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CO NTE N T S

I. FA S H I O N DE SIGN

F R E E F OR MING

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PAP E R D R APING

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Shape-borrowing as a design tool to create free forms

Conceptual draping with paper

à la sha

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WAS A BILABO

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Women’s wear design: garments, textile patterns and accessories

Men’s wear design: shirts and textile patterns

II. E X H IBIT I O N SPACE DE SIG N

S U R G I NG WAVE S Exhibition space design for Chen Cheng-Po 120 th birthday anniversary touring

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I II. S U STA INABLE KIDSW E AR DES IGN

P E T IT BO NHO MME

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CIRCULA R DE S I GN T HI N K IN G

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T E NDE R NE SS: TH E TE XTUR E OF AGE

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Zero waste design thinking and co-creation with kids

Sustainable children’s wear design for closing the loop

Integrating longevity and aesthetic in a cross-generational clothing design

I V. S U STA INABLE TE XTILE & PR ODUCT ION

L IF E CYCLE IMPACT O F SILK Looking into the sustainable issues of silk from a silk dress

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FREE FORMING


FREE FORMING

Shape-borrowing as a design tool to create free forms

“Shape-borrowing”, also known as free form, is a fashion design technique to enhance the possibility for creating multiple outcomes through an irregular pattern, which refers to a method for draping as well. Technically, the first step is to trace the outline from an image and enlarge it to the scale that adapts the torso prototype. Next, combining the two into a pattern at random, then draping on a mannequin. This design technique enables designers to make patterns arbitrarily, which depends on how to trace the image’s outlines and where to place the torso prototype, as a result, a garment may have more than one possibility to drape and finish. In this project, taking the neon light at the midnight as the image, I attempt to impress the design as dynamic as the neon by tracing the neon frame’s outline and details as the main pattern. In addition, by selecting bright and strong colors for the dress to response the vivid neon light. Meanwhile, I create ruffles by hand-sewing in order to present my sensation, inspired by the image.


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PA P E R D R A P I N G


PA P E R D R A P I N G Conceptual draping with paper

The hardness of paper makes it easy to shape three-dimensional forms on mannequins, in this project, instead of using the greige fabric, I practice to perform draping with paper for the prototype. After deciding the cutting lines, I structure the corseted dress with numerous geometrical cutting pieces. On the one hand, to express the lightness of the dress, I choose to use two thin layers, the upper is translucent organza and the lower is the printed chiffon. On the other hand, in the detail, by reforming the waists sides to blur the boundary between clothes and body, presenting the distance among visible and invisible.


CB

CF

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à la sha


à la sha

Women’s wear design: garments, textile patterns and accessories

à la sha is an apparel brand for the mass market in Taiwan, and the customer segmentation focuses on 18 to 28 year-old girls, who do not follow fashion trends but want to create styles by themselves. For the a/w collection in 2013, I sought to capture the aesthetic from à la sha by learning their color scheme and design methods, thriving to integrating my viewpoint with them. Mostly, over-sized silhouettes and slight childlike designs are favored from the wearers.


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WASABILABO


WASABILABO Men’s wear design: shirts and textile patterns

“We only take a bit of wasabi to taste its spicy.” For Urbanwasabi, we pursue to create small and delicate designs which enable to highlight environment. Urbanwasabi architectural design studio situated in Tainan where is one of the slow-paced city in Taiwan. We tried to propose the concept of slow living by presenting an extensional project, Wasabilabo. The project took apart into two sections, the first part was about building up space. We proposed our business plan to rent the space as the physical store and studio from Tainan city government, and the second was to establish Wasabilabo as a brand to spread our value, we tended to develop daily wears and objects. Our team believed that slow living starts from having braves to be

experimental and concentrating on details. This belief approached us to develop practical and experimental men’s wears in the beginning. The first line was designing daily basic men’s shirts, but we attempted to shift the image of the basic shirt by designing details or transforming the silhouettes. Furthermore, because we treasured the value of “wabi-sabi”, the magnificence of imperfection, we would start the “unfinished stories” plan to provide re-use, re-design and re-make services for people who wanted to give their unworn garments second chances to extend the lives.


