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t ac k l i n g t h e n e e d 2007–2008 annual report

There has never been a more urgent need for competent, determined psychology professionals prepared to serve our communities and our world. The Chicago School is not merely responding to that need. We are tackling it head on.


In 2006, Chicago lost more children to acts of school violence than all of Illinois lost to the Iraq War. With only one psychologist for every three schools, the Chicago Public Schools have found themselves ill-equipped to deal with the aftermath.

Actively disengaged employees—the least motivated and the least productive—

cost the American economy up to $350 billion per year in lost productivity.

Latinos account for the fastest

growing, but most underserved, segment of the U.S. population. In Chicago, one in four residents is Latino, and in Los Angeles, it is nearly one in two. Yet, there are only 20 Latino mental health professionals for every 100,000 Latino residents in the United States.

Worldwide, more than 450 million people suffer

from some form of mental disorder, often the result of trauma, genocide, war, or natural disaster. In many of the hardest-hit countries, less than 10 percent of those with mental health needs have access to services that can help them.


A Vision, A Mission, A Future In preparation for the Annual Report, Board Chair Ricardo “Richard” Grunsten and President Michael Horowitz reflected on the past year and on their shared vision for becoming the premier school of professional psychology in the world.

Question: Take us through the decision to form The Chairman and President’s Task Force on Mission and Scope, and how you worked collaboratively to develop a vision for the future. G: The roots are based on our belief that psychology is not just for psychologists; psychology applies to every aspect of life. It seemed logical that if we believe in our mission and we have a successful formula, it made sense to broaden our message and get more students and more institutions connected to us. H: We talk frequently about meeting the full potential of psychology—and the interesting thing is, plans as bold as what we are doing can’t come out of conversations that Richard and I have. We were pleased that the task force came back with broader and bigger aspirations than we had at the moment.

T CS AN N U AL R EP O RT 2007– 08, PAGE 2

G: Originally we talked about how do we expand The Chicago School presence? Do we look at possibilities outside the Chicago area, and do we look at education outside of psychology? The initial discussions were about expanding what we had; I think the task force and the board came back with a license to consider other options.

The Chicago School Model is about

breaking down the artificial limits of psychology. H: Their specific embrace of major locations on the coasts with an aggressive timeline and other innovative models of higher education really let us know that they were ready for much

more. Richard said ‘since we are The Chicago School, why not think of cities like Shanghai, Paris, New York, London?,’ which was kind of an epiphany at the time: let’s think really big: The Chicago School way. G: The multinational perspective came about through my business. I thought, why shouldn’t this school be comfortable working internationally? If you are going to think internationally, it makes thinking nationally, East Coast/West Coast, less daunting. Hey, if we’re going to be in China, what’s the big deal being in Los Angeles? It basically changed the overall perspective on how we think about The Chicago School. Question: Was there ever any discussion of changing the name of the school? H: Yes, we talked about it, but there is growing confidence that The Chicago School is a powerful name. We had a former vice chair of the board who commented that it would be good if we could get to a point where The Chicago School means an approach to psychology, not just the physical location. We are now seeing that happening. In all of our programs, The Chicago School Model is about breaking down the artificial limits of psychology. So even in Business Psychology, psychologists were perceived as human resource people, and Richard, you said ‘shouldn’t they be thinking about consumers and how to grow a business?’ G: I think it makes a great deal of sense to look at psychology as a much broader discipline than traditional therapy. And it can range from issues that people have in school, to businesses with personnel issues to organizations trying to communicate with a community.


What would you say to someone who says there are already too many psychologists in the field? H: I tell them they have it backwards. I think there are too few psychologists because we are living in a time where government and social service agencies and other organized entities that helped people in the past are really not meeting the needs that are out there. Psychology has a way to build community, strengthen businesses, and strengthen relationships.

We’re meeting more needs and solving

more kinds of problems in more parts of the world. G: Those people may not have a clear view of how we define psychology. H: Change is a constant, so our comfort in rolling with change has made the difference. Whatever we are doing today will have to be modified for one year, three years, five years, but I think a contribution we’ve brought is our comfort with the environment. It changes and we go with it. Question: Do you believe The Chicago School is impacting the entire field of psychology? G: Well, we’ve had presidents from other schools come here and visit, basically asking ‘how do we do what you’re doing?’ which is very flattering.

H: Our CFO gets a little nervous because he’s from traditional business and he says ‘stop giving away the secrets’ because in higher education there’s more tradition of sharing. G: Everybody wants our secret sauce. H: We are moving the needle, and I go back to the question about people saying there are too many psychologists. Yes, we’re increasing the supply of psychologists…but not the same type of psychologists those people are thinking of. We’re meeting more needs and solving more kinds of problems in more parts of the world. G: Often, views of the future tend to be wrong. If you look at old magazines that showed you what cars of the future would look like, they got it completely wrong. If you look at visions of what this century would be like, they’d have all these robots walking around…there was no vision of the personal computer. So when people say ‘if present trends continue, this can happen,’ well, you know what—present trends never continue. There are always significant changes and we have to be alert and open to those changes. We think we are pretty good at that. H: When we updated the Mission Statement in 2000-2001, Richard was insistent that one word be a part of it: innovation. While a lot of people talk about it, I think it’s been a rallying

Let’s think really big:

The Chicago School way.

cry here—to always rethink what we are doing. It has given us confidence to be different. G: The great successes have come from people innovating. Rembrandt started off by making things a little more out of focus than the other artists…he did OK! The Wright Brothers challenged the prevailing wisdom that it was impossible for a heavier-than-air machine to fly. See, you have to look at things in a different way to do things that are exceptional. There’s risk in that, no question. But I like the risk-reward equation, and we’ve done OK with that.

To listen to a podcast of the complete conversation between President Horowitz and Mr. Grunsten, go to www.thechicagoschool.edu/annualreport.


