Page 1

Preparing

Agents of Change for the 21st Century YEAR IN REVIEW 2009-2010


2009-2010 Year in Review | TCS ES | 1

TCS Education System prepares innovative, engaged, purposeful agents of change who serve our global community. It began three decades ago as a big idea at a small graduate institution: to prepare professional psychology practitioners through a program abundant in real-world experience and rich in multicultural training and community engagement—a program that would benefit graduates as well as society. From these modest and imaginative roots emerged a new educational enterprise—a nonprofit organization committed to raising the bar for professional training by developing a model that could reach beyond psychology to a wide range of applied disciplines, and to creating a transformative educational experience that would change the way students learn, hone and apply their skills to bring about lasting social change.


A New Model for Education TCS Education System is a private, not-for-profit education system that includes three specialized professional colleges—as well as a foundation that provides philanthropic support to our schools; an online services affiliate that assists our schools with cost-effectively delivering cutting-edge online coursework; and two P-8 schools that provide powerful training opportunities for our college students while delivering progressive education to young learners. The System’s innovative business structure is uniquely designed to ensure sustainability, adaptability, and positive social impact.

Doing Business Differently A rapidly changing and increasingly complex external environment—fueled by economic uncertainties, changing student demographics, and mounting competition—has created new challenges for traditional higher education. Institutions have met with varying success in confronting these obstacles, some closing their doors, reducing services, or trimming programs and faculty ranks. Meanwhile, TCS Education System has crafted a business model that is intrinsically adaptive and that responds to today’s realities, relying for growth and viability on a formula based on size, focus, diversification, and impact.

• Size: moderately-sized institutions that are large enough to be sustainable without inhibiting agility. • Focus: highly specialized institutions focused on discrete disciplines such as education, health care, and psychology— providing distinction in a marketplace cluttered with broad, multi-disciplinary schools. • Diversification: a network of schools that share services and resources, allowing us to retain the value of specialized education while enhancing our ability to reach new markets. • Impact: a shared mission that effectively prepares students for professional success and social impact.


2009-2010 Year in Review | TCS ES | 3


The Genesis of a

“New Century” Global Education Provider In preparation for TCS Education System’s first annual report, we asked President Michael Horowitz and Board Chair Ricardo Grunsten to reflect on the origins and goals of the System.

Q: The two of you have worked together for more than 10 years. Much has happened in higher education in the past decade. What do you think were the most pronounced changes you have witnessed since your partnership began in 2000? RG: Obviously, the economic situation has created more demand for educational options. However, because of the economic crisis, schools are beginning to cut back on services—even though they have increased enrollment—because of major problems with efficiency. The other thing to note is the emergence of online education. Technology is going to play a bigger and bigger role. MH: As usual, Richard hit it on the head. In the last 10 years, we’ve seen the collapse of a number of financial models that supported higher education relatively well. With the implosion of state funding, they are not just cutting back services, but now we are going to see them cut enrollment. So large public institutions that are supposed to serve students seeking higher education are just not going to be able to. Again, that creates enormous opportunity for private institutions. But we’ve also seen many institutions struggle, and some go out of business completely, because even private institutions are not running efficiently. Q: Let’s put on the forecast goggles. We are now in 2010; where do you see higher education in 2020? RG: I think that what we really have to consider is our global standing. We are slipping at every level. In our primary school system, we have a very short school year, compared with the rest of the world. I will tell you in China, for example, the amount of classroom time combined with homework time is double what it is in the U.S. The reality

is that there is a correlation between time spent in the classroom and homework, and outcomes. The competition for jobs is going to come from outside the U.S. So we have to do a much better job of educating. MH: I think we are going to see continued evolution of the business models in higher education. TCS Education System, as far as we know, is one of only two not-for-profit private education systems. And we are going to see groups of schools wanting to collaborate and band together, and be more effective, and have a more complex but efficient way of educating our students. It’s going to be innovative institutions that grab that initiative. Q: Will it be more challenging for small institutions to be able to go it alone, to continue to be independent? MH: That was our recognition. Smaller institutions cannot get the technology, or fundraising, or administrative infrastructure that’s required to be effective today. They may have to affiliate with a system like ours, or they are going to be acquired, bought by for-profits, or even go out of business. RG: The need for technology is proving significant; the web certainly has an impact on all of us. That can be expensive, and for a small institution, unattainable. Again, by building some critical mass, it gives us the financial horsepower to be leading edge. MH: One other trend is the heightened activity of the government in education, in regulation of all kinds. That’s a very costly activity that many small not-for-profits are not equipped to handle. They don’t have the regulatory and legal expertise that a larger institution or system can muster. The System’s model is to support smaller institutions, and make them highly effective, and something much greater together than they could be on their own. Q: Let’s transition to where the idea emerged to create TCS Education System. MH: I think that we believe in our mission profoundly, and that we have an opportunity and an obligation to deliver innovative


