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Find out if AB moved to 5-0 in Blue last night

Will you be taking the plunge Sunday?

Check out frigid fun at Lions’ Winterfest

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LCN stumbles Defending Red champs drop pair of MAC contests Page 24

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Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Freezing for a good cause to put on her bathing suit in late January and, icy temperatures aside, she still thinks it’s a great cause. “If I can help anyone in some way by doing this and collecting the money to BY BARB PERT TEMPLETON donate then I will,” Miller VOICE REPORTER said. Lion board member Mary If it’s cold out, the lake is frozen and crowds are cheer- Rutledge, of New Baltimore, is the chairman of the Polar ing “Go Ma Betty” it can Plunge and said organizers mean only one thing: The welcomed over 300 plungers New Baltimore Lions Polar last year. As of late last week Plunge is here. 169 were signed up to take a Betty Miller, of dip this year. The registration Chesterfield fee for Township, or teams is “Ma Betty” as Plenty to do at $25; a she is affectionteam Winterfest ately known meaning around town, The annual Lions two or has been taking Winterfest has something for more parto the freezing everyone. To find out what’s ticipants, waters of going on, see page 7. and it’s Anchor Bay $15 for since the event individudebuted a decade ago. A als. The first 175 people regdesire to help others in need istered receive a free T-shirt prompted Miller’s decision and a medallion.

Plungers gear up for 10th annual dip in Anchor Bay

Forecast partly cloudy for Macomb’s future Page 12

Study concludes Lake Huron in ‘fair condition’ Page 14

Vol. XXVIII, Issue 4 Contact us: 586-716-8100 1-800-561-2248 www.voicenews.com

Fundraising for the event comes in the form of pledges that many of the participants get for their efforts in the

cold water. Last year was a success with $22,000 in pledges coming in. “We ended up getting last

minute people registering too, some where just in town See PLUNGE on page 9

Anchor Bay students learn respect for the elderly

Disability sensitivity Tars unbeaten unit teaches Great in MAC Blue Oaks students Page 26 lessons in understanding aging INSIDE BY NICOLE TUTTLE Deaths . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Police News . . . . . . . . .4 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Target . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

File photo

Groups of plungers will again take to the icy waters of Anchor Bay, as this team did last year, Sunday afternoon.

VOICE REPORTER

Fifth grader Angelina Licari is a long way from the nursing home, but the Great Oaks Elementary student said she has gained a new understanding of what it is like for the elderly and disabled through lessons in her physical education class.

“You learn how it feels when people have disabilities,” Licari said. “They look different, but they are not that different on the inside.” Great Oaks Elementary physical education teacher and Student Health Team advisor Marisa Stoppa didn’t just teach students what it means to suffer from Alzheimer’s, paralysis or arthritis. She and her team of fifth graders showed them through a series of activities meant to simulate common ailments the aging and disabled suffer from. Stoppa began to teach them lessons in disability sensitivity when they returned from their holiday break and continued them through the week of Jan 10.

Several items, such as wheelchairs and crutches, were donated to the school to help students simulate situations that the aging or disabled suffer from on a daily basis. The purpose of the unit is to help students understand and respect the needs and feelings of the disabled or aging as people. Stoppa began teaching the disability sensitivity unit this year because when students learn to treat those who are different from themselves with respect and courtesy, it can dispel their fears. “I really feel that this is an important unit or lesson for young people as I’ve noticed so many young people in public places respond in a fearful, naive, or even many

Photo by NICOLE TUTTLE

Great Oaks Elementary physical education teacher Marisa Stoppa read stories about the effects of Alzheimer’s to first grade students on Jan. 12 as part of a learning unit on disability sensitivity.

times scared way when they see people that are a bit ‘different’ than they are,” she said. One simulation station

students’ visit during the exercise requires them to put See DISABLE on page 26

Chesterfield supervisor trumpets cost savings The Village of

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Measures include new pension program, reduced utilities BY NICOLE TUTTLE VOICE REPORTER

Cutting costs and money saving tactics were the focus of the Chesterfield Township Board of Trustees meeting on Jan. 18. The board adopted a resolution to terminate the Charter Township of Chesterfield pension and plan trust with Merrill Lynch due to the adoption of a defined benefit retirement plan for employees with the Municipal Employees Retirement System, or

MERS. Neighboring New Baltimore also recently signed on with MERS, citing better returns and lower costs. “The benefits are better, plus the township isn’t paying quarterly fees to keep four or five people in a plan any longer,” said Chesterfield Township Supervisor Michael Lovelock, echoing a statement made by New Baltimore Mayor Larry Smith earlier this month. The move is effective March 15. Participants will become 100 percent vested in their account balances in the plan upon IRS approval of the termination, and each participant will be properly notified of the plan termination as well as provided with documentation as necessary for distribution of benefits,

according to the resolution. Lovelock said he did not know how much money employees have in the funds, but that the Merrill Lynch pension and plan trust was costing the township money. “It is costing us about $225 per quarter for Merrill Lynch to do it, where MERS will do it as part of their program,” Lovelock said. Ultimately, employees who were in the Merrill Lynch program will have to make some decisions, he said. “There is no guarantee that we are going to transfer it; it is up to the people that have their funds in there, the four, five or six people that have their funds in there, where they go with it,” Lovelock said. “They could take it someplace else and move into their own financ-

ing.” Lovelock also reviewed some of the cost saving and cash flow changes that have taken place in the township since 2008. “First of all, the clerk’s office, in 2008, when we first got here, business registrations total collected estimated at $5,000. In 2010, business registrations to date collected was $31,340,” he said. Lovelock added the township is saving $120,000 per year with its insurance carrier. “About a year ago we were going to go out and look at all of our policies, they said let us shop them, they came back with the same coverage that we have had for the last six years, maybe seven years, and they saved us $120,000 per year,” he said.

Lovelock also said that the township board and township employees found their own cost saving methods instead of hiring consultants. “By comparison, we saved $50,000 by not hiring a consultant and doing it ourselves to figure out how we could save money for our residents,” Lovelock said. “In an effort to reduce costs, we reduced hours in the building department and laid off two employees. One person retired and one left. Neither one was replaced.” Lovelock said the township also entered into a three-year contract with the city of New Baltimore’s police department for shared services and dispatch and data management services. See SAVINGS on page 26

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Always Care & Always There


2 - VoiceNews.com

The Bay Voice

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January 26, 2011

The Bay Voice

VoiceNews.com - 3

Lawmakers: Stop flow of Toronto trash to area

John Hebert Columnist

Garbage trucks continue to flood Lenox Township landfill, officials say

Eleven is the magic number This is going to take a lot of planning; with luck there won’t be many rehearsals. Pretty soon, unless it’s happened already, somebody is going to take note that on the 11th of November this year, the date will be 11/11/11, and will predict that sort of thing won’t happen again for another 100 years. “Golly, ya think?” I can’t wait for 2111 to find out. Who knows, maybe one of the “doomsday theorists” will predict dire happenings for that day, thus foreshadowing the already infamous 21st of December 2012. By the way, one group of scientists figure that the “translation” from the Mayan calendar to the Western one may have been 50 to 100 years off, in which case the Mayan Long Count Calendar could have already ended, and a new one started. I have a further idea; on that day this fall, we can also commemorate the armistice ending the First World War at 11 a.m. So, 1100 on 11.11.11. We can do something to show a connection amongst all mankind, by joining hands and reaching across continents. Then at 11 a.m. in each time zone (I haven’t figured out yet what we’ll do about Newfoundland and Canberra, Australia), we sing all eleven stanzas of “Kumbayah,” along with all 11 choruses. We’ll need a lot of sandwiches for the momentous event, which people will remember where they were at the time and just whose hands they were holding. Crowd control could turn out to be a problem, especially if every television station and radio station shows up to record history in the making. Other problems could arise if certain factions insist on singing “Wimoweh (The Lion Sleeps Tonight)” instead of the prescribed stanzas. In any case, we’ll all be sick to death of both songs when it’s over.

Local officials hold forum Macomb County Board of Commissioners Chair Kathy D. Vosburg and Rep. Andrea LaFontaine will hold joint district office hours from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday at the Chesterfield Township Library, 50560 Patricia Ave. Residents in either Vosburg’s district - Lenox and Chesterfield townships, New Haven village, and the cities of Richmond and New Baltimore - or LaFontaine’s district - District 32, northeast Macomb and parts of St. Clair County - are encouraged to attend with any questions, comments or concerns for their public officials.

Photos by DAVE ANGELL

Pine Tree Acres began to accept trash shipments from Canada in 1999, and the volume tripled from 2002 to 2005. BY FRANK DEFRANK FOR THE VOICE

Some 1.5 million fewer tons of Canadian trash will be dumped each year in a northern Macomb County landfill, two U.S. senators said last week. At a news conference in Detroit, Sen. Debbie Stabenow announced the Ontario Minister of Environment has met the terms of a 4-year-old agreement and halted shipments of trash generated in metropolitan Toronto to the Pine Tree Acres Landfill. The 565-acre landfill is located along 29 Mile Road in Lenox Township, near New Haven. The flow of trucks hauling the Canadian trash to Pine Tree Acres has aggravated and angered residents near the site for several years. “This is a great victory for Michigan in the fight against Canadian trash,” Stabenow

said. “This trash poses serious health, safety and security threats to Michigan families and our communities.” Pine Tree Acres began to accept trash shipments from Canada in 1999, and the volume tripled from 2002 to 2005. Stabenow and fellow Sen. Carl Levin worked for several years to reduce the shipments, and in 2006 reached an agreement with Ontario officials. As recently as last year, the senators accused Ontario officials of reneging on the deal to gradually eliminate shipments by the end of 2010. The Monday, Jan. 17 announcement indicates a deal is finally in place. “This agreement prevents more than 40,000 trash trucks hauling city waste from entering the state, topping 1.5 million tons of city waste that otherwise would have been dumped in

Michigan every year,” Stabenow said. The shipments were stopped Dec. 31, but the deal affects only residential trash. Other trash, including that from private companies and construction and industry, is still shipped to Michigan. “That is simply unacceptable,” Levin said in a statement. Levin said Michigan’s congressional delegation “will work to gain passage of legislation that would address the non-municipally managed Canadian trash

shipments into Michigan.” Two environmental groups cheered the senators’ announcement. “Debbie Stabenow and Carl Levin have delivered a real victory for Michigan,” said Cyndi Roper, Clean Water Action Michigan director. “Imported trash is a blight on our state, and we are grateful that progress is being made to end the dangerous and environmentally costly dumping of trash from Canada.” “This is great news for

The old headquarters of Citizens First on Water Street in Port Huron. The bank had several branches throughout the area, many of which now operate under the flag of First Michigan Bank, which also took over the Chesterfield Township branch. Photo by JIM BLOCH

Bank risk was not rewarded Report details troubles at Citizens First that led to failure BY JIM BLOCH VOICE REPORTER

The Blue Water area got a bitter taste of the bad banking practices that led to the collapse of 157 banks nationwide in 2010 when CF Bancorp, known locally as Citizens First, failed. Technically, the Michigan Office of Financial and Insurance Regulation closed the Port Huron-based bank April 30, claiming it was in “an unsafe and unsound condition.” The collapse cost the Deposit Insurance Fund, operated by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, $535.7 million, quite a piece of change for a pillar of the local community that had specialized in family home mortgages for 65 of 73

By July 2009, examiners found that 26 percent of the bank’s assets, more than $500 million, were “adversely classified” on the basis of risk.

years in business. Its assets at the time of its failure stood at $1.8 billion. Apart from its headquarters in Port Huron and a second office there, Citizens Federal had branches in Marysville, St. Clair, Algonac, Fort Gratiot, Marine City, Shelby Township,

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Michigan,” offered Anne Woiwode, Sierra Club’s Michigan Director. “Trash imports from Canada and other states is unhealthy, unsafe and is a threat to Michigan’s families. “Every trash truck we keep from crossing into Michigan makes our state a better place, encourages recycling and helps control our landfill growth.”

SCHNELL, GEORGE; of Riley; 82; formerly of St. Clair Shores; died January 16, 2011. He served in the U.S. Army. George was an insurance adjuster and member of ISO from 1953 to 1992. For 18 years, he served on the Riley Twp. Planning Commission and was Chairman for 16 years. He was a former member of Huron River Labrador and Retriever Club and a member and usher of Our Saviour Lutheran Church, Armada. George was an avid car lover; enjoyed car shows and raced the quarter mile track at Motor City Raceway. George is survived by wife, Beverly (nee Maas); sons, David (Laurie) Schnell and Gary (Michelle) Schnell; grandchildren, Sarah and Rachel Schnell. George was predeceased by parents, George and Charlotte (nee Hiller) Schnell and brother, Robert. F u n e r a l Service 10 a.m. Saturday, January 22, 2011 at Our Saviour Lutheran Church, 22511 W. Main, Armada. Burial with Military Honors in Cadillac Memorial Gardens East. Visitation Friday 2 to 8 p.m. at Tiffany-Young and Hauss Funeral Home, 73919 North Ave. (North of 33 Mile), Armada and at church Saturday 9 10 a.m. In lieu of flowers, memorials to Blue Water Humane Society.

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The Bay Voice

Energy drink in demand by crook A suspected thief at the Meijer store at 23 Mile Road and Gratiot Avenue in Chesterfield used a lot of energy to no avail trying to steal cases of an energy drink. According to a police report, on the night of Jan. 18 a loss prevention officer called the station from his cell phone while chasing a man through the parking lot who was attempting to make off with 15 cases of Red Bull in a shopping cart. He watched the man who wearing a camouflage jacket get into a waiting car in the Charter One Bank parking lot and speed off heading South on Gratiot. The cart was later found, and the cases valued at $300 were retrieved. Police “swarmed” the area looking for the Chevy Malibu described by the complainant, but it was not found. A license plate number was taken down by the Meijer employee, and the vehicle owner was determined to be from Chesterfield and wanted by other retail establishments as well for stealing the same product. AN OBSERVANT CUSTOMER SAW a man take off from the Kroger store on 23 Mile Road with a cart full of Red Bull on the afternoon of Jan. 18. According to the Chesterfield Township Police Department, a customer informed store staff that a man had gotten into a black Dodge Dakota after unloading a cart filled with two 12-

Patricia L. Gendernalik Manager Funeral Director

We’re Glad You Asked! HOW DO I BREAK THE NEWS OF DEATH? Most people hate to be the bearers of sad tidings - especially the tidings of death, actual or impending. But the “bad-news bringer” can actually do great good by making sure that the receiver of the news will have the support he or she needs to bear and express the feelings of shock, loss and sadness. Even for persons who are not very emotionally expressive, it is important for them to feel that they are with people who will be supportive when they receive such news. Such support comes in the form of total listening and acceptance. This means appreciating the full human beauty of the bereaved person even as his face is contorted with distress and tears. It does not mean trying to “calm” or “reassure” him or otherwise turn off his expressions of feeling. An attitude of attentive listening, physical touching or embrace are more important than your exact choice of words. Indeed, if you are in touch with your own feelings you will find the right words. A simple “I’m sorry” backed by a genuine feeling will be more supportive than a lengthy praise of the deceased. And remember - you can go on giving support well past the formal mourning period. That may be when you’re needed the most.

packs, three 8-packs and six

4-packs of the energy drink. A detailed description was given, but a license plate number was not taken down. The incident is believed to be unrelated to the incident at Meijer later in that day, and no suspect has been found. A CRAFTY TEEN got away with two catalytic converters from the parking lot of Structural Steel on the night of Jan 11. According to the Chesterfield Police Department, two employees went to start their trucks that morning and heard loud noises coming from them. They both found that their catalytic converters had been cut off and taken. A surveillance video showed a teenager on the property between 2 and 2:30 a.m. The front gate was locked and the perimeter surrounded with barbed wire, but there is a wide gap at the bottom of the front gate that can allow access to the parking lot. No suspect has been found. MACOMB COUNTY SHERIFF deputies responded to a call from a resident on Woodcreek Road in Lenox Township on the night of Jan. 16 after she heard a gunshot and other trouble coming from next door. While en route she told deputies the man who had fired the gun had left the residence. The

January 26, 2011

car he was driving was later

found and pulled over by the New Haven Police Department. The two people in the car were taken back to the residence to explain the incident. The female passenger in the car said the driver, her boyfriend, had gotten into an argument with her and chased her down the street. To avoid a confrontation she got back into the car with him and returned to the residence. Another witness in the residence stated the two argued, and in a fit of rage the suspect rammed the barrel of a 12-gauge shotgun through a door and damaged a wall in the home. When he took the gun outside he got to the bottom of his steps and the gun discharged. The account matched that of what the neighbor initially reported and freshlychipped concrete at the bottom of the stairs verified the account. The man was charged with reckless discharge of a firearm and domestic violence and taken to the Macomb County Jail. TWO TEEN-AGED COUPLES WERE SEEN destroying private property in the 50000 block of Jefferson Avenue on Dec. 23, according to a New Baltimore police report. At about 8 p.m. the four were observed kicking out the landscaping lights near the driveway and then walking down the street. The damage

came to about $60, said the homeowner. A GPS UNIT WAS STOLEN FROM A VEHICLE on Dec. 22 in the 38000 block of Murdick Drive, according to a New Baltimore police report. The owner told police his car was parked in the driveway, and he wasn’t sure if the vehicle was locked or not. Loose change was scattered throughout the vehicle, and paperwork from the glove box was on the front seat. A DRIVER GOING 49 MPH IN A 35 MILE zone was pulled over by a New Baltimore police officer on Jefferson Avenue near Harbor View Drive, according to a Dec 26 police report. When the officer asked the driver and passenger for their identification, he could smell alcohol coming from inside the car. There was a baby in the back seat in a child seat. A test revealed the driver had a .11 percent blood alcohol level, and the driver was arrested for operating while intoxicated and child endangerment. The officer asked if it was OK for his wife to drive, but the husband said she would not be fit to drive. The officer went to talk to her and noticed she was in the back seat nursing her 3month-old baby. She was slurring her speech when she talked to the officer. She told him she called someone to pick them up. It was discovered the driver had prior arrest for operating a vehicle while impaired out of Center Line, resulting in a second offense charge.

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Jacob Scott Husken was born November 3, 2010 to Scott and Becky Husken of Macomb. Siblings: Will, 2. Grandparents: Mike and Christine Hunyady of Chesterfield and Bill and Cheryl Husken of Macomb.

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Kristen Weiss, of Chesterfield Township, and Brian Alluvot, of Utica, are engaged to be married. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Paul and Jan Weiss of Chesterfield Township. She is a 2009 graduate of Macomb Community College and is a Registered Nurse and Henry Ford Macomb Hospital. The groom-to-be is the son of Bruce and Joan Alluvot of Utica. He is a 2002 graduate of Macomb Community College and is a documentation detailer and drawing specialist at Troy Design & Manufacturing. The couple is planning a January 2012 wedding.


The Bay Voice

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The Voice is a weekly newspaper dedicated to bringing local news and information to readers in two counties

PAGE 6

The Voice welcomes letters from our readers. Contact the editor at editor@voicenews.com

January 26, 2011

Deadline for election letters is coming Following past precedent, The Voice will not publish letters to the editor related to the Feb. 22 special election the week prior. Anyone wishing to submit a letter related to the special election, which is being held

Keep ORVs off Ira Township roads On Jan. 3, the Ira Township board approved adoption of an ORV ordinance that allows persons 16 years and older to drive on many of the residential roads in the township. This includes dirt roads, many of which have no shoulders and very deep ditches. The second day after the vote, although the ordinance is not yet in effect, we had a three-wheeler come down our road much faster than the car traffic, estimated at 60 mph. Imagine what it will be like when it becomes legal. Even though several of the residents on our road spoke out against the ordinance, there were a couple of ice fishermen present who spoke in favor of it. I would like to publicly thank Township Clerk Crystal Sovey for her no vote and for having the good, common sense to realize the dangerous conditions that will be presented when mixing full-size vehicles with ORVs. The absent Ira Township board members, Jacobs and Jeannette, had sent notes that they would also vote yes with James Endres and Supervisor Bob McCoy. We have been residents of Ira Township since 1986 and, when my husband addressed the board at the meeting, stating that adoption of the ordinance would pose health and safety hazards because of the ORVs racing up and down the roads, creating clouds of dust, one of the supporters in the audience suggested that we move.

College wrestler is grateful I am especially grateful now more than ever for the coaches, teachers, administrators, and any other staff who have made Richmond schools what they are today. I have come to realize that there is no way I would be living the dream that I am today if I had not transferred to Richmond in middle school and continued there through high school. I owe so much to so many people in the Richmond community whether it be my friends, parents, friends of parents, parents of friends, the many supporters of Richmond’s students and athletes, and many more people who go unrecognized in their selfless efforts to contribute to the wonderful opportunity and experience of growing up in Richmond; but I especially want to take the time to give a special significant thank you to the staff in Richmond schools. I have made many friends in Minnesota (my phone has

to vote in five new city commissioners, must submit their letter no later than noon on Friday, Feb. 4 to be considered for publication in the Feb. 9 edition of The Voice and at our website, voicenews.com.

Standard length and content rules apply to electionrelated letters. Anyone with questions is invited to call The Voice at (586) 716-8100, e-mail us at editor@voicenews.com or go to our Facebook page.

This is not a rural area. This is a mixed residential/country community with families and a right to expect the elected officials to do what is in their power to provide a safe and healthy township. The ORVs will definitely affect the peace and tranquility we have enjoyed here for the past 25 years. When it was suggested elected officials would be responsible for any injuries or deaths, Supervisor McCoy became offended and took issue, stating that he would not accept that responsibility; and he compared it to bars serving alcohol, for which he also would not be responsible. The difference, Mr. McCoy, is that you have endorsed, approved and said yes to ORVs, so whatever happens as a result is on your tab. I suggested that ORV stands for Off-Road-Vehicles and that’s exactly where they need to stay: Off the road.

under a temporary contractual basis. Hackel is obviously taking advantage of a legal loophole in the county’s pension fund. Either that or he is being given a complete pass by the county’s pension board (if there is one). But to reiterate my statement, Mr. Hackel should not be allowed to receive a Macomb County pension while still employed as a Macomb County employee. And here’s another question that needs to be addressed: What benefits will Mr. Hackel be entitled to following his exit as county commissioner? Will he be granted additional pension benefits from that position also?

VIRGINIA L. VOGEL Ira Township

Questions compensation, not work To letter writer Geri Kelly (“Exec. Hackel worth his keep,” Jan. 19), regarding Mark Hackel, you either missed my point or ignored it completely. Nobody, especially myself, is questioning the “worth” of our new county commissioner. The issue here is the fact he is now drawing two incomes from Macomb County: One as a retired elected Macomb County sheriff, and another as an elected Macomb County commissioner. Nowhere in the private sector does an employee draw a pension that they are entitled to while maintaining full employment status with that same employer. The only exceptions are when a retiree is rehired by that company

over 1,100 contacts). But, I find it fascinating that after Gophersports posted an article about me, I received more supportive expressions of encouragement and praise from my small hometown in Michigan than from the thousands of people around me who were even more exposed to the article it was included in a handout received by over 15,000 fans at the basketball game and posted on the university’s website. Imagine that; the people who poured into me over four years ago have still not let go, and although I have let you down in some ways, you still continue to celebrate with me and push me forward. It is really heartwarming and motivates me to want to make the most of my experience, hoping that some day I will be able to pour back into your community. BRIAN PETERSON Richmond University of Minnesota Wrestler

Newsboys had lots of help The Marine City Old Newsboys would like to thank everyone who donated money, toys, knitted hats, other goods and services to help us provide a better Christmas to 431 needy children in our area. We also thank these businesses that were our toy drop-box and

DON RUEDISUELI Macomb Township

Lower speeds, lighting needed Our neighbor was recently hit by a car on New Year’s Day. The car ran over him on 23 Mile Road at Seadon around 6:30 p.m. in Chesterfield. He suffered a crushed pelvis, intestines, as well as his legs. One leg had to be amputated below the knee. He is in a coma. Another friend was hit by a pickup truck crossing 23 Mile at Gratiot and suffered a broken leg. Wouldn’t it be wise to lower the speed limit to 40 miles per hour in the whole Gratiot and 23 Mile area? It’s just too congested. The area is just about fully developed, both commercial and residential. How about street lights in the area as well? These are greatly needed for night driving and walking. It’s just too unsafe for the children, the disabled, and for seniors, as well as the general public to be walking and/or driving in the area. GENEVIEVE WALKER

money-canister locations: AJ’s Salt Docks, Anita’s Place, Apple Core-Foster Drugs, Bank of America, Blue Water Big Boy, Cash Advance, Citizen’s First Bank, Corner Grocery, Dairy Queen, Dollar General, Dry Dock Party Store, Fifth Third Bank, Gar’s Lounge, Girls w/Tools Hair Salon, Gord’s Bar, H&R Block, Harbor Home Health Care, Hell’s Our Home Motorcycle Club, Hungry Howie’s, Little Grocery, Marwood Bar, Michael Bros. Men’s Wear, Mobile Gas Station, Phelp’s Service, River Rat Tattoo, Riviera Restaurant, Ron’s Roadhouse Tavern, Save-A-Lot, ShangriLa Village Club House, The Little Bar, Tim’s Party Store, VG’s and Winner’s Circle Saloon. Special thanks to Kmart and Busuttil’s Family Shoes for their assistance in providing clothing and shoes, to Blue Water Development for the use of the storage unit, and to Chief Tucker and the Marine City Fire Department for the use of the bays in the fire hall. We hope everyone had a Merry Christmas and will have a happy and safe New Year. GEORGE BUKOWSKI Secretary, Marine City Old Newsboys

Supporters came for good chili The Algonac Cub Scouts Pack 222 would like to thank

Put it in writing The Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters to the editor may be sent by e-mail, fax or mail and must include a name, home address and daytime phone number to allow us to verify the identity of the reader. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity, especially those exceeding 300 words in length. Send letters to: The Voice Letters to the editor 51180 Bedford New Baltimore, MI 48047 editor@voicenews.com (e-mail) (586) 716-8918 (fax)

Chesterfield

Candidate states case for office As mayor, I will value the past and honor the history that founded or formed our city. I realize one of our issues in our town is that a house divided against itself cannot stand. My desire is to bridge the gap in our city and bring us together. We have problems in our city that are short term, and we need a mayor that will rise to the challenge and address these issues with a long-term mindset. If elected, I will be that mayor and will strive for our city to set the example. There is an old saying that there are people that view the glass as half empty, or half full; but if you are an engineer, you know that you need a smaller glass. Also, my intentions are to not only hear the people but also listen to the people. I

the following for helping make our second annual chili cook-off a huge success. Leslie Gillis, Jennifer Girtman, Kevin McKeown, Mark Ketterer, Jeff Brack, Sue Brack, Katie Girtman and Pat Prevost for setting up and running the event. We would also like to give a huge thank you to Mary McKeown and Kim Prevost for supplying and running the bake sale. Thank you to the Algonac VFW for supplying the hall and for your support. The winners were: Hottest Chili Jim Harris; Algonac’s Best Jim Harris; Best of Show Karen Rickert; and Peoples Choice - Michael Garshott. Restaurant winners were: First place, Cheers, and second place, A.J.’s Salt Docks. We would also like to thank the public for coming out to the event and supporting the local Cub Scouts. AUNDRIA KETTERER Algonac Cub Scouts Pack 222 Clay Township