Emerging Needs. Cutting-Edge Treatments. In a world beset by change, psychology cannot stand still. Its enduring relevance lies in the ever-expanding creativity of its practitioners, in new and continually evolving applications of their profession. At the vanguard of this evolution is The Chicago School. With values grounded in innovation and service, our collective lens is trained on the emerging needs of society, and on the development of

T CS AN N U AL R E PO RT 2007– 08, PAGE 4

solutions to the psychological challenges of the 21st century.


6.03.07—Students and faculty participate in 6th annual Naomi Ruth Cohen Conference

6.19.07—Clinical Psychology hosts first Dissertation Day

6.21.07—School Psychology program gains ISBE accreditation

6.23.07—Students travel to behavior therapy conference in Germany

7.19.07—Fudan University students visit for month–long exchange

7.20.07—Center for Academic Excellence introduces new programs

Addressing the L atino Need

Tackling Autism

Reuniting At-Risk Families

A newly launched Center for Latino Mental Health—the first of its kind in the Midwest—helped jump-start the profession’s response to the unique mental health needs of our nation’s fastest–growing ethnic group. Degree and certificate programs, research, and community service projects focus on the development of culturally competent psychology services and the preparation of a new generation of professionals equipped to provide leadership in this increasingly vital area of expertise.

With a repertoire of proven skills that can virtually eliminate the diagnosis of autism in young children, Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) students use their internship placements to radically alter the futures of their small clients. ABA techniques, which represent the only empirically validated treatment for autism, are increasingly in demand as diagnoses of this disorder continue their alarming ascent (in the 12 years leading up to 2006, they multiplied almost ten-fold). The development of a new doctoral program—a Psy.D. in ABA—offers ongoing evidence of The Chicago School’s tireless commitment to addressing this challenge.

Using a bug-in-the-ear system to coach struggling parents through difficult disciplinary interactions, Forensic Psychology students are learning the difference a skilled intervention can make. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy, a proven strategy for reducing the recurrence of abusive behavior, has secured the respect of Illinois DCFS workers, who are working with The Chicago School to deliver pioneering therapeutic services designed to reunite families and reduce the need for foster-care placements.

solutions in the making

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Crisis is reality in today’s world. At The Chicago School, we never stop identifying new opportunities for creative response that can change the shape of tomorrow, both locally and around the globe.

At a time when school violence has redefined the K-12 experience, we are in discussions with the Chicago Public Schools about the role our institution can play in addressing the dire shortage of psychologists in our schools. As our veterans return from tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, we are exploring opportunities to develop and deliver treatments that address the challenges of post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. As Rwanda continues to struggle with the effects of genocide, HIV/AIDS, and gender-based violence, we are in conversations with the country’s leaders about developing a large-scale counselor training program for a culture that doesn’t have a word in its language for “psychology.”


Broader Reach. More Agents of Change. We take our responsibility—and our capacity to bring about change—seriously. As the largest nonprofit school of psychology in the world, The Chicago School is poised to dramatically extend its reach, to build on its strengths and successes, and to assume a leadership role in the development of the 21st century psychology workforce. In 2008, we awarded degrees to a record 350 new psychology professionals; as we broaden our vision to include new programs, new campuses, and new learning formats, that number will climb T CS AN N U AL R E PO RT 2007– 08, PAGE 6

exponentially. The world waits.


08.17.07—APA convention reception offers alumni a chance to reconnect

8.30.07—Mountains Beyond Mountains selected as Book of the Year

9.01.07—New post-doc program launched as TCS welcomes 590 new students

9.10.07—1st Annual Job and Volunteer Fair draws 260

10.07.07—Cambridge Center Conference draws nation’s top ABA scholars to The Chicago School

10.11.07—Sponsored by the U.S. State Department, Iraqi youth workers visit Chicago School

A West Coast Presence

New Populations, New Opportunities

Going Global

After 30 years of addressing the need for more psychologists in the Midwest, The Chicago School took its unique approach to psychology education and moved west. Our new Los Angeles campus—the first outside the Chicago area—opened its doors April 1. Intentionally located in the most diverse city in the most diverse state, the campus seeks to continue the focus on community service and meeting the needs of the underserved that have become hallmarks of our educational model.

Class schedules and room assignments gave way to anytime, anywhere learning when the Online Campus opened its virtual doors March 1. Targeted at a new breed of professionals—those who recognize the value of incorporating psychology into their existing work rather than practicing psychology directly—the new course lineup accommodates the needs of mid-career professionals who don’t want to put their day jobs on hold to pursue career advancement.

The world’s most populous nation has become home to The Chicago School’s first international presence. Collaboration with Fudan University, consistently ranked as one of Asia’s leading universities, has led to opportunities for student and faculty exchanges as well as the potential for joint degree and certificate programs. In March, we opened an office in Shanghai to coordinate our ongoing and expanding international efforts with China.

new programs

Online and on-ground, we are expanding into new areas of psychology specialization:

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Career Counseling Child and Adolescent Psychology Gerontology International Psychology Media and Consumer Psychology Organizational Leadership Sport and Exercise Psychology


Community Service. Global Outreach. For The Chicago School, the goal of preparing tomorrow’s professionals has never been enough. Our desire to make an impact now has always been prominent in the pursuit of our mission, and has spawned the model of community engagement that defines our educational philosophy. We prepare students for psychology careers by putting them to work—in our community and beyond. This year, our idea of community service underwent further metamorphosis as we made the decision to reach beyond our own borders to address the need for

T CS AN N U AL R E PO RT 2007– 08, PAGE 8

psychology on distant continents. Our efforts have become global; impact will not be far behind.