2009-2010 Year in Review | TCS ES | 5

education to students who want to go into great professions— professions that have a global and national need. We realized in the 10 years working with professional psychology that an adapted mission would apply to the other important professions—health care, law, business—really any place where students want to both engage with their community through their profession and learn skills in an innovative way that’s meaningful to their context—whether that is in the United States or abroad. An important clarification is that as a not-for-profit, we are not buying schools. Schools are affiliating with us. Because the model is small, focused institutions, we can share resources more effectively. So even with respect to traditional fundraising, we have a foundation for grants, and philanthropy. We are sharing that among a number of colleges and schools because it is more efficient than duplicating that for each small college. So part of the model is to think creatively about resources and deploy them

cultures is about language. It is not. It is about everything. And to really understand cultural diversity, it pays to experience a completely alien (to us) culture. That’s part one. The second part is that we are a global economy. There is no way around it. What corporate entity you are connected to, either directly or indirectly, may be more important than what country you happen to be living in. So does that mean the new national flag is the corporate logo? Maybe it does, for better or worse. But the fact is that we are a global community. Q: We talk a lot about what’s being called the Transformative Educational Experience. I’d like to get your thoughts on what that is for TCS higher education affiliates. MH: The Transformative Educational Experience speaks to the fact that students themselves are growing while they are studying with us. We want all the elements of their engage-

Between philanthropy, the potential for investor dollars, and tuition, we create a much more energetic and dynamic base for funding. more effectively across institutions, so that we can direct more resources toward the core educational activity. Similarly, we’ve set up structures that in the future will allow investors to invest in projects that we couldn’t do on our own, but require capital to expand and make the educational experience more excellent. That should allow us to take on new projects, and also not just to rely on tuition dollars. So between philanthropy, the potential for investor dollars, and tuition, we create a much more energetic and dynamic base for funding. Q: Why is it important to reach out globally and have an international focus? RG: One reason has to do with our emphasis on diversity. What better way to understand diversity than to get out of the U.S. and be exposed to where some of our students are really coming from, whether it is India, Asia, South America, Central America? It is a habit with many people to think that the difference in

ment with the institution to be transformational. Particularly in professional education, you are saying that the psychologist, the teacher, the lawyer, the business person, the main tool is themselves. So we want to treat the students as adults, we want to give them superior service. We have to help them develop themselves in the most meaningful way. That means extracurricular activities, that means the way we handle the business. It is an opportunity for us because again we are staking out something with high aspirations. Whether it is technology, how we handle financial interactions, placement activities, helping students develop their careers, we want to have a lifelong relationship with all of our students. I think those are some of the very powerful components of what we are calling the Transformative Educational Experience. This interview has been condensed and edited. the complete dialog can be viewed at www.tcsedsystem.org/interview.


Higher Education Affiliates

Changing the way teachers are taught:

Pacific Oaks College


2009-2010 Year in Review | TCS ES | 7

T

he future of our nation—and indeed our world—depends on our ability to produce the next generation of critical thinkers, astute problem solvers, and creative expressionists. That, in turn, depends on the quality of the education system responsible for preparing today’s children for tomorrow’s realities. To expand its mission into this vital area of professional training, TCS Education System identified Pacific Oaks College—an institution known for its progressive approach to learning—as its springboard into the world of P-12 education. With a six-decade history of preparing early childhood and human development professionals, Pacific Oaks is committed to nurturing individual potential in each of its students and to advancing the principles of inclusion and social justice. Buoyed by a history rich in forward-thinking pedagogy, together with the shared vision of social change that gave birth to TCS Education System, Pacific Oaks is poised to take its place at the center of the education reform movement. Having just celebrated its 50th commencement, the college is looking toward the coming year, during which it will broaden its historic focus on early childhood education to include additional grade levels and areas of specialization.

President: Dr. Cindy Carter Degrees: M.A. B.A. Programs: Human Development Marital and Family Therapy Teacher Credentialing Founded: 1950 462 Students 11 Faculty


Higher Education Affiliates

A holistic approach to health and human services:

Santa Barbara Graduate Institute


2009-2010 Year in Review | TCS ES | 9

S

anta Barbara Graduate Institute offers students a specialized education in an emerging area of health care—a field that integrates traditional, scientific methods with alternative approaches to healing. The pathway to careers in holistic health and human services that attracts students to SBGI is paved with the belief that mind and body are inextricably linked, that neither can be understood or treated in isolation. As the first institution in the country to offer degrees in prenatal and perinatal psychology and one of only three to train somatic psychologists, SBGI has staked its claim in a field on the cusp of rapid growth. Its faculty are thought leaders in an emerging industry, positioning the institution to draw on its unique specialties to inform such wide-ranging fields as childbirth education, genetics counseling, infant care, clinical psychology, dance and movement therapy, and traditional and alternative medicine. Students who seek out SBGI do so intentionally, guided by a desire to improve their own lives as well as the lives of others, and to contribute to well-being in their communities.