Montville bowling fundraiser successful Thank you to everyone who attended the Laura Montville Charity Bowl at Premier Lanes on Dec. 5. Because of your participation and generous hearts, I was able to write a check to the Downriver Goodfellows for $5,000. I would like to thank Dave Fernandez for

would appreciate your support for mayor on Tuesday, Feb. 22. RAYMOND MELI Candidate for Marine City Mayor

Township taxes are too much At the end of the Jan. 18, 2011, Chesterfield Township board meeting, Supervisor Michael Lovelock gave a list of the money the current board has saved the taxpayers of Chesterfield Township. He neglected to mention the taxes that this board has increased. This board increased the fee for doing business in Chesterfield and applauded themselves for doing it. This board has added an “administrative fee” of 1 percent to property taxes for the next eight years. Why eight years? Why not one year at a time? In fact, why have one? The board recently added a $65 fee for replacing a roof in

making the necessary arrangements and being the DJ all day, and also to Frank Sgroi for providing the venue to hold this much-needed event. A thank you to the staff at Premier Lanes for the fast and friendly service they provided. A thank you also goes out to Chris Ferris and Ben Matthews for their assistance, The Waterfront Shop, Colony Marine, Premier Lanes, Rich and Gail Jolly, Monica Shulte, F.O.E. 2784, Algonac Lions, Ron’s Marine, Club Capri, Decker’s, The Raft, Snoopy’s, Colony Motel, BG’s, Nelson’s Sand Bar, Johnny Lega’s, John and Michelle Vigliotti, Lighthouse Tavern, P.D.Q. Printing, Earl Smith Distributing, Chris Meldrum, AJ’s, Dennis Nicholson, Richard Deland, Colony Cut n Curl, D. & D. Hair Salon, Algonac Lionesses, Cheers, Great Lakes Distributing, Lumberjack, Chem-Dry, and The Galley, all of which made donations of goods and services to help make this event a huge success. Thank you to the Goodfellows and F.O.P. members who were there to lend any assistance needed. Lastly, but not least, a big thank you and a hug to all the bowlers who attended. Without you, there is no bowl-a-thon, and no help to needy families. I want everyone involved to know that what they did on this day will never be forgotten by the

Chesterfield. The reason given was to protect the homeowner from wayward roofers. It’s just another excuse for the political class in Chesterfield to put their hands in the taxpayer’s wallet. Not long ago the board added a fee for taxpayers with a second water meter. Doesn’t the “nickel and diming” ever stop? Supposedly the board works for the taxpayer. This board is more concerned about the employees of the township than the taxpayer. For this fiscal year Chesterfield is spending $600,000 more than it is collecting in taxes. That $600,000 is coming out of surplus (or as the political class calls it a rainy day fund). What happens when that fund is depleted? The political class is kicking the can down the road. Keep this in mind in November, 2012. DON MARKOWSKY Chesterfield Township

people that you helped. I am sure that it also will not be forgotten. HERMAN E. MONTVILLE JR. President, Fraternal Order of Police Robert J. Christy Lodge No. 185 Algonac

The Bay Voice, published weekly by Voice Communications Corp. at our main office, 51180 Bedford, New Baltimore, MI 48047, is mailed periodicals (permit: ISSN 8750-7188) postage paid at New Baltimore Post Office and additional offices. Subscriptions: $30 a year. Advertising and editorial deadlines: 5 p.m. Friday, except on weeks preceding a holiday. Deadline for letters to the editor , 5 p.m. Thursday. The Voice is printed by The Macomb Daily Press. Postmaster, send address changes to 51180 Bedford, New Baltimore, MI 48047. Publisher: Kevin Haezebroeck General Manager/Adv. Director: Debbie Loggins Editor: Jeff Payne Assistant Editor: Lisa Gervais Office Manager: Dorothy Miok Circulation Manager: René Allard NEW BALTIMORE MAIN OFFICE 51180 BEDFORD, NEW BALTIMORE, MI 48047 All correspondence to: 51180 BEDFORD, NEW BALTIMORE, MI 48047 The Voice Newspapers are published weekly by Voice Communications Corp., including The Bay Voice, The Downriver Voice, The North Macomb Voice, The Blue Water Voice and The Macomb Township Voice. New Baltimore (586) 716-8100 | (800) 561-2248

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January 26, 2011

The Bay Voice

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A full house crowded the festival tent for the chili cook-off last year.

New to this year’s lineup is wine tasting BY BARB PERT TEMPLETON VOICE REPORTER

There will be chili, wine tasting, children’s activities, ice fishing and even some wintertime swimming at the New Baltimore Lions 18th annual Winterfest this weekend. Set for Friday, Saturday and Sunday in downtown New Baltimore the popular event that chases the winter blahs has events for all ages. Co-chairmen Karl Rutledge and Mark Paparelli are looking forward to another great winter weekend event in the city. Rutledge, who is also treasurer for the Lions Club, said 2011 marks the 18th festival, the 10th Polar Plunge and the seventh annual chili cook-off. New to the schedule this year is a wine tasting event in the festival tent downtown on Friday night from 7 to 11 p.m. Sponsored by the Washington Street Wine House, admission to the tent is $20 and includes three glasses of wine, crackers and cheese and live entertainment provided by the local 10-piece band, The Sound Alternative. “We set that tent up on Thursday so for years it would sit vacant on Friday night so it’s nice to have something going on there,” Rutledge said. Another addition to the weekend schedule is a children’s activity event at the New Baltimore Recreation Center on Sunday, from 10 a.m. to noon. The free morning of fun for both parents and children is sponsored by the New Baltimore Recreation Department and Moon River Soap Company.

Popular events return The fishing contest on Saturday and Sunday, chaired by Lion Bob Gatfield, has local enthusiasts trolling for blue gill and crappy. A tent will be set up at the festival site for fisherman to stop in and get their catches weighed and recorded. Prizes will be awarded in several cate-

gories including largest fish. The entry fee is $10 and the number of entrants seems to vary every year depending on the weather. It’s not unusual to have hundreds on a good year, Rutledge said. Lion Carol Gatfield chairs the annual Children’s Party on Saturday from noon to 2 p.m. at the New Baltimore Recreation Center. Activities and treats give local kids the chance to have some fun during the Winterfest too. The chili cook-off in the tent at 6 p.m. on Saturday night, chaired by Lion Fred Kopson, has really grown in popularity. For a $5 admission, visitors can taste all the chili they want, enjoy refreshments and music from a Disc Jockey. “We had 27 chili entrees last year and I think we’re having 30 or 35 this year,” Rutledge said. “We’ve even had to add 60 feet to the tent this year because it gets so crowded in there.” A Sunday morning breakfast hosted by Boy Scout Troop 211 in the pavilion in the park has been going on for 10 years now. Meals are served from 8 a.m. to noon and the cost is a donation. “They do pretty well and all the money they make is for the troop; we (Lions) don’t get anything from that at all,” Rutledge said. Likely the largest crowd draw for the weekend is the Polar Plunge, chaired by Lion Mary Rutledge, on Sunday afternoon. Several hundred people come out and walk into the hole that’s been cut into the frozen lake. Plungers, who collect pledges, brought in $22,000 last year. There are also dozens of spectators standing by on the shore, and even the lake, watching the festivities. “I’ve jumped in four times and fallen in three times,” laughed Rutledge, noting he was once part of a team called the Polar Studs. “It happens so quick that it’s really like nothing, it’s like when your shower runs out of hot water and it’s just suddenly cold. When you’re really cold though is when you’re waiting in line to get into the lake and when you get back out.” Paparelli was Rutledge’s teammate on the Polar Stud squad five years ago and it marks the first and last time he plans to take a dip in Anchor Bay in January.

“I went in that one time and that was it, it was too cold,” said Paparelli. “It’s kind of like one of those things you hear about and just have to do once to experience it.”

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Volunteers plentiful The New Baltimore Lions Club currently boasts 40 members. The Winterfest brings out “great support from the entire club” plus the community. Paparelli agrees and says organizers couldn’t make the event happen without both manpower and monetary support from businesses and individuals. Everything from the set-up to the take down to the bartending, to serving up chili and registering plungers is handled by volunteers. “Karl has been working with the local Kohl’s for a couple years now and they give us a donation plus send five individuals to work for us throughout the weekend,” Paparelli said. “And we have the wrestling team from Anchor Bay that takes care of security during the plunge, getting people in and out of the lake with no problems.” As for equipment for the various events, Paparelli said Bay Rama is a great help lending many of their items to Winterfest organizers. Beyond the city, Richmond Mayor Tim Rix is loaning them a portable electric panel that will secure heat for the Lions big tent downtown. “This is a huge undertaking; we have to worry about everything from the PortaJohns to the lights to providing a safe walkway for the plungers and we could not do it without all this help from volunteers,” Paparelli said. All the proceeds from the Winterfest go back into the community and to support Lions charities. A few of the charities they support yearround include Leader Dogs for the Blind, youth baseball, the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation and The Penrickton Center, which helps visually impaired and handicapped children. The Lions can also be called upon to assist people in need in their community throughout the year. Barb Pert Templeton is a freelance reporter. She can be contacted at barbperttempleton.reporter@yahoo.com.

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The Bay Voice

January 26, 2011

Garden program, Valentine’s Day activities at Chesterfield Twp. Library

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The Chesterfield Township Library offers the following programs and events in late January and early February: Attend an “Email Class - Gmail” on Friday from 1-3 p.m. Participants will learn the basics of e-mail using Gmail. Topics include setting up an account, creating and sending a new message, and sorting received messages with labels and filters. This is not a basic computer class. Participants must be able to use a keyboard and mouse. Class is limited to 10 attendees. Registration is required. Children in grades K-5 can attend a 4:30 Fun Time session on Thursday, Feb. 3, and make a variety of crafts to give to those they care about. Registration is required for this “Valentine’s Day Crafts” event, held from 4:30-5:30 p.m. Teens can attend an “Anti-Valentine’s Day Party” set for Tuesday, Feb. 8, from 6-7:30 p.m. Tired of all that red and pink? How about red and black? The library will have games, crafts and snacks celebrating how much fun it is to be single and free. Registration is required as supplies are limited. “The Busy Gardener” program is scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 10, from 6-7:30 p.m. This session is packed with tips for those who want to make the best use of their time and money. Garden designer and writer Janet Macunovich will present ideas and answer questions to help people get their garden, shrub, and lawn work done this spring in ways that will make summer more relaxing and beautiful. Registration is required. Chesterfield Township residents will have registration priority until Feb. 1. Call (586) 598-4900 or register online at www.chelibrary.org.

Peanut brittle holiday at Ira library set for today The holidays are over. Or are they? Certainly, Christmas 2010 is done, the fruitcake is gone and the lights have been taken down. By now everyone should have recov-

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in Troy, took over most of Citizens First’s deposits. What happened to an institution trusted by thousands of residents in Michigan’s Thumb, across generations, to do the right thing with their hard-earned savings? Far too many high risk investments; poor due diligence; ineffective oversight by the board of directors; ineffective oversight by top management; weak risk management; an unwillingness to follow the recommendations of the FDIC, designed to right the ship, over a period of five years and potentially criminal behavior by a bank officer. So concluded a report by the FDIC’s Office of Inspector General titled “Material Loss Review of CF Bancorp, Port Huron, Michigan,” issued in December. Two kinds of bank investments played key roles in the bank’s collapse: Commercial real estate loans and collateralized mortgage obligations. In 2003, the bank began shifting away from its focus on family real estate mortgages and increased its commercial real estate loans, including acquisition, development and construction projects. In 2005, commercial real estate loans jumped 33 percent or $356 million. In 2006, they jumped 11 percent or $158 million. The bank funded the loans by relying on brokered deposits, where the bank pays a broker for large deposits, and Federal Home Loan Bank borrowings. In their size and the pace of their growth, these loans exceeded the recommendations by federal banking regulators. The bank began struggling in 2007 and 2008 as the commercial real estate market tanked. By July 2009, examiners found that 26 percent of the bank’s assets, more than $500 million, were “adversely classified” on the basis of risk. In 2008, examiners found

ered from the New Year’s Eve celebrations and the banks are open because another Martin Luther King Jr. Day has come and gone. However, today, Jan. 26 is a holiday. “What?” you say, “do I need to send a card to someone? Is the Post Office open?!” The answer to those questions are “no” and “yes”. No, you do not need to send a card and yes, the Post Office is open. It’s a quiet holiday, an unknown holiday (like so many). According to punchbowl.com, Jan. 26 is National Peanut Brittle Day and there are some ‘secrets’ to making good peanut brittle. They are as follows: ■ Use a candy thermometer to make sure it heats up at the proper temperature. ■ Weather affects the taste of Peanut Brittle and should not be made on a humid day because the sugar crystals will seize all of the water out of the air, leaving you with a sticky mess. Punchbowl.com also shared some trivia about Peanut Brittle, such as: ■ Peanuts gained popularity in America during the Civil War. According to the National Peanut Board, many soldiers who were fighting survived off peanuts. ■ Peanut Brittle first appeared in American cookbooks during the 19th century, but it was made probably long before then in other countries in the form of praline. To help the Ira Township Library celebrate, bring this article into the library and enter to win a prize. The Ira Township Library is located at 7013 Meldrum Road (corner of Shortcut and Meldrum) in Ira Township. Contact the library at (586) 725-9081 for hours of operation.

the bank had underfunded its allowance for loan and lease losses by $5.5 million. That jumped to $48 million in 2009. “Examiners attributed the underfunding to the bank’s inaccurate ‘Watch List’ and management’s failure to properly write down impaired and collateraldependent loans to the fair value of the underlying collateral,” the report said. In 2007, the bank began to realize the riskiness of its commercial real estate loans. Hoping for higher returns, management began investing in private label collateralized mortgage obligations, or CMOs, backed by Alt-A mortgage loans, subprime loans - that are riskier than prime loans. Despite warnings from the FDIC, Citizens Federal purchased $370 million in such CMOs in 2007-08. The bank trusted the analysis presented by the broker of the CMOs - basically relying on a sales pitch instead of independent analysis. “Due diligence for these investments were poor,” the report concluded. “At the time of the purchases, national economic indicators were showing severe signs of stress, particularly in the mortgage industry. Further, the CMO portfolio was largely collateralized by nontraditional mortgages with substantial exposure in certain geographic locations such as California and Florida, which were area exhibiting weak market conditions and high foreclosure rates.” CMOs comprised 89 percent of the bank’s total investment portfolio as of mid-2008. In other words, the bank had put nearly all of its eggs in a bad basket that it had not properly investigated. The basket was underwritten by high-risk mortgages in parts of the country that were in economic trouble. The bank had other problems that may have contributed to its poor investments. The report found repeated “apparent violations of law” and policy in four areas: Call reports, affiliate transactions, appraisals and statuto-

ry bad debt. For example, the bank repeatedly made errors on its required, quarterly call reports - balance sheets, income statements and supporting documentation totaling more than $2 billion. The errors resulted in the FDIC dropping the bank from “adequately capitalized” to “undercapitalized” in March 2009. To take another example, in May 2008, examiners found that the bank violated FDIC rules by not getting appraisals for two real estate transactions; they found 12 more cases a year later. The bank also violated FDIC rules because it “had not established internal controls that were sufficient for (its) size and complexity...” For example, management’s oversight of upper level personnel was inadequate. Further, the bank did not get sufficient information - such as credit reports or analyses of the ability to repay - when loans were modified. The bank repeatedly ignored recommendations by the FDIC and the Michigan Office of Financial and Insurance Regulation. “During the period June 2005 through April 2010, the FDIC and OFIR, through their supervisory efforts, identified key risks in CF Bancorp’s operations and brought these risks to the attention of the institution’s Board and management in examination reports and in informal and formal enforcement actions,” the report said. During a July 2009 joint examination, FDIC and OFIR examiners found a CF Bancorp officer who “deliberately had relevant bank information hidden from regulators, purged appraisal information from loan files, and had relevant information excluded from reports requested from by the examiners.” The official is not identified in the report, beyond noting the person was placed on administrative leave and subsequently resigned on Oct. 2, 2009. The FDIC is still pursuing “civil money penalties” against the individual.

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January 26, 2011

The Bay Voice

PLUNGE continued from page 1

and said ‘Hey, I want to go what do I need to do?’” Rutledge said. Miller, a 66-year-old mother of three, has taken the top fundraising honors for an individual since her first dip in 2002. After that first year trophies were awarded so she has eight with her name on them plus a T-shirt and commemorative medallion for each year she’s participated. “She’s just amazing, she’s so tiny the wind could blow her away but she just walks right up there and goes in,” Rutledge said. Miller doesn’t claim to have a strategy for taking the plunge beyond just getting her body temperature lower before hitting the water. “It is cold but people don’t realize that they have to get their body temperature down, I get undressed and get my mind set for it and then when you hit the water it’s actually warmer than you are,” Miller said. Miller is on oxygen currently for a health issue and is not certain she can do the full-on dip this weekend but she’ll stand by to be splashed or get someone else to plunge on her behalf. “I can’t get out as much as I used to to get those donations, but I’ve got some and it’s a great cause so I’ll be there,” Miller said.

Look for Lady ‘Ka Ka’ at plunge The team that has participated for the most consecutive years is “Da Bearsicles” which includes Dave Kruczynski and his wife, Marie Gapinski Kruczynski, of Sterling Heights and usually one other participant they recruit each year. “One year I got my uncle to come out with us and jump in but that was it for him,” laughed Dave Kruczynski. “It’s really not that bad, kind of like jumping into Jello, and the first year it was a 14 below wind chill and the water temperature was 20 degrees so we wanted to stay in the lake.” Another year he donned some white long underwear and a huge pink tutu to take his plunge and caused quite a stir when he left the lake and his outfit was now transparent. As he made his way across the park the crowd cheered and laughed with delight as a lot more of him was on display than he ever planned. “My tutu had fallen down, the trap door on my underwear fell open and well, all of New Baltimore got to see a lot of me out there that day,”

laughed Kruczynski. The couple, who have taken the January dip eight years in a row now and have raised thousands of dollars for the Lions, won’t be together in the water this year. Surgery for a broken ankle will keep Dave on land but he will be cheering from the shore if his medical condition allows. Still, his wife will do the sideshow honors as she’s planning to appear as “Lady Ka Ka” for this year’s plunge. She will don a long purple dress, a hat with spider webs and pieces of rubber dog duty as jewelry. “We have a lot of fun with this, it’s really great,” Dave said. He first heard about the Lions annual Polar Plunge when it was started in memory of local youth, Justin Mello, who was senselessly killed during a robbery at a pizza shop in New Baltimore in 2000. “I just read about that kid in the local newspaper, how he was just trying to do his job and that happened and I told my wife I’m going to do everything I can to raise some money for this kid, and we do every year now,” he said. Rutledge would certainly agree. “I think we do pretty good for the economic times we’ve been seeing lately,” Rutledge said. “And really, literally, we expect nothing because of the economy so we are always pleasantly surprised.” For the second year in a row members of North Shore Church have volunteered to go out on Anchor Bay with chainsaws to cut the hole in the ice later this week. Winterfest Co-Chairman Mark Paparelli said, in the past, he and a handful of local volunteers would go out on the lake and spend the better part of a day freezing and cutting the hole in the ice for plungers. “Having North Shore volunteers to do this is great, they get it done a lot quicker than we did and just having that done for us is, in itself, takes a whole lot of stress off of us because we have to have that ready for Sunday,” he said. Beyond great support from the community, organizers have also welcomed backup every year without fail from city officials, the police department, fire department and DPW. “We’ve never had any real problems and the New Baltimore firefighters stand in the water to help in case someone needs it during the plunge,” Rutledge said. “It’s really a great community effort and event.”

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Lawsuit claims they should have known metal was stolen BY JAMESON COOK FOR THE VOICE

An operator of a Sterling Heights scrap metal yard said his business had no knowledge that a man was illegally selling them parts. “We didn’t know what we were buying we shouldn’t be buying,” said Charlie Fishman, a vice president at Macomb Scrap Metal. “It didn’t seem like new product. It looked all mixed up. We have a number of factor customers, as all scrap yards do, and in their processes they have rejects that we

has graduated from Basic Combat Training at Fort Sill, Lawton, Okla. He is the son of Paul McGregor of Chesterfield and Debbie Williams of Clinton Township. McGregor is a 2008 graduate of Anchor Bay High School.

Air National Guard Airman 1st Class Michael J. Geist graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. He is the son of Edgar Geist of Rochester Hills and Marina Struve of Lenox. Geist graduated in 1996 from Rochester Adams High School, Rochester Hills.

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days in the Macomb County Jail, and was ordered to pay $414,042 in restitution. Noting that Schefke has paid little toward restitution, MacLean Maynard and its insurer, Federal Insurance Co., based in New Jersey, this month sued the three scrap yards along with Schefke, seeking about $414,000. Federal Insurance paid for the loss except for the $10,000 deductible paid by MacLean Maynard. The case was assigned to Edward Servitto. The actual value of the parts may have been less as the victims are allowed to collect up to three times the value of the stolen goods, according to the lawsuit. Schefke said in a written response that he believed the value of the parts was

“overblown” by more than $300,000. Fishman said he agreed with Schefke, considering that he was receiving $1.10 to $1.20 per pound. Macomb Scrap resold the metal to buyers that melt down the scrap to extract the valuable portions. Fishman said once informed of the theft, Macomb Scrap Metal returned 1,000 to 1,200 pounds of metal it bought from Schefke. “We had some of that material and arranged to give it back and did give it back,” he said. He said the incident is “disturbing” because the company “endeavors to be a good corporate citizen.”

and is a 2010 graduate of L’Anse Cruse North High School, Macomb.

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buy. We thought we were buying a bunch of junk.” But it was determined that Robert Schefke, at the time an employee of MacLean Maynard LLC in Chesterfield Township, was stealing parts from his autosupplier employer and selling them to Macomb Scrap Metal, Great Lakes Stock Corp. in Roseville, and Mt. Clemens Metal Recycling Inc. in Harrison Township. It appeared he began the theft in early 2009 and was caught in July 2009. Schefke, 62, of Sterling Heights, pleaded guilty to embezzlement between $50,000 and $100,000 and was sentenced in October 2009 by Circuit Judge David Viviano in Macomb County Circuit Court to five years probation, with the first 90

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Scrap yard denies knowing materials were stolen from Chesterfield business

Barb Pert Templeton is a freelance reporter. She can be contacted at barbperttempleton.reporter@yahoo.com.

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graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. She is the daughter of James and Deborah Zientak of Chesterfield Township. Zientak graduated in 2010 from Anchor Bay High School.


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The Bay Voice

January 26, 2011

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The Bay Voice

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Forecast partly cloudy for Macomb’s fiscal future MCCC President remains optimistic for upswing in local economy BY MATTHEW FAHR ARMADA TIMES REPORTER (AT) VOICE STAFF WRITER (VOICES)

Macomb County Community College President Dr. Jim Jacobs said that the future of Macomb County is looking up despite some staggering economic statistics. At the annual economic forecast luncheon, held Thursday at Zuccaro’s Banquet Center in Chesterfield Township and sponsored by several Macomb County chambers of commerce, including Richmond and Anchor Bay, Jacobs laid out what has happened to the county over the last decade and what will be needed to regain economic stability and growth in the years to come. “We are going to start to turn some of these figures around,” Jacobs said in regard to auto industry jobs. “We have also started to see significant investment in Macomb County that will serve us very, very well.” Some of the numbers shown to those in attendance contradicted Jacobs’ optimistic outlook, a fact he acknowledged during his presentation. He said the State of Michigan is poised for a recovery based on resurgence of the auto industry, but unemployment remains at 12.4 percent for Macomb County. From 1999 to 2008 the median household income for Macomb County fell 17.7 percent from $67,326 to $55,399. Over the past decade the county has lost over half of its construction and manufacturing jobs, with only information and educational services sectors growing. Both losses occurred at a rate higher than the rest of the state. There has been a 74 percent decline in overall loans

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from commercial banks since 2007, and clients served by the Michigan Works program has almost tripled since 2005. Households served through the Macomb Emergency Food Distribution Program have gone from 37,450 in 2008 to 44,432 in 2010, and the total number of individuals served has increased by over 60,000 during that time. Jacobs warned that even with a turn in the economy, the gaps in economic strata are more discernable. “There is a growth of individuals in both higher and lower incomes, but the middle class is in the middle of a decline,” he told the guests. The most shocking numbers came from the housing industry. There were 8,307 foreclosures in the first eight months of 2010, up from 3,577 in 2006. Over $2 billion, or 6.8 percent, of county value is in contention at the Michigan Tax Tribunal. It appears businesses in Macomb County have a

brighter outlook on the future than in 2010. A survey of 526 business leaders throughout the county, 49.7 percent, said that conditions will be better six months from now. The number is up from 32.7 percent a year ago. They are also anticipating revenue will be better by the middle of the year, with 48.4 percent saying there will be an increase in their business’s bottom line. That is up almost 10 percent from a year ago. However, over 60 percent said they believe that their access to credit will remain the same - a factor Jacobs said is a major impediment to financial recovery. Jacobs pointed out there are over 12,000 fewer people unemployed, which dropped the unemployment rate by almost 4 percent to 12.4. Christmas sales were up for the first time since 2005, and health care employment grew by over 25 percent in the last decade. Over 60 percent of all defense contracts awarded

to the State of Michigan went to Macomb County firms with Selfridge ANGB adding a Homeland Security Center. He predicted the keys to recovery will be the auto and defense industries. The addition of 800 jobs at the Sterling Heights Assembly Plant, along with $1 billion in new investments by Ford and Chrysler, are signs they will be part of the backbone of the county in the future. Jacobs also had positive words for the new Macomb County Executive Mark Hackel, who was in attendance. “I think he can play a great role in the region,” he said of Hackel. “He will brand us as a major player in our economic future.” The term “bottomed out” was used on more than one occasion by Jacobs. How long it will take until the term “economic stability” is used remains to be seen. Contact Matthew Fahr at (586) 716-8100, ext. 300 or at matt.fahr@voicenews.com.

