezuma Esparza’s love for film as a child. As he grew older, that love would define his activism. Esparza’s career has been devoted to providing representation for Latinos onscreen. First, by creating Spanish-language segments on Sesame Street. Later, by producing films which highlight Latino culture and history, such as Selena, starring Jennifer Lopez, and The Milagro Beanfield War, which won an Oscar. Today, he has turned his sights back to the movie theatre. Many low-income neighborhoods lack basic retailers such as grocery stores and movie theatres. That means residents have to go across town for services, taking their revenue and tax dollars outside the area. Esparza has focused on reversing that equation. His company, Maya, develops movie theatres in low-income Latino markets and just closed a

HERE’S TO THE

12

deal with help from CPLC PRESTAMOS. The new complex will fill an empty lot across from City Hall in North Las Vegas, a predominantly Latino community riddled with poverty, unemployment, and low education. The project, which will feature a movie theatre, retail, restaurants, and a school, will address the root cause of the city’s problems by sparking economic activity and opportunities, including short- and long-term accessible jobs for local residents. This approach aligns with the City of North Las Vegas’ economic development strategy for long-term growth. Prestamos contributed a $7 MILLION LOAN through the New Markets tax credit1 program, making the $30 million project possible.

1

NEW MARKETS TA X CREDIT Federal program which incentivizes investment in low-income communities.

By contributing to these kinds of projects, CPLC provides opportunities for low-income communities to become self-sustaining. As for Esparza, it’s just another day at the movies.

chang


C H I C A N O S P O R L A C AU S A ECONOM IC DE VELOPM ENT 2017 IN REVIEW

523

J O B S C R E AT E D O R R E TA I N E D

$16 . 2

MIL L ION D E P L OY E D I N

S M A L L B U S I N E S S LOA N S (OUR BEST YE AR YE T )

4 ,0 6 3

JOB-SEEKERS C O N N E C T E D W I T H E M P L OY E R S

1 ,056

LO C A L FA R M E R S S T R E N G T H E N E D BY O U R NEW MEXICO CO-OP

gemakers 13


9

C AR SON CI T Y

M A RY VA L E CO M M U N I T Y S E RV I C E C E N T E R

1

2

3

7 16

5

17

51

9 9 10

6

N E VA DA

15 12 11 8 7 18

8

101

16

202

143

9

1

60

5 10

B U C K E Y E CO M P L E X

1

2 9 17 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 4 11

14

11

5

18 17


M A P O F S E RV I C ES CPLC PROGR AMS HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

HOUSING

EDUCATION

1. 2. 3. 4.

8. Housing Counseling 9. Single- and Multi-family Housing 10. Rural Housing

11. Early Childhood Development 12. Youth Enrichment 13. Community Schools 14. Scholarships 15. Adult Education

Behavioral Health Domestic Violence HIV Services Immigration

5. Parenting 6. Senior Services 7. Substance Abuse

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 16. Workforce Solutions 17. Small Business Lending 18. Financial Literacy 19. Farmer Co-Op

9 9

5 7 5

SAN TA FE

5

9 19

4 16

A R I ZO N A

11

16

N E W M EXI CO

PHOENIX

11 11 11 13 8 18 12 13 10

11

15


BOA R D O F D I R EC TO R S EXEC U T I V E CO M M I T T E E

CARMEN CORNEJO

Chair Lacy & Larkin Frontera Fund

A N TO N I O M OYA

Vice Chair Salt River Project

A L E X VA R E L A

DELMA HERRER A

Treasurer Grid Architectural

Secretary Cox Communications

T E R RY C A I N

JAV I E R C A R D E N A S

E R I C A G O NZ A L E ZMELENDEZ

J O S E A N TO N I O H A B R E

M E M B E R S AT L A R G E S T E P H A N I E AC O S TA

A B E A RV I ZU

M I K E E S PA R Z A

TED GEISLER

jr

Ed & Verma Pastor Elementary City of Phoenix

Crescent Crown Distributing MANNY MOLINA

M&M Media

Arizona Public Service RO B E RT O RT IZ *

Bashas’

Avnet, Inc.

