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Issue 243

May 2019

Lost for words? Not this lot... A great night for Scrabblers at the Red Hill Hotel! Table after table of concentration... and the best part? It was so successful it is going to become...

esday Wedn st at 1 May . is 6 p.m t... ex the n

CHEWTON DOMAIN SOCIETY Inc Reg # A0034364L PO Box 85, Chewton. Victoria. 3451

www.chewton.net

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Chewton’s Biggest Morning Tea 2019 It’s May already! That means it’s BIGGEST MORNING TEA (BMT) time. So… out with the recipe books, check the cups and saucers, make lots of lists and let’s get stuck into it. The BMT has become a fixture on Chewton’s social calendar and we look forward to welcoming you to the Chewton Town Hall at 10.00am on Friday, 24th May. Jess Saunders the Manager of the Castlemaine Library will be our Guest Speaker this year. She will give us some understanding of the way libraries operate today - very differently from when the Castlemaine Mechanics Institute operated in the same building that houses our very popular library today. Everyone is welcome – we will serve you lots of goodies – sweet and savoury and as much tea and coffee as you can drink. Diane Frape-Linton has made another lovely quilt for us to raffle (tickets: $2.00 each). There will be other raffles too. Gather up a few friends and come along on 24th May: you will be most welcome. If you have any

special dietary requirements or need further information any of the following will be happy to try to help you:Marie Jones on 5472 2892; Judy Cobb – 5472 5118 or Barbara Dry - 5472 3385. Funds raised at the Biggest Morning Tea are used to support Cancer Research. Barbara Dry.

Fryerstown Community Lunch The Fryerstown community will welcome anyone who would like to join us at our next monthly 3 course luncheon at the old School commencing at 12.30 on the 26th May. Children and the elderly especially! Bookings at Fryerstownschool@gmail.com

Fryerstown Community Lunch $12.50 ($5 for kids 12 and under) BYO: drink of choice

Yoga classes leave you with a deep sense of relaxation on all levels - physically, mentally and emotionally...

Come and join the yoga course in Chewton. • • • •

If you have never done yoga before, feel free to come and try the gentle class. If you have experience then join the progressive course. We do body postures, breathing practices and guided meditation. Wednesday afternoon/evenings in the Chewton Town Hall.

YOGA IN CHEWTON For enquiries or enrolment forms, please call Iris on 0419 110 125.

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Cornish Mining is a World Heritage Site

Barry Gamble (third from left) with a town hall cuppa Author and a major figure in heritage interpretation Barry Gamble has been taking in the local sights, scenes and relics of our local Castlemaine Diggings National Heritage Park (CDNHP). Barry visited the area to see first hand the remains of Cornish Engine Houses in central Victoria. Evidence of these structures can be found near Castlemaine, Carisbrook, Timor and Smeaton. Barry is in the final stages of finishing a book on the subject of Cornish engines. It has been a lifetime fascination for him, he began photographing these monumental structures in Cornwall when he was a boy. According to Barry, Cornwall has over two hundred engine sites. As his author notes state in his books, “After a career in industry, Barry Gamble entered the specialist field of heritage interpretation in the 1990s. He was a member of the Bid Team for the Cornwall and West Devon Mining Landscape World Heritage Site as principal author of the nomination to UNESCO’s World Heritage List. This experience led to projects in Australia, Mexico, South Africa, New Zealand, South America, Poland and Japan. Barry continues to work regularly and extensively on a variety of subjects across Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly, and always has a camera to hand.” And there he was in the Chewton Town Hall, sharing his knowledge of Cornish mining expertise and how it spread around the world in the nineteenth century. Barry’s experiences were the basis of his illustrated address. He showed how the community of Cornwall got firmly behind seeking world heritage listing for their mining heritage and explained how there were plans to include other areas elsewhere in the world where Cornish mining had left significant remains. One such place, according to Barry, will be South Australia, particularly Burra and Moonta. Barry made the point that his work focused on ensuring that heritage preservation had advantages for local communities, and was not just for being an attraction for tourists and visitors. Why Cornish Mining is a World Heritage Site is explained on https://www.cornwall.gov.uk/…/conserva…/ world-heritage-site/ Cornwall and West Devon’s mining landscape,

shaped during a period of intense industrial activity, is testimony to one of the greatest periods of economic, technological and social development Britain has ever known. From 1700 to 1914, the metal mining industry played a vital role in transforming our way of life. It provided essential raw materials to feed the Industrial Revolution in Britain and pioneered technological developments that helped shape the society we live in today. For example, Richard Trevithick’s advances in steam engine technology – originally motivated by the need to pump water out of mines – ultimately enabled the development of steam trains, changing the world forever through the mass movement of people and goods. This and other new engineering solutions and inventions developed here were exported to mining regions across the world – including Australia, the Americas and South Africa – playing a key role in the growth of an international capitalist economy. There are at least 175 places, across six continents, where Cornish mine workers took their skills, technology and traditions; a truly global heritage. Barry’s talk, along with the images of engines houses, ports, and industrial towns, showed just how important copper mining was in the nineteenth century. Carried out by large and powerful mining companies, it certainly made one think how different our gold rush was. Here everybody could be a master and everybody could get rich if lucky. In Cornwall only the bosses got rich.

Parks Victoria personnel and Chewton Domain Society committee members enjoyed Barry’s presentation

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New lights for the Castlemaine Goldfields F.C.

Our soccer club has grown over the years, with 2019 seeing 19 teams and 350 plus members, but sadly the small area of the ground under lights is grossly insufficient for our training activities. Recently our council secured state government funding to support the installation of six new light towers and LED floodlights at the ground to replace the existing two light towers. The new lights will massively improve our ability to provide a positive and safe sporting experience for our junior and senior players. As a member of the Chewton community, the club is very conscious of its responsibility as custodians of the Soldiers’ Memorial Park. Our priority with the lighting project is to ensure minimal inconvenience to the community who use the ground, and to ensure minimal impact on the important rows of memorial elm trees, trees of significance to us and the local community. The six new towers will be only slightly taller than the current 20 metre towers, with two 1300 watt LED lights per tower down from the current three 2100 watt lights on our existing towers. While our project will increase the area under lights at the ground, the club and council have invested significant financial resources to ensure the most modern and efficient LED technologies will be used, with the benefit of reducing the amount of spill over light affecting our neighbours compared to other installations in the shire. In general, our night time operating hours will not increase as a result of this project.

AT THE SIGN OF THE UNICORN REG & SYLVIA EASDALE Antiques, Coins, Badges Open Friday & Saturday 67 Forest Street Castlemaine 3450 Ph: 0419 673 663

We have an ongoing program of improvements at the ground with an emphasis on infrastructure for the benefit of both our football club and the general community who use the ground. The CGFC committee is happy to discuss the lights and any aspect of our activities and plans with members of the community. As a community club we invite all of our community to be a part of our activities. Our games are free to watch, with our senior women’s and men’s teams playing most Sundays. The kangaroos have been enjoying our grass this summer, feel free to come and enjoy it too! John Harvey, Business Manager CGFC. email questions to: secretary@castlemainegoldfieldsfc.net.au

• Florins pay $2 each • Shillings pay $1 each • Round 50 cents pay $5 Phone Reg 0419 673 663

Fryers Tea House invites you to join us in the Biggest Morning Tea to help raise funds for Cancer research on Thursday 23rd May from 10-12.30 at the Fryerstown School House. There’ll be a raffle with prizes including a gift voucher for a Vaughn Springs picnic basket, Blackjack wine, Coffee Basics blend and more local goodies. Experience fine china complemented by an array of sumptuous food including scones, lemon tarts, hedgehog, lemon slice, gluten free options (Persian love cake, flourless orange cake), sausage rolls and more. Follow the Teapot signs from Chewton or Campbells Creek to share in the Biggest Morning Tea with all funds raised going to the Cancer Council. Call Melanie Mitchell on 0459 097 758 for further information.

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Sydney to Bendigo direct flights begin

Exciting news for Central Victoria! And some Sydney visitors came to visit a Chewton Chat regular on the very first flight into Bendigo... The inaugural Qantas Flight from Sydney to Bendigo took off from Sydney Airport at 5.40 pm on the 31st March and arrived to a great fanfare at Bendigo Airport at 7.20pm. Passengers were treated to a party like atmosphere with drinks and nibbles and as the plane landed hundreds of Bendigo residents came out to welcome the new service. Cars were lined up along streets leading to the airport and people put their headlights on to greet the plane. This will be a daily service with morning flights from Bendigo to Sydney and late afternoon flights from Sydney to Bendigo. This direct flight is an important development for the Bendigo airport and will provide greater opportunities for tourism and industry. The planes used are Bombardier

Dash 8 Q300 which are built in Canada and carry 50 passengers. These planes are not as fast as larger planes and the tickets are dearer than flights from Tullamarine but for Central Victorian locals the ease and time saving of travelling to Bendigo rather than Tullamarine (and the savings in car parking services) makes this new service a viable option. And an exciting one! Jackie McMaster.

The month of May at St. John’s • • • • •

Saturday 4th, 6pm Eucharist Service Saturday 11th, 6pm Eucharist Service Saturday 18th, 6pm Eucharist Service Saturday 25th, 6pm Eucharist Service Into the Silence will meet as per usual at 3.30pm on Monday afternoons. Everyone Welcome.