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opment division. Now it looks like the board of commissioners will officially name him to the post once incumbent Shaun Groden’s departure becomes official on Jan. 21. “I don’t like the interim label,” said Jeff Bohm, who the board voted as its chairman at its organization meeting on Jan. 5. “We put the interim label on him until Shaun leaves. In my eyes, he’s the county administrator.” Is the rest of the board in agreement? “Absolutely,” Bohm said. Kaufman said he would definitely accept the permanent position if it was offered to him. “My understanding is that we’ll work together for X number of months, and if it works out and we all get along, it will become permanent,” Kaufman said. Bohm sounded as if the process would unfold much

more quickly than that. “When Shaun made his announcement, we needed to figure out what to do,” Bohm said. “I talked to about 15 people - longtime county officials and asked who would be a good replacement for Shaun. Every single person said ‘Bill.’” Bohm ticked off Kaufman’s pluses. “He’s been with the county for 20-plus years,” Bohm said. “He’s got a planning background. He’s extremely thorough. He’s systematic. He knows the area and what our issues are.” “It’s flattering,” Kaufman said of Bohm’s assessment of him. “It’s very humbling.” The typical national search for a county executive costs tens of thousands of dollars and takes many weeks. When all is said and done, you’re still never sure about the person you’re ending up with, Bohm said. “You know what you’re

getting with Bill,” Bohm said. The city of St. Clair hired Kaufman

Kaufman as its assistant city superintendent in 1985, and he rose to superintendent before joining Metropolitan Planning in 1990. He has directed the county agency for the past seven years. The planning commission has named senior planner Dave Struck as Kaufman’s interim successor. What unique skills would Kaufman bring to the post of county administrator? “Certainly realizing that I’ve been here for 20 years,” said Kaufman, “I know See KAUFMAN on page 27

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A May 24 trial date was set last week for a 42-year-old Chesterfield Township man accused of stabbing his wife to death even though a second mental evaluation of him is not yet complete. Leonart Nazarko is scheduled to face trial in Macomb County Circuit Court in Mount Clemens for firstdegree premeditated murder in the Dec. 5, 2009, alleged attack on his wife, Andoneta Nazarko, 41, in their home

near Gratiot Avenue and Cotton Road. A state psychiatrist determined that Nazarko was “depressed and disturbed” but can assist in his defense and understood his actions were criminal. Nazarko’s attorney, Carl Marlinga, gained permission from Judge Matthew Switalski for a private doctor to conduct a second examination. Nazarko has said he “saw

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a light” and an “atomic bomb” ignite in the moments before the incident. Nazarko is being held in the Macomb County Jail in lieu of a $1 million bond. —Jameson Cook


January 26, 2011 ▲ Blood Drives ● 1-7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 27 at the Donor Center, 615 Pine St., Port Huron. Call (810) 985-7117. ● 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Jan. 28 at the Donor Center, 615 Pine St., Port Huron. Call (810) 985-7117. ● 1-7 p.m. Jan. 28 at Fire Station No. 3, 33991 23 Mile Road, New Baltimore. Call (586) 725-2233. ● 12-4 p.m. Jan. 29 at St. Clair High School, Pink Halo Project, 2200 Clinton. Call 800-Give-Life. ● 1-7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 1 at the Donor Center, 615 Pine St., Port Huron. Call (810) 985-7117. ● 1-7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 3 at the Donor Center, 615 Pine St., Port Huron. Call (810) 985-7117. ● 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, Feb. 4 at the Donor Center, 615 Pine St., Port Huron. Call (810) 985-7117.

▲ Breakfast-dinner ● Enjoy a chili and hot dog supper for a donation, 2-6 p.m. Jan. 29 at Lamb United Methodist Church, 1209 Cove Road, Wales; between Lamb and Masters Road. (810) 392-2294. ● Breakfast is 8 a.m. to noon Sunday, Jan. 30 at the Masonic Temple, 1800 St. Clair Highway, St. Clair. Cost: $6, under 5 free. Pancakes, sausage, eggs, juice, more. Call (810) 329-2198. ● All-you-can-eat breakfast buffet served 8:30 a.m. to noon Sunday, Jan. 30 at K of C Hall, King Road, Marine City. Cost: $4-$6. Buffet offered the last Sunday of each month. Call (810) 765-0259.

▲ Children ● Openings available for 3- to 4year-olds in the preschool winter semester starting Jan. 31 at Memphis Community Schools. Deposit: $25 holds a spot. Call (810) 392-2125, ext. 525.

The Bay Voice

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Smiths Creek. Cost: $5. Draw for partner. Sign-up starts 11 a.m. Call (810) 367-9242

▲ Group meetings ● Vegetable Growth seminar is 6-10 p.m. Jan. 26 at the St. Clair County Auditorium, Admin Bldg., 200 Grand River, Port Huron. Fee: $15. Farm owner will teach. 810-989-6312 ● Harsen’s Island Garden Club will meet for lunch at 11 a.m. Feb. 2. For directions dial (810) 329-6813. ● Super Bowl Sunday starts 4 p.m. Feb. 6 at the New Baltimore Civic Club, Main Street. Cost: $20. Much included. Must be 21+; call (586) 914-0711 or (586) 805-6990 for a square or tickets. ● Current and former American Business Women members are invited to the chapter’s 6 p.m. 40th anniversary Monday, Feb. 7 at the Voyageur Restaurant, St. Clair. Call (810) 982-7316. ● R.S.V.P. by Feb. 9 to attend a 1:45 p.m. Widowed Friends dinner Sunday, Feb. 13 at the Voyager Restaurant, 32 Mile Road, St. Clair. Call 586-784-9210 or 810-982-8574.

▲ History

● Special prayer service held 78:15 p.m. Feb. 4 at Restoration Christian Community Church, 2625 Moak, Port Huron. (810) 985-7560 or go to christcenteredcommunity.org.

▲ Fundraisers

▲ Library events

● Play horseshoes in the snow for Leader Dog charity 1 p.m. Feb. 5 at Pink Elephant Bar, 340 Henry,

Market Charity Benefit runs 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Feb. 6 at 36551 Main St. Variety of items displayed on 35+ tables. Rent table: $10. 586-329-4291

community events c a l e nd ar

● St. Clair County Family History Group meets 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 26 at the Port Huron Museum, 1115 Sixth St. Bring ancestor chart and receive help. (810) 989-0399. ● “History of Biewer Lumber” will be presented 7-8 p.m. Feb. 3 at the St. Clair Library, 310 S. Second. Cost: Free. Learn about the many different lines of this St. Clair business. Call (810) 329-3951.

▲ Church

VoiceNews.com - 13

● Estate Planning is 6 p.m. Jan. 26 at the Marysville Library, 1175 Delaware. To register, dial (810) 364-

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9493. Also, ages 16+ may register now for the 1 p.m. Jan. 29 art class; make a glass-fused pendant 6-8 p.m. Feb. 7; Improv is 6:30 Feb. 9; scrapbook 10 a.m. Feb. 12. ● Area author to sign cookbook “The Kitchen Assistant,” 6:30-7:30 Jan. 26 at St. Clair Library, 310 S. Second. Learn what to always have and how to cook with just necessities. Call (888) 361-9473. ● The Richmond Community Garden Club is offering a local food production discussion 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 2 in the Lois Wagner Memorial Library, 35200 Division. Call (586) 473-6482. ● Wii, board games and other fun things for teens to do will be provided from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 5 at the Armada Free Library, Church Street. Call (586) 784-5921. Also, teens may bring friends to the 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. box doodle Friday, Feb. 18.

▲ Music ● Taste of Music is 6-8 p.m. Feb. 1 at Anchor Bay High School Commons, 6319 County Line, Ira. Cost: $1-$10. Listen to music, sample food. 586-716-9561. Also, hear Claudia Schmidt 7:30 p.m. Feb. 7 at ABHS. Cost: $10-$15; proceeds to music scholarship. Call 586-725-8051

Public transit service expanded for north Macomb residents

● Algonac Little League registration is 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 29 at the Clay Meeting Hall, 4710 Pointe Tremble Road. See algonaclittleleague website or e-mail nmarcangelo915@gmail.com.

Cost: $5. Carryout is available. Call (810) 392-2186. ● Help support SC4 student scholarships and hear from those helped at 6 p.m. Feb. 3 in the SC4 College Center Cafe, Port Huron. Tickets: $20 includes hors d’oeuvres. Call (810) 989-5760. ● Millside Elementary will hold a spaghetti dinner from 5-7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 4 at 1904 Mill, Algonac. Tickets: $4-$6. Family plan: $16. Do not park on the front lawn. (810) 794-8870.

(810) 794-4471 by Feb 2. ● Dance to a live band and enjoy dinner with an open bar when the Armada Pals meet 6 p.m. Feb. 12 at Maniaci’s, Main Street, Richmond. Cost: $35. To R.S.V.P., dial (586) 4891746 by Feb. 4. ● Join the Algonac Lion/Lioness Club for Texas Hold ‘em from 3 p.m. to 2 a.m. Friday-Monday, Feb. 4-7 at Snookers Pool & Pub, 45100 Northpointe, Utica. (810) 208-5566.

▲ Schools

▲ Seniors

● Memphis Elementary students: Register by Jan. 27 to have your photo with dad in front of a favorite team helmet at the 7 a.m. donut breakfast Feb. 2. Cost: $3. Call (810) 392-2125, ext. 555. ● Help East China honor its 50th K-12 district anniversary when SCHS vs. MCHS basketball game begins 7 p.m. Jan. 29 at St. Clair High School, 2200 Clinton Ave. (810) 676-1725. ● Help the bowling team and enjoy a homemade Mexican dinner, 5:30-8 p.m. Feb. 3 at Memphis High School Cafeteria, Bordman Road.

● United Pioneer Seniors Club meets 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Feb. 1 and 15 at VFW Post 7573, 35011 23 Mile, New Baltimore. Play cards and meet friends first and third Tuesdays of every month. Call (586) 725-0084. ● Salvation Army Golden Agers will meet for a noon potluck lunch Feb. 3 at 2000 Court St., Port Huron. Call (810) 984-2679. Also, join them 2 p.m. Thursdays, Feb. 10-24.

▲ Shows and Sales ● New Baltimore Civic Club Flea

▲ Trips ● Pay tribute to “Our Vietnam Generation” at the Fox Jan. 28, sponsored by CoA. Cost: $75. Call (810) 984-5063 or (810) 765-4254. Also, Greektown Casino trip is Feb. 7. ● Registration deadline is Jan. 31 to visit the Windsor Raceway Wednesday, Feb. 9, sponsored by the Richmond Recreation Department. Cost: $6 includes many extras. Call (586) 727-3064.

▲ Everything else ● See Simon’s Simple Machines from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Jan. 28-April 23 at Port Huron Museum, 1115 Sixth St. Call (810) 982-0891, ext. 116. Also, build a simple car to race Feb. 5 and 27. Kit: $3. Celebrate Black History Month 4:30-5:30 p.m. Feb. 6. Catapult Challenge begins Feb 13.

The Voice welcomes calendar items from non-profit groups. Mail yours to Editor, The Voice, 51180 Bedford St., New Baltimore, MI 48047 or fax it to (586) 716-8918 or e-mail it to: editor@voicenews.com.

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▲ Night Out ● Mid-Winter Warm-up fundraiser party runs 7-10 p.m. Jan. 29 at Ray Township Senior Center, 54255 Wolcott. Cost: $5. Euchre; silent auction benefits Lee Cemetery. To R.S.V.P. dial (586) 784-9221. ● “A Journey through Detroit Tiger’s History” is 6 p.m. Feb. 3 at McRae’s Big River Grille, 9715 St. Clair River Drive, Algonac. Meal: $14. Tickets at Algonac Library or call

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The Richmond Lenox EMS has been providing a public transit service for the past few years but residents will soon have even more opportunity to get to where they are going when the EMS expands its service by adding extra hours and two more vehicles. The addition was made possible by a $600,000 federal grant administered through the Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation, or SMART, and will be paid out over the course of three consecutive years. Richmond Lenox EMS Executive Director Jeff White expects the new vehicles and expanded operating hours to be in place by late February. “There’s two things that (the grant) will do for us. It will afford the operation of two more vehicles. It will also afford us the drivers of those vehicles,” White said. “It also provides us the funding to employ someone whose sole purpose is to schedule the rides for people.” White said one of the tougher things about having the shuttle service is the fact the EMS had to turn people away because its bus was already running at maximum capacity. Lenox Township Supervisor Ron Trombly said he was thrilled to find out the EMS would be able to expand their shuttle service without requiring a larger local investment of tax dollars. “Once again, the more services we can provide to our residents without an increase in cost, the better,” Trombly said. He added the need for

Above, a SMART bus dedication is observed in Chesterfield Township in 2009. The Richmond Lenox EMS recently announced an expansion of its service.

public transportation in the northern part of the county is significant because of the distance to areas with employment opportunities and shopping. “We’re in a rural area where things aren’t close. It’s very costly for someone on a fixed income to own a vehicle,” he said. “This is an invaluable service for our residents.” White said 60 percent of the riders already utilizing the service are individuals with disabilities; and many more are elderly individuals who use the shuttles to attend medical appointments, pickup prescriptions and do their grocery shopping. White said that although the grant will only fund the expanded service for the next three years, he is confident that if he can prove the value of the program for funding, grants may be available down the road. “Every time we’ve added dollars to our system, we’ve also added riders,” White said. Richmond Township Supervisor Gordon Fuerstenau could not be reached for comment. For more information

regarding Richmond Lenox EMS Transit programs, please contact Jeff White at (586) 727-2184 or Fred Barbret at SMART (586) 7916834. Contact Andrew Benoit at (586) 716-8100, ext. 303 or andrew.benoit@voicenews.com.

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14 - VoiceNews.com

The Bay Voice

January 26, 2011

Study concludes Lake Huron in ‘fair condition’ Actions or lack of will determine future of Great Lake BY JIM BLOCH VOICE REPORTER

A two-year international study of Lake Huron has pronounced the second largest Great Lake to be in “fair condition” in terms of its biodiversity, a much broader scope of investigation than more common assessments of the lake’s water quality. “Biological diversity, or biodiversity, refers to the variety of life, as expressed through genes, species and ecosystems, and is shaped by ecological practices and evolutionary processes,” according to the report, evocatively titled “The Sweetwater Sea: Strategies for Conserving Lake Huron Biodiversity.”

▲ Biodiversity and the report The concept of biodiversity tries to capture the interconnected web of life in which we live - the unity of atmosphere, hydrosphere and geosphere. In short, biodiversity indexes the air we breathe, the earth’s water, including ice and vapor, and the solid part of the earth, populated as they are by plants, animals and microbes. We rely on our biodiverse environment for clean air and water, fertile soil, fresh foods, medicines, shelter, protection from storms and floods, a stable climate and plentiful recreation. If any element of the ecosphere is damaged or destroyed, it can negatively affect the whole. The judgment of “fair” suggests that the condition of Lake Huron is at critical point. Its health can go either way, building toward vibrancy or careening toward ecological death. “Lake Huron is really on the brink of recovery or further degradation, depending on how you look at it and what actions may transpire in the next 10 to 20 years,”

said Dr. Patrick Doran, the principal investigator of the study. “This report stresses that now is the time to take action before it’s too late.” Doran is the director of Michigan and Great Lakes Science for The Nature Conservancy, the lead group in the study. Other participants included Nature Conservancy of Canada, Michigan Department of Natural Resources & Environment, Michigan Sea Grant and Michigan Natural Features Inventory. The report was officially released on Nov. 29. More than 250 scientists and natural resource managers from at least 100 public and private agencies with an interest in the lake contributed to the report over two years. In 2009, the groups published a biodiversity plan for Lake Ontario. Doran has the grants in place for the consortiums next two projects, Lake Michigan and Lake Erie.

▲ Lake Huron ecosystem In terms of the study, researchers isolated seven natural characteristics of Lake Huron intended to represent all aspects of its biodiverse whole: ■ Open water ecosystem. The portion of the lake 30 meters in depth and deeper, home to lake trout, lake whitefish and diporeia, the tiny shrimp-like creatures that larger fish eat, which have been decimated by zebra mussels. ■ The nearshore zone. Water from zero to 30 meters in depth, where walleye, yellow perch, lake herring and turtles live. ■ Islands. Land masses in the lake surrounded by water, where colonial nesting birds such as herring gulls and ring-billed gulls can be found, and which are often used as stopover sites by migrating birds. ■ Native migratory fish. Fish that spawn in rivers, such as lake sturgeon, suckers and walleye, and in wetlands or nearshore environments, such as yellow perch and northern pike.

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The study found Lake Huron’s islands to be in good shape and its other six features to be in fair shape. The primary threats to these critical features of biodiversity are invasive species, global warming, water pollution, poorly planned residential and industrial growth, alterations in the natural flow of water by dams and other barriers, and poor farming, fishing and forestry practices. To take the example of global warming, scientists expect continuing increases in the lake’s average air and water temperatures, which have jumped .8 degrees C in the last century; increases in the intensity of storms and of droughts between storms; decreases in the percent of the lake covered with ice in the winter, which has declined an average of two percent per year since 1972, thus increasing evaporation from the lake; a decrease in lake levels, perhaps by close to a meter by 2050, and other changes. Higher water temperatures can jeopardize cold water fish such as lake trout. To the extent that global warming triggers more intense storms, we can expect more polluted storm water and sewage to flow into the lake from farms and cities. Species isolated on islands may be unable to adapt to rising temperatures and unable to relocate. Fragmented habitat on the mainland may make it impossible for animals to migrate to colder areas. Wetlands, which provide habitat for migratory birds and spawning fish, and which function to purify storm water runoff, can dry up as a result of lower water levels. Many of these are made worse by human actions, such as dredging, filling and pollution.

Photo by JIM BLOCH

Lighthouse Beach at the southwestern tip of Lake Huron, looking north.

Extended droughts, particularly beyond the Great Lakes region, can trigger calls to divert water from the lakes to other regions of the country. And interactions between these occurrences may intensify their impacts.

▲ What can be done? The researchers mapped the key biodiversity features using a Geographic Information System, including the viability of each feature and threats to it. The researchers also generated a map called the “Coastal Developmental Footprint,” detailing urbanized and farmed areas and the intensity of their development around Lake Huron. The computerized maps should allow for researchers to track changes over time. “One of the biggest accomplishments of this large scale, bi-national effort was bringing together all of the disparate biological information housed within dozens of agencies and conservation organizations from two different countries and making it accessible,” said John Paskus, senior conservation scientist, Michigan Natural Features Inventory, in a press release. The researchers pinpointed five geographical areas for immediate protection and restoration, based on the richness of their biodiversity, their significance to the health of Lake Huron as a whole, and the dangers they are facing: Northeast Michigan, Saginaw Bay, eastern Georgian Bay, south Georgian Bay and the southeast shores of Lake Huron. “The message of the report is that now is the time to do something before it gets worse,” said Melissa

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Soule, public relations spokesperson for the Michigan Land Conservancy, in a phone interview. “It’s a call to action.” What about other areas? “These areas still need conservation action!” the report said. For example, the threats to the southeast shores of Lake Huron, from Sarnia to the base of the Bruce Peninsula, sound very much like an eco-history of the shoreline from Port Huron north to Port Sanilac: “The biological diversity of the shoreline ... is at risk because of incompatible development, habitat fragmentation, the spread of phragmites and damage to sensitive coastal environments,” the report said. “Although it has enjoyed a long history of coastal recreational use, the region has been plagued by episodes of poor water quality, algal blooms and restricted use of public beaches due to non-point sources of bacteria and nutrients from surrounding agricultural, rural and urban land use activities.” “Those are basically the same issues facing the southwest shores of Lake Huron,” said Doran in a phone interview. “It has the same sandy shores and vegetation as the southeast side of the lake. It has faced the same development issues, the same problems with agricultural runoff. And the recommendations for the southwest would mirror those for the southeast.” The report calls for 21 conservation strategies to be implemented from 20112015, organized in eight groupings. ■ Land and water conservation. Governmental and other organizations should protect land and water in coastal terrestrial, nearshore zone and island areas. ■ Land and water management. Communities should actively manage land and water resources by removing dams and other barriers to natural flow; improving septic technology and the handling of sewage; implementing agricultural best management practices to minimize run-off into rivers and the lake; restoring priority coastal terrestrial, nearshore zone and island features. ■ Species management. Restore native aquatic and terrestrial species.

■ Public education. Raise awareness of biodiversity issues, especially the dynamics of climate change. ■ Law and policy. Implement legal mechanisms to control threats to biodiversity across political boundaries. ■ Economics. Develop programs to provide economic incentives to protect and restore ecosystems. ■ Reaction. Develop a data management system to track and guide conservation actions. Form early detection/rapid response teams to eradicate new invasive species. ■ Research. Fill in the many gaps in our scientific knowledge of the Lake Huron ecosystem.

▲ St. Clair County has work to do In St. Clair, some of these strategies have been employed, but there is much to be done. “We’ve done a lot to eliminate sources of bacterial contamination from our beaches,” said Kristen Jurs, stormwater coordinator for the St. Clair County Health Department. “We have one of the lowest beach closure rates in southeastern Michigan.” Jurs attributed the county’s relatively clean beach water to the county’s success in stemming failing septic and separating sanitary sewer systems. “We’ve done a really good job at eliminating millions of gallons of polluted water from the lake and the St. Clair River.” In terms of the larger biodiversity picture, however, more action needs to be taken to protect what the report called wetland and coastal territorial areas. “Right now, we conserve large chunks of beach, but that’s all,” Jurs said. “The main thing we can do to protect the lake is to protect the tributaries.” The wetlands, floodplains and vegetation buffers along rivers and streams that empty into the lake need to be protected. Such features help purify storm water runoff and help slow the flash flows that drive spawning fish out of rivers. “The problem is that local governments that have control over wetlands and floodplains won’t - and often can’t afford to - do anything unless they’re forced to,” Jurs said.

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The Bay Voice

VoiceNews.com - 15

Ray Township warm up benefits cemetery restoration BY BARB PERT TEMPLETON VOICE REPORTER (VOICES) FOR THE TIMES (AT)

Local residents with cabin fever are invited to attend a Mid-Winter Warm-up fundraiser that will include an evening of snacks, games and fun this weekend in Ray Township. The Ray Township Historical Society will host the fundraiser party from 7 to 10 p.m. this Saturday at the Ray Township Senior Center. The cost is $5 and all proceeds will go towards the society’s Lee Cemetery project. Terry Goike, president of the Ray Township Historical Society, said the fundraiser is the second of what she hopes will become an annual mid-winter event to support their group. The evening will include appetizers, non-alcoholic beverages, desserts and a silent auction. There will be card playing, likely a Euchre tournament although there won’t be any prizes awarded. Visitors are also welcome to bring along any other board or card games they would like to play, Goike said. “Last year it was Euchre and, although you don’t win

anything, we do it like a tournament and it’s just an evening of fun,” Goike said. “And we are asking people to make a $5 donation at the door.” The donation will go towards purchasing a sign for Lee Cemetery, the oldest one in the township. It dates to 1827 and is the resting place for about 50 people. Goike said the recent restoration of all the headstones on the property at Indian Trail and 29 Mile roads was completed in a two-year project by an outside firm. The historical society paid the $8,000 bill for that part of the project. “It’s been over 100 years since someone was buried in that small cemetery but it’s a part of our history because original settlers and even Civil War soldiers are buried there,” Goike said. “Now we’d like to get enough funds together to purchase a sign and have a re-dedication ceremony.” Last year’s warm-up fundraiser raised $800 for historical society projects.

Preserving their history Today the Ray Township

Historical Society has close to 30 members who meet on the third Monday of each month at 7 p.m. at the township senior center. Two other projects on the group’s agenda include replacing the tin ceiling at the old school house that is now the Ray Township Library and putting on a dedication ceremony for the Cascade Dam later this year. Camille Grabb, of Ray Township, is the vice president of the historical society. She and husband Dave Grabb joined the group five years ago. A retired school teacher, Camille Grabb is a former member of the Ray Township Library Board and has always had an interest in history. “We have people who are really dedicated to preserving what we have and have a strong responsibility to honor those who came before us,” she said. “And we also want to appreciate what we have, collecting documents and interviewing people to preserve our history and keep Ray Township as wonderful as it is.” Display cases at the township hall show off lots of artifacts donated by area residents over the years including plenty of documents containing dates and events plus

Submitted photo

Work began last fall on restoring the monument to Margaret Morgan at the Lee Cemetery. She died in 1861. It was one of five monuments restored at the cemetery.

even some report cards. “We welcome new members and are always looking for people who support us and enjoy history,” Grabb said. Right now the five board members are working to get donations for the upcoming game night silent auction. So far they have gift certificates to local restaurants, some bottled wine, rounds of golf and even a painting donated by a local artist.

“Last year we had over 40 items, the local businesses are very generous to us,” Goike said. The society welcomed 35 people to last year’s event and Goike’s hoping to have more this time around. “It’s really just a fun evening with a relaxed atmosphere,” she said, noting families didn’t come out but it was basically adults from ages 20 to 90. Ray Township Senior

Center is located at 54255 Wolcott in Ray. For information about the Ray Township Historical Society visit them on the Web at rayhistory.org. To RSVP to the Winter WarmUp or make a donation to the restoration project call (586) 784-9221. Barb Pert Templeton is a freelance reporter. She can be contacted at barbperttempleton.reporter@yahoo.com

Baseball author speaks in Algonac New Baltimore writer, former Voice editor Stanton to talk about Detroit Tigers The Friends of the Library will sponsor “A Journey Through Detroit Tiger’s History” with nationally acclaimed baseball author Tom Stanton at 5:45 p.m. on Feb. 3 at McRae’s Big River Grille, 9715 St. Clair River Drive in Algonac. Tom Stanton is a renowned author and the 2008 winner of the Michigan Author of the Year Award. His books include his latest, “Ty and The Babe,” a finalist for a Publishers Weekly Quill Award; “Hank Aaron and the

Home Run That Changed America,” a Reader’s Digest pick of the month; “The Road to Cooperstown,” a poignant true story about a father-and-son road trip and the Tiger Stadium memoir, “The Final Season,” which was named best baseball book of the year as winner of both the Casey and Dave Moore awards. The suggested donation for a memorable night with the prize-winning author is $14 per person. Dinner orders taken from 6 to 6:15

p.m. Admission includes one of four entrees, a non-alcoholic beverage, gratuity and the after-dinner presentation. Pre-ticket sales only until Feb. 2 at the AlgonacClay Library. Prepaid will-call tickets are available. All sales will be cash or check only. For more information call (810) 794-4471. Stanton, a New Baltimore resident and co-founder of the Voice Newspapers, teaches journalism at the University of Detroit Mercy. He is also a former Knight-

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16 - VoiceNews.com

The Bay Voice

January 26, 2011

Brrrrrrr! Get ready, the Lions Winterfest is this weekend Drop everything! Dress warm! Be a part of three days of great fun, Friday-Sunday, in Our Town. Thanks to a great group of New Baltimore Lions volunteers working like crazy to put on a fantastic group of mostly outdoor events, there is something of interest for all ages. A Fishing Tournament will be held on Saturday and Sunday with prizes awarded for the largest fish in several categories with Bob Gatfield, the chair, (586) 531-1769. A huge tent will be placed in the middle of Washington, between Main and Front Streets, with activities taking place each day at various times. From 7 to 11 p.m. on Friday, there will be a wine tasting event in the festival tent downtown. Sponsored by the Washington Street Wine House, admission to the tent is $20 and includes three glasses of wine, crackers and cheese and live entertainment provided by the local 10-piece band, The Sound Alternative. A Friday evening event is to be determined. There will be a Chili Cook-off at 6 p.m. Saturday with entry blanks available for contestants at Stahl’s Bakery, corner of Main and Washington with the first 30 accepted. The cost is $5 per person to taste the wares. Call Fred Kopson at (586) 873-9160. At 4:30 p.m. Sunday there will be an awards ceremony with live music. Indoor events include a Saturday Children’s Party at 2 p.m. at New Baltimore Recreation and a Sunday morning breakfast served by Boy Scout Troop 211 from 8 a.m. to noon in the Pavilion in City Park. Donations graciously accepted for the meal. Winterfest proceeds benefit charities both local and worldwide. Overall chairmen are Karl Rutledge, (586) 716-3797, and Mark Paparelli, (586) 725-4977. See you there! 10th POLAR PLUNGE: is a must see. Held at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 30, at the edge of Lake St. Clair’s Anchor Bay in City Park, hardy souls will invade the icy water amid chunks of ice and freezing temperatures. Wearing costumes or just a bathing suit, watching them run or dive into the water is an unforgettable sight. This event requires participants to collect pledges in advance of the Plunge with awards given to the top individual and group that contribute the most money. With bragging rights too - don’t miss it! FOUR GREAT PRIZES: in Winterfest raffle. First place: 40-inch Samsung television and Blu-Ray disc player; Second and Third place: $100 gas card; and Fourth place: Pizza buffet for up to 50 people donated by Rosie O’Grady restaurant. Tickets are $2 each, 3 for $5 or 10 for $10 and sold in advance and throughout the Winterfest weekend by Lions members.

