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• In a narrative, the conclusion resolves the problem/conflict, brings the “action” to a close, and/or incorporates some reflection on or analysis of the events and experiences that were conveyed. Narrative techniques • Dialogue is conversation between two or more people/characters in a narrative. In a (prose) narrative, dialogue is shown through quotations marks. • The pacing of a narrative refers to how quickly or slowly the events and actions tell the story (i.e., advance the plot). Narrative language • Writers of narratives use sensory details to describe how things looked, sounded, smelled, felt, or tasted. Writers of narratives elaborate (or provide elaboration) when they develop and provide relevant details about events, people, and reactions in a narrative. • Description and dialogue in a narrative can employ figurative language. Figurative language creates interesting images with words by using language that has a deeper meaning than what the words literally say or mean. Types of figurative language include metaphor, simile, personification and hyperbole. • Transitional words and phrases like before, next, soon, afterwards, lastly, eventually, meanwhile, two weeks later, for awhile, at last, at the same time, and in the meantime can help manage the sequence of events in a narrative. • The plot is sequence of the actions or events that make up a story/narrative and how they relate to one another. • Characters are people, things, or animals in a story that interact with the conflict and move the plot forward through their actions. Characters can be described in terms of their traits, motives, feelings, and actions. • The setting is where and when the story takes place. • The conflict in the story is the challenge or trouble faced by the main character(s) in the story. The resolution in a story is how the conflict ends or is resolved. • Stories are told from a point of view usually through a narrator (sometimes the author or a character in the story) in first-person narration or third-person narration. The characters in a story each have a point of view that is revealed through their words and actions. The reader also has a point of view. • The theme of a story/narrative is a central topic or idea that represents what the story is essentially about. A theme can often be summarized in 1-2 words (e.g., independence, identity, friendship). Stories/narratives can have more than one theme. Essential Skills (Standards)

1. Select a narrative writing form and format appropriate to purpose and audience. 2. Focus a narrative on a real or imagined experiences or events. 3. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters. 4. Organize an event sequence in a narrative that unfolds naturally.

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Grade Five Program of Studies

Profile for Chicago Jewish Day School

CJDS Grade Five Program of Studies  

The theme of Grade Five is Marking Distinction, Havdalah. The Torah teaches that God created the world by making distinctions- first between...

CJDS Grade Five Program of Studies  

The theme of Grade Five is Marking Distinction, Havdalah. The Torah teaches that God created the world by making distinctions- first between...