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Know Your Neighbour Have you met Diane Frape-Linton? Diane Frape-Linton was born in South Wales, moving to Australia as a young adult. ‘I taught Prep at a number of Melbourne primary schools’ before eventually moving to the Castlemaine district when ‘I bought a couple of acres at Fryerstown, ran a few sheep for their wool, and stayed there for 29 years’. Over the years Diane established several connections in Castlemaine. She joined the Agricultural & Horticultural Society and Animal Aid and also became involved with the committee of management of the Camp Reserve. Never one to shirk work, she explains that their old club house was pretty scungy ‘so I set to and ended up cleaning the kitchen and washing all the paintwork inside, including the toilets. Then I cleaned all the spoon drains outside and raked up all the acorns on the ground as these made the area a slip hazard.’ She has also been involved with Buda, the Museum of the Art Gallery, the Vintage Machinery Museum in Maldon, and the Military Museum in Bendigo. Although never a resident of Chewton, Diane has been one of the town’s most fervent supporters. ‘When the Commissioners took over and were going to sell the Chewton post office and town hall, there was a big kerfuffle as these actually belonged to the people, so I phoned Clive Winmill about it. I said to him, if you’re going to set up a group to manage this, you’ll need to be incorporated and you’ll need money, so I’d like to make a $100 donation towards it.’ At their initial meeting they decided to call themselves the Chewton Domain Society. I didn’t join this society as I wasn’t a Chewton resident, but the Committee decided to make me an honorary member for the year and I’ve kept up my membership ever since. I’ve maintained a connection because I’m interested in history.’ Diane has retained her involvement in the Chewton town hall, making an initial donation towards the hall’s restoration, and has made several more donations since. She also contributes regularly with donations to the Domain Society. ‘I also gave a free standing air conditioner unit to the post office because it was hot in there and it was MY local post office, and more recently I donated to the restoration of the Lock-Up. I do all this because

of my interest in history. I like preserving things and I know it’s very hard to raise money in a small community. I catalogue records and conserve artefacts because I think we are products of our past and it’s important to keep that connection. I like to contribute to preserving things.’ Diane is also a quilter and is an associate member of the Spa Quilters in Daylesford. She regularly makes single bed quilts which she gives to charity. ‘A few years ago I was asked if I would make a quilt to raffle for Chewton’s Biggest Morning Tea. I did so and have made one for them every year since.’ What Diane particularly likes about Chewton is that ‘people connect with one another and welcome new people. Everyone seems to know one another. It’s quite a close-knit society.’ Gloria Meltzer. 40 Lyttleton Street Castlemaine P: (03) 5472 4622 A/H Txt: 0407 837 321

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Business of the Month...

Castlemaine Drill Sharpening

Harley Parker is a retired Fitter and Turner. When a tradesman friend complained that he was constantly buying new drill bits because the old ones were blunt, Harley saw the opportunity for a small business. Using a bench top grinder he sharpens blunt or broken drill bits restoring them for further use. A set of 29 Australian made drill bits can cost up to $175 so it makes economic sense to sharpen them rather than throwing them away. He says that a good set of quality tools should last a lifetime if you look after them. Harley likes the fact that his business is good for the environment. Restoring drill bits rather than throwing them away reduces landfill. New drill bits usually come packaged in excessive plastic packaging which also adds to landfill. Harley can sharpen drill bits for a dollar or two per piece depending on the size. Another benefit of having nicely sharpened tools

is the safety factor. Many more accidents happen with blunt tools as things work much better when they are sharp. Local tradies are spreading the word around about the drill bit sharpening service and woodwork and metalwork hobbyists are also using this service. Since retiring to the district 7 years ago, Harley and his wife Lynette have become involved with the local community. Lynette is the treasurer of the Friends of the Box Ironbark Forest and has been secretary of the Taradale Walking Group. Harley is also involved with the Friends of the Box Ironbark Forest, the Taradale Walking Group and he is a member of The Castlemaine Camera Club and the U3A Camera Club and is working on a website for his photography. One of Harley’s recent Chewton images is...

If you are interested in Harley’s sharpening service he can be contacted on 0409 135 889 or castlemainedrillsharpening@gmail.com Jackie McMaster.

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They came for gold and dug up democracy Jan ‘Yarn’ Wositzky and the Chewton Domain Society present “A Bundle of Sticks!” A song and story show written and orchestrated by Jan 'Yarn' Wositzky in collaboration with director and dramaturgh Sue Ingleton.

Chewton Town Hall - Fri/Sat 10-11 & 17-18 May (With thanks to Regional Arts Victoria's Quick Response Grants for financial assistance).

Imagine you do not have the right to vote. That if you leave your job without permission from the boss, that you could face gaol. And that only the wealthy can own land. This was Victoria in 1851, and is the background to Jan 'Yarn' Wositzky's new solo show A Bundle of Sticks - a lively, heart-felt, fun and rebel-rousing musical story that celebrates the birth of Australian democracy. Written and performed by Jan (Bushwackers Band co-founder, writer, musician and storyteller of renown) in collaboration with the wonderful multi award-winning writer, director and comedian Sue Ingleton (APG, Australia You're Standing In It, Dimboola, Bill Rawlings: The Pregnant Man), A Bundle of Sticks is Jan 'Yarn' Wositzky's fourth solo show - following the acclaimed productions Bilarni, The Go-Between and Canakkale/Gallipoli. Revealing a history hidden to most Australians, A Bundle of Sticks tells of how 15,000 gold diggers on the Forest Creek gold rush (Chewton, Castlemaine) held a 'Monster Meeting' and defied the Victorian government's unfair Gold License - a tax whether you earned any money or not. By doing so, the diggers created the movement that led to the vote and to democracy. Taking place on December 15, 1851, the Monster Meeting was the first mass political protest in Australia, and set in motion a peaceful rebellion that the government responded to with policies of police corruption and brutality, that culminated three years later in bloodshed at Eureka, in 1854. And it began with the Forest Creek Monster Meeting, under their unique Monster Meeting flag. The title A Bundle of Sticks comes from the poster that proclaimed the 1851 Monster Meeting. It said, “A single stick may be bent or broken, but a bundle together yields not, nor breaks.” The image of a bundle of sticks is one symbol on the Monster Meeting flag. The songs in the show are from the Victorian History Award winning double CD titled The Monster Meeting, produced

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by Jan 'Yarn' Wositzky for the Chewton Domain Society. The story in the show also includes the 1853 Bendigo Red Ribbon - which actually won the right to vote - and the 1854 Eureka story. In A Bundle of Sticks these stories are contextualised within Australia's colonial history and the fate of the Dja Dja Wurrung people of the gold rush area. The show is part storytelling, part song and part town hall meeting, with Jan playing banjo, bones, harmonica, bodhran and spoons, with the audience joining the raucous fun, volunteers making speeches and a special prize for one erudite audience member. We will, as the diggers proclaimed, Fie Upon Pusillanimity! (What the hell does that mean?) A Bundle of Sticks is a protest history show 160 years in the making, and is a load of fun whilst singing out loud and strong for fairness, justice, democracy and our rights.

They came for gold and dug up democracy.


Long exposures in Chewton Chewton’s main street was the subject of some long exposure camera work by camera club members this week. Seeing old buildings in a new light! Light trails featured too, the main road being the Pyrenees Highway. These images are from Marion Williams and Harley Parker.

More images are appearing on the Facebook page titled Castlemaine Camera Club Members which is visible to all, but only members can post.

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Chewton Domain Society The bookings for the Chewton Town Hall keep everyone busy with the Chewton Pool Committee meetings and the pool wind up event, POHAG, Chewton Phoenix CWA, Chewton Film Society, Chewton Book Club, Yoga, Castlemaine Camera Club, rehearsals for A Bundle of Sticks and Parks Victoria events. The hall will be open for the National Trust Heritage Festival on Saturday and Sunday afternoons 1-4 from 20th April to May 19th with the exception of Saturday May 18th. Jan ‘Yarn’ Wositzky’s Bundle of Sticks performances are scheduled for Fri 10th May at 8 pm, Sat 11th May at 8 pm, Fri 17th May at 8 pm and Sat 18th May at 8 pm with Sunday morning being the clean up and bump out. Bookings for this show can be made online with information in the programs that are available at the Chewton Shop, PO and in the hall as well as online. The presentation by Parks Victoria of its Heritage Landscape Management Framework for the Castlemaine Diggings National Heritage Park (known in PV language as a Heritage Action Plan – HAP) is still being negotiated. MASC Volunteer Week Expo will be in the Market Building on 22 and 23 May – the CDS will organise a box of information for a display. The offer to work with the Chewton Phoenix CWAs Stories of Chewton’s Elders will be followed up by a committee member. Copies of the Monster Meeting flyer are now stored in the town hall along with the extra MM books and flags. Thanks to the Chewton Senior Citizens who returned a MM flag that will be used on the flagpole on the Pyrenees Highway. The Pioneers & Old Residents sent the CDS President an invitation to Elaine Appleton’s multi presentation relating to Doug Ralph to be held on May 5th and those committee members who are able to attend will report back at the next meeting. Barry Gamble gave a talk on Cornwall Tin Mine World Heritage Listing project which was very well received with a report to be included in the May Chewton Chat. The Treasurer reported that the beginning balance on 8th March was $16,384.16 with funds received from hall hire, Chewton Chat donations and advertising, memberships and rental totalling $2,129.60 and accounts approved for payment for COS, Fasom Plumbing, Coliban