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SURGING WAVES


SURGING WAVES Exhibition design for Chen Cheng-Po 120th birthday anniversary touring exhibition

National Museum of Taiwan Literature

Tainan Cultural Center One Impression Four Space Xinying Cultural Center

Zheng Cheng-Gong Cultural Museum

“This one-year project led me to leave the comfort zone, I brought experience from the fashion industry to a new position, exhibition design. Most of the time, I found myself was draping for the spaces.” The exhibition would showcase over 1,100 objects of Mr. Chen Cheng-Po’s artworks, almost all the artworks in his lifetime, the curator team, in accordance with Mr. Chen’s lifetime, formed them into four life status and organized six main themes. However, because there was no museum qualified to exhibit the number of pieces in 2014 in Tainan, in the end, they decided to present the artworks at the four different locations. For Urbanwasabi, this was the first project opened to the public. Bas-

ing on varying requirements and conditions from the four exhibition space and the mission to response the four status in Mr. Chen’s life, we proposed “One Impression for Four Space”. We decided to use textiles as a medium to bring the four exhibition spaces together because intuitively, the textures of textile could be distinguished into soft, hard, light and heavy, which also associated with Mr. Chen’s status in his life. Following the concept, we would like to present four different vibes in each location. Furthermore, we designed the same visual image for the exterior of buildings which would be easier for the visitor to reach our idea, bringing one impression to the four space.


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Character / Hard Theme / World Coordinates, Parisian Imagination Location / Tainan Municipal Cultural Center In this spatial and temporal installation, we aime to demonstrate the dynamic fluidity, expressing the coordination between virtual and real space, in order to echo Mr. Chen’s experience while he was studying aboard. On the other hand, the installation provides flexible space to present pictures and information for storytelling, viewers are able to have a peek the installation from different angles.


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Character / Soft Theme / Glittery Waves Location / Nation Museum of Taiwan Literature Nation Museum of Taiwan Literature is the smallest space of all, where only exhibits 33 objects. In order to relate with literature, in associated with 33 contemporary poets to write poems inspired by Mr. Chen ChengPo’s paintings. For us, to response the theme “Glittery Waves”, we design the wave-look for the space, meanwhile, the fabrics allow people to walk through between artworks and poems. Additionally, we present the poems by the digital printing, which makes it possible to achieve the integrity.


Character / Light Theme / Art Education, Modem Eyes Location / Xinying Cultural Center Xinying Cultural Center, as the biggest exhibition space of all, the two floors include five galleries. Because the galleries locate dispersedly, it takes more effort to design and construct. To practice our concept, the lightness of fabric, we combined light-weight structures and layered fabrics with gradient colors to set up a tunnel, which is the main corridor for leading viewers to each gallery. Also, the paints’ color in the galleries response to the colors of the tunnel.

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Character / Heavy Theme / Oriental Mood Location / Zheng Cheng-Gong Cultural Museum Our concept for this exhibition space is to create a steady and smooth environment for viewers to enjoy the paintings. In this space, we have more ability to work with fabric. We carry out the heaviness by selecting black as the main color for fabrics, olive and orange are the secondary colors, meanwhile, to improve the perception, we design display props, for instance, a long table, which visually made from a pile of fabric, and the showcases, we use fabric to extend them till the ceiling. Moreover, we design a curtain which takes Mr. Chen Cheng-Po’s self portrait to print and pleat on the big scale fabrics, viewers can find it before leaving the exhibition space.