IMPORTANT FUNDRAISER: for Evans family. Andy Evans, 36, passed away last week and leaves a devoted wife and young family of two children who attend Lighthouse Elementary and Anchor Bay Middle SchoolNorth. An “Andy Evans Memorial Fund” has been established at Flagstar Bank with donations accepted at any branch. The first fundraiser organized for the family, sponsored by Broadway Bound Dance Studio, is a Spaghetti Dinner held tonight from 5 to 9 p.m. at The Island Bar & Grill, 43711 Van Dyke, (near 191/2 Mile Road) Sterling Heights. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children age 12 and under, which includes dinner, dessert and pop. There will be a cash bar. For information, please call (586) 7257480 or (586) 884-6283. RECREATION CENTER NEWS: Schedule information for February is posted on their website: newbaltimorerecreation.com. Highlights of the program include: Ballroom dancing (try it FREE on Feb. 4), fine arts with watercolors, boxing, indoor soccer, guitar lessons, voice lessons and a special exercise class for ladies only on Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 6, from noon to 1 p.m. at a cost of $5 per person. Call (586) 725-0291 for details. Note: The Recreation Center will be open this Sunday during Polar Bear Plunge festivities to warm up and enjoy an interesting way of expressing one’s artistic side. Little artists will be able to paint on a canvas, which will be displayed at the center the following weeks in the lobby. LET’S PLAY BALL: for IRA LL. Ira Little League welcomes youngsters to play baseball or softball at their country facility in Ira Township. Sponsored by the Anchor Bay Lions Club at 9200 Short Cut Road, Anchorville, (between Church and Meldrum roads) there are six well-manicured ball fields for the children’s playing pleasure. Registration will be held on the next two Saturdays, Jan. 29 and Feb. 5, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Anchor Bay Lions Club House, at the above address. Opportunities for team play and the cost per player are as follows: T-Ball - Coach Pitch for ages 5-6 years, $70; Pitching Machine for ages 78, $70; Minors for ages 9-10 years, $70; Majors for ages 11-12, $70; Jr.-Sr. Girls Softball for ages 13-16, $70; Baseball for ages 13-16, $80 and Challenger League for ages 6-26, $50. Register by Feb. 5 and receive a $10 per player discount. A copy of the child’s birth certificate and the showing of a parent/guardian’s valid driver’s license to verify residency is required. Cash, check or

money order payable to Ira Little League will be accepted with no refunds after Feb. 5. Residency boundaries include Starville Road, M-29 and the Colonies in Clay Twp., villages of Fair Haven and Anchorville, the city of New Baltimore, part of Chesterfield to Sass Road, I94, part of County Line Road to Puttygut Road and Meisner Road to Starville. Outstanding volunteers of all ages give hours of time and effort for the benefit of the youngsters ensuring that they have fun, most of all, as well as to learn skills in playing the game. Questions? Call Rachel Sommers at (586) 716-5904 or Cheryl Super at (586) 725-7581. Play Ball! T.O.P.S. MI 1250: Invites Our Town to take Off Pounds Sensibly when they meet in the Chesterfield Township Senior Center on Thursday evenings with weigh-ins taking place from 5:45-6:25 p.m., followed by the meeting from 6:30-7:15 p.m. “TOPS is a great way to lose weight in a support group setting with camaraderie and fun, while achieving a slimmer, healthier you.” Call Leader Lora Roberts at (586) 859-7566. Take them off and keep them off is the goal; pounds, that is. CALL RON FOR: Kewadin trip Jan. 30-31. With a few seats remaining, don’t delay in calling (586) 725-1051 or stopping by Anchor Bay Pharmacy, Washington and Main, to register. The cost is $120 per person, double occupancy, which includes deluxe motor coach transportation, lodging at Kewadin in the Upper Peninsula, (with crossing the Mighty Mac a perk), $50 in coins, a $10 food coupon, buffet dinner and breakfast, luggage handling and the driver’s tip. There will be stops at St. Ignace both ways. Good luck and do have fun, won’t you? GRAND CANYON AND MORE: Deadline Feb. 1. Gather friends and embark on a once-in-a-lifetime trip to the southwest to see some of God’s wonders in person, June 19-26. A $400 deposit is desired by Tuesday, Feb. 1 to Anchorville Travel, 9836 Dixie Hwy (M-29), Anchorville, corner of Church Road. The total per person cost, double occupancy, is $1,400. Contact Amie or Renate at (586) 7251780 or visit: anchorvilletravel@ameritech.net. The trip begins in Phoenix, Ariz. and ends in Las Vegas, Nev., visiting Sedona, the Grand Canyon National Park, Lake Powell, Monument Valley, Bryce Canyon and Zion National Parks. Travel options (extra) to Ariz. and from Nev. include, by Amtrak round trip from Port Huron, Mich. or flying round trip from Metro Airport in

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WEAR RED AND CELEBRATE: On Friday, Feb. 4 at 2 p.m., the village of East Harbor, 33875 Kiely Drive, Chesterfield, (just off Callens Road), is celebrating American Heart Month. Our Town is invited to a healthy luncheon and to hear guest speakers from Wayne State University and the Institute of Gerontology. Topics include: “Understanding Hypertension & Its Effects,” “Causes of Hypertension,” “Controlling & Living with Hypertension,” and “Stroke Prevention.” Call Nancy Smiley at (586) 716-7183 to learn to live the healthiest you possible. FLEA MARKET AT: Civic Club Feb. 6. Open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., the Civic Club, 36551 Main, has interesting and unusual items for sale in the area of jewelry, glassware, books and treasures, wood carvings and more. Refreshments will be available for purchase. Tables may be rented for $10 each with 35 available by calling (586) 329-4291. BREAKFAST WITH: the AB Lions Feb. 6. The Anchor Bay Lions Club invites Our Town to join them for a yummy pancake, French toast and sausage breakfast that Sunday morning from 8 a.m. until noon at their club house, 9200 Short Cut Rd. in Anchorville. The donation is $5 for adults and $3 for children under 12 years of age. A wonderful organization of volunteers, the Lions support many charities local and worldwide, including providing their grounds for the Ira Little League ball fields. ABHS GRAD: Claudia Schmidt entertains Feb. 7. That Monday at 7:30 p.m., former resident Claudia will share her expertise as a song writer, singer, poet and player of a multitude of instruments on the stage of Anchor Bay High. A world traveler who has entertained throughout our country, Canada, Europe and South Africa, don’t miss her unique vocal range and her phenomenal memory (hundreds of lyrics can be recalled at a second’s notice). Word has it that her parents, Gus and Jane, will be in Our Town too. A reunion of old friends has possibilities. Claudia has recorded numerous CDs and will have them available for purchase. Proceeds will benefit the Bette Dunlap Carrothers Vocal Music Scholarship Fund, administered by the Anchor Bay Community Foundation, which presents a $1,000 scholarship to a graduating Anchor Bay High singer who will pursue further study at the college or university level. Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for students and senior citizens, and may be purchased at the door, New Baltimore City Hall or Moon River Soap Co. Call Bette Carrothers at (586) 725-8051 for tickets also. See you there! NBRC CASINO TRIP: Feb. 17. With a deadline of

own O ur TTown Our

Tuesday, Feb. 11, the Greektown Casino trip has a cost of $10 for residents and $16 for non-residents (all guests receive a $20 coin play voucher). Aboard a deluxe motor coach, the trip departs at 8:45 a.m. and returns at 4:15 p.m. Call (586) 725-0291 or visit: www.newbaltimorerecreation.com. PASTIES FOR YOUR: dining pleasure Feb. 18-March 1. Don’t bother cooking. Stop by First Congregational Church during the hours of 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. and pick up one or dozens, fresh or frozen. On opening day, Feb. 18, the hours are noon to 6 p.m. On Sundays, Feb. 20 and 27, the hours are noon to 3 p.m. Still priced at a bargain $5 each, call (586) 7250909 and place an order during the hours of 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., M-Thur. Otherwise, leave a message with a name, phone number, the amount desired and the date and time for pick-up. Made with fresh ground chuck from Boffs Marketplace on Gratiot near 24 Mile, freshly peeled potatoes, onions, carrots and rutabaga, the pasties have been baked and sold by the church for 13 years. With a product still in great demand into its 14th year, the church, located at the corner of Base and Alfred streets, (watch for the signs) in Our Town, serves customers from the entire Southeastern Michigan area and the U. P. Call and order today. See you there. NEXT LOGIA: Feb. 19. Bethel Temple Church is the site of the outreach, established by Karen Winter and her staff over eight years ago. Food and warm clothing are given to those in need. Located at 51028 Base, between Main and Alfred streets, those who live in Our Town, Fair Haven and Chesterfield are eligible. For information concerning donating clothing or food, a need for emergency food, or to be a volunteer, call Karen at (586) 201-6543. Such a need never ends, and Our Town sends a huge thank you to Karen and her volunteers for their work in helping others. You are truly God’s servants. FIREKEEPERS CASINO TRIP: Feb. 21. With a deadline of Tuesday, Feb. 15, the trip has a cost of $45 per person, including $20 slot play and a $5 food coupon. The one-day trip leaves at 9 a.m. from the Target parking lot at Hall Road and Heydenreich with a return scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Games, movie and popcorn are treats for the way home. Call Shirley Tinson at (586) 725-0427. MAAA FUNDRAISER: Feb. 23. Proceeds of 20 percent will be given to Metro Area Animal Adoption to aid in the foster care of cats and dogs toward their adoption. Stevie B’s Pizza Parlor, 50670 Waterside Drive, during the hours of 3 to 9 p.m., is offering its all-you-can-eat buffet for $7, with salad and pasta included. All-you-can-drink pop is $2. Prices are less for

children age 10 and under. ABJROTC PENNY AUCTION: Feb. 26. It’s an evening of fun and wonder as one waits to learn if an auction item will belong to him/her. Under the leadership of Col. Jeffrey Carrothers and cadet parents, the Saturday event will open the doors at 5:30 p.m. Tickets may be purchased at 25 for $3 or 100 for $10. Here is how it works: Over 150 items will be displayed on tables around the area with a small container in front of each. Stroll amongst the aisles, taking in what is shown, and place tickets in the containers in front of what is desired to win. At 7 p.m., the auction begins with each item and its container brought to the announcer. A ticket is pulled and the item is awarded to the person with the winning ticket. It might be a gift certificate, a game, an electronic item or something truly unusual. It’s always a pleasant surprise. Food and refreshments will be available. Proceeds benefit Anchor Bay Junior ROTC programs. See you there. NEXT STORY TIME: March 19. Mrs. Beth BagleyStanton, Our Town’s fantastic children’s storyteller, will greet youngsters that Saturday morning at 10:30 a.m., at the Lenox Twp. Library, located at 58976 Main, in New Haven. Important traveling information: New Haven’s Main Street is a continuation of Our Town’s Washington. Follow it out of town, over I94, cross over Gratiot right into New Haven, crossing the railroad tracks and soon on the right, spot the bright blue LIBRARY sign. Free and open to the public, Mrs. Beth presents songs, poems, stories and just a pleasant experience for the younger ones. Older ones love being there too. One Saturday per month until June 11, will find the following programs: March 19: “Spring Into Spring;” April 16: “Rabbits and Chicks;” May 14: “Searching for Rainbows” and June 11: “Camping Fun.” ABHS WIND ENSEMBLE: shines. The Anchor Bay High School instrumental music program has another star in its crown. Requested to perform for the sixth annual Michigan Music Conference Friday, Jan. 21, at DeVos Performance Hall, DeVos Place, in Grand Rapids, the Wind Ensemble performed seven pieces in its concert. The conference gathers school and college/university music teachers from throughout the state to share techniques and ideas toward the betterment of school music programs on the K-12 level. Under the leadership of Anchor Bay band directors Mr. P. David Visnaw II and Mrs. Molly Schack and guest conductor Mr. Douglas J. Bianchi of Wayne State University, the performance also featured five ABHS Alumni Guest Artists, in one selection. Anchor Bay High Principal Joseph MacDonald and Superintendent of See TOWN on page 17

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January 26, 2011

TOWN continued from page 16

Schools Leonard Woodside wrote letters of pride and words of congratulations in the printed program that accompanied the ensemble to the conference. The printed programs were given to audience members. ABHS WIND ENSEMBLE: Program selections, conductors and guest artists are “Seize the Day!” (Carpe Diem) by Patrick J. Burns; “Canzon, Fugato, and Hymn” by Mark Camphouse, Douglas J. Bianchi, guest conductor; “Suite From Mass,” by Leonard Bernstein, arranged by Michael Sweeney with Anchor Bay Brass Quintet alumni guest artists: Andrew Miller, trumpet class of 2008; Susan Rudnick, trumpet, class of 2010; Kari Caretti, French horn, class of 2008; Jon Carrothers, trombone, class of 2009 and Michael Sauer, tuba, a former co-director of

The Bay Voice bands at ABHS; “Dancing at Stonehenge” by Anthony Suter, Molly Schack, guest Conductor; “Easter Monday on the Whitehouse Lawn” by John Philip Sousa, edited by R. Mark Rogers; “Dusk” by Steven Bryant and “Cityscape” by Scott Boerma. MEET THE WIND: ensemble musicians. Piccolo: Carolyn Kazmer; Flute: Marissa Alphonse, Kelsea Boswell, Olivia Haskin, Jessica Jones, Rachel Kempisty and Sarah Miller; Clarinet: Emily Barc, Remi Beach, Emilie Cline, Kelsey Endres, Alexandrea Floyd, Rikki Heath, Alex Kish, Amber Shekoski, Jessica Stocker and Shelby Winner; Bass Clarinet: William Turri and Emily Blanchette; Oboe: Justine Nestorowich; Bassoon: Christina Bartholomew and Ian Guir; Alto Saxophone: Sarah Blanchette, Michael Carrothers, Jessica Duggan and Amanda Rososko; Tenor Saxophone: Katie Harbert; Baritone Saxophone: Justin Andrews; Trumpet: Kylar

Beierlein, Stephen Caren, Adrianna Czostkowski, Kenneth Houf, Christopher Kubinec and Tyler Scott; Euphonium: Annemarie Barc and Zachary Jenson; French Horn: Jessica Cesarek, Jacob Hunter, Elizabeth Lanni and Sarah Strassburg; Trombone: Steven Brancaleone and Shane Maly; Bass Trombone: Aaron Beck; Tuba: Vincent Nicolazzo and Parker Saleski; Percussion: Anna Anger, Matthew Clifford, Nick Marr, Sharla Rudnick, Zachary Tezak and Daniel Werner. Our Town salutes Mr. Visnaw, Mrs. Schack and the Wind Ensemble for their work in continuing to bring pride and recognition to our Anchor Bay Schools. Truly, Anchor Bay Schools deserves to be recognized as one of the “Best 100 Communities of Music Education in America,” first in 2006. MEET THE ANCHOR BAY: Schools music staff. Each of the music teachers had a part in the development of musicianship displayed by the Wind Ensemble. They

VoiceNews.com - 17

are: Janice Boswell, ABMS-N choir; Audrey Brown, ABHS choir and elementary music; Melissa Dresbach, elementary general music; David Kleckner, ABMS-N bands; Bruce Materazzi, elementary music and fifth-grade band; Scott Oranchak, ABMS-S bands, choir and sixth-grade general music; Diana Rodgers, elementary general music and fifth-grade band; Deborah Root, elementary general music; Molly Schack, ABHS bands, sixth-grade general music and fifthgrade band; Barbara Sheldrick, elementary general music and fifth-grade band; Amy Tarnaki, elementary general music; P. David Visnaw, ABHS bands; and Theresa White, elementary general music and fifthgrade band. TO KATIE, WITH LOVE: Kathryn Koenig Fisher Savoie, a lifelong resident of Our Town, has left us at 83 years. The youngest of the renown Koenig family, famous for their gorgeous dahlias at the Lakeside

Gardens on Green Street at the curve, loved and worked with flowers all of her life. The lovely display dedicated to her father, Nick Koenig, at the foot of Washington, in which she planted the bulbs along side her loving sister, Elsie Koenig Kay, their children and grandchildren is a tribute to their desire to keep the dahlia legacy alive in Our Town. Her loving family includes husband, Henri, children James (Margaret) Genso, Susan (the late Frank) Hellebuyck and Jerry (Mae) Genso, six grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren and several step-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her parents, Nicholas and Ann, brothers John and Henry Koenig and sisters, Elizabeth Koenig Mattingly and Ann Koenig Wyzykowski. All of the family worked with the flowers to make New Baltimore the Dahlia Capital of America and father Nick, Dahlia King. Blessings, dear friend - your beautiful smile and helping hand will be remembered always.

GOOD NEWS TO SHARE: Matt and Amanda Robinet are scholars to be congratulated. Matt is a student at Siena Heights in Adrian, Mich. and Amanda, who studies at Central Michigan University, earned all A’s last semester. Parents Chuck and Patti LeRoy Robinet and grandparents Jack and Rosalie LeRoy are proud and pleased. FROM 1800 SPEECH SPARKLERS: by E.C. McKenzie. No. 1538: “The hardest of all is trying to look busy when you are not.” No. 1559: “To avoid old age, keep taking on new thoughts and throwing off old habits.” No. 1573: “Footprints on the sands of time were not made sitting down.” No. 1579: “There are two very difficult things in this world; one is to make a good name for oneself, the other is to keep it.” To report news about your service organization, call Bette Carrothers at (586) 725-8051 or e-mail her at wgcmusicbjc@webtv.net.

L’Anse Creuse gets second chance at $25,000 Pepsi Refresh grant District earned more than 100 votes for senior citizens project in December BY NICOLE TUTTLE VOICE REPORTER

A potential program to benefit students and senior citizens still has a chance to become reality in L’Anse Creuse Public Schools this month. The district is seeking community votes now through Jan. 31 for a $25,000 grant through the Pepsi Refresh Project. The project is to fund student-run, career focused programs to benefit senior citizens at the Frederick V. Pankow Center in Clinton Township. Grant money could assist in providing the necessary funds connected to programs such as PC repair, exercise, health screenings, Internet classes, computer basics, theater performances and automotive repair. Money would specifically be used in obtaining supplies and materials, transportation for senior citizens and communications. “Although the district did not get funded during the December voting period, we have been given another chance since we were one of the top 100 vote-getters,” said Michelle Irwin, the district’s director for community relations and programs. According to the Pepsi Refresh Project website, the program seeks people, businesses and non-profit organizations with ideas that will positively impact communities. Pepsi accepts 1,000 ideas each month, and people vote

for their favorite ideas. According to the website, applications are generally accepted on the first through the 15th of a month, or until the program receives 1,000 ideas. Grants are available in many different sizes. Grants of $5,000 are awarded to up to 10 individual applicants per month for projects, grants of $25,000 are awarded to 10 individuals or small groups per month; $50,000 is awarded to up to 10 companies or organizations per month, and $250,000 is awarded to up to two organizations per month. Categories include health, arts and culture, food and shelter, the planet, neighbors and education. Submitted ideas must be feasible to complete within 12 months from the date upon which funds are received. The quest for a Pepsi grant began last summer, when a grant was written and designed to be entered into the Pepsi voting process for September, according to L’Anse Creuse Assistant Community Relations Director Paula Rose. The district tried unsuccessfully to get its bid for a grant into the Pepsi system in September and October, but it was not until November that the district’s application was accepted for December voting, she said. Although the district’s bid for a grant in December was not successful, since the district was one of the top 100 vote-getters in December, it earned a second chance to gain votes, according to Rose. Pepsi does not indicate the number of votes a potential project obtains, only if it is a top contender in votes, she said. “We came in around the 45th spot,” Rose said.

To be funded, a project needs to be within the top 10 vote getters. The district is also employing a new strategy, one of alliances with other Pepsi projects of different categories to help obtain votes. “What is new this time is we have formed an alliance with other projects,” Rose said. The district’s Pepsi link connects to other links for projects. “Last spring, we piloted this program with senior citizens learning computer skills from our Pankow students and got tremendous feedback,” Irwin said. “In fact, we are offering two three-week sessions starting in February through our Community Education department, which are already full, so we know there is a need.” The February program will be offered at no charge to seniors. Last spring, the district piloted a two-day program bringing senior citizens and Frederick V. Pankow Center students together. Students from computer networking, culinary arts, dance and theater as well as student ambassadors from the Pankow Center participated in the program. During the program, students taught seniors computer basics and offered opportunities for lunches prepared by culinary arts students as well as entertainment from the drama department at Pankow. “This is so senior citizens or those short on their budget ... can find services available to them free or greatly reduced,” Rose said. “We want to give our students real opportunities to serve the public.” There are three ways to vote for the Pepsi grant, which means the grant can get three

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votes per day per person. One method of voting is to go to the district’s webite at lcps.org and check for the Pepsi grant link, which links to refresheverything.com/seniorshelpingseniors and log in to vote. A second voting method is to go on Facebook at facebook.com/pages/LAnseCreuse-Pepsi-RefreshGrant/167463933274445. Voters can choose “Like” and vote daily. This will download the Pepsi app to the Facebook user’s page. A third method of voting is to text 104382 a vote to Pepsi at 73774. Nicole Tuttle is a freelance reporter. She can be contacted at ntuttle.reporter@sbcglobal.net.

Submitted photo

Frederick V. Pankow Center students and senior citizens came together to teach and learn computer skills through a program the L’Anse Creuse school district offered last spring. The district is hoping to obtain funds for the program through a Pepsi Refresh grant.

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The Bay Voice

January 26, 2011

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VoiceNews.com - 19

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20 - VoiceNews.com

The Bay Voice

January 26, 2011

VALOR League makes its presence known Veteran’s support group draws members from around area BY JERI PACKER VOICE STAFF WRITER

Five years ago, as the economy continued to spiral downward, a new organization was forming to help raise funds for a local veterans’ service group. They called themselves the Veteran’s Assistance League of Recognition, or VALOR League, and their fundraising efforts mainly benefited the Fred Quandt 3901 Veterans of Foreign Wars in Algonac. Membership at veteran organizations has decreased over the years as many older members have passed away. VALOR League Vice President Kathy Fernandez said Post 3901 was almost among the casualties. She remembers the day her husband, Post Commander Jim Fernandez, came home with some sad news. “Jim came home one day and said 57 VFWs closed that year,” she said. “Then he said, ‘It looks like ours will, too.’” VALOR League President Pam Ceder said, soon after, the new support group began. She had been involved in some fundraisers at work, and they started talking about saving the old post. “Jim Fernandez at the post 3701 said why we don’t start a new organization,” she said. “We started out with seven to eight people with some good ideas. We created some bylaws and started recruiting. We have about 35-40 members now at any one time.” Unlike membership in other veteran groups, members of the VALOR League need no military affiliation to join. Members are mostly local, but some come from as far as Grosse Pointe and Warren, Ceder said.

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“We do fundraisers supporting many of the veteran’s functions, like funerals, but we do anything we’re asked to do,” she said. “When the Moving Wall was here, we put in many hours on that. We want to bring awareness to veterans and to the VFW.” The group is proud of its recent 501C3 designation, making them an official nonprofit organization. “To earn this, you have to have a really good track record of community service,” Kathy Fernandez said. After five years of service in the community, many of the residents plan on attending one or all of their annual events: the Mother’s Day Brunch, Easter Bunny Lunch for Kids, Annual Burnwood Pig Roast and Pasta Feast for Families. The pasta event, held in October, raises funds to help a veteran’s family in need at Christmas and is held jointly with the Algonac VFW. Kathy Fernandez said the group has worked hard to make every dollar count towards helping the needy. “We get a good response from the community to all our functions,” she said. “They have come to know the VALOR name and that the money stays with the veterans.” Although much of their efforts go to support the local VFW, the group also takes on other community projects. When members heard of a resident’s daughter in Afghanistan having a hard

time getting personal items, they enlisted the help of the membership to get her and other servicewomen the needed supplies. “We sent a list out to our members and they brought the things to the club,” she said. “We sent out a couple of big boxes.” During the last annual Burnwood Pig Roast, which raised more than $6,000, they gave $1,000 toward cancer research. Jim Fernandez said because of the work of the VALOR League, the post has one of the stronger veterans’ relief funds in the district. VALOR League proceeds total about $60,000 to date. “They’re a godsend,” he said. “They made all the difference in the world for the VFW.” For more information, or to apply for membership, call Pam Ceder at (810) 278-0150. Contact Jeri Packer at (586) 716-8100, ext. 302 or jeri.packer@voicenews.com.

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FYI:

VOICE REPORTER

Event: Go Red for Women/Men Brunch Where: VFW POST 3901 1005 Pointe Tremble, Algonac When: Feb. 13 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Cost: Donation at door. Nurses will be on site for blood pressure readings. Proceeds: Heart Association and area veterans. Sponsored by: VALOR League

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plows haven’t produced a lot of mailbox demise. “It’s not the truck or the driver, 90 percent of the time it’s the weight of the snow against the mailbox post,” Weston said. “If we (drivers) hit it, we fess up,” Weston said. SCCRC is initially governed by a board of directors, which challenges the agency to provide the same level of service despite a decreasing operational budget. “The board wants us to maintain the same standard of winter maintenance and service,” Weston said. Complicating the commission’s fiscal picture is the fact road salt prices have increased. In 2004, a ton of salt was $23.55. Even if the same amount of salt is used, overall there is a $130,000 increase in salt expenses. Weston assures residents the agency is watching every dime. “Steps are being taken to control expenses. There are computer systems in the truck. We re-calibrated our trucks because we were over salting by 250 pounds per lane,” he said. “I would like to emphasize to run a business is comparable to what you do to run your own households.” He added the commission continues to work with local school leaders and police to ensure needs are being met. “The driving public needs to understand one six-inch snowfall costs a lot less than six one-inch snowfalls,” Warner said. “Each storm is fought differently,” Weston said.