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The first CDS committee in 1996 Water, Green Graphics and the CFA totalling $2,516.06. The general and savings account balance is $43,819.60 with committed funds of $6,000 for insurance and paper. There are currently 149 CDS members with special thanks to the Chewton Film Society and a reminder that membership payments may be made at the Bendigo Bank BSB: 633 000, Account No: 106 516 479; Account Name Chewton Domain Society and please include your name for reference. The Chewton Progress Association folder is being completed and a CDS and a Chewton Chat folder are being prepared with the Metcalfe Shire Heritage Study still being completed. As new material becomes available it is being incorporated into the collection. CDS members may borrow items of interest from the collection. The park is need of attention though with the continued dry weather a tidy up is necessary first with the removal of a number of dead trees in the park happening first. After a recent site inspection, it was decided to leave the open spaces for ease of grass cutting, tidy up the plants that are there and look at areas that could be cluster planted once the rains have come. The shrubs that are still surviving are certainly very hardy native plants! The report for the Chewton Chat included the management of its April publication when the computer decided to stop working – it is now working again. The Chewton Film Society is all going OK with the most recent film well received. The next meeting is planned for Monday May 20th 2019 starting at 7 p.m. after a very busy April/May.


Chewton Brigade News April 2019

Earlier this month the brigade whooped and yelped the length and breadth of Chewton, collecting $2,382.20 for the Royal Children’s Hospital Good Friday Appeal. Thanks to all of you who dug deep. Every year our community demonstrates its generosity and this year was no different. Every second year, CFA brigades elect the members of their management team. The elections are an opportunity for the brigades to appoint members to positions that reflect their skills and experience, and to refresh the brigade’s leadership and bring new skills, ideas and approaches to the team. This year saw the re-election of Dave Button as Captain, Group Delegate and Health & Safety Coordinator. Barry Mounsey was re-elected as 1st Lieutenant, Group Delegate, Community Safety Coordinator and Asset Maintenance Officer. Rob Palmer was re-elected as Secretary and Treasurer, and Amy Palmer was re-elected 3rd Lieutenant. This year’s election also saw Rob Blaney and Frances Corstorphan join the management team as 2nd Lieutenant and Communications Officer respectively. Rob was also elected Training Officer and Fundraising Coordinator. The new management team brings a wide range of experiences and backgrounds to the job and we wish them all well and thank them for stepping forward.

Again, this month we’ve been fortunate to have had very few turnouts, despite the dry start to autumn. Our slip-on was called upon to help black out a grass and scrub fire in rough terrain around Baynton. And we responded to a small illegal burn in our own neighbourhood. Please be reminded that although the nights have cooled, at the time of writing we are still in the fire restriction period. Burn-offs are not allowed until restrictions are lifted, and all illegal burns are referred to Victoria Police; the consequences can be severe. With the current dry conditions showing no immediate sign of easing, there is still the potential for fires to get away and cause property damage or worse. Restrictions are due to be lifted in Mt Alexander Shire on 1 May. However, given the current dry spell, the restriction period could be extended. Please check with local media before burning off. Or visit the relevant page on the CFA’s website: https://www.cfa.vic.gov.au/warnings-restrictions/ restrictions-during-the-fire-danger-period.

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Councillor’s Chat Council’s 2019/2020 proposed annual budget was made public at the April council meeting. It’s now out to the community for comment for the next four weeks. For regular budget watchers and scrutinizers there’s nothing too out of the ordinary. The lion’s share of capital works expenditure is on roads, footpaths and bridges. There’s a new playground for Harcourt, design works for a footpath along the main road in Chewton and the stage one of levee works for Castlemaine-Campbells Creek. It seems like an odd item to fund in a drought, but with the prediction that more of our increasingly unpredictable rains will come as deluges, perhaps it’s not such a bad idea. For a good look at what council is proposing to spend money on next financial year, have a look at the draft budget in the ‘Have your Say’ section of the council website (www. mountalexander.vic.gov.au) or pick up a hard copy. To quote the website: “Copies of the document and a budget summary are available for public inspection during office hours at the Civic Centre in Castlemaine…. Copies are also available at the Castlemaine Library, Visitor Information Centres in Maldon and Castlemaine, and the Newstead Rural Transaction Centre.” See, also, the article on page 28). Council meetings have taken on a new dimension. Interested residents can now watch the action live, or later on YouTube. There’s no editing or segmenting so it’s a case of screening the entire event, rather than being able to jump to a particular section of interest. Still it seems that online council meetings have attracted a fair degree of interest. Recently, a resident concerned about a planning

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decision made at the April council meeting took me to task for my position on the matter and the arguments I put forward during the debate. Previously the resident would have had to attend the meeting to find out how I voted, and what I might have said. While I might feel a bit uncomfortable about being thus exposed, I fully support council’s decision to live stream and make recordings available via the internet. Democracy in action. To find us, search Mount Alexander Shire Council in YouTube. That same meeting saw councillors going against the recommendations of the council officers and debating motions put forward by councillors. One item took us three goes to reach a decision, the first two attempts failing to attract sufficient votes. After the meeting was over we chuckled at a letter to the editor in a recent edition of the local paper that suggested that all council decisions were actually made beforehand, behind closed doors. If that were the case then we had spectacularly forgotten our rehearsed scripts! Of course we discuss matters before a council meeting. Planning items are presented at a closed council briefing session two weeks prior to the public meeting, including the recommended planning officers’ course of action. Councillors are able to read the multipage reports, quiz the planners, ask for more information and for explanations of how various parts of the planning provisions are being interpreted, read objectors’ letters etc. It would be remiss of us to come to the council table without adequate background preparation. The one thing we must not do is come to a firm decision of how we will vote. For that we must wait for the debate, held in a public forum. Similarly, councillors have worked with staff over several sessions, beginning late last year, to put together the annual budget. All councillors made submissions to the capital works budget and those receiving majority support from fellow councillors feature in the proposed budget now out for public consultation. Don’t forget to have your say. It’s all part of our small-scale but precious democratic process. And yes, we do make changes to the budget based on public comment. Cr. Christine Henderson, Coliban Ward.


An MM flag fluttering...

Real Estate Round Up A couple of shots of the Monster Meeting flag proudly flying way above Chewton, although barely visible from the Pyrenees Highway.

Large new flag $100 Small flag $50

Call Pat Healy 0422 759 661

Two new properties on the market and a few sold since last month... Here is the round up for May. Cantwell Real Estate: • No properties available at present. Castlemaine Property Group: • NEW - 4 Church St, newly built home within walking distance to the amenities of Central Chewton, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, study, ducted heating and cooling as well as 2 older timber buildings on the 1340m2 block. $575,000 • 157 Golden Point Rd, unique and creative, stone, timber and brick cottage. 2 large living spaces, 2 bedrooms and a separate 2 roomed stone cottage. $535,000 • Lot 1/128 Fryers Road, elevated land with mains water, sewer and power. 2440m2. $175,000 Keogh Real Estate: • No properties available at present. Jellis Craig: • No properties available at present. Waller Realty: • NEW - 22 Pitman St, nicely renovated 2 bedroom home. Split system, gas heater, entertainer’s deck. Large 1548m2 block with potential to subdivide (STCA). $445,000 • Lots 1 to 7 Steele Street. New land release in the heart of Chewton. Sizes vary from 663m2 to 1174m2. Prices vary from $147,500 to $210.000. This land will be titled in late 2019. All town services available. • Lot 2/50 Albert Street. Attractive 1474m2 block. Power, water and sewer ready to connect. Close to National Park. $185,000 Minus the Agent: • 48 Dinah Rd. Just under one acre of land with great views in a quiet valley. Electricity connected. $280,000 Property Now: • 734 Pyrenees Highway, large family home with 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, an indoor pool and recreation room. Set on over 1 hectare of maintained grounds, $600,000 to $650,000 Jackie McMaster.

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Community-Inclusion-Curiosity-Integrity

Nurturing the whole child in every child

Term 1 ends and Term 2 begins‌. Welcome to Term 2! We hope that all friends and families have enjoyed the school holidays and had a very happy Easter. In this Chewton Chat, we would like to share some of the Chewton Primary School activities as we finished off a great Term 1. We would also like to share our important beginning of Term 2 where we had our first whole school activity for the term, ANZAC Day whole school service and we look forward to our participation in the Chewton ANZAC Day Service on Thursday.

ANZAC Day - Whole School Service On Wednesday 24th April the whole school walked down to Chewton Soldiers Memorial Park for a whole school ANZAC Day service. Students participated in the service by writing and sharing stories and poetry, creating and laying wreaths and running parts of the service. Students also made ANZAC biscuits and prepared and displayed personalised drawings, poetry and stories for the Chewton ANZAC Day service on Thursday. Please enjoy a selection of student writing that was prepared and displayed for the Chewton ANZAC Day Service.