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PETIT BONHOMME


PETIT BONHOMME

Zero waste design thinking and co-creation with kids

On average, 15 percent of fabric is wasted at the cutting stage during garment production (Townsend K., & Mills F., 2013), which presents the first part of the textile waste problem is pre-consumer textile waste. Zero waste pattern design is a sustainable design approach to minimize the pre-consumer waste. It means that while designing garments, designers need to grasp the textile dimensions in order to arrange the pattern pieces, and likewise, it can work the pattern by draping. This zero waste capsule collection, Petit Bonhomme, its name originally takes from Taiwan’s phonetic symbol “ ㄅㄆㄇ ”. The collection is designed for kids from 3 to 6 years old, who full of curious and like to take adventures. Also, Petit Bonhomme is to create for catching the sparkling eyes from little kids and taking care of their skin. For the sustainable approach, firstly, I apply zero waste pattern thinking in the garments, the waste fabrics are used for both functional and decorative parts, for instance,

the pockets on the dress and the shorts, and the ears, which sew on the backpack. Secondly, taking opinion from parents, they tend to choose natural fibers for their kids because the concern of health, and the characters of natural fibers are breathable and comfortable, hence, I source environmental friendly materials for this collection. The jersey and plain weave fabrics are 100 percent cotton, certificated with GOTS, meanwhile, to prevent the negative impacts of screen printing ink, I select the vegan water-based ink from HyprPrint TexPro, which is free of contaminants and certificated from Ökotex100. Most of all, “co-creation” inspires me to make this collection, despite the prints, the garments are finished with milk-white or non-colored fabrics. I wish kids can boldly color their clothes with their creativity, before they wear them, which let them feel themselves participating in making the garments.

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Bias binding CB

CF

WL Fx2 Bx2

Bias binding

WL

CB

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x2

Stringx2

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CIRCULAR DESIGN THINKING


CIRCULAR DESIGN THINKING Sustainable children’s wear design for closing the loop

PRODUCER

RECYCLING MILL

BRAND

return

purchase

BRAND

“Today’s goods can serve as tomorrow’s resources.” The close-loop design thinking is that if we bring the fashion industry into an endless cycle, it would be possible to minimize the consumption of resources, to protect the environment and enable sustainable consumption. We believed that it is possible to redesign the fashion industry and reduce negative impacts while express personal style and aesthetic through fashion. The circular design workshop in Esmod, we partnered with TTRI (Taiwan Textile Research Institute), which gave us the conceptual framework to development design strategies for synthetic fabric, and the disassembly in its many potential forms to remain within the technical cycle loop. As a group project, we constructed circular design thinking with two parts, design strategies and closed-loop approach. Meanwhile, each of us sketched our own collection, adapting to the design strategies.

CONSUMER


A.

B.

Circular design strategies

Closed loop approach

1. Mono-material

1. QR code

Nowadays, when it comes to textile recycling, there are limited possibilities due to the lack of facilities that process into new high-value materials. Many unworn garments go to the landfill before sending to the recycling process. Thus designing garments that are made of a single type of material is more easily to recycle from worn out.

QR codes contain the same concept as constraint-based supply-chain management, which aims to increase the speed of product flow on the manufacturing floor, shorten lead times, and improve throughput. On the one hand, through learning the purchase behavior via QR code, it is able to monitor the amount and preference of the textile production. On the other hand, the in-store return system will need QR code as the tool to sort accurately as consumers recycle their products.

2. Mono-chrome Similar color palette ensure the recycling process easier as well. We suggested in an effort to improve this, designers should only make use of utilizing mono-color or similar color shades on one garment.

2. Recycling The collection could then be easily sorted according to their materials and colors once returning to the recycling sector. Directly chemically and/or mechanically recycled to create the next collection. This allows not only for a closed loop approach but also optimization of the recycling process.