President: Dr. Allan Hoffman Degrees: Ph.D. M.A. Programs: Somatic Psychology Prenatal and Perinatal Psychology Clinical Psychology Founded: 2000 169 Students 6 Faculty

Sharing experiences is a critical learning tool at SBGI.


Higher Education Affiliates

Expanding the impact of psychology and behavioral science:

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology


2009-2010 Year in Review | TCS ES | 11

T

he most defining innovation to emerge from The Chicago School’s 30-year history is the Engaged Professional Model of Education, an approach to psychology training that combines intensive hands-on learning with a strong commitment to community service. Evidence of the model at work can be found at every campus, in every program—each of which partners with local agencies, organizations, and businesses to produce civically engaged, socially entrepreneurial agents of change. In Chicago, it is evident in the cadre of students who last year gave up every Saturday morning to participate in the Home Again program, helping children of returning soldiers sort through the anxieties and confusion that war wreaks on families. In Los Angeles, it is evident in the work of the newly opened TEACH Center, which will build on the experience of faculty who are national leaders in Applied Behavior Analysis to provide training opportunities for professionals and caregivers who treat autism. And in the nation’s capital, the site of The Chicago School’s newest campus, the Engaged Professional Model is rapidly establishing a presence with initiatives that connect students with veterans in need of mental health services and that leverage opportunities provided by a newly launched Center for African Psychology.

Reaching Out in Southern California Businesses, too, benefit from the work of Chicago School students. Through the newly established ConCISE Center—the practice arm of the L.A. Business Psychology Department—master’s and doctoral students receive real-world experience while helping develop leadership programs, manage change, and undertake strategic planning initiatives.

President: Dr. Michele Nealon-Woods Campus Presidents: Dr. Carroll Cradock, Chicago Dr. Orlando Taylor, Washington, D.C. Degrees: Psy.D. Ph.D. Ed.S. M.A. Programs: Clinical Psychology Business Psychology Forensic Psychology Applied Behavior Analysis Marital and Family Therapy International Psychology Organizational Leadership School Psychology Counseling Psychology Psychology Founded: 1979 3,563 Students 120 Faculty


Children’s Education Affiliates

Closing the achievement gap with Applied Behavior Analysis:

Garfield Park Preparatory Academy


2009-2010 Year in Review | TCS ES | 13

F

or children in one of Chicago’s most economically and educationally disadvantaged neighborhoods, a new vision of possibility and potential has emerged. Garfield Park Preparatory Academy—an elementary school operated by The Chicago School of Professional Psychology in collaboration with the Chicago Public School system—has proven during its first year of operation that academic success is an attainable goal for all students, regardless of background or previous classroom experience. At the heart of this new educational venture is Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), an empirically validated approach to learning that breaks instruction into small, discrete nuggets, enabling students to master content, one piece at a time, steadily building knowledge and understanding. It is the first school in Illinois to base and entire academic and social curriculum around ABA, and one of the few in the country. GPPA stands as an illustration of “engaged professionalism” at work. While infusing children and families in this marginalized community with the pride of achievement, the model serves as a real-world training laboratory for Chicago School students working toward careers in ABA, school psychology, and forensic psychology.

Principal: Dr. Denise Ross Programs: Mandarin language instruction Before- and after-school programs Headsprout early literacy software Parent programs Founded: 2009 215 students 10 teachers

Demonstrating Results Less than a year after GPPA opened its doors, its students were living proof of the difference their new school was making. On Illinois Standard Achievement Tests that all third graders across the state take, GPPA students outscored their neighborhood public school peers by an average of 11 percentage points. % of students, including special education students, who met or exceeded state standards.

GPPA

Garfield Park public schools

Composite

67.5%

56%

Math

75%

61%

Reading

60%

51%


Children’s Education Affiliates

Teaching inclusion and peaceful conflict resolution from infancy:

Pacific Oaks Children’s School


2009-2010 Year in Review | TCS ES | 15

F

ew schools would take their preschoolers’ penchant for concocting mud balls and turn it into a multi-disciplinary learning experience. But it’s an example of the emergent curriculum philosophy that sets Pacific Oaks Children’s School apart from other early childhood education programs. If kids are happiest playing in the mud, teachers reason, what better way is there to introduce them to reading, writing and arithmetic? Poems about mud balls, dictated or written by each child, become literacy activities that are then used to line classroom walls in a print-rich environment; mud ball recipes provide science lessons and practice with measurement, and a mud ball stand (why sell lemonade when you can sell handcrafted mud balls?) teaches basic numeracy. Serving families in and around Pasadena since 1945, Pacific Oaks Children’s School has established itself in early learning circles, offering a progressive, experientially based education to its small students and a rich parent education program for moms and dads. And while families of all economic levels make up the Pacific Oaks community, the school bears the rare distinction of being able to boast 100 percent family participation in annual fundraising drives.