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Grade 4-6 Bike Ride - Expedition Pass Reservoir On Thursday 4th April we were reminded of how lucky we are to be able to enjoy such beautiful surrounds at Chewton as I rode with the Grade 4/5/6 students and parents on our school bike ride to Expedition Pass Reservoir. It was such a pleasure to spend this time with the children and to see them all working together as a team, supporting and encouraging the success for all. I was particularly impressed with Lee (one of our Grade 6 students) and the persistence that he demonstrated throughout the ride. It is what makes teaching so rewarding when you have the opportunity to see children challenge themselves and enjoy the success that challenge brings. We would like to take this opportunity to thank all parents who attended the ride, ensuring that we had the correct ratio for students to participate.

Chewton Primary School Art Program Friday is one of the favourite days for many students at Chewton Primary School as they all have the opportunity to learn with Melissa, our Visual Art Specialist Teacher. The children have been very busy throughout Term 1 creating in the ART room and were very happy to share their artwork for others to enjoy. We are very proud of each and every one of our artists at Chewton.

Writer’s Notebook Over the holidays, the teachers decided to begin their own writer’s notebooks. We did this with the aim to model to all children that we ourselves are writers too, and engage actively in writing for the love of writing, expression and creativity with authenticity, purpose, voice and choice. This term, we will be sharing with students how teachers are using their Writer’s Notebooks and we look forward to launching our Student 2019 Writer’s Notebooks. Children will be provided with a notebook and will be given the opportunity to personalise their writer’s notebook with pictures, words and/or drawings that are significant and important to them. In our next Chewton Chat, we look forward to sharing how the Writer’s Notebooks are used across the school and enjoyed by students. Thanks for Chatting with us! Marita Eddy Acting Principal.

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ANZAC Remembrance Approximately sixty people gathered at the gate to the Chewton Soldiers’ Memorial Park on the 25th April to commemorate Anzac Day. It is always a pleasure to have children from the Chewton Primary School attend on this day when they display their original “Anzac poems” on the fence of the park, this has become a tradition and the children, so far removed from the attitudes and lifestyle of 1915, present poems into which they have put much thought. While Bettie Exon spoke of the late Fred Cole and Rose McMillan, both of whom attended the gatherings from the very earliest meetings, and wreaths were being laid at the fence, I thought of Gwen Stayner who for years made a small posy with flowers from her garden and fastened it to the gate - often it was the only sign that someone remembered the significance of the day. Gwen would be very happy to see how things have changed. Chewton is fortunate to have a trumpeter who has been coming from Melbourne for eight years or so to play the Last Post which is so much more satisfying than a recording – and Riley does it very well! Barbara Dry. Images from Anzac Day 2019, including Marley and her grandfather Owen, courtesy of Steve Womersley

Neighbourhood House Week ‘Bringing People Together - from your neighbourhood to your nation’ - that’s the theme for Neighbourhood House Week 2019, taking place in Victoria from 10 to 17 May. This week provides an opportunity for Neighbourhood Houses to celebrate and showcase their diverse offerings, not just to those who already attend, but especially to those in the community who may not yet be aware of what their local house has to offer. Castlemaine Community House (CCH) has 3 events/programs during the week...

Wesley Hill Community Market Every Saturday Now 9am – 1pm An old fashioned Country Market Opposite the Albion Hotel New stallholders always welcome.

Call the Market Manager

0418 117 953

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Neighbourhood House Week 2019 10th - 17th May

Wee Ones Stuff Swap: Monday 13th May Wondering what to do with old baby clothes, toys, books, parenting bibs and bobs? Come along to swap or give away items and meet other local families. All left overs will be donated to local Castlemaine charities. Time: 9.30am – 11.00am Where: Castlemaine Community House

Big Community Lunch: Tuesday 14th May. You know that friend who always says “oh yeah, community lunch, I’ll go one day…”? This is the week to get them along!! Big Community Lunch is an opportunity to introduce new folks (bring a friend!) to community lunch, or sit with someone you don’t know and enjoy lunch together. Make new friends, catch up with old ones and enjoy the BEST 2 course vego meal . Time: 12.30pm – 1.45pm Where: St. Mary’s Hall (57/31 Lyttleton St, Castlemaine) Cost: $5. Donation

CCH Seniors Moment: Thursday 16th May Calling all seniors! Come along to enjoy an afternoon tea with other local seniors, get to know what’s happening at Castlemaine Community House and maybe even discover something new to be part of. Or perhaps there’s something you’d like to with us about, something you’d like to see happening in your local community? Time: 1.00pm – 2.30pm Where: Castlemaine Community House Cost: Free 30 Templeton Street PH. 5472 4842 E. reception@cch.org.au www.cch.org.au


Busy Buda! Buda’s exclusive exhibition of Australian Arts & Crafts jewellery and decorative arts brought together from public and private collections, continues throughout the Victorian program of the Australian Heritage Festival. Running until 19 May and titled Pursuits of Passion and Principle, the exhibition includes exquisite Australian-made jewellery and objects from materials including metalcraft, enamelwork, porcelain and glass in the Arts & Crafts style from the period c1900-c1930. Also on display is Buda’s unique collection of fine works by several female artists such as Ursula Ridley Walker who is also represented in the exhibition. Buda’s Sunday Arts and High Tea for Winter will be on Sunday 12th May for Mother’s day. Guest performers Blue Tango (image right) will beguile you with their unique arrangements of jazz flavoured classic pop songs on vocals and guitar. With a glass of bubbly on arrival and a beautiful High Tea served for your table, Mum will be delighted. Bookings are essential via the website. The Queen’s birthday long weekend is a must with the Castlemaine Jazz Festival about town and Buda is delighted to present a special twilight evening with the incomparable CHONK on Sunday 9th June. Chonk is one of Melbourne‘s hottest swing outfits specialising in the music of Count Basie and the Benny Goodman sextet. They bring an energy and authenticity to their music that excites both the ears and the feet. Combining the talents of some of Melbourne’s most established musicians as well as its rising stars, Chonk captures the fervour and passion of swing in the 1940s along with the creativity and edge of early Bebop. Whether you want to dance to stomping rhythms or sit and listen to romantic melodies, Chonk will have you grinning ear to ear. This is a separately ticketed event and there are discounts for Jazz Festival ticket holders. Bookings via the Buda website: https://budacastlemaine.org/

Buda Historic Home and Garden A property of national significance.

Home of the noted Gold and Silversmith ERNEST LEVINY and his family from 1863 to 1981, featuring authentic furnishings, arts and crafts collection, significant heritage garden and grounds. Nursery selling drought-hardy plants, many propagated from the garden. Open hours Wed - Sat 12noon to 5pm, Sunday 10am to 5pm. Groups by appointment. 42 Hunter Street, Castlemaine 3450, T/F: (03) 5472 1032 E: admin@budacastlemaine.org

PLUMBING & GAS FITTING: Please contact us for all your requirements • • • •

Unblock drains, pipes & sewer, repairs and new installations Repairs and New installations to Roofing and Spouting Water Meter Connections & Backflow Prevention Devices Supply and installation of • HOT WATER SYSTEMS: Gas Storage & Continuous Systems, Evacuated Solar Systems and Electric Storage, Heat Pumps, Chilled & Boiling Water Systems WE REPRESENT MAJOR BRANDS • GAS HEATING: Space Heaters, Ducted Systems, Hydronic & Gas Log Fires Showroom Open • WOOD HEATING: Freestanding & Inbuilt Monday to Friday: 8.30am – 5.00pm Saturday: 8.30am – 12.00pm • COOLING: Inverter Splits and Evaporative systems Fasom Pty Ltd • KITCHEN: Upright Cookers, Ovens, Cooktops, Range Hoods, Tapware, Sinks & LPG Fridges 224 Barker Street Castlemaine 3450 Ph: 5472 2533 • BATHROOM: Tapware, Basins, Baths, Shower Screens, Toilet Suites, Vanities and Cabinetry E: admin@fasom.com.au • LAUNDRY: Tapware, Sinks & Cabinetry

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“I took a few photos of the official Chewton BBQ photographer last night as his headcoverings would not otherwise feature in the shots he will be sending to you for the Chat,” was the explanation provided with the first photos of Chewton’s April Community BBQ. Q: How do pirates know that they are pirates? A: They think, therefore they ARRRR!!!!! Incidentally, you do learn a lot at these community BBQs. An ancient CFA beret with the word “Moolort” on it appeared at the BBQ – and it caused a giggle (well, actually two giggles!). The giggles were explained by the Danish speaking BBQers, “Moolort” means cowpoo in Danish! Obviously a pat on the head for the wearer!

And not a chef’s hat amongst the lot! We may not have quite had 20 people at the April community BBQ, but we probably had more than 20 hats! How come you ask? Well a certain Antique Store in Chewton brought multiple spare straw sombreros for the hatless and, as it transpired, there were very few hatless on the night. There were Danish graduation hats – two would you believe? Hard to top, but there was a Stetson, a pirate’s bandana, and at least one old faded creation out of the wardrobe for the first airing in years. No chef’s hats though, so the barbecued food was not entirely epicurean. Ah, but the cheeses! Each BBQ sees a range of imported cheeses brought to share. Mick has been doing this for years, and the range keeps getting more tantalizing. Incredibly generous is Mick, and the tastebuds of the Chewton BBQ regulars are receiving quite a workout – and an education! Thanks Mick - from all of us! Conversation turned to how long the community BBQs have been going. Well, the October 2012 Chewton Chat promoted the second one! And the first photos appeared in the December 2013 Chat. And over the years we have seen the regulars, the newcomers, and unfortunately some leavers. A passing parade of Chewtonites, occasionally added to by visitors, tourists and those who had heard of the phenomena and came out of curiosity. And it’s on again on May 4th. Why not come along and join the throng? The brazier has been invited to this one so there should be a warm feeling attached to it. You could add to that warmth!