Snow, Carpio & Weekley RO D O L FO PA RGA ,

md

St. Joseph’s Hospital

jr

Ryley Carlock & Applewhite

City of Phoenix

RU DY P E R E Z

A L B E RTO E S PA R Z A

Sí Se Puede Foundation L EO N A R D O LO O

Quarles & Brady, LLP R AY S A L A Z A R

City of Phoenix (Retired)

Arizona DOC (Retired)

M A X G O NZ A L E S

ALICIA NUÑEZ

*IN MEMORIAM

J O DY S A RC H E T T

Lovitt & Touché

R AQ U E L T E R Á N

Community Advocate

EXEC U T I V E L E A D E R S H I P T E A M

DAV I D A DA M E

President & CEO

JOHN RAMIREZ

Executive Vice President Business Enterprises

16

P E D RO C O N S

Executive Vice President Int. Health & Human Services

GERMÁN REYES

Executive Vice President Real Estate Operations

ANDRES L . CONTRER AS

Executive Vice President Social Services & Education

MARIA SPELLERI

Executive Vice President General Counsel

Executive Vice President Executive Vice President Strategy & Relationship Mgmt. Chief Financial Officer


CO M M U N I T Y A DV I SO RY BOA R DS N E VA DA CHELSIE C. CAMPBELL

esq

Chair Campbell Legal Strategies L I S A RU IZ L E E

N A N CY M . A L A M O

edd

Vice Chair Clark County School District A L E X O RT I Z

Mosaic Partners

T H E L M A LO P E Z

Secretary Southwest Gas

S A N TA N A GA RC I A

City of Henderson

NILEEN KNOKE

Cox Communications

JAV I E R T RUJ I L LO

Clark County

City of Henderson

N E W M E XI CO A N TO N I O M E D I N A

Chair Mora Valley Community Health Services (Retired) PAU L A GA RC I A

NM Acequias Association A L I C I A O RT IZ

Y VO N N E A R AG O N

NM Dept. of Transportation

MICHAEL GUTIERREZ

C H R I S TO P H E R M A D R I D

HELP-New Mexico, Inc.

Rio Arriba County

A N D R E A RO M E RO

NM Dept. of Health

A M O S AT E N C I O

Siete del Norte (Retired)

RENEE VILL AR AEL

LANL Coalition of Communities

Santa Fe Community Foundation

JA S O N E S P I N OZ A

PAT R I C I A GA L L EG O S

NM Assoc. of Commerce

NM Dept. of Health (Retired)

L I D D I E M A RT I N E Z

T I M N I S LY

Los Alamos National Bank

Rio Grande Community Development Corporation

DA N I E L W E RWAT H

NM Housing

SO U T H E AS T A R I ZO N A SOFIA R AMOS

phd, mba

Chair The University of Arizona RO B E RT LO GA N

iii

The Book Lady

DR . NED NORRIS JR .

Desert Diamond Casino

DA N I E L F E R N A N D E Z

HANNIBAL CHINCHILL A

Vice-Chair CitiMortgage, Inc.

Barca Financial Group

PAT LO P E Z

Rusing Lopez & Lizardi, PLLC DOR ALINA SKIDMORE

esq

Doralina Law

L AW R E N C E T. LU C E RO

UNS Energy Corp./TEP

E L I Z A B E T H S O LT E RO

Guerrero Student Center

MARISOL FLORES-AGUIRRE RO S A N N A GA B A L D Ó N

REA Communications

E D GA R M A RT I N E Z

Tucson Metro Chamber

AZ State Representative LD2 E R N E S TO M E L E N D E Z

Intuit

M I C H A E L VA S Q U E Z

Ironwood Advisors

P RO G R A M BOA R DS I N T. H E A LT H & H U M A N S E RV I C E S A DV I SO RY BOA R D Chair Planned Parenthood Optum Consumer Solutions G.