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TENDERNESS: THE TEXTURE OF AGE


TENDERNESS: THE TEXTURE OF AGE Integrating longevity and aesthetic in the cross-generational clothing design

Introduction I envision a world where sustainable fashion is touchable and around our lives. As a result, I want to encourage people to be curious about sustainability through my work “Tenderness: the texture of age”. As a designer, I intend to develop a daily wear collection, presenting the practicality and simplicity of clothing, meanwhile, concentrating on improving detail designs. This collection is designed for fast-growing kids and grandmother, for sustainable focuses, I pay attention to prolong garments’ lifespan and minimize pre-consumer waste. Aiming to integrate longevity and aesthetic in this collection, I structure the design concept “Design with Mindfulness”, which inspires

from Japanese Zen. Mindfulness-based design thinking is to nourish our fashion environment, which means we need to regard the fashion environment as ourselves and take care of it. For children’s wear, the main concern is the size problem, most parents have to buy them new clothes every season. Average shows that they grow at least 40 cm from 2 to 8 years old, to solve this problem, I design trans-functional clothes to grow with kids. Then, for grandmother, most of them have experienced with fitting problems with ready-made clothing, meanwhile, they prefer to dress independently and keep clothing as long as possible. I

create clothes with wrinkles which adapt to different body types and easy-to-wear. Most of all, these designs involve in the concept of waste-minimization by planning geometrical pattern, which reduces the textile waste from cutting process. And, focusing on slow-making by manipulating shibori and natural dye to skip the mass production, highlighting the essential of slowness among nowadays’ fast fashion industry.


Material Following “Design with Mindfulness�, the collections use organic peace silk from Seidentraum, which is the leading of certificated silk. Also, considering the biodegradability of silk, the garments are finished with natural materials, for instance, natural sewing threads and organic elastic rubber band. Most of all, the bottons and elastic rubber bands are designed to disassemble.

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Inspiration Ikebana is known as the flower arrangement, which is translated to “ways of flower” and “living flowers” in Japanese. Ikebana presents a disciplined art form that brings nature and humanity together. Kawase Toshiro’s floral artworks inspire me to create this collection, who is a contemporary ikebana master in Japan. His ikebana technique is renowned for the combinations of seasonal wildflowers and ancient vases. From my point of view, ikebana is like the relationship between grandparents and grandchildren. Kids are like fresh wildflowers with vitality and they are seeds of future, and grandparents are the symbol of ancient vases, who pass down their knowledge and wisdom to the “seeds of future”.


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A

B

a

c

b

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a’

C

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b’

c’

C’

d’+ e’

d

D’


D

e organic and peace mulberry silk 100% fair trade hand woven in India design and make in Berlin

we recommand to hand wash under 40°C with special silk detergent silk is sensitive in the wet condition, do not dry in the sun or tumble dryer

we provide re-dyeing and repair services for the garment size 95cm - 128cm from 3A to 8A price â‚Ź150

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LIFE-CYCLE I M PAC T OF SILK


L I F E C YC L E I M PAC T O F S I L K Looking into the sustainable issues of silk from a silk dress

Towards a sustainable silk industry Sericulture is a labor-intensive economic activity, which contains mulberry tree cultivation and silk production, also, the processes of producing raw silk are more complex than other natural fibers. As a result, I propose the three pillars, organic cultivation, peace rearing and fair trade to achieve a sustainable silk industry. First, organic silk provides an eco-friendly and sustainable way to cultivate mulberry trees and harvest silks, which excludes any residues from artificial fertilizers, pesticides or growth-enhancing substances. In addition, a study reveals that organic mulberry tree plantation helps to reduce carbon dioxide emission.

silk extraction is the most controversial part because cocoons use to boil in hot water in order to collect silk filaments. On the contrast, peace silk is produced organically and respectfully without violence, which silkworm can fulfill its life cycle. Last but not the least, silk production mainly produces in rural areas in India, the fair trade business develop fair partnerships with local producers, providing opportunities to achieve co-operation and co-education. What is more, fair trade enable local workers to invest their businesses and communities for a sustainable future.