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Next Gentleman Please!

On Thursday April 4th the Chewton Film Society (CFS) members were treated to two short films by Tim Purdie, talented film-maker and one of the Chewton Film Society committee. These films are part of the 20 films Tim made interviewing Bruce Pascoe about our Australian First People. The films will be used in Australian schools as part of the curriculum, a world removed from the education most of us received at school about Aborigines. The shorts were followed by ‘Searching for Sugarman’, a moving and heart warming story of musician Rodriquez. Our next film on Thursday May 2nd is ‘The Sum of Us’.

P o e t r y C o r n e r

She used to work at ‘The Snip for Men’ ‘Til some bloke took exception: “To trim my locks I had a yen “Not permanent contraception.” “It’s all very well that ‘Ms’es “Should practise tonsorial arts “But keep your flaming scissors “Well away from my private parts.” Their conversation, purpose-crossed, Whatever she said was wrong, Continued thus all meaning lost “You want it short?” “NO! Leave it long!” One day she felt the penny drop (Say a dollar, now we’re metric) “I’ll ply my art in a brand new shop “Gloss black and Chromo-electric. “I’ll call it ‘Manes of’ Maine’ “ she thought “It has a more classy ring “The Hipster beard, locks long or short “Old favourites or the latest thing.” Now clients in new surroundings Reading magazines at their ease Wait for her voice resounding: “You’re gorgeous. Next gentleman please.” David Watson 2019.

The CFS is a members only organisation. Our next season starts in June. If you wish to join you can phone Beverley on 0402 438 288 or look up the CFS website https://chewtonfilmsociety.wordpress.com/contact/ and click the link to the application form. Margot Ryan.

Advertising... and appearing around town.

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The 2019 June Maldon Swapmeet is being held on 9th June. This event regularly gets over 200 stalls as well as a large number of exotic, modified and very rare cars. This year we will have a special area set aside for these cars for the first time. Site size has been increased to 6 x 6 metres but the sites fees will stay at $20 per site. Stallholders can set up on the day before to make life a bit easier. As usual we DON’T require any pre-booking or any paperwork, just rock up, set up and sell up! Can it get any simpler? Gates open to the public at 7ish and it runs till about 2ish‌ Stallholders can set up on the day but must be set by 7 am or run the risk of being turned away. Public admission is $5 per person and kids are free. This is a family friendly, dog friendly event and is a great day out for anybody who loves cars, antiques and collectables.

For enquiries call Mark or Bonnie on 0414 244 842

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PH 0407 372426

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Renfrey’s Magnum Opus in Chewton The reader may have caught mention of Renfrey’s twopart volume, “A Field Guide to Roadside Weeds of Central Victoria” in a previous Chat article. Regrettably there are no such books. We did have a long discussion well into the night last winter beside a fitful fire, in the smoke-blackened living room of his hopefully-soon-to-be-adverselypossessed mud-brick shack. I cannot divulge the precise location of that rude dwelling for fear of upsetting his ambitions toward freehold title but I can say that it had hessian in the window spaces and that the open fire place was so poorly constructed as to continuously issue smoke into the room instead of up the chimney. It soon became apparent to me that as yet, the two volumes consisted of a working title and copious notes that might be lumped under the heading of a foreword. Some of these notes are worthy of reproduction and the reader will forgive me if I quote them from time to time in future articles. Renfrey was unsure of his proposed title and asked (if I didn’t mind) that we closely scrutinise it and, by the end of the evening, have a title worthy of the sweeping nature of the work. After four hours we decided that the first word of the title should be the indefinite article “A” instead of the more definitive “The”. Shortly after midnight we finally settled on “Field Guide”. Renfrey was keen on “Glove box Companion” but I suggested a trusty guide was more appropriate than a

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companion in a field of environmental villains. The argument about “Glove box” was more difficult to resolve. Renfrey reasonably asserted that a glove box was an ideal place for a book about roadside weeds. I ventured that “glove box” guides ended up in the same place as old biros that don’t work, keys that don’t open any locks, old, unused bandaids, flat batteries and industrial strength toenail clippers; a rubbish bin in a used-car detailing yard. At three in the morning we finalised “Roadside Weeds”. “Roadside” was easily agreed upon. Renfrey was adamant that this was an aspect of public land management worthy of discussion and here we found common ground; the uselessness of a “glove box companion” on freeways, which have less and less roadside room for discretionary stoppages. Although there was instant agreement about using the word “Weeds”, there was much discussion on what a weed actually is. It should be noted that I proposed a definition that would have kept a field guide to a couple of dozen pages, whereas Renfrey’s definition would easily need two volumes. It was either “Central Victoria” or “Chewton” and shortly before dawn it was settled; “A Field Guide to Roadside Weeds of Central Victoria” was named. Article by Fritz Hammersley.

Post Office Hill It is most interesting with what turns up unexpectedly and the sources of information which exist. From recent findings by different people, it is apparent that the eastern end of Chewton was the original “commercial hub” of Chewton. This occurred because of a number of factors - eg. the flood of people to the Forest Creek goldfield after the discovery of alluvial gold in Forest Creek, and temporary means of communication, after which an official post office was set up at the foot of a spur of Old Post Office Hill which descends to the junction of Forest Creek and Wattle Creek, close to the Monster Meeting site. Other businesses in the area included a number of shops, the Mount Alexander Hotel and Adelphi theatre, the Post Office Hill hotel, a Free Lending Library, a saddlery, Pleasure Gardens and other businesses. This changed when funding was sought and gained for a permanent building to erect the current Chewton Post Office. If anyone has other information about Old Post Hill, we would appreciate sharing it with you. Currently POHAG activities have focused on finalization of tourist information and installation of indicators at points of interest and parking areas. Extensive weed control has been carried out by contractors (Bushco) from the old railway station to Railway Street and beyond. The next meeting is on Sunday,12th May at 10:00am. All welcome. Ian O’Halloran.

An excerpt from an 1852 report...

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Walkies 1 There were cars aplenty parked at the Monster Meeting site, and others up Golden Point Road and even one in O’Hallorans Road. Obviously the Castlemaine District Community Health Walk for April was going to be a busy one. Park’s Victoria’s Noel Muller was there to introduce and interpret the site for the appreciative group. A quick talk and it was off. Down to the interpretive sign at the junction of Wattle and Forest Creeks firstly, then upstream and over a very, very dry Forest Creek. The old mines along the crest of Burns Hill was the attraction. An hour later and the group returned, many taking the new Monster Meeting flyer on offer. Ten minutes later and the walkers and cars had left, leaving the Monster Meeting site in peace again. The free CDCH walks are held monthly, and widely advertised. The next is on May 29th and is the 2019 National Reconciliation Week walking tour. Meet at the Castlemaine Market Building at 10 a.m., and see the flyer below.

Walkies 2 The Australian Heritage Festival walk at Eureka Reef was booked out! Unfortunately not all of the 30 expected made it to the starting line, but Parks Victoria’s Ranger Noel Muller was there to interpret the heritage site for the walkers.

Fancy a piece of Chewton’s history? Large new flag $100

Small flag $50

Monster Meeting book $20

Monster Meeting CD $30

Call Pat Healy 0422 759 661 22


FOBIF walkers discover the difference lack of water can make A good group rocked up for FOBIF’s April walk into the Salter’s Creek-Smutta’s Track area on Sunday. As expected, the bush is showing numerous signs of drought stress, including a significant number of dying Golden Wattles. Nevertheless, this corner of the Diggings Park has plenty of charm even in its present desolate state, and the walk was completed in good spirits, although it must be said that no one sprinted up the almost vertical track out of the Bradfield flumes. The following photos will give an idea of the different faces of this little valley. First, after a week of heavy rain, in 2013 and here’s the same spot, as walkers passed it this month – almost unrecognisable six years later. The forked tree in the top photo has collapsed into the dry creek bed. Even the deepest pools in the creek are now dry.

2013

2019

Thanks to Rex Odgers and Julie Hurley for taking the group into this great corner of the park, and for the informed commentary on the history of the water race.

The next FOBIF walk is in the area of Stone’s Gully, south of Vaughan Springs on the 19th of May. Starting on the Glenluce Road, it will be via a figure 8 route above Sebastopol Creek. Some off track walking is involved. c. 7 kms. For more information contact Bernard Slattery 5470 5161. Taken from theFOBIF website. ADVERTISEMENT

Walkies 3 Listening Post held in Castlemaine last Friday of the Month 10am to 2pm. Please phone for appointment.

The Monster Meeting walk was similarly booked out. Again, Noel did the honours...

8 Panton Street, Golden Square VIC 3555 P: 5444 4125 @mareeedwardsmp mareeedwardsmp www.mareeedwards.com.au Authorised by M Edwards, 8 Panton Street, Golden Square. This material has been produced by Maree Edwards MP using her Parliament’s Electorate Office & Communications budget.