Serving the Chicago Area in Hundreds of Ways 11.14.07—President Horowitz makes return visit to China to continue conversation about cross-cultural academic opportunities

12.09.07—10 Chicago School students visit Bethlehem, Jerusalem and Jericho

12.21.07—Clinical Counseling program adds six new concentrations

12.21.07—ABA announces new Psy.D degree

1.11.08—Alumni Council elects Scottie Girouard (M.A. ’03) as chair

1.25.08—Chicago School partners with CARE to host international photographer Phil Borges’ exhibit, “Women Empowered”

10.16.07—Fudan Professor lectures on Chinese culture in Chicago

10.16.07—Agreement with Germany’s IVS signed to pave the way for articulation

10.24.07—ABA hosts conference focusing on disabilities as a diversity issue

10.26.07—Trustees approve Chairman and President’s Task Force Report

10.28.07—Students create Unity Quilt with Lawrence Hall Youth Center

11.12.07—Strategic Plan updated: Becoming the Premier School of Professional Psychology in the World

Learning by Doing

Organizations throughout Chicagoland benefit from the time, effort, and professional skills contributed by Chicago School students and faculty. Last year, these partners provided more than 400 placement opportunities for students fulfilling community service, community-based research, practicum, internship, and service-learning commitments.

Embracing Those Who Share Our Commitment

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 500,000

$10,000,000

400,000

$8,000,000

13

300,000

200,000

100,000

0

$11,104,209 Dollar Equivalent

14

557,360 Service Hours

A plaque acknowledging the Utigard-Transwestern gift will be unveiled at a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new facility in fall 2008.

$12,000,000

$8,856,600 Dollar Equivalent

This year, Utigard and Transwestern, the commercial services firm for which he serves as executive vice president, took their relationship with The Chicago School to the next level by making a major gift to support a portion of the newly acquired space in

With Transwestern’s help, the school recently acquired new space on the fourth floor of the neighboring Mart, as well as adjacent “just-in-time real estate” that will accommodate the continued growth of academic programs and student enrollment.

S e rv i c e H ours P rov i de d (dollar equivalents to the right) 600,000

446,045 Service Hours

“I remember being at Dearborn Station when the campus was confined to a few rooms,” he says, referring to the Polk Street address that the school occupied before moving to its current Wells Street location in 2004. “But Michael Horowitz had a dream. To go from then to what the school is today…it’s hard to realize that it’s actually the same institution.”

“Over the years, we have invested a lot of time and energy in The Chicago School,” Utigard says. “During that time, I have developed a very special affinity to the school; it was time to invest some money too.”

Our service efforts were recognized this year when The Chicago School became the first school of professional psychology to be named to the President’s Honor Roll for Higher Education Community Service. Sponsored by the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), the honor roll represents the highest federal recognition a school can achieve for its commitment to service learning and civic engagement.

$7,256,000 Dollar Equivalent

T CS AN N U AL R E PO RT 2007– 08, PAGE 14

A commercial real estate executive, Utigard has led the seemingly non-stop quest for new classroom and office space as the school has continually outgrown facilities almost as fast as it has completed renovating them.

Last year, Chicago School students and faculty contributed more than 500,000 hours of pro bono or low-cost services at an estimated value of more than $11 million.

362,800 Service Hours

Phil Utigard has witnessed first hand the transformative growth that has characterized The Chicago School during President Horowitz’s tenure.

the Merchandise Mart. The Mr. and Mrs. Philip R. Utigard and Transwestern Treatment and Observation Room will be the centerpiece of the school’s Forensic Center, which was launched in 2007 as the practice arm of the Forensic Psychology program.

hours

Phil Utigard: Making Space for Growth

President ’s Honor Roll

$6,000,000

$4,000,000

$2,000,000

$0 2005–06

2006–07

2007–08

Note: Service hours and dollar equivalents are summaries of data from the offices of Community Partnerships, Clinical Services, Placement & Training, and all academic departments.


Serving the Chicago Area in Hundreds of Ways 11.14.07—President Horowitz makes return visit to China to continue conversation about cross-cultural academic opportunities

12.09.07—10 Chicago School students visit Bethlehem, Jerusalem and Jericho

12.21.07—Clinical Counseling program adds six new concentrations

12.21.07—ABA announces new Psy.D degree

1.11.08—Alumni Council elects Scottie Girouard (M.A. ’03) as chair

1.25.08—Chicago School partners with CARE to host international photographer Phil Borges’ exhibit, “Women Empowered”

10.16.07—Fudan Professor lectures on Chinese culture in Chicago

10.16.07—Agreement with Germany’s IVS signed to pave the way for articulation

10.24.07—ABA hosts conference focusing on disabilities as a diversity issue

10.26.07—Trustees approve Chairman and President’s Task Force Report

10.28.07—Students create Unity Quilt with Lawrence Hall Youth Center

11.12.07—Strategic Plan updated: Becoming the Premier School of Professional Psychology in the World

Learning by Doing

Organizations throughout Chicagoland benefit from the time, effort, and professional skills contributed by Chicago School students and faculty. Last year, these partners provided more than 400 placement opportunities for students fulfilling community service, community-based research, practicum, internship, and service-learning commitments.

Embracing Those Who Share Our Commitment

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 500,000

$10,000,000

400,000

$8,000,000

13

300,000

200,000

100,000

0

$11,104,209 Dollar Equivalent

14

557,360 Service Hours

A plaque acknowledging the Utigard-Transwestern gift will be unveiled at a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new facility in fall 2008.

$12,000,000

$8,856,600 Dollar Equivalent

This year, Utigard and Transwestern, the commercial services firm for which he serves as executive vice president, took their relationship with The Chicago School to the next level by making a major gift to support a portion of the newly acquired space in

With Transwestern’s help, the school recently acquired new space on the fourth floor of the neighboring Mart, as well as adjacent “just-in-time real estate” that will accommodate the continued growth of academic programs and student enrollment.

S e rv i c e H ours P rov i de d (dollar equivalents to the right) 600,000

446,045 Service Hours

“I remember being at Dearborn Station when the campus was confined to a few rooms,” he says, referring to the Polk Street address that the school occupied before moving to its current Wells Street location in 2004. “But Michael Horowitz had a dream. To go from then to what the school is today…it’s hard to realize that it’s actually the same institution.”

“Over the years, we have invested a lot of time and energy in The Chicago School,” Utigard says. “During that time, I have developed a very special affinity to the school; it was time to invest some money too.”

