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3. Explain how information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears. 4. Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text. 5. Integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

Reading Foundational Skills Key Knowledge

Word Attributes/Parts and Analysis • All words can be “broken up” into one or more syllables. A syllable is a word part that contains a single vowel sound. • Words can be categorized/organized according to patterns they follow (in how they’re spelled, how they sound). Some words follow patterns that are easier to “see” or hear than other words. Not all kinds of patterns are common, and not all words reflect common patterns. • There are different ways of thinking about the “parts” of words and where they “come from.” – An inflectional ending/suffix is a group of letters added to the end of a word to change its meaning (e.g., -s, -es, -ed, -ing). – An affix is a group of letters added to the beginning or ending of a word that changes the meaning of the word (e.g., prefixes, suffixes, bases, and roots). Many affixes for English words come from Latin. Some affixes are more common than others. – Base refers a word that stand “on its own” and to which an affix can be added to change the meaning (e.g., pretest and testing). – A prefix is an affix added to the beginning of a word that changes the meaning of the word (e.g., pretest). – A suffix is an affix added to the end of a word that changes the meaning of the word the (e.g., vision - the suffix /-ion/ meaning the act of ). – A root (word) is a word part that has meaning but cannot stand alone ( e.g., vision - /vis/ is the root word - meaning to see). It’s what’s left of a word without any affixes. The root(s) of a word help explain what language(s) the word comes from. Skill-based terms • Fluency is the ability to read something “smoothly” and easily. Fluency comprises accuracy (decoding words correctly), rate (decoding words an appropriate speed/flow), and expression (reading and interpreting the words as they are intended to be read). • Sight words are words that readers can memorize and read “whole”—without sounding them out. (They know the words by sight!) Sight words are usually shorter words that show up a lot in reading (they’re high-frequency). Memorizing sight words can make reading “faster.”

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Grade Five Program of Studies

Profile for Chicago Jewish Day School

CJDS Grade Five Program of Studies  

The theme of Grade Five is Marking Distinction, Havdalah. The Torah teaches that God created the world by making distinctions- first between...

CJDS Grade Five Program of Studies  

The theme of Grade Five is Marking Distinction, Havdalah. The Torah teaches that God created the world by making distinctions- first between...