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Chewton’s People and Places Collection A large proportion of the people who visit Chewton’s People and Places Collection are on a quest to discover their family history. During the gold rush such a lot of people flocked to Chewton to try their luck and strike it rich. Consequently there is a huge number of descendants of those people who have a family connection to Chewton. There are also many families who stayed in the district for numerous generations. In the past few decades many people have come to the Chewton Town Hall to research their family history and are happy to share the information they have already gathered. Photos, letters, copies of family trees and extensive family histories have been donated to the collection in this way. These family history documents have been collated and put together in a series of folders entitled “People”. There are currently 8 volumes which include many comprehensively researched family histories and articles about particularly interesting or influential past Chewton residents. A sample of the families that are featured include,Madigan, Ralph, Whaley, Ottery, Archer, Brown, Chapman and the James family of Donkey Gully. Just recently a history of the Dennis family was donated. Even more recently donated were lots of excellent quality photos together with information about the Thomas family who lived in “The Manse” at Golden Point.

William Thomas b 1830 and Ann (Morgan) Thomas b 1844

PEOPLE AND PLACES ROSTER 1pm to 4pm

May Saturday 4th Pat Healy and Marie Jones Sunday 5th Jackie McMaster and Marie Jones Saturday 11th Pat Healy and Marie Jones Sunday 12th Allan Dry and Ken McKimmie Saturday 18th Polling Day Sunday 19th Marion Landy and Rose Darling Sunday 26th Elaine Appleton and Frank Benbow

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“The Manse” photo taken in 1990 The Manse was built in 1866 by Welsh Settler William Thomas who later became the manager of Crown Nimrod Mine, and who was an important leader of the Welsh Church. This newly donated material has photos with captions about William, his wife and five of his children. Along with these old photos are photos taken in 1990 of “The Manse” with information about the dairy, the well, the water race and the ruins of the Welsh Chapel which was built by William and Ann Thomas. These photos together with other documents were kindly donated by Chris Kane, the great granddaughter of William and Ann Thomas. Chris lives in Warnambool and in researching her family history has found that she has lots of convoluted connections to many old Chewton families. She is related to Joseph Davie who in the 1800s ran the Chewton Boot Factory. Her Great Aunt married into the Smith family and there are connections to the Morgan family, and the Anderson and Tyrell families. She says she feels a real pull to visit Chewton and the People and Places Collection to research her numerous family connections. If you have a Chewton connection in your family history, or own one of the really interesting historic homes of Chewton, then a visit to the People and Places Collection is a must. There is a computer data base to make research easy. Even if you don’t have family history to research there is so much other informative and enjoyable history to explore about the mining history, the businesses, the pubs, buildings, infrastructure and people in Chewton’s rich history. Opening hours are Sundays from 1pm to 4pm at the James “Doc” Thomas, 4th child of William and Ann, Chewton Town Hall. Schoolteacher at Sutton Jackie McMaster. Grange 2001.


Previously in Chewton Argus, Wednesday 12 May 1852. MOUNT ALEXANDER. Forest Creek, May 8, 1852. I have not a single case of rape, robbery, accident, murder, or theft, of any kind to report since the date of my last. Oh! that I had but one ounce two pennyweights and three grains of poetry in my composition, to enable me in the absence of more important matter, as on the present occasion to record for the information or amusement of those of your readers who take an interest in all that concerns the sublime and beautiful, the sad havoc that, is being daily perpetrated by the Diggers in the most interesting scenery, both at the Forest Creek and other parts of the Mount Alexander Diggings. It is scarcely a month since we were assured by the best authority, that in what ever direction the eye might wander, whether up or down the Forest Creek, the beholder could not fail to be transported with a magnificent vista, composed of gumtrees - tall, stately, and ‘’none so dimly.” Within the short period named however, it is my melancholy task to record that these trees, once so magnificent, have now shared the fate of the unfortunate Charles of France have been decapitated, “laid low, and are to the dust gone down.’’ From the avidity with which the smallest particle of wood is now collected by the diggers, both for the use of fires and other purposes, like Shakespeare’s “baseless fabric of a vision,” not a wreck is left behind being the stumps. Instead of noon on Sunday last, the Argus did not reach the Diggings until late on Monday night, and in consequence, those who were anxious (and who amongst the diggers is not?) to peruse the paper, were tempted to return without it, after a journey of some miles. Never was any body of men more grossly misrepresented than the diggers have been in a certain quarter. Instead of a continued scene of bloodshed, rapine, and every other crime which is calculated to disagree humanity, peace and good order may be said to reign in all parts of the Diggings. Surely the diggers may be said to be of the migratory class, for no sooner is a report circulated of new Diggings having been discovered, or that there has been an extraordinary find, at one of the old ones, than they pack up and tramp at the rate of 5,000 per month. At the present moment, to use their own phrase, ‘Bendigo is all the go,’ - and they go accordingly; many of them paying enormously for the transit of their tents and baggage. It is a common practice at night for parties to discharge their fire arms, and reports may be heard for many miles up and down the Creeks. This practice has occasioned some little emulation in the minds of the juveniles, and not being possessed of firearms, one little follow, who lives in an adjoining tent to ours, last night charged the hollow handle of an old saucepan with gunpowder, and in letting it, off was dangerously

wounded in the face and eyes. There appears to be a great demand for pistols among the strolling vagabonds at the Diggings, two pairs having changed hands or gone off, one very handsome pair from Mr Yorke’s stores, which were taken in broad daylight and within a few feet of where a man was at working building a chimney, the other pair from the tent adjoining the old Argus office last evening. DANIEL BUNCE PS. Should you publish a Gold Diggers Directory, pray put down the Herald office as being situated on the top of Mount Gambier, and the entry will be fully as correct as the locality given of the Argus in the agent of the Herald’s directory just printed. The above has been edited for the reason of space. To see the entire article please go to; https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/rendition/nla.newsarticle4785016.txt Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer, Monday 10 May 1852. FOREST CREEK DIGGINGS. May 5, 1852. THE great rain has come at last! On Saturday, when I wrote my last communication the quantity which had then fallen was quite insignificant, but on the following day it rained heavily and continuously, filling holes in gullies, and flowing into the main creeks in such quantity as to justify the confidence that no want of water will be felt till next Summer. This is the most important news I have sent to you for some time; it forms the beginning of quite a new epoch to all of us. When it became evident that the rain was enough for our wants, and that we were not this time to be cheated with a passing shower, you might see men paddling about over the sloppy ground to get a peep at the water-holes, and see how they were filling! The immediate effect of the rain, say for the next fortnight, will be to diminish considerably the amount of gold collected, a great many are flooded out of their holes, and even those who had not this misfortune, will take two or three days to shift their cradles, tents, &c, to where they mean to dig. During and after the rain, numbers were walking about with eyes fixed on the ground, nuggeting, at places on the road side, there is a story current, that on Sunday a large nugget was picked up on the surface of a

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heap of refuse stuff — I have heard the weight stated at from three ounces to two pounds, so I leave the story in your hands. Among the minor changes effected by the rain, lemonade tents are transferred into Hot Coffee booths; 6d. per pint, 3d. per half pint, such is the tariff. Prices of provisions are very unsettled. Flour £6 10s. to £7 15s. per bag of 200 lbs., or 8d. to 9d. per lb.; sugar 6d. to 8d. per lb.; fresh beef and mutton have advanced unreasonably — beef 6d. per Ib.; bread 3s. 6d. per 4 lb. loaf (advance of 6d. since last week) ; brandy 10s. to 11s. per bottle; Hollands, 12s. to 15s. per small flask, these can be got at most stores with or without a medical doctor’s certificate. The above has been edited for the reason of space. To see the entire article please go to; https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/rendition/nla.newsarticle91929474.txt Glen Harrison.

Local government education project Councillor Max Lesser invites the community along to help launch a series of educational resources to help explain the role of local government. This Councillor PEG Project stands for People, Education, Government, and the resources that include a card game, mazes, colouring activities and more have been developed independently by Cr Lesser as part of the charity Goldenhope Foundation. “I became interested in telling the story of local government because I felt there was a need to explain its role to children and the community,” said Cr Lesser. “The games and activities help people to understand what their rates go to and what local government does.”

Seen the April/May Royalauto?

Cr Lesser has worked with the state’s peak body for local government the Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) to refine the messages and information. Everyone is welcome to come along to the launch of Cr PEG Project. The launch will be held as part of the Business, Bunfights and Brawls exhibition at the National Trust and Australia Heritage Festival. The exhibition highlights the history of the establishment of local government in the Mount Alexander area. Come along at 10.00am on Saturday 4 May to the Castlemaine Historic Society, 7 Goldsmith Crescent, Castlemaine, but please RSVP to Lucie Curry Cheenne on 5471 1857 or email l.currycheenne@mountalexander.vic. gov.au by Monday 29 April. Taken from a Press Release.