Executive Director: Jane Rosenberg Special Offerings: Artist-in-residence Musician-in-residence Art studio Adventure yard Frequent parent programs Founded: 1945 217 children 40 teachers

Building on Quaker Roots Like Pacific Oaks College, the Children’s School traces its heritage to its Quaker founders, who believed strongly in the principles of inclusion and peaceful conflict resolution. An unmistakable anti-bias message permeates everything that happens—from the stories that are read, to the dolls in the doll house, to the crayon-bright artwork that students proudly display. While children are intentionally grouped to represent a broad range of racial backgrounds and family configurations, there is always a “critical mass” of each represented group, ensuring that no child feels isolated.


Service Affiliates

Meeting a growing demand for accessible degree programs:

TCS Online


2009-2010 Year in Review | TCS ES | 17

T

echnology has changed the face—and the substance—of learning in the 21st century. Even with the hands-on educational model that defines TCS Education System affiliates, an approach that immerses students in the community and engages them in life-changing professional experiences, the availability of online instruction can make the difference between opportunity and exclusion, between now and maybe later. TCS Online was created to assist our higher education institutions with making internet-based education available to their students while ensuring that instructional quality consistently mirrors that of their on-ground programs. TCS Online provides technology infrastructure and behindthe-scenes services that blend seamlessly with each affiliated institution. TCS Online’s course development team works collaboratively with each affiliate’s subject matter experts to ensure effective delivery as well as the achievement of desired learning outcomes.

Last year, more than 4.6 million U.S. students—one in every four—were

enrolled in online higher education programs. Online education is growing at a rate of 13% a year, faster than any other segment of education.

President: Mark Griesbaum Services: Student enrollment services Course development consultation E-college administration


Service Affiliates

Supporting the education and outreach efforts of TCS Education System:

TCS Foundation


2009-2010 Year in Review | TCS ES | 19

T

CS Foundation offers donors the opportunity to take an active role in advancing the mission of transformative education and service to the global community that defines each of TCS Education System’s affiliated institutions. Its efforts span the hemispheres, seeking and managing resources that bring the best and most ambitious TCS ES initiatives to life. As a service affiliate, the Foundation benefits the System by consolidating philanthropic activities under a single umbrella and coordinating the management of all charitable assets, including endowed funds. President: Dr. Timothy T. Shannon Foundation Activities: Grant acquisition Annual funds for education affiliates Alumni activities Fundraising for System initiatives

In a land where suffering has often defined everyday existence, the Global HOPE Training Initiative is bringing hope and

healing to survivors of trauma. The small African nation of Rwanda— which continues to struggle with the aftermath of the 1994 genocide that took more than a million lives—is reaping the benefits of this TCS ES-sponsored initiative in which teachers and orphanage workers are trained in strategies of trauma recovery. As the program grows beyond Rwanda, the Foundation will be instrumental in securing support for expansion to Zambia and Peru.


TCS Education System Financial Overview Pacific Oaks College 2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008

2008-2009

Unaudited 2009-2010

Total Revenue

11,127,286

12,424,568

11,162,238

8,332,379

5,799,433

Operating Surplus

1,945,579

1,323,250

2,368,937

(4,991,374)

(2,576,320)

Net Assets

13,189,876

14,513,126

16,882,083

11,890,708

9,314,388

Founded: 1950

Joined TCS ES: 2010

Santa Barbara Graduate Institute 2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008

2008-2009

Unaudited 2009-2010

Total Revenue

1,113,887

1,141,743

1,432,078

1,541,615

1,464,796

Operating Surplus

105,727

40,874

(193,650)

147,337

145,745

Net Assets

168,702

229,297

(77,795)

231,199

207,137

Founded: 2000

Santa Barbara Graduate Institute is affiliated through a services relationship and not through corporate structure.

Joined TCS ES: 2009

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology 2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008

2008-2009

Unaudited 2009-2010

Total Revenue

15,231,799

19,857,859

27,362,841

39,756,539

50,541,058

Operating Surplus

3,016,514

3,075,614

1,560,010

1,450,933

4,125,881

Net Assets

8,261,535

11,337,149

12,920,497

13,875,065

17,493,110

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is affiliated through a services relationship and not through corporate structure. 2008-2009 EXCLUDES one-time charges related to the acquisition of the California graduate institute.