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belongs to MDOT (Michigan Department of Transportation), the majority is highway construction costs are much higher.” “In 2006, when gasoline prices increased to over $4 per gallon, we paid $3.70 and saw an immediate increase of $4,000,” Weston said. “Basically, we receive less MTF revenues because people drive less. It’s a doubleedged sword,” Greg Owens, SCRCC director of internal revenues, said. “We are seeing good things but the way transportation is funded now it needs to be done differently to update with current times. It’s what we have to deal with today. “We are reliant on the tandem axle trucks we purchased, which now cost $193,000, an increase of almost $100,000. We have aging front line equipment, aging fleet and an increase in repair cost,” Weston said. By attrition, SCCRC has decreased its work force by 27 people. During the winter the decrease in workforce is more apparent. “We recorded a $1.2 million in savings from wages to retirement to benefits,” Weston said. The community was accustomed to snow plow trucks maintaining roadways in a shorter time period. Routes increased from 30 miles to 50 miles. The county has over 30 plow trucks. Wing plows were purchased to increase effectiveness. “Five are out there now, we will have two more soon. We have to increase our routes due to reduction in work force,” Weston said of the attachments that cost $5,000. “We (SCCRC) like what we do, there’s a lot of passion ... it’s a community service, it’s job satisfaction and the drivers are doing the best they can with what they have. Our employees stay here at SCCRC, they don’t leave after four years,” Weston said. Fortunately, the wing

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The Bay Voice

Pine Tree operators recognized for wildlife program the importance of the import from the Wildlife Management Team. Some of the successful projects already accomplished or underway at the site include a pollinator garden, bee houses maintained by a Waste Management employee as well as bat houses installed throughout the property. “Part of our pledge has to do with conservation and the environment and we have a number of members who are involved with other organizations that support wildlife and environmental functions,” Burke said. One of the local officials to show their support for the wildlife program at the landfill was Lenox Township Trustee Mary Beth Paisley, who stated the commitment to safeguard the wildlife in the area by those associated with the landfill is important because of the ecological diversity the area has. “Kathleen Klein is a sincere and passionate environmentalist whose mission is to include residents in this pursuit. I wrote her that my commitment is to assist her in any area where she needs strong support,” Paisley said. Anyone interested in learning more about the wildlife projects currently ongoing at Pine Tree Acres can contact Klein at (734) 231-8258. Contact Andrew Benoit at (586) 716-8100, ext. 303 or andrew.benoit@voicenews.com

Graduates offer advice to advanced math students Pankow Center’s MST students learn tips on coping with college and more

“This program has a huge workload...when you make the college transition, it is easier and less overwhelming.” — Madison Herbart, college freshman

BY NICOLE TUTTLE VOICE REPORTER

Thomas Wolfe may believe that “You Can’t Go Home Again,” but Frederick V. Pankow Center alumni found that they easily could on Jan. 3. The Frederick V. Pankow Center, a L’Anse Creuse district school located in Clinton Township, hosted a reunion for its first graduating class of Math, Science and Technology, or MST, program students at the school on Jan. 3. Erik Edoff, the senior director of instructional programs, arranged for two groups of June 2010 graduates to visit classrooms of current students throughout the school day at Pankow. The group was also treated to a reunion lunch. “Last year was our first graduating class, so this is our first opportunity to have this type of program,” Edoff said. Not only did the reunion offer the first class the opportunity to see old friends in a familiar setting, it also offered the opportunity to serve as mentors for the current MST students, according to Edoff. Current MST students had the chance to ask questions about college life and learn study tips from the graduates. The program also offered the chance for graduates to give feedback on the MST program, Edoff said. About 60 students were in the first MST graduating class, and 25 were able to attend the reunion. “We spent a considerable amount of time contacting families to determine a date that the majority of graduates could attend,” he said. “This date allows many students that are on break from college to attend.” Many of the graduates are enrolled in engineering and pre-med programs at their

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is something she said she hopes to impart to her own younger brother, who is currently part of the MST program. Drake Kress, a 15-year-old sophomore at L’Anse Creuse High School North who is part of the MST program, said the experience of talking with the graduates helped him to understand college scheduling and scholarships, as well as how the study habits necessary for the MST program can help in college. Rob Nolan, another 15year-old L’Anse Creuse High School North sophomore, said he learned that the MST program can help not only to get into college, but also to stay ahead there. “It seemed to me like MST helped them a lot to get into school and it helped them when they got there too, because they already had solidified the studying habits from the advanced program,” Nolan said. Nolan added listening to the graduates also helped him to compare the experiences of a small and large university, and solidified his goal to attend University of Michigan. “They gave a lot of information,” Nolan said. “One was from a small university and one was from University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. They compared how going to a big school is different than a little school and the benefits of a little school because they have a smaller class and everything, but then the whole experience of going to a big school and living in a dorm and stuff.” Nicole Tuttle is a freelance reporter. She can be contacted at ntuttle.reporter@sbcglobal.net.

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$ respective colleges. About 325 students are currently enrolled in the MST program. “All the students will have access to the returning graduates,” Edoff said. Madison Herbart, an 18year-old freshman at Ferris State University, was one of the MST graduates who returned for the reunion and mentoring program. Herbart is currently a psychology major and part of the honors program at the university. She said she wanted to be part of the reunion in order to see old friends and old teachers. Herbart said that having been part of the MST program prepared her for the rigors of college. “This program has a huge workload ... when you make the college transition, it is easier and less overwhelming,” she said. Kristen Boschma, an 18year-old University of Michigan student, is currently majoring in business accounting with a minor in math. Joining the MST program while in high school was an easy decision, according to Boschma, because she loved math and excelled at homework and tests. The most important thing Boschma said she wanted to impart to current MST students is the need to experience college on many levels. “It is not just the academics,” she said. “It is the social life.” Massachusetts Institute of Technology student Audrey Healy, age 18, said that she spent her freshman through senior years as part of the MST program. She said she hoped to encourage current students to follow their passions, but also to manage their time. This

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At first glance the only wildlife seen thriving at the Pine Tree Acres landfill are the thousands of seagulls often seen circling the site. A closer look, though, would show that birds, plants, mammals and amphibians can be found thriving at the site. Pine Tree Acres, which is owned and operated by Waste Management, recently received certification from the Wildlife Habitat Council for their work to protect and help sustain approximately 80 acres of wildlife area adjacent to the landfill. With certification in hand, January marked the first meeting of the newly-formed wildlife management team, which is tasked with creating projects to further improve the wildlife area. Kathleen Klein, Waste Management’s community affairs representative, was responsible for getting the project off the ground. Klein said projects like the one at Pine Tree Acres are becoming more common at Waste Management’s other properties as well. “Waste Management typically has land holdings adjacent to and around our landfill sites. It is important to utilize those properties, to promote and encourage wildlife habitat,” Klein said. “Many of our sites already provide habitat, without necessarily going through the

Wildlife Habitat Council program. The program allows Waste Management to establish partnerships with local, community groups and organizations over a common goal; protection/preservation of wildlife habitat as well as enhance our public education program to remind individuals of the need to connect with our natural environment.” The first meeting of the Wildlife Management Team was held Jan. 12 at the Huron Pointe Sportsmen’s Association clubhouse and brought together people from throughout the community who wanted to share their opinions on how the wildlife area is managed going forward. The group included a handful of Huron Pointe members, township officials and members of other local conservation groups. With the wildlife area located just across the street from the Huron Pointe grounds, it only made sense for the group of conservationists to get involved. “We’re looking to have more of a partnership with Waste Management. We like what they’re doing over there,” Huron Pointe President Joe Burke said, referring to the wildlife program. To maintain their certification through the Wildlife Habitat Council constant improvement and ongoing projects are necessary, hence

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VoiceNews.com - 21

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22 - VoiceNews.com

3

The Bay Voice

January 26, 2011

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January 26, 2011

The Bay Voice

Civic Club brings back Super Bowl Sunday party Old tradition resumes at downtown New Baltimore facility BY JERI PACKER VOICE STAFF WRITER

Some of the best traditions seem to just quietly die off without any notice. Dinner dances, playing cards until late, watching the game together and other social activities seem to have given way to the complexities of life. But, in a different era, in the much smaller town of New Baltimore, these kinds of social gatherings were enjoyed by many at places like the New Baltimore Civic Club. Florence and Jack Hayman would meet with

others there for friendly gettogethers. “My husband belonged to the civic club for 52 years,” she said. “I know that because it’s the year before we were married. His father before him was president at one time.” One of the big events of the day was Super Bowl Sunday at the Civic Club. “It was a big event for people watching the game,” she said. “We attended it back in the old days. Back then, we had a wild game dinner.” Bill Burkhardt, now serving as president of the civic club, has also been reminiscing about those days. With Super Bowl Sunday almost coming up, he decided it was time to resurrect the gathering. “When I look back at the history of the club, I’d like to bring back some of the things from that time that

the club used to do,” he said. The Super Bowl Sunday event will begin at 4 p.m. on Feb. 6 in the New Baltimore Civic Club at 36551 Main St. Tickets are $20 each, which includes beer, drink setups, chili, pizza, snacks and hot dogs. Four TV’s will be set up to make sure all have a good view of the big game. Squares will be available for purchase; and there will be a bucket of cheer raffle, 50/50 drawings and poker and euchre tables going on throughout the event. Burkhardt and Dave Duffy are heading it up. Hayman said her husband is now in his 70s and doesn’t have as much energy as he used to. They are both glad that Burkhardt is stepping up to bring some of the old vim and vigor back to the club. “When Billy became president,” she said, “a real vitality began coming into the club. Some younger members are taking an active role. We’re so excited. He’s really working to bring back the old energy of the civic club.” Burkhardt said the club has about 12-15 new members, and they are looking for more.

VoiceNews.com - 23

Submitted photo

Local residents enjoy a night of euchre at the New Baltimore Civic Club recently. Organizers are bringing back the club’s Super Bowl party Feb. 6.

Burkhardt added the club still has community service as its focus, including giving out scholarships and allowing the local Boy Scouts to have use of the building at no cost. The steak-out dinner dance is still held once a year, where the participants get to cook their own steak on grills outside. A holiday tradition

Burkhardt would like to bring back is decorating the giant evergreen that goes up in the middle of Washington Street each Christmas season. He couldn’t help but notice the ornaments are getting worn and tattered from years of wear in the elements. “The Civic Club started providing Christmas lights

and decorations 20 years or so ago,” he said. To join the club there is a $15 initiation fee and then $30 per year for annual dues. For more information call Burkhardt at (586) 914-0711 or go to the website at newbaltimorecc.com. Contact Jeri Packer at (586) 716-8100, ext. 302 or jeri.packer@voicenews.com.

New Baltimore woman volunteers time to chronicle city BY BARB PERT TEMPLETON VOICE REPORTER

When Phyllis Roulo appears at dozens of community events in and around New Baltimore she always wears her official ID badge issued by the city police department. No, Roulo isn’t carrying a shield or a gun but instead a Cannon 40D camera and a big smile as a volunteer photographer for the community. “People comment that they know I enjoy what I am doing by the smile on my face,” Roulo said. “It took months for me to be able to smile again after my husband died and this photo work is what did it.” Roulo, of New Baltimore, first took her hobby public last June and has been snapping, editing and posting hundreds of photos to the city Web site and for local organizations ever since. Her work often appears in The Bay Voice and The Voice Weekend as well. “I feel fortunate to have found a niche and to contribute to the city I love by doing something I enjoy,” Roulo said. “And I feel grateful to New Baltimore Mayor Larry Smith and Marcia Shinska for allowing me this opportunity.” City Clerk Shinska helped Roulo get started by welcoming her efforts to promote the city through her photographs. A schedule of upcoming community events allows Roulo to plan her volunteer time behind the camera and she checks in with Shinska from time to time.

“Phyllis has devoted a countless number of hours to this and we are so fortunate to have a volunteer that loves our city so much,” Shinska said. That’s a point Roulo really wants made clear to the public too, the fact that she’s a volunteer. Her work is of no cost to the city or anyone else for that matter. The time she spends taking pictures at events, editing the photos and getting them printed by request is all out of the goodness of her heart. “Sometimes people have commented that they think I work for the city or am on the city payroll but that’s totally not true,” Roulo said. “I would never let anyone incur expenses for something I’m volunteering to do.” As for recognition for her photos, being behind the camera around town meeting new people and capturing memories is all the payment or recognition Roulo needs. She even refuses to put her name on the city Web site taking credit for her work. “This isn’t about me at all, this is about promoting our city and all the great things that go on here,” she said Shinska said a company out of Traverse City hosts the Web site for the city and now Roulo works with them to put her photos on its pages. “I totally trust her judgment and she uploads the pictures right to our site,”

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Shinska said. “And when our Web site needed some pizzazz she designed banners for the pages, too, and they really look great.”

Smiles soften tears Seeing her hobby turn into a volunteer opportunity actually came about for Roulo after the sudden death of her husband, Lawrence Roulo, in August 2009. The couple owned and operated a business together. It was closed and its employees were laid off after his untimely death. “All of a sudden I had a lot of time on my hands,” said Roulo. “I was searching for a volunteer position I would be comfortable with when I mentioned to Mayor Larry Smith Roulo that if he wanted photos taken at any city events I would be happy to do so.” She continues to look for photo opportunities to showcase the city and the many events taking place around town. Roulo especially enjoys taking photos of children; the Halloween and Christmas collections she captured are

among her favorites. While she doesn’t stick to a certain number of photos taken for each event - she took over 200 at a recent fundraiser - she does spend a lot of time editing her work. Like most creative people, she admits she’s her own worst critic. “Now I cringe when I look back six months and see how amateurish my photos were,” smiled Roulo. “I can see the progression and I’ve bought a couple of new camera lenses too.” As she continues to learn new photo taking techniques, Roulo will sometimes visit the location of her next shoot in advance, checking out the space and lighting, to prepare herself and her camera for the event. “I believe that visual images are powerful and photos convey perceptions which may not always be tangible, but register in our minds,” she said. “And I really make sure there are no unflattering images of people used, I really try to edit things out when it’s necessary.” People are always receptive of Roulo’s request to photograph them and she’s received nothing but good feedback from all the people she’s met so far.

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“There are so many volunteers in this city, I’m just one of them,” she said. “I get way more from this than I give, plus, I enjoy it and am very grateful to be able to do it.” To check out some of Roulo’s work on the city of New Baltimore Web site go to cityofnewbaltimore.org, or just keep reading The Voice. You’re likely to see them in print or on the paper’s Web site (voicenews.com)

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“Really, most people are just great about it and I love working with kids and they love having their pictures taken,” Roulo said. Having a local volunteer so willing to give so much of her time and talents to the community is something Shinska doesn’t take for granted. “Phyllis is a blessing to the city, the community and the organizations here,” Shinska said. “If you want to see the true spirit of a volunteer she’s certainly it.” The ever modest photographer continues to deflect any personal praise.

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Call The Voice to get your game results, notices for upcoming sporting or recreation events or sportsrelated story ideas published.

the bay

PAGE 24 • Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Spor t s

Contact The Voice at 586.716.8100 Fax: 586.716.8918

editor@voicenews.com

www.voicenews.com

Pair of losses even LC North’s MAC Red record BY CHUCK KLONKE FOR THE VOICE

Defending champions don’t go down without a fight. L’Anse Creuse North is the defending Macomb Area Conference Red Division basketball champion and Crusaders battled through several obstacles before dropping their first division game, 54-52, in overtime to Ford Tuesday, Jan. 18. “I thought our kids battled,” said North coach Jay Seletsky. “I’m extremely proud of them - their grittiness, their scrappiness. We had kids fill in when kids fouled out and I can’t ask for more grittiness and toughness. “I thought we executed fairly well, but I’m just proud of the kids playing tough tonight. That’s the bottom line. We were outsized and didn’t let it affect us.” The Crusaders had two key starters foul out with the game still hanging in the balance. Craig Smelley picked up his fifth foul with

The effort Ford put forth 3 1/2 minutes left in the matched that of the fourth quarter and Khial Crusaders. Watson followed him to the “It was a gritty performbench with nearly three ance by our guys, too,” Bray minutes to play in oversaid, “Especially staying out time. of foul trouble, defending “I would say that’s a without pretty gritty fouling.” effort by North their guys “I thought our took the with two of kids battled. I’m lead early their best scorers extremely proud in the second quargoing out of them -- their ter and and we still grittiness, their with less only beat than a them by scrappiness. ...I minute two,” said can’t ask for more remaining Falcons in the coach Mark grittiness and third quarBray. “I give toughness.” ter, the a lot of Crusaders credit to them. — Coach Jay Seletsky had their biggest Smelley’s lead of the one of the game, 37-30. best players in the league Then the momentum and with Watson their switched. Shane Ellis, who backcourt is really good. had 17 points and 12 Playing us that close with rebounds for Ford, scored those starters fouling out on a put back with 2.4 secand having a chance to win onds left in the third quar- that’s really commendter and was fouled. He able. I really appreciate missed the free throw, but their effort. Jay’s a great Les Olson grabbed the coach.”

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Watson sent the game into overtime at 50-50 with a 3-point basket with 19.2 seconds to go. “We’ve been there before,” Seletsky said. “We have four guys back from last year’s run at the MAC Red who’ve experienced this type of game. That’s what I told them. ‘We’ve been here before and I expect a good response. ‘Just keep battling back and we’re going to try to extend the game.’ They did a great job extending the game and getting into overtime. Khial made a big shot. “Those are kids who’ve been there before. That was the key to us battling back

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rebound and scored as time expired. Eric Posavetz tied the game with a 3-point basket in the first minute of the fourth quarter and gave the Falcons the lead when he split a pair of free throws after a North turnover. Moments later Posavetz stole the ball and scored on a layup to cap Ford’s 10-0 run. The Falcons had a 50-44 lead after Ellis made two free throws with 1:17 remaining in the fourth quarter. The Crusaders’ Drew Isabell scored on a layup, was fouled and made the free throw to cut the margin to three points.

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Khial Watson, going for a layup in a game against New Haven earlier this season, was one of the key Crusaders sent to the bench with foul trouble against Ford.

after a few questionable calls.” Ellis made one of two free throws in the overtime to give Ford an early lead, but another basket by Isabell put North back in front. Aaron Cox got the deciding basket off an offensive rebound with 2:20 remaining in the overtime. Nick Boguth added a free throw with 13.8 seconds left for the final margin of victory. North never got a shot off on its final possession as the Ford defense smothered point guard Calvin Curry before he could get rid of the ball. North devised its game plan to prevent Ford from feeding Cox, Ellis and Olson at will. “We wanted to pick up the tempo and extend the floor and make their guards work hard to get the ball up the floor,” Seletsky said. “We felt if we could have good ball pressure it would make it tougher for them to enter it into the post. I thought we did that for three quarters of the game. “Then we started to wear out a little bit and our ball pressure wasn’t as good so their wings got an opportunity to throw it into the post and that hurt us inside.” Smelley and Curry led the Crusaders with 11 points apiece. Ryan Lombardo had eight points and eight rebounds. Friday, Romeo led throughout as the Crusaders were beaten 5745. North was led by Smelley’s 11 points. Watson added nine. LCN is 2-2 in the MAC Red, 4-4 overall while Romeo advanced to 2-2 and 3-6.

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January 26, 2011

The Bay Voice

VoiceNews.com - 25

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26 - VoiceNews.com

The Bay Voice

January 26, 2011

Sports results BOYS BASKETBALL ANCHOR BAY 65, PORT HURON 57: Anchor Bay is on a roll. Taiwan Jones scored 19 points and had 10 rebounds and lead guard Tony Smith totaled six assists to spark the Tars to their fourth victory in a row last Friday, one that made them 4-0 in the division. Anchor Bay outscored the Big Reds 26-7 in the first quarter, during which Smith had a dunk. “We could have played a little better defense,” Anchor Bay coach Todd Green said. Port Huron 7-13-18-19 -- 57 Anchor Bay 26-12-14-13 -- 65 Port Huron (1-4, 3-6): Winslow Chapman 7, Tahj King 5, Mark Chapman 4, Everette Boone 13, Alex Zmolik 13, Tyler Rowbotham 11, Evan Wagner 4. Totals: 22 (5) 8-15 -57. Anchor Bay (4-0, 5-4): Taiwan Jones 19, DeUndre Brown 2, Tory Smith 6, Eric Bramos 2, Zach Hite 12, Ryan Larose 4, Evan Miller 3, Branden Padgett 15, Ben Donovan 2. Totals: 24 (3) 14-22 -- 65.

ANCHOR BAY 58, STEVENSON 49: Taiwan Jones had two dunks as he scored 13 of his 17 points in the third quarter to help Anchor Bay come from behind to improve its record to 3-0 in the division. Branden Padgett scored 16 points and added 10 rebounds and four steals, and Tony Smith had eight assists for the Tars. “We played well in the first quarter, but we had three starters in foul trouble in the second and were down seven at the half,” Tars coach Todd Green said. “We played real well defensively in the third quarter.”

points and Alexis Taylor had 20 points and 11 rebounds to carry New Haven.

Photo by DAVE ANGELL

Zach Hite of Anchor Bay takes a shot up over Port Huron’s Winslow Chapman in the first half of Friday’s Tar win.

23 (4) 8-13 - 58.

NEW HAVEN 41, STERLING HEIGHTS 36: Robert Farr scored 21 points and had 16 rebounds as New Haven got into the win column in the Gold Division. NEW HAVEN (1-3, 5-4): Tyler Smith 6, Rayshawn Griffin 2, Jamael Bell 2, Romello Moore 8, Vantrell Williams 2, Robert Farr 21. Totals: 18 (2) 3-3 - 41.

NEW HAVEN 53, WARREN MOTT 47: Robert Farr had 16 rebounds and 26 points, including a couple of dunks when it counted at the end of the game. “He had two big dunks, they really sparked the team, got them going again,” assistant New Haven coach Ed Sims said. Warren Mott 8 7 14 18 New Haven 9 14 16 14 NEW HAVEN: Tyler Smith 12, Rayshawn Griffin 1, Tedaro France III 5, Roemello Moore 6, Robert Farr 26, Paul Evans 3, Rob Sarr 2. 14 2s, 3 3s 16-25.

GIRLS BASKETBALL ROSEVILLE 57, ANCHOR

BAY 22: Anchor Bay, which fell to 0-4 in the MAC Blue and 0-8 overall, was led by Emily Bemis’ nine points. Anchor Bay 5 7 8 2 - 22 Roseville 17 20 10 10 - 57 ANCHOR BAY (0-4, 0-8): Mary Barber 4, Emily Bemis 9, Taylor Katham 2, Genna Merrick 4, Maddie Powers 2, Taylor Scott 1. Totals: 8 (1) 5-15 22.

L’ANSE CREUSE NORTH 50, LINCOLN 38: Alexandra Michayluk scored all six of her points in the first half when L’Anse Creuse North built a 21-8 lead and the Crusaders went on to the victory that made them 3-0 in the division. Jazmine Brown had 13 points and five rebounds for the Crusaders. LC North 14 7 10 19 - 50 Lincoln 2 6 13 17 - 38 L’ANSE CREUSE NORTH (3-0, 6-3): Emily Nieman 3, Stephanie Garland 10, Elizabeth Rawski 3, Marisa Oleksiak 9, Kaylee McPharlin 4, Jessica Finegan 2, Alexandra Michayluk 6, Jazmine Brown 13. Totals: 20 (0) 10-23 - 50.

NEW HAVEN 70, LAMPHERE 29: Sylnovia Croft scored a season-high 25

New Haven 20 13 23 14 - 70 Lamphere 6 7 6 10 - 29 NEW HAVEN (3-1, 6-3): Kiya Luczak 8, Brooke Berger 6, Sylnovia Croft 25, Alexis Taylor 20, Danielle Maxwell 4, Sam Koebbe 6, Destiny Little 1. Totals: 33 (0) 4-8 -70.

LAKE SHORE 46, L’ANSE CREUSE NORTH 44: L’Anse Creuse North started the third quarter with a major run that looked like an eventual victory, but Lake Shore chipped away at the lead through the fourth quarter to squeak out a win. Lake Shore’s Alicia Huerta had eight assists to create a lot of offense, while Sara Coppola shot big baskets to hit 17 points overall. LC North 8 15 14 7 - 44 Lake Shore 10 12 9 15 - 46 L’ANSE CREUSE NORTH: Ashley Dunford 10, Stephanie Garland 7, Marisa Oleksiak 13, Alexandra Michayluk 4, Kelsey Thompson 2, Jazmine Brown 8. Totals: 26 (6) 8-19 - 44.

PORT HURON 56, ANCHOR BAY 19: Port Huron’s Adrianna Jordan stole the show with 17 points, four assists and seven steals, while Heather Weiss had 4 points and 12 rebounds. The Tars were led by Taylor Scott’s nine points. Port Huron 15 22 14 5 - 56

Anchor Bay 2 5 3 9 - 19 PORT HURON (7-3): Darchelle Mitchell 9, Adrianna Jordan 17, Meaghan Murphy 7, Heather Weiss 4, Sydney Jones 2, Courtney Baker 2, Alexis Howe 3, Jade Rhone 4, Candace Gunter 2, Courtney Corby 6. Totals: 28 (2) 6-14 - 56. ANCHOR BAY (0-9): Mary Barber 1, Hunter Dolan 2, Lexi Gainer 3, Jenna Morisette 4, Taylor Scott 9. Totals: 11 (2) 3-17 - 19.

SWIMMING GROSSE POINTE SOUTH 130, ANCHOR BAY 56 200 MEDLEY RELAY: Grosse Pointe South (Craig Campbell, Luke Hessburg, Patrick Jackson, Cam Johnson) 1:44.96; 200 FREESTYLE: Nick Victor, AB, 1:50.92; 200 IM: Campbell, GPS, 2:03.80; 50 FREESTYLE: Mike Martin, AB, 23.19; DIVING: Ben Cornillie, GPS, 153.50 points; 100 BUTTERFLY: Victor, AB, 55.88; 100 FREESTYLE: Jackson, GPS, 52.99; 500 FREESTYLE: Roby Boggs, GPS, 5:24.07; 200 FREESTYLE RELAY: Grosse Pointe South (Hessburg, Ryan Graham, Boggs, Johnson) 1:37.22; 100 BACKSTROKE: Jack Chase, GPS, 1:04.35; 100 BREASTSTROKE: Campbell, GPS, 1:05.64; 400 FREESTYLE RELAY: Grosse Pointe South (Nicholas Yoo, Graham, Jackson, Campbell) 3:36.85. L’ANSE CREUSE NORTH 101.5, L’ANSE CREUSE 81.5 200 MEDLEY RELAY: LCN (Ryan Vanpoppelen, Alex Marsack, Adis Jakupovic, Sebastian Rajewski) 1:46.07l; 200 FREESTYLE: Paul Smyrski, LCN, 1:59.02; 200 IM:

GIRLS BOWLING L’ANSE CREUSE NORTH 30, EISENHOWER 0: Alyssa Meade had 214-245/459 and Shannon Burns had 248183/431 for L’Anse Creuse North.

BOYS BOWLING EISENHOWER 16, L’ANSE CREUSE NORTH 14: James Carson bowled 194-245/439 and Kevin Craft had a 392 series in Eisenhower’s victory over L’Anse Creuse North. Justin Clark led the Crusaders with 235-209/444.