Our service efforts were recognized this year when The Chicago School became the first school of professional psychology to be named to the President’s Honor Roll for Higher Education Community Service. Sponsored by the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), the honor roll represents the highest federal recognition a school can achieve for its commitment to service learning and civic engagement.

$7,256,000 Dollar Equivalent

T CS AN N U AL R E PO RT 2007– 08, PAGE 14

A commercial real estate executive, Utigard has led the seemingly non-stop quest for new classroom and office space as the school has continually outgrown facilities almost as fast as it has completed renovating them.

Last year, Chicago School students and faculty contributed more than 500,000 hours of pro bono or low-cost services at an estimated value of more than $11 million.

362,800 Service Hours

Phil Utigard has witnessed first hand the transformative growth that has characterized The Chicago School during President Horowitz’s tenure.

the Merchandise Mart. The Mr. and Mrs. Philip R. Utigard and Transwestern Treatment and Observation Room will be the centerpiece of the school’s Forensic Center, which was launched in 2007 as the practice arm of the Forensic Psychology program.

hours

Phil Utigard: Making Space for Growth

President ’s Honor Roll

$6,000,000

$4,000,000

$2,000,000

$0 2005–06

2006–07

2007–08

Note: Service hours and dollar equivalents are summaries of data from the offices of Community Partnerships, Clinical Services, Placement & Training, and all academic departments.


Expanding Our Reach Worldwide Examples of our Community Engagement 1

Julia S. Molloy education Center

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) students work with children with special education needs.

Eight students traveled to New York as World Federation for Mental Health delegates to the 52nd Session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, which coordinates global efforts to set worldwide standards for gender equality.

Ch i n a In addition to opening an international office in Shanghai, The Chicago School played host to students from Fudan University, and to a Fudan faculty member who lectured on mental health issues surrounding China’s one-child policy.

Mexico Students enrolled in our new Latino Mental Health program will have the option of completing a three-week immersion experience with Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico.

9 Gads Hill Center

Forensic Psychology students work with at-risk families on improving parent-child interaction and preventing abuse, while Clinical Psychology students provide mentorship and an empathetic ear to youth in LHYS’ residential treatment program.

Chicago School students provide mentoring and tutoring services; Industrial and Organizational (I/O) Psychology students complete needs analyses and assist with the creation of an employee development plan. 10 Easter Seals Chicago

A delegation of Iraqi professionals visited The Chicago School in October 2007 as part of a Visitor Leadership Program sponsored by the U.S. State Department.

GER M ANY

Together, The Chicago School and Erie Neighborhood House have changed countless lives in Chicago’s underserved Latino community. An eloquent testimony to the power of partnerships, the two organizations have effectively pooled resources and expertise to incorporate a mental health perspective into the broad range of social services that Erie offers its clients. 5 Casa Central

Students work on social skills and problem solving with school-age children served by Chicago’s largest Latinoserving social service agency.

An agreement signed by The Chicago School and Institut für Verhaltenstherapie, Verhaltensmedzin und Sexuologie (IVS) in Nurnberg, Germany, laid the groundwork for a clinical psychology articulation program.

ABA students work with children with autism who attend the Autism Therapeutic School. 11 IO Solutions Inc.

I/O students develop public safety assessments for police and fire departments. 12 Chicago Public Schools

School Psychology students complete service learning and practicum experiences throughout the CPS system, tutoring underserved children and assisting teachers in the classroom. 13 Blue Cap Inc.

6 Harrington College of Design and 7 John Marshall Law School

israel rwa n d a Faculty and administrators visited universities, clinics, and hospitals to explore joint programming with a neuropsychology focus.

3 Lawrence Hall Youth Services

4 Erie Neighborhood House

I r aq

P o l a n d & C roat i a

Forensic Psychology students work with formerly incarcerated adults to help them prepare for re-entry into society, while student volunteers provide tutoring in basic skills.

2 Safer Foundation

U N i t e d n at i o n s

8 Chicago Youth Centers

Quality improvement efforts undertaken by the Chicago Youth Centers (CYC) have offered students from the Industrial and Organizational Psychology program the opportunity to put their skills to work for the ultimate benefit of CYC and the youth they serve. Students recently completed an environmental scan and conducted focus groups with clients, staff, and community opinion leaders.

The Chicago School has begun exploratory conversations with Rwandan officials about how we can use our resources to meet the glaring need for mental health care in this country. Rwanda photos by Matt Gillis, GRDP

Ten students representing six Chicago School programs visited Bethlehem, Jerusalem, and a refugee camp in the Palestinian village of Nahhalin. Organized by the Center for International Studies, the trip offered students insight into the psychological trauma experienced by people involved in ongoing conflict.

Sri Lanka A Clinical Psychology professor made his fourth trip to Batticaloa, Sri Lanka, to train “barefoot counselors” in trauma therapy.

Counseling students fill gaps in student services at small professional schools by providing on-site counseling, peer mentoring and anxiety screening.

Applied Behavior Analysis students work with adults with developmental disabilities to help improve their life and communication skills. 14 Aimstar Precision Learning Center

ABA students help children increase their reading levels and improve their academic performance.


Expanding Our Reach Worldwide Examples of our Community Engagement 1

Julia S. Molloy education Center

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) students work with children with special education needs.

Eight students traveled to New York as World Federation for Mental Health delegates to the 52nd Session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, which coordinates global efforts to set worldwide standards for gender equality.

Ch i n a In addition to opening an international office in Shanghai, The Chicago School played host to students from Fudan University, and to a Fudan faculty member who lectured on mental health issues surrounding China’s one-child policy.

Mexico Students enrolled in our new Latino Mental Health program will have the option of completing a three-week immersion experience with Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico.

9 Gads Hill Center

Forensic Psychology students work with at-risk families on improving parent-child interaction and preventing abuse, while Clinical Psychology students provide mentorship and an empathetic ear to youth in LHYS’ residential treatment program.

Chicago School students provide mentoring and tutoring services; Industrial and Organizational (I/O) Psychology students complete needs analyses and assist with the creation of an employee development plan. 10 Easter Seals Chicago

A delegation of Iraqi professionals visited The Chicago School in October 2007 as part of a Visitor Leadership Program sponsored by the U.S. State Department.