Founded: 1979

Garfield Park Preparatory Academy 2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008

2008-2009

Unaudited 2009-2010

Total Revenue

-

-

-

185,000

980,122

Operating Surplus

-

-

-

40,947

(199,396)

Net Assets

-

-

-

40,947

(158,450) Founded: 2009


2009-2010 Year in Review | TCS ES | 21

Pacific Oaks Children’s School 2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008

2008-2009

Unaudited 2009-2010

Total Revenue

2,061,551

2,365,438

2,679,174

2,813,171

2,579,668

Operating Surplus

132,905

49,561

310,676

227,984

162,958

Net Assets

1,896,021

1,945,581

2,256,473

2,484,240

2,636,873

Founded: 1945

Joined TCS ES: 2010

TCS Online 2005-2006 Total Revenue

2006-2007

2007-2008

2008-2009

Unaudited 2009-2010

-

-

2,440,795

9,660,624

Operating Surplus

-

-

-

754,581

(113,599)

Net Assets

-

-

-

1,254,581

1,140,985 Founded: 2008

TCS Foundation 2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008

2008-2009

Unaudited 2009-2010

Total Revenue

-

-

-

-

746,983

Operating Surplus

-

-

-

-

(657,463)

Net Assets

-

-

-

-

(152,871) Founded: 2010


TCS Education System Donor List Gifts received for TCS Education SYSTEM affiliates between June 1, 2009 and May 31, 2010

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology

Matthew F. Sauer Timothy T. Shannon, Ph.D.

GIFTS OF $100,000 AND ABOVE

GIFTS OF $500 - $999

Corporation for National and Community Service’s Learn and Serve America Higher Education Grant Philip J. Tobin Living Trust

George W. Hay, Ph.D. Robert C. McKim Francis Mechner Deane Rabe, Psy.D. Dina Schenk Mark Williams

GIFTS OF $25,000 - $99,999 The Chicago Community Trust Michael Reese Health Trust NARSAD, The Brain and Behavior Research Fund Mr. and Mrs. Philip R. Utigard and Transwestern GIFTS OF $10,000 - $24,999 Anonymous (2) Ricardo Grunsten GIFTS OF $5,000 - $9,999 Lawrence and Marilyn Cohen Steven Cohen, J.D. The Davee Foundation Michael Horowitz, Ph.D. Jeff Keith, M.B.A. Rotary Club of Los Angeles Elizabeth Thompson GIFTS OF $2,500 - $4,999 Edward Bergmark, Ph.D. Patricia Breen, Ph.D. Dean Chung, M.B.A. John DelMonaco, Psy.D. ‘96 Paul Dillon, M.S. Brian Fabes, Ph.D. Dorothy Farris Bruce Fox, J.D. Linda G. Havard, M.B.A. Kevin Kotecki Louise Lane Steven D. Nakisher, Psy.D. ‘96 Mary Turner Pattiz, Ph.D. Orlando Taylor, Ph.D. Rev. Mary E. Tudela, M.B.A. Carmen Velasquez GIFTS OF $1,000 - $2,499 Carroll A. Cradock, Ph.D. Louise Greilsheim Sean T. Hart, Psy.D. ‘89 William Houston, M.S. George P. Mitchell Michele A. Nealon-Woods, Psy.D. ‘01 Tamara Rozhon, Ed.D.

GIFTS OF $100 - $499 Stephanie L. Agost, M.A. ‘08 Sylvia Babbin Claude Barbre, Ph.D. Linda Randall Bianco James Campbell Keith Carroll, Ph.D. Susan Wyn Cherco CITADEL Information Group Ellis P. Copeland, Ph.D. Vincent Copp, Psy.D. ‘95 Harvey L. Coustan Susan Craig Gail and Norm Cutler Nancy Davis, Ph.D. Martin Denis Dr. and Mrs. Richard Evans Matthew R. Feldman Robert Finkel Martin Fleishman John Fortunato, Psy.D. ‘95 Shayle Fox Susy Francis-Thornton, Psy.D. ‘03 Laury Franks Seymour Frolichstein Connie Fuller Elizabeth S. Girouard, M.A. ‘03 Jill Glenn Harvey Golden Jeffrey Goldman William Goldstein Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Gutman Erik H. Hansen, Psy.D. ‘98 Sheldon P. Holzman Marian R. Jakubczyk Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Kelber Magdalen Kellogg Barbara J. Kelly, Psy.D. Jay H. Kopstein Joseph Kovach, Psy.D. ‘86 Terrence Layng, Ph.D. Janet Leder Dr. and Mrs. David S. Levin, Psy.D. ‘83 Elana Lieberman and Lorne Abramson