HOCKEY ANCHOR BAY 6, PORT HURON 3: Forward Matt Kaiser scored two goals nine seconds apart to spark a four-goal third period that carried Anchor Bay to a come-from-behind victory over host Port Huron. Senior Andy McEvoy scored two goals and had two assists, and senior Alex Fonstad and Andrew Lahr had a goal each for Anchor Bay, which trailed 3-1 after one period and 3-2 after two. Fonstad assisted on three goals and goaltender Jeff Wilssens made 21 saves as the Tars posted their first division victory over the season. Anchor Bay is 1-5 See RESULTS on page 27

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Stevenson 13 17 8 11 - 49 Anchor Bay 15 8 24 9 - 58 ANCHOR BAY (3-0, 4-4): Logan Merrick 1, Taiwan Jones 17, DeUndre Brown 4, Tony Smith 5, Eric Bramos 4, Zach Hite 8, Evan Miller 3, Ryan Larose, Branden Padgett 16. Totals:

Photo by DAVE ANGELL

Mike Martin of Anchor Bay swims the butterfly in a MAC crossover dual meet loss against St. Clair last Thursday.

Logan Jordan, LC, 2:08.04; 50 FREESTYLE: Vanpoppelen, LCN, 23.30; DIVING: Danny Keaveny, LC, 140.25; 100 BUTTERFLY: Jake Feyers, LC, 58.07; 100 FREESTYLE: Vanpoppelen, LCN, 50.72; 500 FREESTYLE: Jordan, LC, 5:11.93; 200 FREESTYLE RELAY: LCN (Marsack, Rajewski, Vanpoppelen, John Nowinski) 1:35.09; 100 BACKSTROKE: Ryan Redoute, LC, 57.87; 100 BREASTSTROKE: Chad Pierce, LC, 1:06.38; 400 FREESTYLE RELAY: LC (Jake Feyers, Redoute, Jordan, Pierce) 3:41.55. ST. CLAIR 122, ANCHOR BAY 64: Winners for the Tars included Mike Martin (200 IM), Nick Victor (50 free) and the 200 free relay team of Martin, Victor, Nick Wise and Kyle Ashworth. AB is 2-3.


January 26, 2011

The Bay Voice

DISABLE continued from page 1

beans in their shoes to simulate the feel of corns on the feet. Students also put tape on their finger tips to simulate arthritis and the inability to have full functionality in their hands, wore goggles full of masking tape and tried to dial a phone, walk and view an eye chart. In addition, students had to run, then hold their nose and breath through a straw to simulate an asthma attack, use a wheelchair, crutches, cane or walker with a an elastic band around their ankles limiting their ability to walk, and several other activities. “We spend quite a bit of time discussing the stations, the purposes, and meanings

SAVINGS continued from page 1

Reduction in staffing and a temporarily reduced work week have also amounted to savings. “That saves approximate-

KAUFMAN continued from page 12

what’s going on. I know the department heads and the systems that are in place. I know the local communities and their leaders. So the learning curve will be

RESULTS continued from page 26

and 4-8-1. Austin Fetterly scored twice and Jason Pringle added a goal for Port Huron. L’ANSE CREUSE NORTH 2, MARYSVILLE 2: A battle of the goalies was played out here on what turned out to be a great night for high school hockey. L’Anse Creuse North goalie Alex Sytniewski handled 40 shots, and Marysville’s Anthony NOTICE TO THE VILLAGE OF NEW HAVEN RESIDENTS TWO (2) OPEN SEATS ON ZONING BOARD (ZBA) AND (3) OPEN SEATS ON PLANNING The Village Council of New Haven is seeking residents that are interested in filling the open seats on the Zoning Board (ZBA), and the Planning Commission. Please submit a letter of interest at the Vi l l a g e o ff i c e , o r f a x a letter to 586-749-3859 for review. The positions will be presented to the Village Council on February 8, 2011. (2) Positions for the Zoning Board (ZBA), (3) Positions for the Planning Commission. The requirements for these positions are as follows: 1. You must be a Village Resident. 2. You must be a registered voter for the Village of New Haven. 3. You must be current on all bills from the Village of New Haven. The letter or letters should be addressed to the Village Clerk’s office by mail or fax no later than February 2, 2011 by 12 noon. The Village Office is located at 57775 Main Street, PO Box 480429, New Haven, MI 48048. The office hours are 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. If you should have any questions, please feel free to contact the Village Office at 586 749-5301 ext. 215. Deborah Mack, Village Clerk Published 1-26-11

SYNOPSIS OF MEETINGS OF THE IRA TOWNSHIP BOARD OF TRUSTEES 1/3/11 Study Session - 5:30 p.m. PRESENT: C. Sovey, R. McCoy, and J. Endres Jr. ABSENT: J. Jacob, T. Jeannette 2009-2010 annual audit presentation PUBLIC COMMENT: none ADJOURN 6:25 p.m. 1/3/11 Public Hearing - 6:30 p.m. PRESENT: J. Endres, R. McCoy, C. Sovey ABSENT: J. Jacob, T. Jeannette comments and concerns heard on proposed ORV Ordinance ADJOURN: 6:59 p.m. 1/3/11 Regular Meeting – 7:00 p.m. Moment of Silence /Pledge of Allegiance PRESENT: J. Endres, R. McCoy, C. Sovey ABSENT: J. Jacob, T. Jeannette APPROVALS: grant one time sewer relief over average use for 9563 Dixie; ORV Ordinance No. 75; retain service of current auditing firm; property split for 74-23-620-0059-000 and combination of 74-23-620-0059000 & 74-23-620-0059-100; 2011 assessing contract with the county; send MGM Dumpsters to planning Commission for site plan review; order 50-100 copies of “Heritage of Ira Sesquicentennial books”; RES 11-0101 Performance and Indemnification resolution; attend afternoon session of annual road commission/township meeting; 2011 schedule of township meetings; renew AWWA membership; reports and bills DENIALS: request to relinquish garbage service at 7563 Dixie TABLED: 2011 police service contract; update on Long Island Ct. dredging PUBLIC COMMENT: none ADJOURN: 7:55 p.m. CRYSTAL SOVEY, IRA TOWNSHIP CLERK Published 1-26-11

Great Oaks Elementary Health Team students Madison Allen, Elena Oldani and Nicole Mohr test and prepare donated equipment used in the school’s physical education classes to teach students disability sensitivity.

being ignorant, etc.” Students completed papers describing their thoughts and feelings toward the aging and disabled before they went through the simulations and after. “This unit really has changed some of the students overall,” Stoppa said. Members of Stoppa’s Student Health Team, a group of fifth graders who assisted Stoppa in leading their classmates through the disability simulations, agreed that their perspectives have changed. “She taught us how not to be rude to people in wheelchairs,” said Madison Allen, a 10-year-old fifth grader on the team.

and how the students felt during their time at each station,” Stoppa said. “We discussed appropriate termi-

nology too, like ‘fat,’ ‘stupid,’ and ‘retarded,’ and how those words are inappropriate and can make us seem as

Nicole Tuttle is a freelance reporter. She can be contacted at ntuttle.reporter@sbcglobal.net.

ly $903,000 annually for the last two years here in the township,” Lovelock said. At the time, New Baltimore Police Chief Tim Wiley called the move a winwin, saying it also saved the city money. The township has also

saved about $19,000 in gas and electric over two years, Lovelock added, as a result of changes at its buildings. “All of this and more. And we maintained the level of service our residents and business have grown accustomed to,” Lovelock said.

“We will continue researching methods to make township services more economical and effective.”

tighter.” Kaufman underlined his communication and analytical skills as especially useful as the county works to emerge positively from the recession. “My communication skills will be helpful in dealing with employees and local units of government,”

Kaufman said. “There is so much information out there that affects policy-making. You have to be able to sift quickly through it, assess it and figure out how it will affect the county. Those are skills that planners have. Our minds work a little differently - on the analytical side of things, on the what-if side.

That’s a skill that will be very important to the county at this point in time.” Kaufman’s salary jumped from $79,800 as the head of Metropolitan Planning to $95,900 as interim county administrator. “I think he’ll do a great job,” Bohm said.

Benbenuti handled 28. Scorers for L’Anse Creuse North included Richard Kobylski, who also had an assist, and Evan Corbett. Robert Ochmanski had an assist. Marysville scorers were Trevor Pettee and Ron Nunez. Assists were made by Mark Pavelek and Drew Johnson.L’Anse Creuse North is 8-5-3.

Nicole Tuttle is a freelance reporter. She can be contacted at ntuttle.reporter@sbcglobal.net.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT CITY OF NEW BALTIMORE PLANNING COMMISSION Notice is hereby given that there will be a Public Hearing at the regular meeting of the City of New Baltimore Planning Commission on Tuesday, February 15, 2011. The meeting will be held at the New Baltimore City Offices, 36535 Green Street, New Baltimore, Michigan, beginning at 7:30 p.m. The purpose of the Public Hearing is to hear comments relating to the proposed amendment to the New Baltimore Code of Ordinances, Chapter 60, Zoning, Article V Residential Districts, Section 60-101 Provisions applicable to residential districts. (e) Fences, walls and protective barriers. The proposed amendment would consider amending the setbacks, location, and design requirements of the ordinance. Copies of the proposed amendment are available for inspection at the City Offices during regular business hours, and will be available at the time and place of the Public Hearing. All interested citizens will be given an opportunity to comment. Written comments may be submitted up to the meeting time. Marcella Shinska, City of New Baltimore Clerk Published 1-26-11

VoiceNews.com - 27

PROPOSED MINUTES OF THE REGULAR BOARD MEETING OF THE CHARTER TOWNSHIP OF CHESTERFIELD JANUARY 18, 2011 The meeting was called to order by Supervisor Lovelock at 7:00 p.m. in the Charter Township of Chesterfield Municipal Offices at 47275 Sugarbush, Chesterfield, MI 48047. Present: Supervisor Lovelock, Clerk Uglis, Treasurer Hartman, Trustees: Bell, DeMuynck, Ficht, Printz. Also Present: Deputy Clerk Wurmlinger, Township Attorney Anderson The meeting was opened with the Pledge of Allegiance by Boy Scout Troop 97. The Board held a moment of silence for Livonia Police Officer Larry Nehasil who was killed in the line of duty. Motion by DeMuynck, seconded by Ficht to approve the: 4A) Agenda as submitted. 4B) Approve the minutes of the Regular Board Meeting of January 3, 2011 and Study Session (Closed Session) of January 3, 2011. 4C) Approve the Payment of Bills as submitted by the Finance Department. 4D) Set a Public Hearing for February 22, 2011 at 7 P.M. concerning Community Development Block Grant funding for Fiscal Year 2011. Ayes: All, Nays: None. MOTION CARRIED Motion by DeMuynck, seconded by Printz to adopt Resolution #2011-02 terminating the Charter Township of Chesterfield Pension and Plan Trust with Merrill Lynch. Roll Call Vote: Ayes: DeMuynck, Printz, Bell, Uglis, Lovelock, Hartman, Ficht. Nays: None MOTION CARRIED Motion by Printz, seconded by Ficht to adopt a Performance Resolution, 2011-03, required by the Michigan Department of Transportation for the purpose of issuing to Chesterfield Township an “Individual Permit for Use of State Trunkline Right of Way”. Roll Call Vote: Ayes: Printz, Ficht, DeMuynck, Hartman, Lovelock, Uglis, Bell. Nays: MOTION CARRIED Motion by DeMuynck, seconded by Hartman to approve Third Amended Consent Judgment for Deer Trail Condominiums. Roll Call Vote: Ayes: DeMuynck, Hartman, Printz, Bell, Uglis, Ficht, Lovelock. Nays: MOTION CARRIED Tom Dunn, Joe Miller and Gerald Burak addressed the Board during Public Comments. Motion by Lovelock, seconded by Ficht to adjourn the meeting at 7:36 P.M. Ayes: All, Nays: None MOTION CARRIED Janice M. Uglis, Clerk Michael Lovelock, Supervisor Published 1-26-11

CHURCH DIRECTORY ANCHORVILLE Immaculate Conception Catholic Church & Elementary School 7051 Church Rd., M-29, Anchorville: iccatholic.org Rev. Tomek Maka Masses: Saturday 4:30 pm; Sunday 8:00 am, 10:00 am, 12 noon 586-725-3051

CHESTERFIELD TOWNSHIP Chesterfield Woods Church of the Nazarene Pastor Lerrin Wentworth 54205 Washington St., Chesterfield (586) 725-0700 Sun. 10 am, Wed. 7 pm, www.thewoodschurch.org/chesterfield “Contemporary Worship” Vessels Full Gospel Church 23611 23 Mile Rd. Sunday Worship 10:00 am

Pastor Danny L. Stokes 949-0010 www.vesselschurch.org

Christ The King Lutheran Church 29920 23 Mile Road, Chesterfield Services Sunday 9:15 am, 11:15 am, Sunday School 9:15 am

Rev. Mel Hiler 598-3363

Good Shepherd Evangelical Lutheran Church Rev. David Ulm 31100 23 Mile Road 586-949-9440 Sunday Worship 8:15 am & 11:00 am, Sunday School & Adult Forum 9:45 am Northside Church www.northsidechurch.org Pastor Lee Granada 25600 23 Mile Road 586-949-7251 Sunday Worship 10:30 am, 6:15 pm, Wednesday 6:30 pm, Sunday School 9:30 am Grace United Methodist Church Rev. Dr. Jill Zundel 49655 Jefferson (1/4 mile SW of Brandenburg Park) 586-725-1054 Sunday Worship 8:30 and 11:00 am, Sunday School 9:45 am www.graceUMCnb.org Roman’s Road Baptist Church Rev. A.E. Hoskinson Please call for meeting place. (586) 206-4676 Sun. School 10:00 am, Sunday Service 11:00 am, www.romansroadbaptist.org Living Hope of the Bay Lutheran Church Pastor Paul Werner Mtg at L’Anse Creuse Middle School East 30300 Hickey Road (586) 201-3302 1/4 mile north of 24 Mile, East of Gratiot, Sunday Worship 10:00 am

FAIR HAVEN Rock Community A/G www.rockcommunity.net Pastor Angelo Fleece 6135 County Line Rd. 586-716-1267 Sun. 9am & 11am, Tues. Youth Service 7pm, Wed. Adult Ed. & Kids’ Program 6:45 pm

NEW BALTIMORE First Baptist Church www.firstbaptistnb.com Senior Pastor Jeff Bean 52260 Washington, Sunday School 9:15 to 10:15am 725-9951 Worship 10:30 to 12. Sun., Discipleship, All ages 6:30 pm, AWANA Wed 6:30 - 8:30 pm St. John’s Lutheran Church Corner of Green and Maria Sun. 8 & 10:15 am, 9:10 am Education

Rev. Peter J.L. Perella 725-6801 E-Mail: historicstjohns@sbcglobal.net

St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Church Main Street and Maria Masses: Saturday 4:30 pm; Sunday 7:30, 9:30, 11:30 am

Rev. Nick Zukowski 725-2441

New Hope Full Gospel Church Pastors James and 51820 County Line Road Janice Holder Sunday Worship 10 am, 6 pm; Bible Study Wednesday 7 pm 725-3115 North Shore Church northshorechurch.us “A Perfect Church for People Who Aren’t” Sunday 10:00 am at Anchor Bay Middle School

Rev. Christopher Steinle 586-725-0234 48650 Sugarbush Road

First Congregational Church, U.C.C Rev. Henry C. Brinker 36223 Alfred (corner of Base and Alfred) 586-725-0909 Sunday Worship: 8:45 am & 10:15 am, Sunday School 10:15 am Handicap acc & nursery avail at 10:15

NEW HAVEN Greater New Hope Baptist Church Rev. John Mack 58527 Delanie 749-3813 Sunday School 9 am, Worship 10 am, Bible Study Wednesday 11 am & 7 pm Living Word Fellowship 60170 New Haven Road Sunday Worship 10:00 am, Wednesday 7:00 pm

Pastor Warren Hood (586) 749-3945 www.livingwordfellowshipnh.org

First Congregational Church 58801 Main Sunday School 9:15 am, Morning Worship 10:30 am

Pastor Todd Evans 749-9857

New Haven Seventh-day Adventist Pastor David Gotshall 30844 Clark St. (586) 850-1524 Saturday Sabbath School: 9:30am, Worship Service: 11am

IRA TOWNSHIP Life Christian Church 7487 Swan Creek Road, Ira, MI 48023 Worship: Sunday 10:00 am & Wednesday 7:00 pm

Pastor Dino Lasala www.lifechristian.com 586-716-1166

LENOX St. Peter Lutheran Church E.L.C.A. Pastor Scott McKinney 60980 Omo Road at 28 Mile, 1 mile East of North Ave. 586-749-5260 Worship: 10am, “The small church with the big heart”


28 - VoiceNews.com

The Bay Voice

January 26, 2011

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SAVE UP TO $14,000

26,742 28,242 $

$13,880** LAST ONE!! $15,380** NEW 2010 SIERRA CREW CAB 5.3L V8, HD Trailer Tow Pkg.

Employee

*

*

Everyone

Stk# T1565 MSRP $32,340

$19,995**

2 Others Available

$21,995**

36 Mos.

244 289 †

$

mo.

$0 Down

$

mo.

$0 Down

5.3L V8, auto, air cond, pwr winds/ locks, heated mirrors, aluminum wheels, deep tinted glass, keyless entry, HD trailer equip, pwr seat, Bluetooth, pwr tech pkg and much more. Stk. #T1412

0 APR 0% % APR for 60 60 Months

NO SECURITY DEPOSIT REQUIRED!

Available

GM EMPLOYEE & FAMILY EVERYONE MEMBER LEASE LEASE

$

36 Mos.

36 Mos.

299 339 †

$

mo.

$0 Down

† mo.

$0 Down

GM EMPLOYEE & FAMILY MEMBER PURCHASE

$

**

EVERYONE PURCHASE

**

27,835 29,335 $

All power! Pwr sunroof, 20” chrome whls, DVD entertaiment, dual 6-way leather seats, pwr winds/locks, keyless entry, r.backup camera, front/rear air/ heat, remote start, Bose Stereo System, Bluetooth and much more! MSRP $54,325 Stk. #T1644

0 APR 0% % APR for 72 72 Months

Last One!

GM EMPLOYEE & FAMILY EVERYONE MEMBERS PURCHASE PRICE PURCHASE PRICE

$

$

NEW 2011 SIERRA CREW CAB SLE 4X4

MSRP $62,199 Stk. #T1704

*

**

23,591 24,995

Navigation, Sunroof, 22” Wheels! LOADED!

$

**

EVERYONE PURCHASE

NEW 2010 GMC YUKON SLT 4X4

22,495 24,995 48,495 51,495 $

36 Mos.

NEW 2010 GMC YUKON DENALI

Available

$

$

GM EMPLOYEE & FAMILY MEMBER PURCHASE

Everyone

Stk# T1804 MSRP $19,315

8-Passenger seating, pwr windows, pwr seats, pwr heated mirrors, alum wheels, front & rear heat and air cond, trailer pkg, 5.3 V8, rear defrost, remote start. MSRP $33,565 Stk. #T1844

GM EMPLOYEE & FAMILY EVERYONE MEMBERS PURCHASE PRICE PURCHASE PRICE

GM EMPLOYEE & FAMILY EVERYONE MEMBER LEASE LEASE

$37,995 $39,495 NEW 2010 CANYON PICKUP

NEW 2010 GMC SAVANA PASSENGER VAN

0 APR 0% % APR for 60 60 Months

Available

Everyone

Stk# B1176 MSRP $48,505

Employee

0 APR 0% % APR for 60 60 Months

GM EMPLOYEE & FAMILY EVERYONE MEMBER LEASE LEASE

MARKDOWN!! Employee

0 APR 0% % APR for 60 60 Months

NO SECURITY DEPOSIT REQUIRED!

NEW 2010 BUICK ENCLAVE CXL2

3.6L V6, frt and rear air cond, 8passenger seating, pwr windows, pwr locks, pwr mirrors, keyless entry, aluminum wheels, tinted glass, cruise control. Stk. #T1260

NO SECURITY DEPOSIT REQUIRED!

300hp V8, auto, air, power windows, locks, mirrors, bluetooth, chrome wheels, deep tint glass, keyless entry and much more. Stk. #T1448

2010 MODELS!

Available

39 Mos.

NEW 2011 GMC SIERRA EXT CAB 4X4

WE HAVE HARD TO FIND

32

MPG

*

Last One!

Available

GM EMPLOYEE & FAMILY EVERYONE MEMBERS PURCHASE PRICE PURCHASE PRICE

$

*

41,885 44,885 $

*

ALL BUICK & GMC TRUCKS, COME WITH A 5 YEAR OR 100,000 MILE WARRANTY Purchase & Lease Payments Expires 1-31-11 @ 9pm • ROCHESTER • PONTIAC

• SHELBY • UTICA

• TROY

• LIVONIA

VAN DYKE

• SOUTHFIELD

• MT. CLEMENS

I-696

• BIRMINGHAM • ROYAL OAK

HALL RD

• STERLING JIM CAUSLEY HEIGHTS BUICK GMC 16 MILE (Metro Parkway)

• WARREN

IOT AT

ST. CLAIR SHORES

GR

8 MILE I-94

• DETROIT

BUSINESS HOURS: Mon & Thurs 8:30am-9pm Tues, Wed & Fri 8:30am-6pm

THE NEW CLASS OF WORLD CLASS

GROSSE POINTE

LAKE ST. CLAIR

16 11⁄22 MILE & GRATIOT CLINTON TOWNSHIP

586-465-8465 • 1-800-966-CAUS

*Add rebates to sale price plus tax and license. Picture may not represent actual vehicle. Rebates assigned to dealer with approved credit subject to tier interest rates. Some residential restrictions apply regarding rebates and purchase. GM employee must present GMS certificate. All prior sales excluded. All lease payments are plus 1st payment, tax, title, plates, security deposit if required by lender. Sierra, Acadia based on 10,000 miles per year. **Sierra, Canyon - Must finance with Ally bank, w/ approved credit. See dealer for details. All lease payments & purchase prices include GM loyalty bonus. †Must own/lease a ‘99 or newer GM vehicle in household. See dealer for details.


January 26, 2011

The Bay Voice

VoiceNews.com - 29

AUTO SHOW SAVINGS Chevy

Buick

GMC

ENDS MONDAY, JAN. 31ST

HURRY IN! Great Product Knowledge, Price & Service 2011 BUICK REGAL CXL • 2.4L DOHC MFI Engine • 6 Speed Automatic Transmission • Dual Zone Climate Control • Power Locks and Windows • Heated Front Seats • Rear Spoiler • 18” Alloy Wheels

MSRP $26,995

BUY PRICE $327/MO*

GMS SALE $24,406

2011 BUICK LACROSSE • 2.4L DOHC MFI Engine • 6 Speed Automatic Transmission • Dual Zone Climate Control • Power Locks & Windows • Remote Vehicle Start • Power Driver and Passenger Seat • Bluetooth for phone • 17” Machined Aluminum Wheels

The Bu Area’ ick s P De remi ale um 18 r! MSRP $27,245

BUY PRICE $324/MO*

2011 GMC SIERRA EXT. CAB • Automatic Transmission • Cruise & Tilt • AM/FM w/CD with USB Port • Locking Rear Differential • Full Factory Equipment

NO SECURITY DEPOSIT

LEASE $223/MO* The

Are De a’s V ale olu r! me

MSRP $27,710

BUY PRICE $229/MO*

2011 CHEVROLET TRAVERSE • 3.6L V6 • Automatic • Air • Power Windows & Locks • Tilt/Cruise • 6 Passenger Seating • AM/FM/CD/XM • Onstar Keyless Entry

GMS SALE $24,109

LEASE $185/MO*

Available

GMS SALE $24,149

GMS SALE $17,800

The Bu Area’ ick s P De remi ale um r!

LEASE $185/MO* You r

Lo De cal C ale he r! vy

MSRP $30,439

BUY PRICE $329/MO*

2011 CHEVROLET IMPALA • 3.5L V6 Automatic • Power Windows • Power Locks • Tilt • Cruise Control • CD Player

LEASE $244/MO* You r

Lo De cal C ale he r! vy

• 0% Financing for 72 Months on select models • General Motors Preferred Pricing for Everyone!*

• 3.6L V6 SIDI Engine • 6 Speed Automatic Transmission • Air Conditioning • Power Locks and Windows • Rear Parking Assist • 8 Passanger Seating • 18” Aluminum Wheels

BUY PRICE $218/MO*

2011 ALL NEW CHEVY CRUZE • Auto • Air • Power Locks & Windows • Tilt Wheel • Keyless Entry • AM/FM/CD/XM • Onstar • More

GMS SALE $15,418

LEASE $249/MO* You r

Lo De cal C ale he r! vy

MSRP $18,100

BUY PRICE $189/MO*

LEASE $133/MO*

MSRP $36,490

BUY PRICE $419/MO*

GMS SALE $30,275

LEASE $329/MO*

2010 CHEVROLET COLORADO

The

Are De a’s V ale olu r! me

• 2WD • Regular Cab

Clearance! Hurry, Only 3 Left!

MSRP $18,860

BUY PRICE $189/MO*

GMS SALE $13,409

2011 GMC ACADIA • 3.6L V6 Engine! • 6 Speed Automatic Transmission • Air Conditioning • Power Locks & Windows • Rear Parking Assist • 8 Passenger Seating • 18” Aluminum Wheels

The

Are De a’s V ale olu r! me

MSRP $32,715

BUY PRICE $353/MO*

GMS SALE $26,642

2011 CHEVROLET EQUINOX • 2.4L DOHC Engine • 6 Speed Automatic Transmission • Power Locks and Windows • Tilt & Cruise • AM/FM w/CD • Remote Keyless Entry • 17” Aluminum Wheels • Stabilitrak Stability System

LEASE $259/MO* You r

Lo De cal C ale he r! vy

MSRP $23,490

BUY PRICE $296/MO*

GMS SALE $21,512

CHEVROLET SILVERADO EXT. CAB

LEASE $234/MO* You r

Lo De cal C ale he r! vy

• Automatic Transmission • Cruise andTilt • AM/FM w/CD with USB Port • Locking Rear Differential • Full Factory Equipment

NO SECURITY DEPOSIT

MSRP $25,295

GMS SALE $17,249

The Bu Area’ ick s P De remi ale um r!

2011 BUICK ENCLAVE

MSRP $27,210

BUY PRICE $219/MO*

GMS SALE $16,788

2011 CHEVROLET MALIBU • 2.4L DOHC MFI Engine • 6 Speed Automatic Transmission • Power Locks and Windows • Tilt & Cruise • AM/FM w/CD • Remote Keyless Entry • Rear Window Defogger • Stabilitrak Stability System

Call 1-800-628-6284

You r NO SECURITY DEPOSIT

Lo De cal C ale he r! vy

MSRP $23,025

BUY PRICE $217/MO*

GMS SALE $17,289

LEASE $182/MO*

LEASE $148/MO*

for details.

*0% FOR SELECT MODELS WITH APPROVED GMAC FINANCING. *Lease payments based on Employee price. General public slightly higher. Plus tax, title and plate fee. 39 month, with $1,900 Down Payment. 10,000 miles per year subject to credit approval. 0% is in lieu of all factory rebates. Price includes all Rebates. Must finance with GMAC to qualify. Retail buy payments are based on 75 months with approved credit.