GER M ANY

Together, The Chicago School and Erie Neighborhood House have changed countless lives in Chicago’s underserved Latino community. An eloquent testimony to the power of partnerships, the two organizations have effectively pooled resources and expertise to incorporate a mental health perspective into the broad range of social services that Erie offers its clients. 5 Casa Central

Students work on social skills and problem solving with school-age children served by Chicago’s largest Latinoserving social service agency.

An agreement signed by The Chicago School and Institut für Verhaltenstherapie, Verhaltensmedzin und Sexuologie (IVS) in Nurnberg, Germany, laid the groundwork for a clinical psychology articulation program.

ABA students work with children with autism who attend the Autism Therapeutic School. 11 IO Solutions Inc.

I/O students develop public safety assessments for police and fire departments. 12 Chicago Public Schools

School Psychology students complete service learning and practicum experiences throughout the CPS system, tutoring underserved children and assisting teachers in the classroom. 13 Blue Cap Inc.

6 Harrington College of Design and 7 John Marshall Law School

israel rwa n d a Faculty and administrators visited universities, clinics, and hospitals to explore joint programming with a neuropsychology focus.

3 Lawrence Hall Youth Services

4 Erie Neighborhood House

I r aq

P o l a n d & C roat i a

Forensic Psychology students work with formerly incarcerated adults to help them prepare for re-entry into society, while student volunteers provide tutoring in basic skills.

2 Safer Foundation

U N i t e d n at i o n s

8 Chicago Youth Centers

Quality improvement efforts undertaken by the Chicago Youth Centers (CYC) have offered students from the Industrial and Organizational Psychology program the opportunity to put their skills to work for the ultimate benefit of CYC and the youth they serve. Students recently completed an environmental scan and conducted focus groups with clients, staff, and community opinion leaders.

The Chicago School has begun exploratory conversations with Rwandan officials about how we can use our resources to meet the glaring need for mental health care in this country. Rwanda photos by Matt Gillis, GRDP

Ten students representing six Chicago School programs visited Bethlehem, Jerusalem, and a refugee camp in the Palestinian village of Nahhalin. Organized by the Center for International Studies, the trip offered students insight into the psychological trauma experienced by people involved in ongoing conflict.

Sri Lanka A Clinical Psychology professor made his fourth trip to Batticaloa, Sri Lanka, to train “barefoot counselors” in trauma therapy.

Counseling students fill gaps in student services at small professional schools by providing on-site counseling, peer mentoring and anxiety screening.

Applied Behavior Analysis students work with adults with developmental disabilities to help improve their life and communication skills. 14 Aimstar Precision Learning Center

ABA students help children increase their reading levels and improve their academic performance.


Expanding Our Reach Worldwide Examples of our Community Engagement 1

Julia S. Molloy education Center

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) students work with children with special education needs.

Eight students traveled to New York as World Federation for Mental Health delegates to the 52nd Session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, which coordinates global efforts to set worldwide standards for gender equality.

Ch i n a In addition to opening an international office in Shanghai, The Chicago School played host to students from Fudan University, and to a Fudan faculty member who lectured on mental health issues surrounding China’s one-child policy.

Mexico Students enrolled in our new Latino Mental Health program will have the option of completing a three-week immersion experience with Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico.

9 Gads Hill Center

Forensic Psychology students work with at-risk families on improving parent-child interaction and preventing abuse, while Clinical Psychology students provide mentorship and an empathetic ear to youth in LHYS’ residential treatment program.

Chicago School students provide mentoring and tutoring services; Industrial and Organizational (I/O) Psychology students complete needs analyses and assist with the creation of an employee development plan. 10 Easter Seals Chicago

A delegation of Iraqi professionals visited The Chicago School in October 2007 as part of a Visitor Leadership Program sponsored by the U.S. State Department.

GER M ANY

Together, The Chicago School and Erie Neighborhood House have changed countless lives in Chicago’s underserved Latino community. An eloquent testimony to the power of partnerships, the two organizations have effectively pooled resources and expertise to incorporate a mental health perspective into the broad range of social services that Erie offers its clients. 5 Casa Central

Students work on social skills and problem solving with school-age children served by Chicago’s largest Latinoserving social service agency.

An agreement signed by The Chicago School and Institut für Verhaltenstherapie, Verhaltensmedzin und Sexuologie (IVS) in Nurnberg, Germany, laid the groundwork for a clinical psychology articulation program.

ABA students work with children with autism who attend the Autism Therapeutic School. 11 IO Solutions Inc.

I/O students develop public safety assessments for police and fire departments. 12 Chicago Public Schools

School Psychology students complete service learning and practicum experiences throughout the CPS system, tutoring underserved children and assisting teachers in the classroom. 13 Blue Cap Inc.

6 Harrington College of Design and 7 John Marshall Law School

israel rwa n d a Faculty and administrators visited universities, clinics, and hospitals to explore joint programming with a neuropsychology focus.

3 Lawrence Hall Youth Services

4 Erie Neighborhood House

I r aq

P o l a n d & C roat i a

Forensic Psychology students work with formerly incarcerated adults to help them prepare for re-entry into society, while student volunteers provide tutoring in basic skills.

2 Safer Foundation

U N i t e d n at i o n s

8 Chicago Youth Centers

Quality improvement efforts undertaken by the Chicago Youth Centers (CYC) have offered students from the Industrial and Organizational Psychology program the opportunity to put their skills to work for the ultimate benefit of CYC and the youth they serve. Students recently completed an environmental scan and conducted focus groups with clients, staff, and community opinion leaders.

The Chicago School has begun exploratory conversations with Rwandan officials about how we can use our resources to meet the glaring need for mental health care in this country. Rwanda photos by Matt Gillis, GRDP

Ten students representing six Chicago School programs visited Bethlehem, Jerusalem, and a refugee camp in the Palestinian village of Nahhalin. Organized by the Center for International Studies, the trip offered students insight into the psychological trauma experienced by people involved in ongoing conflict.