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Lieberman Janice Linn Mr. and Mrs. Richard Loundy Shana Lowitz Daniel R. Madock Charles Merbitz, Ph.D. Jill A. Miller, Psy.D. ‘96 Mr. and Mrs. Michael I. Miller Andrea MacAulay O’Neil, Psy.D. ‘95 Kathy R. Pick Roslyn Pollack Rosalie A. Price, Psy.D. ‘86 Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Randell Louise Rosenblum Esther Saks Dawgelene Sangster, M.A. ‘06 Gwendolyn R. Satterfield Theodore Scholz Nancy Schwartz John W. Shustitzky Michael L. Sklar Jonathan Smith Benjamin Z. Sosewitz Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Steltjes Elizabeth J. VanDyke Terry L. Webster, Ph.D. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Weingarten Robert Wieseneck Joel Wineberg Mr. and Mrs. Harry Wolin Deborah Wood Nancy Yalowitz GIFTS UP TO $99 Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Anderson Marilee J. Aronson, Psy.D. ‘99 Michelle M. Bailleaux-Rago, Psy.D. ‘93 Nicole Barnett Judith Beaupre Hugh Brodkey Mr. and Mrs. Jack J. Brown Mr. and Mrs. James A. Burstein Mr. and Mrs. William R. Cottle Anne Davis Rebecca Davis Nancy Dubrow William Epperly Naomi B. Feldman Michael Fogel Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Foley James F. Frank, M.A. ‘06 Otto A. Furth Danea Gorbett Rachel Greeley Tim D. Griffith, M.A. ‘06

Jerome Hausman Babette Heller Mr. and Mrs. Larry Herndon Jillian Hiller Kerri Hulsebus, M.A. ‘07 Mr. and Mrs. Martin Hurtig Libby Isaac Rachel Kelber Susan Lane Cynthia L. Langtiw, Psy.D. ‘05 Mr. and Mrs. James C. Larsen Krista M. Larson, M.A. ‘07 Ramona Lewis Yoona Lim Lori Martinez-Conticelli, Psy.D. ‘95 Rita W. McCleary, Psy.D. ‘88 Rebecca M. McKibbin, M.A. ‘06 Shari Mikos Katia Mitova, Ph.D. Michael Mitzen Matt Nehmer Harry Opila Nicole Paryz, M.A. ‘08 Michele Pesiri Mr. and Mrs. Jack Polyak Marcia Pomerantz William E. Rattner Phyllis Reynolds Richard S. Rhodes J. Breezer Rickey Adina E. Romain Wendy Schiffman, Psy.D. Sheilla Shanes Lauren Shapiro, M.A. ‘08 Mr. and Mrs. Myron Shapiro Deborah J. Spidale Maria Stewart, Psy.D. ‘92 Olga S. Stiefel Adam Sullivan Michele Swiatkowski Beth Tinkham David C. Usndek, Psy.D. ‘04 George Vinci Robin B. Wagner, Ph.D. Mr. and Mrs. Burton L. Weitzman Nancy A. Zarse, Psy.D. ‘89

Pacific Oaks College GIFTS OF $10,000 AND ABOVE Anonymous Anonymous* George H. Mayr Foundation Dorine Real and Lee Tepper

GIFTS OF $2,500 - $4,999 Bank of the West Wendy Munger and Leonard Gumport GIFTS OF $1,000 - $2,499 Ann and Olin Barrett Cynthia L. Carter, Ph.D.* Ann Cutting and Tom Soulanille Jean and Louis Fleming Lois and Richard Gunther Kim Kemp and Matthew Cohen Rose Anne Nespica Mary Lois Nevins Donna Vaccarino GIFTS OF $500 - $999 Alice F. Rozan Trust GIFTS OF $100 - $499 Marsha and Vern Bohr Katherine Del Monte Benavidez Dorothy Brooks Judy and Phil Callahan Judith and Stephen Ernst Lynda Fick Mary-Alice and Richard Frank Betty J. Ho Jerrie R. Ingram Cledith M. Jennings Margaret A. Lais Julie McAdoo Karen Miller Eleanor A. Muhlstein Evelyn Nagel Megumi and Richard Strathmann Palma and John Vincenti GIFTS UP TO $99 Alma and Greg Apodaca Jane and Tom M. Apostol Elaine C. Bumiller Franceslee Foster Maxine Segal Handelman Hon. Shirley Hufstedler Mary Jane Horton and Stuart Shipko Nancy B. Lichtenstein Virginia B. Lloyd Kristine Ann Majich Lois A. Martin Gale L. Moore Janice and Richard Morris Taka and Michy Nomura Mary O’Neal Anna Rind