Area’s Friendliest Sales Staff: Dave Abou-Ganim-General Sales Manager, Jeff Zimmer-Pre-Owned Sales Manager, Roberta Henderson-Finan ce Manager, Mark Terhune-Internet Sales Manager, Ron Campbell, Jerry McCarthy, Bob Prosser, Steve Terhune, Terry Dawson, John Martin, Pat Alter

BUY AMERICAN FROM AN AMERICAN COMPANY

“We Care” Chevy

Buick

GMC Award Winner

810-329-1000 Shop online at www.stclairauto.com

1-800-628-6284 King Rd. at Fred Moore Hwy. • China Twp.


30 - VoiceNews.com

The Bay Voice

January 26, 2011

SHEPHERD Financing As Low As 0% On Select Models Big Retail Rebates

Huge Lease Rebates Leasing for 24, 36, 39 Month Term Leases Available

1 Driving while distracted can result in loss of vehicle control. Only use mobile phones/MyLincoln Touch/other devices, even with voice commands, when it is safe to do so. 2Custom Lease Disclaimer. 3EPA-estimated 19 city/26 hwy/21 combined mpg, FWD. Class is non-diesel Luxury Midsize Crossovers vs. 2010/2011 competitors. 4Some features are unavailable while driving. Service available in the 48 contiguous states and DC. Sirius Traffic™ and Sirius Travel Link™ are trademarks of Sirius XM Radio, Inc. Requires available Navigation System. Offer ends 3/31/11.

BE ON THE GO IN THE SNOW WITH A 4X4 OR ALL WHEEL DRIVE! 2010 Ford Escape 4x4 Limited 2010 Ford F150 XLT Supercab SPECIAL OF THE WEEK! FULL

OR FACT

Y WA

RRAN

TY

2008 Lincoln MKZ AWD

$

22,995

Only 17,967 Miles

F

RY ACTO ULL F

A WARR

FULL

OR FACT

Y WA

RRAN

TY

NTY

$

25,995

Only 20,644 Miles

One Owner, Heated Leather, CD, All Power! Stk# 28751

All Power, CD/MP3, One Owner, Like New! Stk# 28729

2010 Ford Expedition XLT

2010 Ford Explorer XLT 4x4

OR FACT FULL

Y WA

TY RRAN

OR FACT FULL

$ $

32,995

21,995

Only 20,201 Miles

2008 Ford Ranger XLT SuperCab 4x4 ER T POW

RAIN

WAR

2008 Ford F150 XLT Supercrew

Y RANT FAC FULL

$

16,995

Only 74,914 Miles

WAR TORY

$

ER T POW

27,995

TY

RAIN

WAR

Only 18,909 Miles

2008 Ford Escape XLT 4x4

Y RANT ER T POW

$

15,995

Only 21,105 Miles

25,495

One Owner, Non-Smoker, All Power Package Stk# 28756

2008 Mercury Mariner Premier

Y RANT

$

RRAN

Only 20,943 Miles

One Owner, Non-Smoker, Leather Heated Seats, All Power, CD Changer! Stk# 28753

One Owner, Non-Smoker, 3rd Row Seating, All Power, Like New! Stk# 28728

Y WA

Only 71,439 Miles

$

RAIN

A WARR

NTY

19,995

Only 29,981 Miles

All Power, CD, 4-Doors, Styled Wheels Stk# 28722

One Owner, All Power, Chrome Running Boards & Wheels, CD, Tow Package! Stk# 28486

Non Smoker, Moonroof, All Power, CD, Alloy Wheels, Luggage Rack. Stk# 28649

One Owner, Non Smoker, CD, Moonroof, All Power Stk# 28716

2007 Ford Explorer 4x4 XLT

2007 Lincoln Navigator Ultimate

2007 Lincoln MKX AWD

2006 Jeep Liberty Sport 4x4

POW

$

ER TR

NT ARRA AIN W

Y POW

16,995

Only 73,476 Miles

One Owner, Non Smoker, All Power, Moonroof Stk# 28745

$

ER TR

NT ARRA AIN W

Y

29,995

POW

ER TR

NT ARRA AIN W

Y

$

25,995

Only 70,972 Miles

Heated Leather, Moonroof, All Power, Running Boards, V8, CD Changer Stk# 28737

POW

Only 36,114 Miles

One Owner, Leather, All Power, 6-Disc CD Changer Stk# 28241

$

ER TRA

IN WA

RRAN

TY

13,995

Only 43,374 Miles

All Power, Moonroof, CD Player, Luggage Rack Stk# 28337

*Plus tax, title & plate. See dealer for details.

• Authorized Ford Diesel Repair • We Service All Makes • FREE Courtesy Cars • State Certified Body Shop • Pre-Owned Cars, Trucks, SUV’s & Vans

( 5 8 6 ) 7 2 7 - 3 8 8 5

www.shepherdlm.com

( 8 1 0 ) 3 2 9 - 5 7 7 2

ROMEO 32 Mile Rd.

9 -1 M in a (M t.) S

SHEPHERD Pleasing People With Price & Service Since 1946

68200 GRAND TRUNK RICHMOND, MI 48062

G

r

io at

t

ST. CLAIR

31 Mile Rd. NEW BALTIMORE


January 26, 2011

The Bay Voice

ATTENTION ALL LESSEES:

VoiceNews.com - 31

EARLY OUT ON ALL PAYOFFS $2000 OR LESS!!!

! w o N e l b a l i a Av

BONUS CASH

Michigan’s Exclusive 2011 INAUGURAL EDITION

SUPERCARS

2010 SRT8 CHALLENGER

Buy $ Now

s ’ r e g a n Ma ecial Sp

2011 SMS 570 CHALLENGER

Last Chance to Save Over $11,000

HEMI V8 Supercharged 570HP

Dealer!

Supercharged 550 HP

34,999

ALL NEW 2011 DODGE® DURANGO & ALL NEW 2011 CHRYSLER® 200

NEW 2010 DODGE® CHARGER Buy Now For

$

24

Remaining

Once They’re Gone, They’re Gone!

MSRP $25,995

NEW 2010 DODGE® GRAND CARAVAN

NEW 2010 DODGE® JOURNEY Employee Savings Starting at

$

IN STOCK & READY FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY!

14,397

0%

*

OR OR

$

17,995

$

Employee Lease as low as

Employee Savings Starting at

$

19,999

1.9% Financing

OR OR

Available

*

Employee Lease as low as

MSRP $29,755

$

$ MSRP $32,995

4X4 BIG HORN

13,995

*

$

Employee Savings Starting at

0%

$

Financing Available

OR OR

257*

$

$ MSRP $21,980

329* w/$1995 due

Employee Lease as low as

w/$1995 due

26,999*

General Public Lease as low as

w/$1995 due

265*

165*

NEW 2011 RAM® 1500 QUAD CAB 4X4

Employee Savings Starting at

294*

175* w/$1995 due

OR OR

Employee Lease as low as

w/$1995 due

$

w/$1995 due

General Public Lease as low as

w/$1995 due

172*

206*

OR OR

w/$1995 due

$

$

w/$1995 due

General Public Lease as low as

$

207*

217*

NEW 2010 DODGE® AVENGER

26,995

OR OR General Public Lease as low as

Employee Lease as low as

Employee Savings Starting at

$

14,664*

Employee Lease as low as

MSRP $24,990

*

$

w/$1995 due

$

w/$1995 due

General Public Lease as low as

$

187*

NEW 2011 JEEP® GRAND CHEROKEE

NEW 2010 CHRYSLER® TOWN & COUNTRY

PRICE BUSTER

OR OR

w/$1995 due

MSRP $21,595

Employee Savings Starting at

MainstreEt package

*

General Public Lease as low as

203*

$

NEW 2011 DODGE® CALIBER

Employee Savings Starting at

Financing for 72mos.

General Public Lease as low as

$

15,990*

Employee Lease as low as

237*

$ MSRP $36,560

w/$1995 due

279* w/$1995 due

100% GUARANTEED CREDIT

PARKWAY Show up... Sign up... & Ride!

21560 HALL RD. Located Between Groesbeck & Romeo Plank

888-711-0323

OPEN SATURDAY 10-3

www.ParkwayCPJ.com HOURS: MON & THURS 9-9 TUES, WED, FRI 9-6 • SATURDAY 10-3

24 HOUR HOTLINE

1-800-964-1265 Credit Problems?

NO PROBLEM! Rachel Collier INTERNET Shop-On-Line! (rcollier@parkwaycpj.com) • Pre-Approved • Inventory On Line

Check Us Out On:

*Price plus tax, title, plate dest. doc. fee. Must qualify for employee advantage and all available rebates including any targeted direct mail. Picture may not reflect actual vehicle. APR programs in lieu of factory rebates. Expires 1-31-11.

Dorian

DorianFord.com 1-888-288-4194

NEW 2011 FORD FIESTA

EDGE NEW 2011 FORD WAS $27,995

an D o ri

an Do ri

WAS $13,995 MSRP

BUY FOR

$ 5-Door Hatchback 40 MPG

$

10,795

139

*

* 39 Mo. Lease

$139 due, plus tax, title & plate. Includes renewal rebate. Security deposit waived w/approved credit.

FOCUS NEW 2011 FORD WAS $17,365

MSRP

$

10,537

139

0 DOWN up to 0% APR 7 2 Mos *

BUY FOR

4-Door Sedan 35 MPG

AUTO SHOW BONUS CASH! $

an Do ri

$

www.

*

$

26 MPG

39 Mo. Lease

$139 due, plus tax, title & plate. Includes renewal rebate. Security deposit waived w/approved credit.

NEW 2011 FORD FUSION an Do ri

GET DEEP DISCOUNTS ON OVER 300 USED VEHICLES ON SITE APPROVALS! NO WAITING! ‘10 FORD E350 CLUB

WAS $21,295 MSRP

‘10 FORD EXPLORER EDDIE BAUER

$

21,319

299

*

Auto trans 30 MPG

$

FLEX NEW 2011 FORD WAS $30,045 $ 7-Passenger 25 MPG

$

309

‘10 FORD FUSION SEL

12-Passenger, 8k Miles

36 Mo. Lease

3rd Row seating, 11k Miles

19,995

*

‘10 FORD RANGER XLT SUPERCAB

$

24,995

*

16,995

SEL NEW 2011 FORD TAURUS WAS $28,195 MSRP

*

‘10 FORD TAURUS ‘10 FORD SEL MUSTANG CONV’T

NEW 2011 FORD ESCAPE

Auto trans, 6k Miles

BUY FOR

17,233

*

*

$239 due, plus tax, title & plate. Includes renewal rebate. Security deposit waived w/approved credit.

Auto trans 28 MPG

$

21,336

299

*

* 39 Mo. Lease

$299 due, plus tax, title & plate. Includes renewal rebate. Security deposit waived w/approved credit.

SUPERCAB NEW 2011 FORD F150 WAS $33,825 an Do ri

WAS $22,995 MSRP

239

48 Mo. Lease

an Do ri

V6, Leather & More!

$

an Do ri

$

*

*

$ $

$169 due, plus tax, title & plate. Includes renewal rebate. Security deposit waived w/approved credit.

Auto trans 28 MPG

23,175

$309 due, plus tax, title & plate. Includes renewal rebate. Security deposit waived w/approved credit.

*

*

$

MSRP

BUY FOR

BUY FOR

14,922

169

24 Mo. Lease

an Do ri

BUY FOR

$

*

$299 due, plus tax, title & plate. Includes renewal rebate. Security deposit waived w/approved credit.

On Select Models, See Dealer for Details.

*

MSRP

BUY FOR

39 Mo. Lease

$

Power thru-out, Reduced!

16,995

*

$

19,995

*

2.9%

Leather, Alloys, Winter Priced

$

4X4

16,995

*

APR on select Certified Pre-owned Fords on Approved Credit Limited Term

• Vehicle History Report • 24 Hour Roadside Assistance • 115 Point Inspection • 6 Year/100,000 Mile Limited Powertrain Warranty • 3mo/3,000 Mile Limited Comprehensive (Premium Care) Warranty • Certified Pre-Owned Warranty is Transferable

$ Trailer Tow 18 MPG

$

MSRP

BUY FOR

24,226

289

*

* 36 Mo. Lease

$289 due, plus tax, title & plate. Includes renewal rebate. Security deposit waived w/approved credit.

All lease payments based on A/Z Plan discount with all Factory rebates to dealer. All Buy Now prices plus tax, title, plate, and destination with A/Z plan discount with all factory rebates to dealer. Picture may not represent actual vehicle on sale. 0% financing available for 36-72 months with approved credit. See dealer for details. All Sale prices end 1-31-11.

Text DORIAN to 53555 For More Info

Showroom Hours: Mon & Thurs 8:30am-9pm Tues, Wed & Fri 8:30am-6pm

Saturday 9:00am - 4:00pm

Costco & Sam’s Club members SAVE MORE!

Dorian 1-888-288-4194

Attention Mercury Owners Turn In Your Lease 11 Months Early See dealer for details

151/2 Mile & Gratiot


32 - VoiceNews.com

The Bay Voice

January 26, 2011

2011 CHRYSLER 200 TOURING

Premium Cloth Bucket Seats, 6-Speed Automatic Transmission, 2.4L I4 DOHC 16-Valve Dual VVt Eng. Customer Preferred Package 29U.

MSRP $21,995

Great Buys on Demos!

www.rosevillechryslerjeep.net • www.rosevillechryslerjeep.net • www.rosevillechryslerjeep.net • www.rosevillechryslerjeep.net • www.rosevillechryslerjeep.net • www.rosevillechryslerjeep.net

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www.rosevillechryslerjeep.net • www.rosevillechryslerjeep.net • www.rosevillechryslerjeep.net • www.rosevillechryslerjeep.net • www.rosevillechryslerjeep.net • www.rosevillechryslerjeep.net


Target Classified

MARKETPLACE 800-561-2248

586-716-8110

Classified Rate $29.16 per week

TARGET your market today place an ad in the Classified Marketplace Call Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Deadline for classifed ads is 1:00 p.m. on Monday. 1000 - 1090 3000 - 3330

t e g r a t

MERCHANDISE

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANIMALS

IN PRINT & ONLINE

2000 - 2240

EMPLOYMENT

4000 - 4170

TRANSPORTATION

6000 - 6140

REAL ESTATE

5000 - 5720

SERVICES

7000 - 7480

The Voice limits responsibility for any errors in ads to our mistakes only, for the space used only and for the first issue of publication only. Please check your ad on the first week it runs to ensure that it is correct. We are not responsible for any error after one week. Spelling errors not crucial to the ad wil be corrected in the next run but are not cause for compensation.

1005 Special Announcements GRAND OPENING The old Great Lakes Inn has been turned into an Adult Foster Care & Specialty Needs Home for Adults. Let us take care of your loved ones at a rate that will be lower than other homes without sacrificing the quality of care. Located at 9334 North River Rd., Algonac MI 48001. One mile north of downtown. For information 810-794-0455.

1070

Found

FOUND ROSARY Richmond Kmart Parking lot. In front radio shack. 586727-9414

2040 Auction / Estate Sale AUCTION IT! RepoMax Saint Clair County's Premier Auction House Now taking consignments! www.RepoMax.biz 586-725-7999 NOTICE OF LIEN SALE on December 27, 2010 10 a.m. at Keewahdin Mini Storage, 3189 Keewahdin Rd., Fort Gratiot for the following Units: A22 Windsor, C16 Sandnes, C18 McCartney, D9 Levitt, D10 Beebe, E23 Havens, G1 Sturdevant, G10 Campau, I12 Swinson, I44 Sammons, J3 Douglas, J19 Shafer. Published Jan. 26 & Feb. 2, 2011 STATE OF MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY Unclaimed Property Two Day Auction Coins - Currency Collectibles and Jewelry

January 29 & 30, 2011 10:00 A.M. Lansing Center 333 E Michigan Ave. Lansing, MI 48933 Inspection: Fri prior to sale; 10 am to 4 pm Sale Day; 9:30 am to 10:00 am Visit Our Website For Info/Photos/Updates 10% Buyers Premium Applies To All Purchases NOTE: CHECKS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED FOR PAYMENT Acceptable forms of payment: Cash - Visa Mastercard- Discover CHUCK CRYDERMAN & ASSOC Gary M. Berry 586-784-8890 - 248-299-5959 www.crydermanauctions.com www.garymberry.com YALE: AUCTION 7541 M-19 Auction Monday 1/31, 6:30pm, Preview 5:30pm Furniture, Antiques, Collectibles, LARGE amount of vintage toys weekly. Photos www.auctionzip.com ID #19604 COR-IAN AUCTIONS LLC 810-304-6085

2115

Farm Equipment

ALL TRACTOR PROBLEMS! We fix and repair at your home or business. J&R Service, 586-727-3916

FORD-MASSEY-KUBOTA-JOHN DEERE-SPECIALIST. Tractor servicing, tune-ups, repairs, hydraulics. Mobile repair service. State certified master mechanic. Insured. 586-344-6925

2120

Farm Produce / Flowers / Plants

Hay Square/ Round bales, no rain & FIREWOOD. St. Clair. Delivery Available. 586-709-4091

DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED MAKE $750-$1000 PER WEEK COAST TO COAST TRUCK DRIVING SCHOOL - Guaranteed job placement - Michigan Works approved - Tuition Cost Covered for eligible applicants 810-765-4300 586-201-7071 coast2coasttruckdrivingschool.com

4060

Education / Training

2140 Firewood / Fuel ALL SEASONED HARDWOOD FIREWOOD FOR SALE $75 FACE CORD. DELIEVERD & STACKED! 586-709-3087 FIREWOOD, 4'X4'X8' cords by semi loads, 989-426-5916 FIREWOOD $65 face cord delivered 248-818-0014

2190

Miscellaneous for Sale

GOGO ELITE Traveler Scooter, great shape, with O2 holder. Capacity 300lbs. $800. 586-727-3336

2200 Miscellaneous Wanted LOCAL COLLECTOR would like to purchase Military (US & Foreign) firearms and war souvenirs. 586-506-3622 WANTED DIABETIC test stripscash paid up to $15 per 100 strips 734-328-2614

2240

Sporting Goods

CCW CLASSES. Instructor Certified by NRA and Michigan Law Enforcement Training Council, $100. Larry,810-434-6740 CCW COURSE: $100 NRA Certified. Range, rentals, repairs, sales. DiamondKote refinishing. M&R Arms 586-954-3998 www.MRARMS.com Michigan Antique Arms Collectors 500 table show, Feb. 5th.-6th., Antique and modern fire arms, knives. Buy/ Sell/ Trade. Rock Financial Show Place 46100 Grand River Rd. Novi. Admission $6, open to public at 9am. Information 248-556-6590

3020

Pets

GOLDEN RETRIEVERS AKC, Vet Checked, shots, wormed, micro chipped, plus more! 586-749-5722 www.walnutgrovegoldens.com

4050 Drivers DRIVERS: Consistent Top Paying. High Miles for Teams or Solo's. Canada Qualified a plus. Werner Enterprises: 1-888-567-3104

ADMISSIONS PROFESSIONAL Ross Medical Education Center in New Baltimore is seeking an Admissions Representative with great communication skills, great listening skills and a strong commitment to education to interview and enroll students. The Admissions Professional will be responsible for managing lead flow, encouraging people to take the next step in the enrollment process and managing a contact list of a minimum of 100 calls per day. Ross offers competitive salary of $12.40-$14.00 per hour, comprehensive benefits package and a positive work environment. Duties include: ◆ Extensive phone work, email & internet to contact prospective students ◆ Setting and ensuring campus appointments show. ◆ Conducting effective on-campus interviews and tours ◆ Achieve weekly/monthly goals. ◆ Contributing to a positive team spirit. Hours are Mon-Fri and will include regularly scheduled evening hours. Qualifications include: Prior sales/customer service experience, positive attitude, tenacity, strong work ethic and belief in education, college degree preferred, "go-getter" attitude a MUST! Apply today at www.myrosscareer.com or fax resume and cover letter to 810-561-6669

FAIRHAVEN LATCHKEY DIRECTOR, TODDLER TEACHER AND PRE SCHOOL CAREGIVER Qualifications: Latchkey Director & Toddler Teacher: Associates degree or CDA with 12 semester hours in an early childhood/or 6 semester hours in a child related field with 2880 hours of experience in early childhood. Preschool Caregiver: High school diploma with child care experience preferred. Send resume or apply at Algonac Community Schools board of education office.

4080 General Employment AVON REPRESENTATIVES All Areas. PAY HOLIDAY BILLS. $1500 Bonus Available Call Julie 586-453-3076

BUY 3 WEEKS, GET 4TH WEEK FREE

www.voicenews.com

J anu ary Th aw

Au A uccttiio on n Thu r

rs. Ja n. 27 th

iew v e r P m 5:00 p Auction m 6:00 p

201 N. Riverside Ave St. Clair, MI (next to the Antique Mall of St. Clair, in the Riverview Plaza) Coins, Toys, Vintage Kids Puzzles, Porcelain Dolls, Oak Furniture and other pieces. Grand Father Clock (reserve), Original Art, Decorative Art, Oriental Primitives, Crocks, Tools, Church Pews, Chairs, Cookie Jars, Crystal Fine Glassware, Retro Pieces, Collectible Plates, New Items Arriving Daily!

Big River River Auctions Auctions L.L.C. L.L.C. Big Henry “Hank” “Hank” Miller Miller Next Auction Henry

Auctioneer Note: Numerous quality pieces, Sat, Feb 12th Don’t Miss this one!!

586-206-8455 586-206-8455

Terms: Cash, Visa, Mastercard, Check with MI ID • 3% buyers premium. CLEANING AUTHORITY Northern Macomb County Home Cleaners, Great Hours/Wages Paid Mileage, Car Required 586-749-6914

Clinton Township Group Home hiring DIRECT CARE STAFF all shifts. Please Call 586.752.0372 Monday-Friday between 8-4. Downriver Community Services is seeking a dependable Part-Time CUSTODIAN to work evening hours for our New Haven office. Please send resumes to Nikole at nhaack@downrivercs.org or fax 810-794-4407.

MOVIE EXTRAS to stand in the background for a major film. Earn up to $200 per day. Experience not required. 877-718-7068 New Baltimore Group Home now hiring full time, DIRECT CARE STAFF afternoon & midnight shifts. Prefer MORC training. Call Kathy 586.725.0757

1 BEDROOM LAKESHORE POINTE APARTMENTS

On Site Laundry Jefferson and 23 Mile Walking Distance to Parks/Shopping

Heat Included!!!

LOW Security Deposit!!!

START A NEW CAREER! Looking to start a career in Real Estate? Professionals For more details call Kim 248-789-1086 or email Kim.Turner789@ColdwellBanker.com

586-913-3095 586-598-9130 248-356-2600 FREE WI-FI ALGONAC & RICHMOND MANOR

GET PAID TO WAVE! We are looking for outgoing, energetic people to be our costumed characters. Temporary positions available, 586-948-4TAX (4829) HELP WANTED Substitute Teachers Requirements: 90 College Credited hours from 4 year University Education Verification. Contact: Alan Latosz Algonac Community Schools 1216 St. Clair Blvd., Algonac (810) 794-9364 - E.O.E. HELP WANTED The Council on Aging, Inc., serving St. Clair County has the following position open: KITCHEN AIDE/HOSTESS. Full-time position (35 hours per week) with benefits. Meal planning/preparation experience helpful. Flexible Schedule. Empathy for seniors. Apply at your local senior center by Monday, January 31, 2011. EOE. MACOMB-BASED MOLD SHOP is looking for individuals who are committed, dependable, organized team players who excel in a fast pace environment. MoldMaker 1st. & 2nd. shift - must have: 1. Ability to build tight tolerance, intricate molds & details 2. An extensive knowledge of Hurco, Fadal, Haas machines a plus 3. Computer software experience in Cimatron or Mastercam 4. Background in all aspects of the Plastic Injection Mold Builds process CNC Machinist, 2nd shift - must have: 1. Ability to run CNC Machines for Mold Base, Detail and other 2D/3D work 2. An extensive knowledge of Hurco, Fadal, Haas machines 3. Computer software experience in Cimatron or Mastercam 4. Background in all aspects of the Plastic injection Mold builds process 5. Able to perform additional duties using shop equipment CAM Programmer, 2nd. shift - must have: 1. Ability to program and run CNC Machines for high tolerance details, core and cavity blocks 2. Skills to optimize the cutting of Aluminum, P-20 and hard milling 3. An extensive knowledge of high speed machining and set-up on Makino's and other VMC's 4. Preferred computer software experience in Cimatron or Mastercam 5. Background in all aspects of the Plastic injection Mold builds process Fax application with contact details to: 586-203-4633

START YOUR REAL ESTATE CAREER TODAY! Let us show you how to start in this market! Full training and mentoring. Call today! 586-421-1555

4090

1 Bedroom $450 2 Bedroom $500

Health Care

DIRECT CARE Full-time opening in Romeo. Must be MORC trained. Great starting pay and good benefits. Call Donna 586-752-3979.

Immediate Occupancy Newly Redecorated

4150 Skilled / Technical

2101 Fruit Street, Algonac 36901 Dow, Richmond

PRESS BRAKE OPERATOR Must be able to do own set-ups and read prints. Days. 50575 Richard W. Blvd, Chesterfield 48051. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

5010 Apartments / Flats

Onsite Laundry Facilities

586-727-9300 ALGONAC Studio Apt $385, 2 bdrm $525, appliances included, onsite laundry, no pets 586-747-3221

A NEW YEAR ! ! A NEW BEGINNING ! !

1-2 Bdrm Apartment. $455-$555, Security Deposit. Washer/dryer hook-ups. Carport. Appliances included. No Pets. Between Marine City and Algonac.

in your carefree apt home

THE MEADOWS at Anchor Bay 55+ Community

810-765-9566

Rent Includes: Heat/ water, select activities, maintenance, pet friendly, controlled entry, private patio/balcony •

1 & 2 BEDROOMS from $549 + $450 Deposit ✓One Month Free ✓Private Entrance ✓ Pet Friendly ✓ Anchor Bay Schools ✓ Pool/Playground ✓ Newly Remodeled

50785 Jefferson Ave New Baltimore

Call: 586-725-7600 Call for a tour today!

www.watersedgemi.com

586-725-4000

CHESTERFIELD 1 & 2 Bedrooms $299 Moves You In Starting $450/mo. + Security Appliances, On-Site Laundry, Completely Renovated, A/C 586-531-2221, 586-716-2941

1 BEDROOM Ideal single! Hall/Gratiot, Clinton Township. Heat/water, appliances, unfurnished, country setting, no pets. 586-468-7766

BELLE RIVER APARTMENTS Studio Apartment $335/mo + deposit 2 Bedrooms $475/mo + deposit 810-765-8146

ARMADA: Heather Heights NEW Townhouses, 1 & 2 bedroom with garages. Starting at $650. 586-855-7551

MARINE City 1 bedroom apt, $400/ month plus security. No pets. Call 248-225-3229

Waters Edge Estates 50631 Jefferson

MARINE CITY


2ROP - The Voice Target

Jan 26, 2011

2000 GMC SIERRA 5010 Very Clean, Ready for Work! SK#U2245

$

Clean In & Out! SK#U2488

$

5,995

2003 SATURN LW300 WAGON Leather, Only 38,000 miles SK#U2495

$

7,995

2004 JAGUAR X-TYPE All Wheel Drive, Luxury SK#U2184

$

8,995

2008 PONTIAC G5 Loaded, Only 29,000 miles SK#U2410

$

9,995

2010 KIA OPTIMA

FREE Water & Carport, POOL

11,995

2007 CHEVY MALIBU Only 14,000 miles SK#U1966

$

11,995

2007 SATURN AURA

Clean,Newly Remodeled

Cats Welcome Low Move-In Costs

1st Month Rent FREE Safe, Quiet Atmosphere

Close to SANG Cotton Rd. & Sugarbush

www.chesterfieldmanorapartments.com conditions apply*

11,995

2006 PONTIAC G6 GTP Leather, Monroof SK#U2367

$

11,995

2008 CHEVY IMPALA LT Only 24,000 miles SK#U2479

$

12,995

Off Donner Road I-94 & 23 Mile Rd.