Sri Lanka A Clinical Psychology professor made his fourth trip to Batticaloa, Sri Lanka, to train “barefoot counselors” in trauma therapy.

Counseling students fill gaps in student services at small professional schools by providing on-site counseling, peer mentoring and anxiety screening.

Applied Behavior Analysis students work with adults with developmental disabilities to help improve their life and communication skills. 14 Aimstar Precision Learning Center

ABA students help children increase their reading levels and improve their academic performance.


Serving the Chicago Area in Hundreds of Ways 11.14.07—President Horowitz makes return visit to China to continue conversation about cross-cultural academic opportunities

12.09.07—10 Chicago School students visit Bethlehem, Jerusalem and Jericho

12.21.07—Clinical Counseling program adds six new concentrations

12.21.07—ABA announces new Psy.D degree

1.11.08—Alumni Council elects Scottie Girouard (M.A. ’03) as chair

1.25.08—Chicago School partners with CARE to host international photographer Phil Borges’ exhibit, “Women Empowered”

10.16.07—Fudan Professor lectures on Chinese culture in Chicago

10.16.07—Agreement with Germany’s IVS signed to pave the way for articulation

10.24.07—ABA hosts conference focusing on disabilities as a diversity issue

10.26.07—Trustees approve Chairman and President’s Task Force Report

10.28.07—Students create Unity Quilt with Lawrence Hall Youth Center

11.12.07—Strategic Plan updated: Becoming the Premier School of Professional Psychology in the World

Learning by Doing

Organizations throughout Chicagoland benefit from the time, effort, and professional skills contributed by Chicago School students and faculty. Last year, these partners provided more than 400 placement opportunities for students fulfilling community service, community-based research, practicum, internship, and service-learning commitments.

Embracing Those Who Share Our Commitment

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 500,000

$10,000,000

400,000

$8,000,000

13

300,000

200,000

100,000

0

$11,104,209 Dollar Equivalent

14

557,360 Service Hours

A plaque acknowledging the Utigard-Transwestern gift will be unveiled at a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new facility in fall 2008.

$12,000,000

$8,856,600 Dollar Equivalent

This year, Utigard and Transwestern, the commercial services firm for which he serves as executive vice president, took their relationship with The Chicago School to the next level by making a major gift to support a portion of the newly acquired space in

With Transwestern’s help, the school recently acquired new space on the fourth floor of the neighboring Mart, as well as adjacent “just-in-time real estate” that will accommodate the continued growth of academic programs and student enrollment.

S e rv i c e H ours P rov i de d (dollar equivalents to the right) 600,000

446,045 Service Hours

“I remember being at Dearborn Station when the campus was confined to a few rooms,” he says, referring to the Polk Street address that the school occupied before moving to its current Wells Street location in 2004. “But Michael Horowitz had a dream. To go from then to what the school is today…it’s hard to realize that it’s actually the same institution.”

“Over the years, we have invested a lot of time and energy in The Chicago School,” Utigard says. “During that time, I have developed a very special affinity to the school; it was time to invest some money too.”

Our service efforts were recognized this year when The Chicago School became the first school of professional psychology to be named to the President’s Honor Roll for Higher Education Community Service. Sponsored by the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), the honor roll represents the highest federal recognition a school can achieve for its commitment to service learning and civic engagement.

$7,256,000 Dollar Equivalent

T CS AN N U AL R E PO RT 2007– 08, PAGE 14

A commercial real estate executive, Utigard has led the seemingly non-stop quest for new classroom and office space as the school has continually outgrown facilities almost as fast as it has completed renovating them.

Last year, Chicago School students and faculty contributed more than 500,000 hours of pro bono or low-cost services at an estimated value of more than $11 million.

362,800 Service Hours

Phil Utigard has witnessed first hand the transformative growth that has characterized The Chicago School during President Horowitz’s tenure.

the Merchandise Mart. The Mr. and Mrs. Philip R. Utigard and Transwestern Treatment and Observation Room will be the centerpiece of the school’s Forensic Center, which was launched in 2007 as the practice arm of the Forensic Psychology program.

hours

Phil Utigard: Making Space for Growth

President ’s Honor Roll

$6,000,000

$4,000,000

$2,000,000

$0 2005–06

2006–07

2007–08

Note: Service hours and dollar equivalents are summaries of data from the offices of Community Partnerships, Clinical Services, Placement & Training, and all academic departments.


Starting from Scratch The Psychology of Beginning

Richard A. Shweder

1.24.08—Cultural Anthroplogist Dr. Richard Shweder kicks off inaugural “Starting From Scratch” lecture

1.31.08—New concentrations and certificate programs in Latino mental health announced

Ricardo Grunsten: A Passion for Innovation

In his decade at the helm of The Chicago School’s Board of Trustees, Ricardo Grunsten has given much of himself. The task of categorizing his contributions—much less quantifying them—is difficult. In addition to the requisite gifts of time and energy expected of a board chair, his contributions have come in the form of vision, business savvy, and intrepid leadership. Perhaps he is best known among fellow board members for his passion for innovation. Arm in arm with President Michael Horowitz, whom he hired in 2000, Grunsten has led The Chicago School through a steady metamorphosis. “We took a discipline that had settled into a sleepy corner of higher education and broadened it into something that had a place in everyday life,” he says. “Psychology is no longer a profession that just treats people going through difficult times.” Grunsten’s most recent financial donation was used to underwrite the creation of a three-dimensional,

1.31.08—Plans to offer programs at University Center of Lake County in Grayslake, Ill., announced

2.22.08—Chicago School named to President’s Honor Roll for Higher Education Community Service

artistically inspired timeline that chronicles the history of psychology. The artwork adorns the corridors of the Clinical Psy.D. department. “It’s important and appropriate to support something you believe in as strongly as I believe in The Chicago School,” he says. George Mitchell: Fostering an Entrepreneurial Spirit