Secondly, Bombyx Mori has been domesticated as the raw material of mulberry silk. In the silk production,

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Life-Cycle Inventory (LCI) Input

Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) of a silk dress Output

Carbon footprint (kg CO 2e )

Blue water footprint (m )

Land occupation (m )

9.95

6.64

4.55 (Argricultural land use:4.38, Urban land use: 0.17)

3

2

Environmental aspect (Management s

Mulberry tree plantation phase Cultivation Irrigation Herbicides and pesticides Land

Fertilizers and Farmyard manure

Organic Mulberry tree plantation

Mulberry leaves Soil: Heavy metals Water

Silk production phase

Disinfectants

Silkworm rearing

Chemicals

Energy efficiency:

Suitable equipment and methodolo

Disinfectants Silk extraction

Colour and dye:

Fabric processing

Intrinsically coloured silk

Energy

*Calculate as estimates

genetically modifield silk Natural dye Certificated chemical dye

Industrial phase

Water:

Manufacturing (CMT)

NO 3

Packaging

Chemical dye stuffs

Transportation

Waterless digital print N/A

N/A

N/A Reduce packaging

Human Retail

N/A

N/A

N/A Optimize trade routes and trasportation

Air: Animal

Consumer phase

N 2 O, NOX, CH4 ,

Washing

NH3 , PO4 , PM

Drying

N/A

N/A

N/A

Ironing

Maintenance: Biodegradable detergents Nontoxic cleaners Hand wash

Chemicals

Iron without steam with temperatur Waste treatment phase

Biodegradability

Collection Recycling Land-filling

N/A

N/A

Biodegradation *N/A: lack of data

On this page, I present two tables, life-cycle impact of silk and recommended action plan for silk industry. LCA (life cycle assessment) is a tool for us to understand a silk product’s impacts from environmental and economical perspectives. However, due to the limited resource for LCA of a silk product, I turn back to research LCI (life cycle inventory), which reveals inputs and outputs of a silk product’s life cycle. Then I estimate the environmental impact of a silk dress in the sector of silk production, the assumed numbers are: carbon dioxide emission is 9.95 kg, blue water footprint is 6,640 liters and the land occupation is 4.55 m 2. In the end, according to the outcome of LCI and LCA of silk, I combine ecological and social perspectives in the section of LCO (life cycle optimisation), meanwhile, providing a recommended action plan for a sustainable silk industry.

N/A


Recommand action plan

Life-Cycle Optimisation (LCO)

system)

Social aspect (Monitoring system)

Transparency Organic mulberry plantation

n

Non-violent silk rearing

Human: Social rights and security

Producer

Minimum wage Health and safety measuresÂ

ogy

Support small-scale farmers and tribal communities Fair partnership

Domesticated silkworm (Mulberry / Eri)

Wild silkworm (Muga / Tussah)

Co-education Suitable equipment and energy efficiency

Animal (Non-violent silk):

Spinning machine or manual machine looms

Domesticated (Melburry silk) Wild (Muga, Tussah silk)

modes

re

Brand

Bridge

Chemical dye Natural dye Waterless print

Certification and standard: GOTS, Oeko-Tex

Information

World Fair Trade Organisation (WFTO)

Education

Intrinsically color

Brand / Designer Natural materials / Zero waste thinking / Handicraft (hand-pleating etc.) / Natural dye

Sustainable trade mark:

Consumer

Peace silk / Organic silk Positive Luxury

Garment production (CMT)

Reduce and reuse packaging Pack by 100% recycle material and degradable plastic

Transportation / Distribution Optimize trade routes and trasportation modes to reduce CO 2 emission

Reduce the distance that garments travel

Retail Sustainable interior material / Electric efficiency / Knowledge sharing

Consumer Maintenance

Re-pair

Re-use

Biodegradation as nutritions

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Circular design thinking:close the loop group members Yasmin & Phili Petit Bonhomme photographer Reiting Lee model Jhinuk Tenderness: the texture of age photographer Charles Su models A. Herrman, Sophia & Mia

Š Chia Yu Hsieh - all right reserved


Profile for h.chiayu

Design portfolio: fashion and space  

fashion design / exhibition space design / sustainable kidswear clothing design / life-cycle study of the mulberry silk

Design portfolio: fashion and space  

fashion design / exhibition space design / sustainable kidswear clothing design / life-cycle study of the mulberry silk

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