248-584-3225

586-598-0300

www.oakviewsquare.com

Apartments

RICHMOND

Chesterfield

586-598-9130

Call: 586-727-9793

SENIOR APARTMENTS 1 Bedroom Apartments 62 Years or Older Rent starts at $525

Contact

Cathy 810-765-9685 Susan 616-942-6553 TDD 800-649-3777

$

2007 CHEVY MALIBU LTZ Leather, Moonroof, Only 15,000 miles SK#U2484

$

13,995

2007 SATURN RELAY Clean, Only 35,000 miles SK#U2072

$

13,995

2007 PONTIAC SOLSTICE Only 15,000 miles SK#U2454

$

14,995

2009 CHEVY EQUINOX LT Only 30,000 miles SK#U2327

$

17,995

2010 SATURN VUE XR $

RICHMOND Very nice Loft 1 bedroom apartment for rent. Washer, Dryer, Central Air, & Large private deck. $525/month. Heat and Water included. No Smoking or Pets 586-206-1719

MARINER COVE FAMILY APARTMENTS Marine City, MI.

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments Available. Heat included, Rent Starts at $520.00

Cathy 810-765-9685 Susan 616-942-6553 TDD 800-649-3777

RICHMOND

Equal Opportunity Provider

3 GREAT LOCATIONS ✦ 36075 Bartell ✦ 35260 Monroe ✦ 35241 Park Street UPDATED 1 & 2 BEDROOMS

MEMPHIS 2 Bedroom apt., appl. inc. $495 mo. 2 Bedroom Duplex $595/mo. 3 Bedroom 2.5 bath. Home $850/mo. No Pets! 586-242-5089

$420-$480/mo. + Deposit

RICHMOND: Clean, 1 Bedroom, Appliances included. Immediate Occupancy 586-615-3000

586-727-9660

NEW BALTIMORE, Downtown, 1 Bedroom, Free Laundry very nice, mature adults please, $450 monthly. 586-876-3739

WOODLAND VILLAGE OF RICHMOND Single level, private entrance, patios, pets, washer/dryer. $475-$525. Senior Community 50-Up

RICHMOND 68255 Main St. Small 2 Bedroom, 1st floor. $385 monthly + utilities Andary Realty 586-776-3100

586-727-4115

NEW BALTIMORE Kitchenettes from $130 Weekly or daily rates available Lakecrest Motel, 586-725-9693

/ Townhouses 5030 Condos / Duplexes For Rent East China: Waterfront Duplex or Apt. 3 bedroom, large yard, no pets. $600 per month + security. 706-5946441

810-794-5544 800-813-4654 www.c21fbi.com 4181 Pte. Tremble • Algonac, MI 48001

TOP PRODUCER

KATHI HACKSTOCK ASSOCIATE BROKER

Leather, Chrome wheels, Moonroof SK#U2467

$

20,995

LAETHEM

CERTIFIED SALES & SERVICE 68811 Main St., RICHMOND

586-727-3115 www.raylaethem.com Photos may not represent actual vehicle.

CLAY TWP • ON 2 ACRES • GORGEOUS OPEN LAYOUT • GREAT RM W/FIREPLACE • LARGE KITCHEN • 24X26 GARAGE • MANY UPDATES

NOW FEATURING

Rentals Starting At $599/mo.

586-749-5090 *Restrictions Apply

5040 Houses For Rent

homefirstcertified.com/meadow-creek-community.aspx

ALGONAC LEASE SPECIAL! 2/3 BEDROOM HOMES STARTING FROM $550! Call for Details: 810-794-5555 ALOGONAC 1 Bedroom, w/ Appliances/water included, immediate occupancy, $350/mo. + Dep. no pets. 810-794-4812 Clay Twp. Clean 3 bedroom, 1 bath, 1000 sq ft, half acre fenced yard. Available 1/10/11. $900 Algonac Schools. 810-397-5305 FAIR Haven: Lake front, 3 bdrm, 1 bath. $1,000 month + $1,000 security deposit. 586-725-1977

FREE HANDYMAN HOME PLUS FREE RENT!!! UNTIL 3/1/2011 Richmond Place CALL 888-558-2534 www.freemobilehomes.net Certain conditions may apply EHO Expires 2/28/11

GOOD NEWS! BEST DEALS EVER!!! Record Sales On Repos & Pre Owned Homes

We'll Also BUY* or SELL YOUR HOME! FREE Market Analysis RICHMOND

Some Restrictions Apply*

$800 PER MONTH PLUS SECURITY. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, 1 CAR ATTACHED GARAGE. A/C, APPLIANCES & BALCONY IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY

CALL SUNRISE HOMES 586-749-7700

www.SunriseManufacturedHomes.net

586-727-9300 IRA TWP, 10240 Dixie (M-29), Lake access/ acres. 1 bedroom ranch, shed, appliances, $600. 586-781-2116 NEW BALTIMORE – 2 bedroom, attached garage, fenced yard. Located near lake. Includes stove, refrig, washer and dryer. Call for more details: 586-337-1383 NEW BALTIMORE - 3 Bedroom, 4.5 Bath., $1500/mo. Brick, colonial, waterfront on canal. 586-337-2088 New Haven 3 bedroom, 1 bath on crawl. Appliances incl. washer/dryer. $800/ month. 586-212-1899

www.voicenews.com

5045

Land For Lease

CLAY TWP • 2574 SQ.FT.- 7 BEDRMS • ON LIMITED ACCESS CANAL • TOTALLY REMOLDED 1991 • AWESOME FAMILY ROOM • GRANITE COUNTERTOPS • 2 FULL BATHS

(VP7583)

Homes for $1 Rentals: 3 bed/2 bath starting at $599! Move in special $199 1st year* & we move you! Americana Estates 586-749-5169 *Restrictions Apply

SiteDISCOUNTED Rent $199 SITE RENT FOR 3 YEARS! Receive up to $8,500 If you relocate your home to one of our beautiful communities. Call TODAY!

Richmond Place 888-316-9517 St Clair Place 888-250-1565

www.relocatemyhouse.com

DEER HUNTING LEASE WANTED, Responsible adult Male from the area looking to exclusively lease min. 80 acres farm/wooded land for deer hunting purposes only. 313-347-3910

Some restrictions apply Expires 2/28/11 EHO

6030 Autos Wanted CONRADS TOWING Flatbed Service Available Cash for Junk Cars Open 7-Days 586-243-2220 or 586-817-2905

REAL ESTATE THINKING OF BUYING OR SELLING?

I Can Help!

ST. CLAIR & MACOMB COUNTY Linda LaCroix

• 29 years full time experience • Lifelong resident • Representing buyers & sellers Call for details

All price ranges. All shapes & sizes. Great time to move up or scale down. Country property, vacation property, lake, river & canal front property, investment properties

FREE NOTARY PUBLIC SERVICE. COMPLETE LIST OF CURRENT & SOLD PROPERTIES GIVE ME A CALL, I WILL BE GLAD TO HELP.

$99,900 $129,900 (VP7573)

....Bankruptcy? ....Foreclosure? NO PROBLEM!

Call Today LANDSTAR HOMES

HAWAII VACATION Imperial Resort, Honolulu 1-Bedroom, 2-Bath. KOA Timeshare $800 - Call Eileen 810-580-9875 www.imperialofwaikiki.com

Navigation, Only 18,000 miles SK#U2409

22,995

$900/mo.

/ Vacation 5070 Resort Homes For Rent

2009 SAAB 9-7X $

FREE WI FI

Rosewood Terrace Penthouse

FUTURE BUILDERS, Inc. Real Estate

2007 HUMMER H3

CAN'T GET FINANCED? Been Turned Down?

2 Bedrooms, 2 Full Baths, A/C All Appliances +washer/dryer

VAN HAVEN Apartments

Contact

18,995

586-725-8171

www.anchorbaymobilehomepark.com

586-727-9300

RICHMOND TWP. 1 bedroom $300/mo. furnished, 1 bedroom $250/mo. Unfurnished, Security + electric. No Pets. Horse Stable available for boarding. 586-727-1277

Like New, Only 13,000 miles SK#U2507

$900 per month. Call: 586-727-9300

$449

www.RichmondClubApts.com

12,995 13,995

featuring: ✓ Anchor Bay marina and fishing ✓ Three clubhouses ✓ Two swimming pools ✓ Fun social activities ✓ Large home sites

Penthouse/Fireplace Upgrades Available

586-727-1210

Only 14,000 miles SK#U2208

Only 18,000 miles SK#U2504

Nice Community Across from Lake St. Clair

Apartments From ◆ Free Heat & Water ◆ 0 Deposit* ◆ Biggest 1 & 2 Bedrooms in town! ◆ Great location next to community park ◆ Open 7 Days Select Apts-Conditions Apply*

2007 CHEVY MALIBU MAXX

2008 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX

Sites for Rent starting at $349 / month

RICHMOND CONDO Rosewood Terrace Townhouse

Balconies & Patios, Pet Friendly Access to Macomb Orchard Trail

MARINER COVE

3 Bedrooms New Appliances

ANCHOR BAY MOBILE HOME PARK

RICHMOND CLUB Marine City

Linda LaCroix

For All Your Real Estate Needs Now And In The Future

CINDY'S SEWING inc. Alterations, repairs, tailoring. Serving all your sewing needs. Quality work, fast service. 810-794-9849

CREATIVE SEWING CENTER professional alterations and tailoring for men and women. Bridal and prom work, leather repairs, zippers replaced, dressmaking and restyling. 586-749-9808

/ 5680 Manufactured Mobile Homes

Richmond-Luxury

Call

ALL KINDS of sewing by Rana, alterations, tailoring, repairs, zippers, leather, hunting and more. 586-925-0451

7040 Appliance Repair 30 Day Warranty! REFURBISHED Washers/Dryers

INVESTMENT - Fair Haven. Clean 3 bedroom, 1 bath, large yard, all appliances. $65,000. 810-397-5305

Flexible Lease Terms Available! Appliances, C/A, No Pets $475 monthly + utilities

2 BR Walk to Target Stores/Restaurants On-site Laundry 1/2 Off 1st Month's Rent!

7020 Alterations

5565 St. Clair County

2 BEDROOMS

Amenities & Features: ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

NEW BALTIMORE Large Condo, 2BR, Sun-Room, Garage, Living Room, All Appliances, Washer/Dryer. Owner pays condo dues 586-707-0216

2 Bedrooms, 1.5 Bathrooms, 1 Car Attached Garage, Kitchen & Laundry Appliances & Basement. App Fee. Security plus 1 months rent to move in.

GEORGETOWN

Totally Refurbished

Paul 248-680-7214 UC Redevelopments, LLC

In-Unit Washer/Dryer Hookups Available ◆ Pet Friendly ◆ Private Entrances ◆ Balcony or Patio ◆ Beautiful Pool & Sundeck ◆ Carports Available

Richmond

Government Subsidized Homes For Sale in Mt. Clemens

Call for Eligibility Requirements

2 Bdrms starting $645/mo.

Equal Opportunity Provider

$

From $375

$450 MOVES YOU IN!

Only 18,000 miles SK#U2290

$

810-982-1502

FREE RENT

✭Pet Friendly✭ ✭ ✭1 Bedroom✭ ✭ ✭Free Water✭ ✭ ✭Central Air & Heat✭ ✭ ✭ On-site Laundry✭ ✭

CHARMING ST. CLAIR, Cheerful, Spacious River View, 2 BR, 2 Bath, Appliances, Garage, Washer/Dryer Hookup MARINE CITY, 2 bedroom upper, 1 bath, remodeled, separate entrance, fridge/stove included. $535/mo. +utilities. 810-329-2077

810-217-4145 810-392-2393 Flexible lease terms!

5550

Macomb County

ALGONAC: Two, 2 bedroom duplexes. Completely remodeled, each have laundry room with new washer/dryer, new appliances and patio. $700/month. 586-781-5431

Studio - 1 BDRM

OAKVIEW SQUARE APTS

Like New, Only 20,000 miles SK#U2523

$

~MEMPHIS APTS~ Stay warm this winter with FREE HEAT ! !

GIGANTIC 800 sq.ft. 1 Bedrooms From $520*

Only 55,000 miles SK#U2269

8,995

810-794-5016 or 810-278-7827

Chesterfield Manor Apts

586-949-1155

5030

Condos / Townhouses / Duplexes For Rent

ALGONAC 2 Bedroom, 1.5 Bath Townhouse Unfurnished, Pets, A/C $590 Monthly + Utilities

MONTH FREE!

2007 PONTIAC G6 $

5010

Apartments / Flats

1

3,995

2002 PONTIAC MONTANA

Apartments / Flats

Visit my web page www.LindaLaCroix.com

1-866-325-4632 DIRECT T OLL FREE OR 586-718-5147

7 Day Service: $30. Oven igniter sales/installation. Appliance parts. 586-725-2230

NO ONE READS SMALL ADS. oh really?

7080 Brick / Block 10% DISCOUNT TO senior citizens and veterans. Act now! JB Masonry, quality and dependable, free estimates. Specializing in all masonry repair including tuck pointing, glass block, fireplaces, chimney repairs and sweeps, porches, doors, windows and masonry cutting. 29 years experience. 586-725-4950 810-499-7149

HAVE A GREAT STORY? Call The Voice at 716-8100

/ 7090 Building Construction

COMMERCIAL AGRICULTERAL RESIDENTIAL SOLID BARN CONSTRUCTION Specializing In: ✦Pole Building ✦Cement work Contract Jobs ✦C

Carl Trupp

810-387-2862

ULTIMATE CONTRACTING CORP.

Floor Leveling House Raising Structural Repair Beams - Joists Foundations 810-794-2232 Lic. & Ins. Tile 7100 Ceramic Installation Affordable Ceramic Tile INSTALLATION/REPAIRS 20 Years Experience Many Local References FREE ESTIMATES! 586-630-7474

7110 Child Care COUNTRY Meadows Montessori MORE than Daycare. MORE affordable than you think. MORE than 20 yrs. serving our community. "Montessori encourages its students to dream, then provides the academic tools to make those dreams reality." 2 openings now available (must be at least 2 ½ yrs. old) Call for info/tour: 586-725-2042 Located on M29, 3 miles E. of County Line. Country-Meadows-Montessori.com MULBERRYBUSH CHILD DAYCARE Licensed facility in Richmond, Armada, 30 years experience, small enrollment, pre-school program, 6wks.-4yrs. 248-765-1954

7120 Chimney 29 YEARS EXPERIENCE JB CHIMNEY SWEEP. Protect your home against fire from cresole buildup. Have your chimney swept yearly, $73.80 former customers, $78.80 new. 586-725-4950

810-499-7149

C&R CHIMNEY SPECIALIST Complete Chimney Services, professional cleaning, brick/masonry repairs, woodstoves installed. Insured. 810-794-0800 586-822-6960

/ Janitorial 7130 Cleaning Services AFFORDABLE CLEANING SERVICES Honest, Dependable, Affordable Rates References available, 7yrs. experience, Satisfaction guaranteed! Karen:586-360-0401 MAID IN THE USA Professional Cleaning. Home, Office. Licensed, Bonded, Insured. Free Estimates, Martha 810-765-5752

7175 Drywall / Plastering BOB'S DRYWALL FINISHING Complete Drywall Service Specializing in taping/finishing All plaster/drywall repairs 25 yrs. Experience Call Bob:586-944-8490 CLASSIC PLASTERING and drywall: wet plaster repair our specialty. Sprayed or hand applied texture, insured, free estimates 810-329-3869


Jan 26, 2011

7190

The Voice Target - 3ROP

Electrical

7285

M.G.S. ELECTRIC Serving all your electrical needs! Residential/Commercial/New construction. Licensed & Insured. Free Estimate! 810-378-6060

7230

7380

Roofing

100 YEARS IN BUSINESS 100% Guaranteed Against Leaks! Licensed/Insured, Free Estimates. Sherriff-Goslin Roofing 810-985-8817 800-964-1906

7408 Siding / Gutters

John: 810-734-5929 Bob: 810-580-8970

7270 Handyman Emergency Storm/Water Damage. FIRST AID HOME REPAIR ROOF TO BASEMENT! Insurance work. Plumbing, electrical, drywall, painting, decks, Sump-pumps, egress windows, floor leveling, foundations, structural repairs. Licensed/Insured. Jeff: 810-650-1696 HANDYMAN JOE All home repairs: basements, plumbing, electrical, carpentry, painting. Licensed. Guaranteed! Good prices! 586-817-0228 Len's Handyman Home Repairs Plumbing,Electrical, Woodworking, Cabinet Repairs Per Hour or Job Len ~ 586-612-1094 NAGY'S SERVICE PAINTING, Roofing, Carpentry, Dry Wall, Ceramic, Electrical, Plumbing, Debris Removal, Snow Service, EXCELLENT WORKMANSHIP 586-549-1300

Heating & Cooling

AIR CONDITIONING, 95% FURNACES BOILERS, WATER HEATERS, TANKLESS SERVICE & INSTALLATION Federal Tax Rebate, Ask us! WHITE HEATING & COOLING.

810-794-0777 EFFECIENT FURNACES from $1,425. Boilers $2,000 CENTRAL AIR FROM $1,895. FED Tax Credit up to $1,500 SERVICE ALL MAKES! Financing Available. REASONABLE HEATING & COOLING 810-367-2003

7285

CENTRAL BOILER outdoor wood furnaces starting at $4490. Limited time offer instant rebates up to $1000 586-709-7165 or 586-405-3698

Flooring

FLOORING by SCHULTZ CONTRACTING Carpet, Tile, Ceramic, VCT, Laminate, Hardwood LICENSED/INSURED

7280

Home Improvement

See it FIRST,

PAT SCHORNAK ● ● ● ● ●

KITCHEN & BATHS ADDITIONS & DECKS ROOFING & SIDING FINISHED BASEMENT CUSTOM PAINTING Licensed and Insured 586-949-7771 Check Out: www.hometechofmacomb.com

7350

Painting & Decorating

HOME IMPROVEMENTS *Seamless Gutters *Siding *Trim *Roofing

LICENSED AND INSURED 586-615-5985

810-765-5955

7450 Tree Service 100% SATISFACTION! Gordon & Sons Tree. Tree Trimming, Topping, Removals, Dozing, Excavating. Insured, Free Estimates. 810-794-5508 810-523-5377

100% RELIABILITY Interior/Exterior painting. Plaster/Drywall repair. Also handyman services. Quality guaranteed, Reasonable rates, Free estimates, References, Insured. K&S Painting. Owner Operated: 586-360-0031

BOB'S INTERIOR & EXTERIOR Painting, Wallpapering and Removal 35 Years Experience! Licensed/Insured, Free Estimates 586-725-3611 ESSIAN PAINTING Special Winter Rates Interior, Exterior Licensed, Insured, Free Estimates CALL BOB: 586-727-2689

7365 Plumbing A-1 PLUMBING fixture repair or replacement, basement bathrooms, sump pumps and backups, Licensed & Insured. Free estimates, 25 years experience. Call - Darrell: 586-436-8492

BRASS PLUMBING PROS, LLC. All Plumbing, Home/Business Licensed/Insured. Personal Service. 586-725-7165 Anytime 586-944-3834 TOM'S PLUMBING: All plumbing repairs and installations, Water heaters, Sump pump, disposals, Licensed and insured 40 years Experience. 586-344-0391

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MOORE TREE SERVICE Trimming, removal, Stump grinding. Licensed/Insured, Certified Arborist, Free Estimates, Senior Discounts Firewood $55. 586-727-8754 586-405-6355

7460 Trucking & Hauling CJ TRUCKING Screened Topsoil, Sand, Gravel, Limestone, Fill Dirt, Driveway Grading, Backfill Seawalls, Tractor/Backhoe Work. Fast Service Fair Prices 7 Days 810-794-9156 SAMPIER TRUCKING MOBILE DUMPSTERS *TOPSOIL *FILL DIRT *DRIVEWAY STONE BOBCAT SERVICE LIGHT HAULING 586-709-7494

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810-794-2008

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Jan uar y T h aw

Au A uc ct tiio on n

Thu rs. Jan . 27 th

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Auctioneer Note: Numerous quality pieces, Sat, Feb 12th Don’t Miss this one!!

Terms: Cash, Visa, Mastercard, Check with MI ID • 3% buyers premium.

56450


36 - VoiceNews.com

The Bay Voice

January 26, 2011

$500

AUTO SHOW BONUS CASH! JANUARY ONLY!!

2

OPEN THIS SATURDAY 9am-2pm

YOU WON’T FIND A BETTER DEAL!

1 1 0

CHECK OUR PRICES!!

ST. CLAIR WINTERFEST FRI-SAT

EMPLOYEE PRICING FOR EVERYONE! WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, FRIDAY ONLY Select 2010 Models

2011 CHRYSLER 200 2011 JEEP COMPASS 2011 DODGE DURANGO 2011 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY “TOURING EDITION”

“LATITUDE 4X4”

• Power Seat • 31 MPG/hwy • 17” Aluminum Whls

4X2 MODELS ALSO AVAILABLE

LIMITED MODELS ALSO AVAILABLE

NOW

NOW

$

List $21,995

16,581*

List $25,055

$

• Heated Seats • Steering Whl Audio Ctrls • AM/FM/CD Touch Tone Sound Sys.

19,442*

2010 DODGE AVENGER

“EXPRESS 4X4”

• New Stow-n-Place Roof Rack • New Touch Tone Radio W/rear Back Up Camera • New Premium Interior

CITADEL & CREW MODELS ALSO AVAILABLE

TOURING L AND LIMITED MODELS ALSO AVAILABLE

NOW

NOW

LEASE * $

BUY

** $ ** 179 203 13,804

$

/mo.

(Employee lease)

27,536*

List $32,990

/mo.

(Non-Employee lease)

• Aluminum whls • Power Windows/Locks • Cruise & Tilt

• 3.7L Magnum V6 • Air Conditioning • Auto Headlights

LEASE * $

/mo.

(Employee lease)

/mo.

BUY

(Non-Employee lease)

/mo.

(Employee lease)

221

/mo.

**

20,432 173

$

$

/mo.

(Employee lease)

BUY

**

219

**

219

/mo.

BUY

/mo.

(Non-Employee lease)

/mo.

/mo.

(Non-Employee lease)

2011 DODGE RAM 1500

“LAREDO” 4X4

“BIG HORN” QUAD CAB 4X4

• New Keyless Go • Steering wheel audio controls • New 3.6 Pentastar V6

• Remote start • 5.7L HEMI V8 & Dual Exhaust • Chrome 20” wheels

**

27,276 259

$

* $

(Employee lease)

LEASE * $

LEASE

** $ ** 254 279 17,154

$

2011 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE

LEASE **

• Aluminum whls • V6 engine • Cloth bucket seats

(Non-Employee lease)

• 4.0L V6 • 25MPG • 3-Zone temp control • Power latch & Sliding doors

* $

$

/mo.

(Employee lease)

“TOURING EDITION”

BUY

“SE”

LEASE * $

20,301 179

$

(Non-Employee lease)

2010 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY

2010 DODGE CHARGER

• “Freedom Top” Hard • Air Conditioning • Automatic trans

BUY

**

months*

“SPORT” 4X4

LEASE

12,342 199

$

/mo.

(Non-Employee lease)

up to

0

2011 JEEP WRANGLER

• Remote keyless entry • AM/FM/6-disc CD • Power Windows/Locks

$

/mo.

(Employee lease)

We Care at “SE”

**

* $

% 72

months*

* $

LEASE

** $ ** 192 229 14,609

$

up to

2010 DODGE JOURNEY

BUY

List $29,834

2011 DODGE RAM 1500 ST

% 72

0

23,696* REG CAB 4X2

** $ ** 175 219 12,964

$

$

“MAINSTREET”

• Heated Leather Seats • Rear Spoiler • Steering Whls Auto Ctrls

BUY

$

2011 DODGE CALIBER

“R/T”

“TOURING EDITION”

• Trailer Tow w/ Trailer Brake Damping • 3rd Row Seat • R. Air/Heat

/mo.

(Employee lease)

$

**

303

/mo.

BUY

** $ ** 223 278 24,494

$

(Non-Employee lease)

LEASE * $

/mo.

(Employee lease)

/mo.

(Non-Employee lease)

*BUY: Chrysler Employee Price with all available rebates and lease loyalty/competitive bonus cash; add dest., tax, lic., doc. Ally Financial may be required and 0% up to 72 mo. on select 2010 models. See us for employee pricing thru 1-29-11 only. **LEASE: 36 month, low mileage, with all available rebates and lease loyalty/competitive bonus cash; $1,995 down plus 1st mo., security deposit where applicable, tax, lic., doc. Subject to availability. See us for employee pricing thru 1-29-11 only.

2010 DODGE CALIBER SXT $

NOW

13,900

• Power windows/locks • Cruise/Tilt • Aluminum wheels

$

NOW

• Full power features • Side supplemental air bags • Factory warranty

NOW

13,900

2010 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4

• Remote keyless entry • Power windows/locks • Low Miles!

$

WE’LL GLADLY DELIVER YOUR NEW OR CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED VEHICLE TO YOUR HOME OR OFFICE! Mon.-Thurs. 8:30-8:00 Tues., Wed., Fri. 8:30-6:00 Saturday 9:00-2:00

•Power adj. pedals • Auto headlamps • Loaded with features

$

$

NOW

• Premium cloth seats • QuadraTrac 4x4 system • All power equipment

$

• Power sliding doors • 3-Zone tep ctrl • Stow ‘n Go

NOW

13,900

2008 JEEP COMMANDER SPORT 4X4

22,900 15,800 JANUARY BEST 2009 CHRYSLER TOWN & 2008 DODGE GRAND COUNTRY TOURING CARAVAN SXT CERTIFIED NOW NOW 16,900 14,900 VEHICLES! Guaranteed Top Dollar For Your Trade-In! $

2008 DODGE CHARGER SE

2009 DODGE AVENGER SXT

• Power seat • Aluminum whls • Good V6 fuel economy

2007 DODGE RAM 1500 BIG HORN QUAD CAB 4X4 $

NOW

19,900

• 20” Tires, Aluminum whls • Power r. sliding window • Fog lights

2007 DODGE NITRO SXT 4X4 $

NOW

13,900

• Power seat • Compass/Temp Center • Sharp!!

Plus tax, title, plate, license, doc fee. Picture may not represent actual vehicle.

VISIT US ON THE WEB AT 24/7 - WWW.STCLAIRAUTO.COM

810-329-2100

1250 Carney Drive, St. Clair

Bay Voice  

The January 26, 2011 edition of the Bay Voice

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