As George Mitchell reflects on his 11 years as a Chicago School trustee, he cites the “entrepreneurial spirit” consistently demonstrated by the institution’s leadership as the factor that has kept him engaged at a time when multiple worthy causes were vying for his time. “As we grew and our successes accumulated, the president and the board have always been looking for the next mountain to climb,” he says. Like so many of his fellow trustees, Mitchell has helped scale some of those mountains. As the institution was embarking on the search that would result in the hiring of President Horowitz, he

3.01.08—Online Campus opens; targets working adults with new master’s in Psychology (MAP) program

3.07.08—Eight students travel to New York as delegates to the U.N. Commission on the Status of Women

stepped in and served as interim president. It was a time when the school was struggling, he remembers, but it was during that period that “the door to an entrepreneurial way of thinking” was opened. Mitchell, who retired as director of diversity management at Commonwealth Edison just before joining the board, has been a leading force in diversity programming, and was instrumental in the decision to start a School Psychology program. “My wife—a school principal—had a tragedy at her school and the effects were devastating,” he says. The situation cast into stark relief the need for—and the dire shortage of—school psychologists in Illinois. Mitchell realized it was an area in which The Chicago School could fill a need and went to work. “I enjoy working with a leadership team willing to take reasonable risks in pursuit of a worthy goal,” he says. “And that goal is the ability to push more and more psychology services out to a larger community.”


3.27.08—Plans for Forensic Center announced

4.01.07—L.A. Campus opens

4.07.07—Utigard/Transwestern gift names Forensic Center observation room

4.17.08 —Forensic students honored at Mental Health in Corrections Consortium

4.18.08—Chicago School explores service opportunities in Rwanda

Donors $25,000 and above

Ricardo Grunsten and Family Mr. and Mrs. Philip Utigard/ Transwestern

$500-$999

$10,000 to $24,999

Ronald Decker Frank Seever

Edith Reim German Academic Exchange Service

$250-$499

$5,000 to $9,999

Naomi Ruth Cohen Foundation Illinois Institute of Independent Colleges & Universities Field Foundation of Illinois $2,500 to $4,999

Edward Bergmark Dean Chung Paul Dillon Brian Fabes Bruce Fox Linda Havard Michael Horowitz Louise Lane Mary Tudela Theodore Weber Constance Williams T CS AN N U AL R E PO RT 2007– 08, PAGE 16

Tamara Rozhon David Scott

$1,000 to $2,499

Anonymous Patricia Breen Daniel Broadhurst Chicago School Students Assn. Kathy Ford Jeff Keith Anthony Kruglinski James J. McClure, Jr. George P. Mitchell Playboy Foundation Thomas Rissman

Richard Ackley Ken Kessler Kathy Lazarus Steve Nakisher (Psy.D. ’96) Michele Nealon-Woods (Psy.D. ’01) Dina Schenk Sandra Siegel $100-$249

Judy Beaupre James Campbell Ellis Copeland Vincent Copp (Psy.D. ’95) Nancy Davis Silvia DeGirolamo (Psy.D. ’04) John Doll Nancy Dubrow David Duke (M.A. ’07) Bill Epperley Susanne Francis-Thornton (Psy.D. ’03) Elizabeth “Scottie” Girouard (M.A. ’03) Jill Glenn Joan Hilby (Psy.D. ’87) Sheldon Holzman William Houston Christine Jacobek (Psy.D. ’93) Robal Johnson Magdalen Kellogg Barbara Kelly

Joseph Kovach (Psy.D. ’86) Christoph Leonhard David S. Levin (Psy.D. ’83) Matthew Nehmer Nancy Newton Richard Niolon Andrea O’Neil (Psy.D. ’95) Sharon Pappas Deane Rabe Kathryn Talley Darcy Tannehill Marla Vannucci $99 and below

Marilee Aronson (Psy.D. ’99) Peter Bennett Christina Brussolo-Johnson (M.A. ’06) Andrea Cady (M.A. ’08) Michelle Cannon (M.A. ’06) Ann Clark (M.A. ’08) Johnna Conley (M.A. ’08) Alice Cottingham Susan Craig Katarzyna Chojan Cymerman (Psy.D ’08) Ana Del Castillo Angela Diaz Keri Fagel (M.A. ’08) Halina Ferdynus Sheila Fleming Kenneth Fogel Mike Fogel Michael Gaubatz Shawn Johnson (M.A. ’08) Kelly Kleszynski (M.A. ’08) Karen Koch (Psy.D. ’05) Amy Kohlmann (M.A. ’08) Lauren Komarek-Kucera (M.A. ’05) Naoko Kyuki (M.A. ’08)

Krista Larson (M.A. ’07) Elizabeth Lefebre (M.A. ’08) Helen Maddix Daniel Marciel (M.A. ’08) Lori Martinez-Conticelli (Psy.D. ’95) Tiffany Masson Rita McCleary (Psy.D. ’88) Breeda McGrath Candace McMillan Charles Merbitz Beth Mihalyov Shari Mikos Katia Mitova Marilisa Morea (Psy.D. ’08) Esther Mrozek (Psy.D. ’90) Sarah Nicoletta (M.A. ’05) Joyce Noser (M.A. ’05) Kerry O’Connor (M.A. ’08) Erin O’Malley (Psy.D. ’08) Jamie Pagano (M.A. ’07) Tara Parsons (Psy.D. ’08) Christine Payne Darlene Perry Karen Pokrywczynski (M.A. ’08) Robert Portsche (Psy.D. ’08) Joy A. Prepejchal (Psy.D. ’08) Judy Ripsch Meghan Roekle (Psy.D. ’03) Yazmin Salgado Julia Sanchez (Psy.D. ’08) Dawgelene Sangster (M.A. ’06) Wendy Schiffman Theodore Scholz Maria Stewart (Psy.D. ’92) Jed Sullivan Jennifer Thompson David Usndek (Psy.D. ’04) Joselyn Woodson (M.A. ’08) Nancy Zarse (Psy.D. ’89)

4.19.08—Career Week 2008: Networking to Success


4.21.08—Forensic students take the stand in mock trials

4.22.08—Business Psychology doctoral program unveils two new specializations

4.27.08—Grant from Field Foundation supports depression screening program at Erie House

5.12.08—Professor Larisa Buhin named Fulbright Scholar; will teach and research in Croatia

5.13.08—Dr. Anat Berko speaks on “The Inner World of Suicide Bombers and Their Dispatchers”

6.13.08—Joe Mantegna receives honorary degree at 2008 commencement

Class Gifts

The Class of 2008 became the second group of graduates to collect funds for a gift to present to The Chicago School. Announced at the June 13 commencement ceremonies, this year’s presentation came in the form of department banners, which were carried in the academic procession and will become a permanent fixture at future graduations. Names of students who contributed are included in the donor list.