2009-2010 Year in Review | TCS ES | 23

Sandra Wick Ruggiero Carol E. Sartz Eileen and Fred Schoellkopf Terry Strand Amelia Sullivan Gerald Tintor Mary Jane and Fred Tonge Itihari Y. Toure Jo and Charles Vos Jacquelene A. Ziegler * Giving supports both Pacific Oaks College and Children’s School

Pacific Oaks Children’s School GIFTS OF $25,000 AND ABOVE Anonymous Pacific Oaks Parent Association GIFTS OF $10,000 - $24,999 Michele and Brett Canon Nina Hachigian and Joseph Deegan-Day Lotus Clinical Research, Inc. Devinyl Schonfeld Michele and John Waller GIFTS OF $5,000 - $9,999 Christine Adams and James Asperger Laura and David Unanue GIFTS OF $2,500 - $4,999 Suzanne and Dante Ariola Michael Balzary and Frankie Rayder Ann Brose and Christopher Anzalone Yolanda and David Garcia Sarah Heidel and Fred Rowley Gabrielle and David Klatsky Allison and Edward Shearmur Sonia and Ryan Yagura Georgina and David Younger GIFTS OF $1,000 - $2,499 Noelle and Edward Aloe Lori and Michael Aramian Charles Callahan and Jacinto Hernandez Kristin and Juan Ceva Eva and Mark Davis Sarah and Christopher Dusseault Mara and Marc Dworsky Lolla and Hesham Elkobaitry

Michele and Andrew Esbenshade Diane Farr and Seung Chung Attica and Karl Fenske Jennifer Freeland and Jason Freeland Levy Priya Girishankar and Damon Cleckler Andrea and Dave Grable Jonathan Gordon Zoe Haruyama and Ralph DeFelice Meghana Frenchman Lakshman and Shanker Lakshman Steven and Arlene Lazarus Foundation Melinda and Robert LeMoine Corina Limon-Madilian and Ari Madilian Stephanie and Michael MacKanic Hayley Marcus-Simpson and Mike Simpson Krista and Kevin Maynard Erika and Jeffrey McConnell Erin and Stephen McDonald Harper and Andrew McDonald Aimee and Mike Mitchell Kristen and Todd Molz Kate and Antonio Rangel Anna-Christine and Christopher Rising Sharon and Nelson Rising Vivian and Rey Rodriguez Elizabeth and Paul Salvati Naomi and Adam Scott Glenna and Henry Shih Alice Song and Scott Ulrich Deborah Stark and Brian Ledahl Therese Soullier and Jennifer Moog Adele and Ralph Suarez Tara and David Thomas Monica and David Walsh Liz and Andy Wilson Joyce and Joseph Ybarra Sharon Yee and Dale Daniel GIFTS OF $500 - $999 Marisza and Paul Avina Susan Babcock Ophelia Chen and Kevin Chan Martha and Bruce Coffey Carolyn and Robert Denham Anne Gillam and Verah Bradford Christine Grant-Arthur and Eric Arthur Pam and John Greer Patricia Han and Robert Yum Krista and Eli Hernandez Sarah Hicks

Beong-Soo Kim and Bonnie Wongtrakool Jamie and Spencer Kook Lauren and Matthew Krieger Phil LaMarr Jeehyun Lee and Mark Kim Karen and Carl Li Frederic J. Liebau Jason Lyon and Tim Hartley Kitty and Paul McNamee-Lazarus Dawn and Earle Miller Sonia Nikore and Blake Koh Lisa and Peter Oliverez Danielle and Joseph Padula Paula Perez-Manzanedo and Daniel Schmit Summer Phoenix and Casey Affleck Nattha and John Quan Brenda Quon and James Lee Caroline and Thomas Rose Larissa Schnitger and Matthew Monahan Wendy Self and Evan Porter Elizabeth and Wendell Vaughn GIFTS OF $100 - $499 Yasmin Anwar and Robert Kamins Ann Anzalone Kim and Sebastian Apodaca Alison Ashford and Michael Arya Gwen and Guilford Babcock Justine Bae and Julian Poon Elizabeth and Holger Besch Mary Jane Biancheri and James Bottoms Linda Bortell and Jock Tardy Ruth Bortell Bobby Brose Heather and Timothy Brunold Samantha Campbell and Donald Petersen Rosalina and Frank Cardenas Katherine Carlson and Peter Frech Bridget Carpenter and Christopher Harrison Ellen and Andrew Chan Erin and Marko Chase Michelle Dakan and Grant Oldfield Chelle and Kurt Farquhar Connie Fenske Alisa Fishbach and Thomas Kosakowski Traci and Bill Fleming Heidi and Craig Fong Jane and Charles Forman