DR . RICHARD JONES

JA M I E A R AG O N

HealthChoice Arizona

Law Offices of Greg Garcia pc

F I L I B E RTO GA RC I A

JAC K I E H U N T E R

JAY I O L E

J E F F L I VOV I C H

F R A N K S A LO M A N

LO R E NZO S I E R R A

Health Net/Cenpatico Integrated Care

Banner Health

Deputy Chief, City of Phx Fire LoSierra Strategic Consulting Department, West Fire District

LU P E C A M P O S

Self-Employed

G R EG GA RC I A

Aetna

md

J E S S I E GA RC I A

Adelante Healthcare D R . B EC C A RO D R I G U E Z

Family & Sports Medicine

D R . RU T H TA N L I M

Dobson Pediatrics

17


4,432 VO LU N T E E R S

ENRICHED COMMUNITIES P ROV I D I N G

31 ,115

H O U R S O F S E RV I C E F O R A N I N - K I N D VA L U E O F

$751 ,139

4,432 VO LU N T E E R S

ENRICHED COMMUNITIES P ROV I D I N G

31 ,115 HOURS

O F S E RV I C E F O R A N I N - K I N D VA L U E O F

$751 ,139

P R E S TA M OS A DV I SO RY BOA R D DAV I D A DA M E

Chicanos Por La Causa E D M U N D O H I DA LG O

Arizona State University

J O S E A N TO N I O H A B R E

City of Phoenix

CO M M U N I T Y SC H OO L S BOA R D

DA N H E R N A N D E Z

CopperPoint

R AY S A L A Z A R

JA I M E G U T I E R R E Z

AZ State Senator (retired) University of Arizona (retired)

ALICIA NUÑEZ

Chicanos Por La Causa

M AG DA L E N A V E R D U G O

AZ Dept. of Corrections (Retired)

Chicanos Por La Causa

P R E S TA M OS LOA N CO M M I T T E E BARBAR A BOONE

Alliance Bank

E L L E N K I RTO N

Management Consulting

R I C A R D O C A R LO

Associated Minority Contractors of America S H E R RY S E N TG EO RG E

Anderson Security

LU P E G O M E Z

Raza Development Fund Inc.

RYA N H A L E

US Bank

JOSE HABRE

City of Phoenix

CHAD WELBORN

CopperPoint

FINANCIALS 20 17 R E VENUE:

$75,680,305

20 17 E X PENSES:

$72 , 385,487

TOTAL A S SE T S:

$162 ,800, 206

NE T A S SE T S: 18

(3-YEAR GROWTH: 26%)

U S E O F R E SO U R C E S

85 %

DIR EC T SERVICES

(3-YEAR GROWTH: 31%)

2 % FUNDR AISING

$53 ,551 ,670

1 3 % ADMIN

(3-YEAR GROWTH: 17%)


CO R P O R AT E & FO U N DAT I O N S U P P O R T E R S AALL Insurance Group SW AARP Foundation Affordable Homes of S. Texas Alfred & Harriet Feinman Fdn. Alhambra School District Allpride Marble & Granite AMA Better Government Fund Amazing Grace Group American Express American Technologies Apodaca Wall Systems Arizona Cardinals Arizona Diamondbacks Arizona Lottery Arizona Mexico Commission Arizona Plumbing Services Arizona Technology Council ATI Restoration Aunt Rita’s Foundation Bank of America Bank Of The West Banner Health BarS Foods Co. Bashas Food City BB Direct Sales Beam Suntory Benevity Comm. Impact Fund Belweather Enterprise Best Buy Foundation Big D Construction Bimbo Bakeries USA BMO Financial Group Born Solutions AZ Bost Breakthru Beverage of AZ Bristlecone Pines Care More Care St Health Plan Arizona Cascade Mechanical Caterpillar CDS Distributing Inc. CenpaticoSpecial Events Centurylink Chevron Corporation Chipotle Chiquita Banana Chispa Cigna

Citigroup Clear Channel Coconino County Comerica Bank Comm. Dev. Corp. of Brownsville Community Pathways Community Resources & Housing Development Corp. Consulado General De Mexico Consulate of Mexico In Tucson Convergys CopperPoint Insurance Co. CoSales Country Financial Creative Plus + Cultural Crescent Crown Distributing Criterion Brock Cruz and Associates CUSO Cute Smiles Kids Del Norte Neighborhood Dev. Dell Delta Dental of Arizona Desert Diamond Casinos Diamond Resources DLJ Produce Inc. Dollar General Dudley Ventures Management E.A. Renfroe Edward Jones Eide Bailly LLP El Paso Affordable Housing Emortgage Inc. Enterprise Holdings Fdn. Epic Produce Equality Health Extreme Internet Federal Home Loan Bank of SF Fidelity National Title Agency First American Title First Bank Ford Motor Company FreeportMcMoRan Frito Lay Inc. Fry’s Food Store Gammage & Burnham Garcia Farm Produce Geile Charitable Foundation