Measuring Impact enrollment grow th continues

There is no more explicit gauge of The Chicago School’s potential or its desire to tackle society’s need for competent, dedicated psychology professionals than its enrollment growth. New degree programs and specializations offer new solutions to individual, organizational, and community needs, while increasing the career opportunities for a new generation of psychology professionals.

students

P rogra m Enrol l m e nt Tr en d s 1600

Clinical Psychology Psy.D. Industrial & Organizational Psychology

1400

Forensic Psychology

In five years, our total enrollment almost tripled, from 458 students in fall 2002 to 1,327 in fall 2007.

Clinical Counseling

1200

Applied Behavior Analysis Business Psychology Psy.D.

T CS AN N U AL R E PO RT 2007– 08, PAGE 18

1000

School Psychology Online

800 600 400 200 0 2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007


FALL 2007 ENROLLMENT BY P ROGRAM Online 7% School Psychology 6% Clinical Psychology Psy.D. 29%

Business Psychology Psy.D. 2%

More programs, More Space

As enrollment maintains its upward trajectory, our program mix continues to shift. As recently as 2002, our Clinical Psy.D. program—which for two decades represented our only degree program—accounted for 79 percent of enrollment. By fall 2007, Clinical Psy.D. students accounted for just 29 percent.

Applied Behavior Analysis 7%

Clinical Counseling 20% Industrial & Organizational Psychology 10%

Forensic Psychology 19%

Accompanying the growth in our student population has been a concurrent increase in facilities. In the past year, we have acquired new space at our North Wells Street location, expanded incrementally into the nearby Merchandise Mart, and opened our Los Angeles Campus.

fac i l i t i e s g r o w t h AS OF MAY 31

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Total Occupied Square Feet

55,265

69,065

69,065

82,895

109,473

t o ta l o c cupi e d s qua re f e e t 120,000 100,000 80,000

In four years, we have doubled the space we have available for classroom, office, and meeting space.

60,000 40,000 20,000 0 2004

2005

2006

2007

2008


Measuring Impact continuing our fiscal grow th

Financial strength is a critical factor in our continuing ability to live our mission and achieve the level of impact we envision. We ended the 2007-08 fiscal year with an operating surplus of $1,560,010; we will invest the majority in new programmatic initiatives and will add to our endowment.

endowment YEAR

2004–05

2005–06

2006–07

2007–08

Amount

$1,191,590

$1,827,611

$3,463,303

$4,419,350

e ndow m e nt Tre nds 5,000,000

Since 2005, our endowment has quadrupled.

4,000,000

3,000,000

T CS AN N U AL R E PO RT 2007– 08, PAGE 20

2,000,000

1,000,000

0 2004–05

2005–06

2006–07

2007–08


an n u a l r e v e n u e GROWTH YEAR

2004–05

2005–06

2006–07

2007–08

Total Revenue

$11,390,948

$15,231,799

$19,311,729

$26,950,507

Surplus

$1,579,315

$3,016,520

$3,075,614

$1,560,010

Net Assets

$5,245,015

$8,261,535

$11,337,149

$12,870,497

a n n u a l re v e nue c ha rt $30,000,000

Total Revenue Surplus Net Assets

$25,000,000

$20,000,000

$15,000,000

$10,000,000

$5,000,000

$0 2004–05

2005–06

2006–07

2007–08

In three years, revenue has more than doubled.


T CS AN N U AL R E PO RT 2007– 08, PAGE 22

Board of Trustees

Advisory Board, Los Angeles Campus

Ricardo “Richard” Grunsten, Chair Louise Lane, Vice Chair R. Edward Bergmark, Ph.D. Dean Chung, M.B.A. Ronald Decker, J.D. Paul Dillon, CMC, M.S. Brian Fabes, Ph.D. Bruce Fox, J.D. Linda Havard, M.B.A. Michael Horowitz, Ph.D. William Houston, M.S. George P. Mitchell David I. Scott, M.S. Frank Seever, Ph.D. Rev. Mary Tudela, M.B.A. Carmen Velásquez Theodore I. Weber, J.D., C.P.A. Constance Williams, Ph.D. Daniel M. Broadhurst, Trustee Emeritus

Norris Bernstein, Founding Chair Jonathan Larsen Elizabeth Pierson, J.D. Joseph White, Ph.D. Michele Nealon-Woods, Psy.D. Alumni Council

Elizabeth “Scottie” Girouard (M.A. ’03), Chair Michelle Cannon (M.A. ’06), Chair-Elect John T. Carlsen (Psy.D. ’94) Silvia DeGirolamo (Psy.D. ’04) Susanne Francis-Thornton (Psy.D. ’03) Lauren Komarek-Kucera (M.A. ’05) Orson Morrison (Psy.D. ’03) Steve Nakisher (Psy.D. ’96) Neha Patel (Psy.D. ’03) Amy Rosenblatt (M.A. ’06) Dawgelene Sangster (M.A. ’06) Jeremy Wicks (M.A. ’07)


CHICAGO CAMPUS • 325 North Wells Street • Chicago, IL 60654 • 312.329.6600 LOS ANGELES CAMPUS • 617 West 7th Street • Los Angeles, CA 90017 • 213.627.2580 ONLINE CAMPUS • www.thechicagoschool.edu


Annual Report 2008