Mary-Alice and Richard Frank Esther and Richard Garcia Ed Golub Kathryn and Patrick Gray Eileen and James Greenbaum Jennifer Ha William Howard Bryce and Seth Howard-Gabel Steve Jesson Beth Johnson and Josh Epstein Marina Khubesrian and Mark Dreskin Janet and Norman Labrador Wing Lau and Henry Szeto Tanya and Jung Lee Ami Mann and Mark Golub Staci Marengo and Howard Lewis Edward McCaffery Gerald McNamee Nicole and Daniel Mendoza Alan D. Minsky Esther Minsky Nina Minton and Robin Bianchi Kelli and Claudio Miranda Monica Mitrani and Robert Abad Sonja Muehlmann and Philip Chu Elisa and Tommy Nixon Katrina and John Onderdonk Maeling Pan and Samir Parikh Alice Park and Michael McDonald Lea Payne and Zachary Scott Ivan Pejic Jenny Rask and Tom Kuntz Elizabeth Schaeffer and Yvette Hassakoursian Jennifer Schlosberg and John Lehr Martha and Bruce Searby Haydeh and Jon Takasugi Target Stacey Thornhill-McFarlane and Kevin McFarlane Sylvia Torres-Guillen and Victor Cannon Lorraine Toussaint Zererino T. Trinidad Jenny and Matthew Umhofer Heather and Thomas Unterseher Graciela Valenzuela and Roberto Longoria Carlota Venegas and Cyrus Khavari Michael Wilson Debi and Eric Younger GIFTS OF UP TO $99 Ninfa Abad Robyn Brown

Max Canon Connie Casillas and Rodolfo Ruiz Jocelyn Chan and John Lunn Elsa and Xavier Chavez Frances Clinton and Shawn Kaplan Susannah Copi Jim F. Davis Emily De Crescenzi Debbie and Cheryl Diggs-Hughes Greta Durelli and John Vrsalovich Cecilia Estolano and Priya Sridharan Elena Fernandez and Heriberto De la Torre Maya Gallegos Rose Granados and Thomas Parada Joanne Grey and Luis Giraldo Mary Guerrero and Nanette Karapetian Paula Kessler and Neal Brown Sonia B. Kessler Azan Kung and Phil Volkoff Ina and Bob Kwan Helen Lau and Shawn Ho Lucinda Lopez-Jesson and Das Jesson Li Lu and Jie Li Suzette and Clarence Major Mary L. McNulty Joseph Mosca and Matthew Bosse Cecilia Muniz and Kristen Ochoa Adam Murray and Aman Thind Sharon Nicholls and Pablo Alvarado Aki Ohseki and John Hawkins Erika and Robert Oller Monica Oller and Tomislav Pejic Annette and Julio Ramirez, Jr. Miriam Recinos Kimberly Sanchez and Camilo Regalado Desiree and Garth Trinidad Caren and Eric Winzenried Joanne Jen and Paul Wong IN-KIND GIFTS Ken Coburn Susan Jefferson

Prior to the official establishment of TCS Foundation in June 2010, all gifts to affiliates were made in response to institution-specific fundraising activities.


TCS Education System Executive Cabinet Michael Horowitz, Ph.D. President Chief Executive Officer

Pat Breen, Ph.D. Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs Chief Academic Officer

Jeff Keith, M.B.A. Senior Vice President of Finance and Administration Chief Financial Officer

Tamara Rozhon, Ed.D. Senior Vice President of Strategic Operations and Business Expansion Chief Operating Officer

Shari Mikos, M.S.M. Chief of Staff

TCS Education System Board of Trustees Ricardo Grunsten, Chair Louise Lane, Vice Chair Michael Horowitz, Ph.D., CEO Edward Bergmark, Ph.D. Richard Chaifetz, Psy.D. Dean Chung, M.B.A.

Steven Cohen, J.D. John DelMonaco, Psy.D. Paul Dillon, C.M.C., M.S. Dorothy Farris Bruce Fox, Esq. Linda Havard, M.B.A.

William Houston Kevin Kotecki Terrence Layng, Ph.D. George Mitchell Steven Nakisher, Psy.D. Douglas Patinkin

Mary Pattiz, Ph.D. Matthew Sauer David Scott Elizabeth Thompson Mary Tudela, M.B.A. Carmen Velásquez

TCS Education System Affiliates CHILDREN’S EDUCATION AFFILIATES

HIGHER EDUCATION AFFILIATES

SERVICE AFFILIATES


TCS Education System 222 North LaSalle Chicago, IL 60601 312.467.2395 www.tcsedsystem.org

TCS Education System 2010 Annual Report  

TCS Education System 2010 Annual Report

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you