The current edition of the RACV’s magazine (Royalauto) has an article that begins in Chewton! And then makes recommendations about where to walk, drive or ride. What about the walk to the Reddy for a “Glasgow Salad”? Chase up the mag or check it on-line at https://www. racv.com.au/royalauto/travelling/victoria/goldfieldsregion-three-ways.html

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Promote and celebrate our local volunteers

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Local community groups and organisations are invited to promote and celebrate their work by participating in the second Mount Alexander Volunteer Expo as part of National Volunteer Week in May. The Volunteer Expo is a Mount Alexander Shire Council initiative that aims to provide local volunteer-run groups and organisations with the opportunity to promote what they do and show how the community can get involved and support them. “We have a very strong culture of volunteering in our community and this is a great way for local groups and organisations to demonstrate and celebrate the valuable work they do,” said Ms Lisa Knight, Director Corporate and Community Services, Mount Alexander Shire Council. “Our first Volunteer Expo was a great success so we encourage as many local organisations and groups to get involved this year and book a stall.” The free event will run over two days from Wednesday 22 to Thursday 23 May, in the historic Market Building in Castlemaine. “Simply register your stall and take up this unique opportunity to attract new members and promote what you do to the community,” she added. Registration forms for the Mount Alexander Volunteer Expo are available on Council’s website www. mountalexander.vic.gov.au/Volunteer Hard copies are also available at the Castlemaine Library, the Maldon Neighbourhood House and the Civic Centre in Castlemaine. Registration is free and closes at 5.00pm on Friday 10 May. A limited number of stalls are available. Taken from a Press Release.

Mount Alexander Shire Council invites you to come along and support, celebrate and recognise the wonderful work of local volunteers by participating in activities throughout National Volunteer Week in May. The Mount Alexander Volunteer Week program will include a range of free workshops, a Volunteer Expo and a celebration event. "Volunteers play such an important role in our community and Council is hosting a special afternoon tea and expo to thank our many generous community members and recognise all the work they do,” said David Leathem, Acting Director Corporate and Community Services, Mount Alexander Shire Council. "We know that our community benefits from a strong contingent of volunteers. It would be wonderful to see as many people as possible at our events in May." The celebration event will be held from 4.00pm to 5.30pm on Wednesday 22 May at the Market Building in Castlemaine. Please RSVP to the Community Partnerships Team on 5471 1700 or email info@mountalexander.vic. gov.au by 5.00pm Friday 17 May. During National Volunteer Week Council will also host four free workshops aimed at helping volunteers, community groups and organisations develop and refine a range of useful skills. Workshops include: • Recruitment, Retention and Recognition, 10.30am to 12.00noon, Monday 20 May. Presented by Volunteer Central Vic Bam! • Get super powered with skilled volunteering, 1.30pm to 2.30pm, Monday 20 May. Presented by Volunteer Central Vic • Grants Writing, 10.00am to 12.30pm, Tuesday 21 May. Presented by Non Profit Training • Online Savvy 101, 1.00pm to 3.00pm, Tuesday 21 May. Presented by Hootville All workshops will be held at the Ray Bradfield Room in Castlemaine. Bookings are essential and places are limited. Register via www.mountalexander.vic.gov. au/Volunteer Taken from a Press Release.

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Have your say on 2019/2020 council budget Mount Alexander Shire Council is seeking feedback on its 2019/2020 Proposed Budget, which has now been adopted. The $43.63 million budget outlines the resources needed to deliver more than 100 services to the community and maintain and improve vital infrastructure like roads, bridges and footpaths. Overall rate income will increase by 2.5%, in line with the Victorian Government’s Fair Go Rates System. As properties are now valued annually some rates will increase by more than 2.5%, while others will increase by less. Kerbside bin collection charges will increase by an average of 3% per property to maintain rubbish and recycling services at existing levels. The proposed budget will deliver $16.72 million of capital works (including carry-forwards). Council is looking to secure around $4.46 million of grants from the State and Federal Governments to help deliver these projects. Key projects of the proposed 2019/2020 capital works program: • $5.40 million on roads: The roads program includes rehabilitation at Sutton Grange, North Harcourt and Barkers Creek, along with the annual road resealing and gravel road resheeting program. • $2.44 million on bridges: Council is seeking funding from the Federal Government to replace bridges at Froomes Road, Castlemaine and Eagles Road, Harcourt. • $1.60 million on footpaths and trails: Footpaths will be renewed and constructed along William, Forest and Ray streets near Camp Reserve, to link the McKenzie Hill growth area, along with completion of the Campbells Creek Trail. • $2.26 million on community buildings: Includes floor replacement at Castlemaine Library, conservation works at the Market Building, and renewal of facilities at the Maldon Visitor Information Centre and Maternal and Child Health Centre. • $1.01 million on recreation facilities: Includes construction of female change rooms and designs for future works at Harcourt Recreation Reserve, and renewal works at Council’s outdoor swimming pools.

$1.19 million on drains and flood levees: Includes completion of drainage works at Saint Street, Castlemaine and initial works to reduce the impact of flooding at Campbells Creek and Castlemaine. • $863,000 on playgrounds: Includes construction of a new play space at Stanley Park North, Harcourt, and upgrade to the Victory Park playspace and playground near Westend Hall in Castlemaine. • $1.41 million on plant, equipment and technology: Includes a water tanker and other equipment to assist improve our roads network. The proposed budget also includes new and continuing projects including: • Aged and disability services – Continue to provide the Home Support and Community Care program during Federal reforms ($2.35 million). • Streetscapes – Continue works to improve streetscapes in our towns including Maldon, Harcourt, Taradale, Elphinstone, Chewton, Campbells Creek, Guildford, Newstead and Castlemaine ($523,000). • Early Years – Continue to implement the Early Years Plan and deliver the State Government funded Supported Playgroups Program ($93,900). • Equity, access and inclusion – New role to help meet legislative requirements regarding access, discrimination and human rights ($35,440) and complete upgrades to improve access and amenities in community buildings ($162,500). • Phee project – At Home residency program to allow local creatives the chance to activate the Phee Broadway Theatre ($21,000). • Trees and vegetation – Maintain street trees to reduce public safety risks ($155,000), manage our significant trees at the Castlemaine Botanical Gardens ($50,000) and roadside weeds ($44,000). • Recycling – introduction of a trial of recycling bins in public spaces to reduce waste to landfill ($20,000). Deputy Mayor Tony Cordy said it’s been a thorough process to develop the budget and community feedback is important. “We’ve met with and listened to our community and their priorities have certainly influenced our budget for the year ahead,” said Cr Cordy. “I would encourage everyone

Rob’s lawn mowing lawn mowing Rubbish and unwanted goods Removed (fully insured) $30 per hour

0402 645 467 28


to read through our budget. If there’s something you feel strongly about – whether it’s something we’ve missed or something you strongly support – we’d appreciate your feedback. People are often surprised at the breadth of services Council delivers – from managing roads, footpaths, buildings, parks and gardens, to monitoring the health of new babies and supporting vulnerable residents to remain independent in their home. Councillors are continually working with staff to review and improve processes and identify efficiencies. We’re also working behind the scenes to advocate for funding from State and Federal Governments for important community infrastructure and services. Delivering services in a sustainable way is a priority, and that’s what you’ll see in this budget. I would like to acknowledge the efforts of staff who have worked with Councillors to put this budget together.”

The proposed budget and budget summary is available on Council’s website at www.mountalexander. vic.gov.au/HaveYourSay Printed copies are available at the Civic Centre in Castlemaine, Castlemaine Library, Newstead Rural Transaction Centre and local visitor information centres. To make a submission please forward a letter to the Chief Executive Officer, Mount Alexander Shire Council, PO Box 185, Castlemaine VIC 3450 or send an email titled 2018/2019 Budget Submission to info@mountalexander. vic.gov.au Submissions close at 5.00pm on Wednesday 15 May 2019. If you would like to speak to your submission at the Special Meeting of Council at 5.00pm on Wednesday 21 May, please indicate this in your submission. Taken from a Press Release.

PROPOSED COUNCIL BUDGET 2019/2020 The Mount Alexander Shire Council Budget outlines our priorities for the upcoming financial year to achieve objectives set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021. We invite you to review and provide feedback on the priorities in the budget by making a submission.

BUDGET SUMMARY

Key dates:

Council has prepared a $43.63 million budget for 2019/2020 to maintain and improve infrastructure, and deliver projects and services which are valued by our community. We will do this within an average increase to rate income of 2.5% under the Victorian Government’s Fair Go Rates System, as we continue to review processes to work more efficiently and prioritise investment, and advocate for funding. Kerbside bin collection charges will increase by an average of 3% per property to maintain rubbish and recycling services at existing levels.

C A P I TA L W O R K S

5.00pm, Wednesday 15 May: Closing date for public submissions

Roads – $5.40 million program includes more than $2.98 million for road rehabilitation works in Sutton Grange, North Harcourt and Barkers Creek as part of the grant-funded Roads to Recovery and Fixing Country Roads programs; $1.89 million for road resealing and gravel road resheeting plus additional funds for design and minor works*. Bridges – $2.44 million program includes the replacement of bridges in Froomes Road, Castlemaine and Eagles Road, Harcourt*. Footpaths tracks and trails – $1.60 million which includes $460,000 to renew and construct footpaths at sites in William Street, Ray Street and Forest Street near Camp Reserve as part of our plans to link the McKenzie Hill growth area and $643,000 to complete the Campbells Creek Trail. Flood levees and drains – $1.19 million to start construction of flood levees and waterway landscaping in Castlemaine and Campbells Creek and complete Saint Street drainage works at Castlemaine.