Gila River Gaming Enterprise Global Multimedia Great West Produce Greater Anesthesia Solutions Health Choice Arizona Health Equity Inc. Health Net Of Arizona Helios Education Foundation Hensley Company Higueral Produce Hormel Foods Corporation Housing Part. Equity Trust Hughes Federal Credit Union IBM IHeart Media Illuminated Funds Group Imagine Schools Indigo Painting Intel Corporation Intuit Inc. John F. Long Foundation JP Griffin Group JP Morgan Chase Juanes & Mon Laferte KI Architects Konica Minolta KS State Bank Law Offices of Gregory Solares Legacy Refinishing Legend Distributing Lewis, Roca Rothgerber LLP Liberty Mutual Local Initiatives Support Corp. Los Altos Ranch Market Lovitt & Touche Inc M.C. Marble & Granite Maricopa Community Colleges Maricopa County Maricopa Reg. School District Maricopa Health Plan Maricopa Int. Health System Mary Kay Foundation Maya Cinemas McDonald’s Mercy Care Advantage Merge Architectural Group Merrill Lynch Mi Casa

Miller Russell Associates Mission Foods Navajo United Way Network For Good New Economics For Women Next Step Network Noridian Healthcare Solutions Norris Square Civic Assoc. Novamex Office of Cong. Ruben Gallego Oportun Loans Outfront Media Pascua Yaqui Tribe Pepsi Cola Perlman Architects PetSmart Charities Philadelphia Insurance Co. Phoenix Chamber Phoenix Health Plan Phoenix Rising Phoenix Suns Pilgrim’s Pride Corporation Pima Community College Pointe Vista Builders Precision Toyota Professional Produce Prowest Quarles & Brady LLP Raising a Reader Raytheon Raza Development Fund Razoo Foundation Real Purified Water Rebuilding Together Reinvestment Fund RL Jones Insurance Services Rockefeller Philanthropy Adv. Rose Perica Mofford Trust Rudy Septic Systems Rusing, Lopez & Lizardi P RWC Group Santa Cruz Heating Santis Pet Clinic, PC Service Link Smithfield Snell & Wilmer LLP Somos Dental Services Southwest Exterminating

Southwest Gas Corp. Springboard CDFI SPS+ Architects Staples Starbucks State Farm Insurance Stewart Title & Trust Sulzer Development Sundt Construction Sunrise Foundation Sunrise Mortgage Synchrony Financial Televisa Foundation Terminix The Boeing Company The Coca Cola Company The HS Lopez Family Fdn. The Jacobson Group The Matthew Project The Resurrection Project Tierra del Sol Housing Dev. Corp. Transdev Services Trellis Investor Trust & Clearing Tucson City Manager’s Office Tucson Electric Power Tucson Realtors Charitable Fdn. Tucson Unified School District United Food & Commercial Workers Union United Healthcare of Arizona University of Arizona Univision Unlimited Plumbing Works US Bank Utah Onions Vantage West Credit Union VFW Ladies AUX Major Merle M. Mitchell Post Washington Federal Wellington Consulting Group West Group Research West Valley Vending Inc. Westat Wise Transportation Woolf Roses Yellow Cab Zummit Plastics 19


S P E C I A L

T H A N K S

T O

O U R

P A R T N E R S

WR IT TEN & PRODUCED BY CHIC ANOS P OR L A C AUSA MAR K E TING DEPARTMENT C L I E N T I M PA C T N U M B E R S BY C H I C A N O S P O R L A C A U S A R E S E A R C H & E VA L U AT I O N D E PA R T M E N T FINANCIAL S BY CHIC ANOS P OR L A C AUSA FINANCE DEPARTMENT CLIENT PHOTOGR APHS BY BEN SCOL ARO

CH ICANOS PO R L A CAUSA 1112 EAST BUCKEYE ROAD PHOENIX, AZ 85034 CPLC.ORG

Here's to the Dreamers: CPLC Annual Report 2017  
Here's to the Dreamers: CPLC Annual Report 2017  
Advertisement