5.00pm, Tuesday 21 May: Hear submissions at a Special Meeting of Council

Recreation facilities – $1.01 million to construct female change rooms at Harcourt Recreation Reserve and design future works, as well as renewing swimming pool facilities across the shire. Playgrounds – $863,000 to construct a new play space in Stanley Park North in Harcourt partially funded by the Victorian Government and to upgrade the playground at Morrissey Reserve near Westend Hall in Castlemaine. The Victory Park play space will be completed.

Streetscapes – Continue works to improve streetscapes in our towns including Maldon, Harcourt, Taradale, Elphinstone, Chewton, Campbells Creek, Guildford and Newstead ($523,000). Phee project – At home residency program to allow local creative people the chance to activate the Phee Broadway Theatre ($21,000). Trees and vegetation – Additional investment to maintain street trees to reduce public safety risks across the shire ($155,000), manage our significant trees at the Castlemaine Botanical Gardens ($50,000) and roadside weeds ($44,000). Recycling – introduction of a trial of recycling bins in public spaces to reduce waste to landfill ($20,000).

Y O U R R AT E S AT W O R K

Your rates fund more than 100 local services across the shire. The services range from maintenance and construction of footpaths, roads and bridges, managing our public open space and leisure facilities, supporting local arts and culture and providing services like maternal and child health, home care and social support for vulnerable and elderly clients. This is how Council allocates spending on different services for every $100 it spends.

COUNCIL SPENDING PER $100 $5

Buildings - $2.26 million to improve community facilities including floor replacement at Castlemaine Library, conservation works at the Market Building and renew facilities at Maldon Visitor Information Centre and the Maternal and Child Health Centre in Castlemaine. *Projects subject to external funding

16.11 18.49

Land/landfill improvements $

6.30pm, Tuesday 12 June: Council to consider the 2019/2020 Budget for adoption at an Ordinary Meeting of Council.

Aged and disability services – continue to provide the Home Support and Community Care program during Federal reforms ($2.35 million).

4.15 4.16 7.82 9.81

MAJOR CAPITAL WORKS

Early years – continue to implement Early Years Plan and State Government funded Supported Playgroups Program ($93,900).

Equity, access and inclusion - new role to help meet legislative responsibilities regarding human rights, access and discrimination ($35,400) and funding to complete upgrades to provide better access and amenities in community buildings ($162,500).

The proposed budget will deliver $16.72 million of capital projects, including carry forward projects. Major projects include:

KEY PROJECTS AND PROGRAMS

The proposed budget includes new and continuing initiatives such as:

885,000

Walking & cycling

1.6million

$

Plant, equipment & technology

Drainage & levees

1.19

$ million

1.41

$ million

Bridges $2.44 million

Recreation

1.01

$ million

Buildings

Roads

$ million

$ million

2.26

5.4

6.03 6.13 42.92 34.95 6.37 7.35 4.01 4.75 1.43 2.57 11.16 11.79

$10

$15

$20

$25

$30

$35

$40

$45

ARTS, CULTURE &LIBRARY AGED, DISABILIT Y & FAMILY SERVICES PARKS, GARDENS & RECREATION PROPERT Y & FACILITIES ROADS, FOOTPATHS & DRAINAGE PL ANNING, BUILDING & LOCAL L AWS COMMUNIT Y & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENT & HEALTH WASTE

2019/2020

2018/2019

H O W Y O U C A N G E T I N V O LV E D

HOW COUNCIL IS FUNDED

Rates and charges 62% Government grants 30% User fees and fines 5% Other income 3%

You can read the proposed budget online at www.mountalexander.vic.gov. au/HaveYourSay, or read a printed copy at the Civic Centre in Castlemaine, Castlemaine Library, our Visitor Information Centres or Newstead Rural Transaction Centre. Send your submission by letter or email titled 2019/2020 Budget Submission to Chief Executive Officer, Mount Alexander Shire Council, PO Box 185, Castlemaine, VIC, 3450 or email info@mountalexander.vic.gov.au. If you would like to speak to your submission at a Special Meeting of Council at 5.00pm on Tuesday 21 May please indicate this in your submission. Submissions close 5.00pm, Wednesday 15 May 2019.

CONTACT US: Mount Alexander Shire Council, Civic Centre, Corner Lyttleton and Lloyd Streets, P.O. Box 185, Castlemaine VIC 3450 t (03) 5471 1700 | e info@mountalexander.vic.gov.au | w www.mountalexander.vic.gov.au

Innovative, creative, connected.

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Mount Alexander’s 2019 Youth Awardees

Photos: Josh Rodgers - Youth Leadership Award in the Workplace with Council CEO Darren Fuzzard. Oscar Johnson - Youth Leadership Award in Education. Cohen Saunders - Youth Leadership Award in the Community and Ada Levis – Youth Leadership Award in Music and the Arts.

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Victorian Youth Week began in style as people of all ages gathered at Victory Park in Castlemaine to celebrate young people in our community. Along with an afternoon of fun activities, Council announced winners of its 2019 Mount Alexander Youth Awards. The awards recognise leadership across six separate categories. Congratulations to: • Cohen Saunders – Youth Leadership Award in the Community • Josh Rodgers – Youth Leadership Award in the Workplace • Ada Levis – Youth Leadership Award in Music and the Arts • Harriet O’Shea Carre – Youth Leadership Award in the Environment • Amy Bachmann – Youth Leadership Awards in Sports and Recreation • Oscar Johnson – Youth Leadership Award in Education. “Our youth award winners are an incredibly impressive group of young people. It’s fantastic to see their impact on the community and celebrate their achievements,” said Darren Fuzzard, Chief Executive Officer, Mount Alexander Shire Council. “We have an exceptional group of young leaders within our shire. I congratulate all the award winners and nominees.” Cohen Saunders won the community award through his significant volunteering roles both within school and the community. “Once a week for the last 18 months Cohen has volunteered with local farmers Gung Hoe Growers. His dedication is astonishing as he’s up before dawn and rides his bike 45 minutes in the rain, heat, or frost to volunteer before school and get hands-on experience in sustainable farming,” said Mr Fuzzard. “As winner of the workplace award Newstead teenager Josh Rodgers is impressing many with his innovative approach to business. He built his own solar powered coffee roasterie, and has established his own coffee roasting business.” “The winner of the Music and the Arts award is Ada Levis, who somehow manages to find time to attend school, host two weekly radio shows, perform in the popular local band Stop That Mammoth, volunteer on a number of committees and study radio broadcasting. Harriet O’Shea Carre is our environment award winner for her integral role in the Students Strike for Climate Change campaign. She has encouraged thousands of young people to get involved and stand up for action on climate change. Amy Bachmann is winner of the sports and recreation award for her achievement in the equestrian field of dressage. As a member of the Victorian interschool team for five years, Amy is now one of the team’s leaders and mentors younger riders with training and support. Oscar Johnson is the winner of the education award through his passion for helping to develop skills in others. He has led a number of group programs including an anti-vandalism project, an art-related group maths activity and program to build creativity in classmates,” said Mr Fuzzard. “Thank you to everyone involved in the festival, particularly the judges, presenters and all the volunteers who worked tirelessly on such a positive and energetic event.” The festival featured entertainment by young musicians including Isabella Fortuna, Maya Rose and local band Ethical Decimal, a Young Makers Market and activities such as tie dying. The popular Youth Awards Festival was organised by members of Council’s Youth Advisory Group and FReeZA Committee (Eight Metre Speaker), Young Makers Market Committee, with help from Council. The Council event was supported by a Victorian Government Youth Week Grants. Taken from a Press Release.


Youth Mental Health First Aid training for parents and carers Parents and carers of young people in Mount Alexander Shire are invited to learn more about the complexities of mental health and how to support young people who might be struggling with a mental health problem. The Youth Mental Health First Aid training will provide skills to help parents and carers recognise a possible emerging mental health concern or a mental health crisis. “There is a lot to understand when it comes to mental health,” said Shannon Lacy, Youth Development Officer, Mount Alexander Shire Council. “This training provides an excellent overview of what can occur and will provide practical skills to support people in need.” The course is designed for parents or carers of young people aged between 10 and 25. The skills learnt can also be used to support other family members, friends or colleagues. The 14 hour course will be held over four Thursday evening sessions on 2 May, 9 May, 16 May and 23 May. Dinner will be provided at each session. Sessions run from 5.00pm to 8.30pm at the Civic Centre, Corner of Lyttleton and Lloyd Streets, Castlemaine. A registration fee of $50 will cover the cost of course materials and catering. To book, visit the Training page at www.mountalexandershireyouth. com.au/training. The first aid course is delivered by Council as part of its commitment to improve access to mental health services for the community. For more information contact Council’s Youth Development Unit on 5471 1700 or email youth@ mountalexander.vic.gov.au

Come along to Youth Mental Health First Aid training where you’ll learn:

WHAT:

Youth Mental Health First Aid Training

WHEN:

5.00pm to 8.30pm Thursday evenings 2, 9, 16 & 23 May

WHERE:

Civic Centre cnr Lloyd and Lyttleton Sts, Castlemaine

COST:

$50

BOOK:

mountalexandershireyouth.com.au/training

CONTACT: Shannon Lacy 0429 369 894 youth@mountalexander.vic.gov.au

> Thedifference between typical adolescent development and a developing mental health problem > How to have open conversations with young people > Signs and symptoms of possible mental health problems > Where to seek further help. Over four evening sessions you’ll learn all this, receive takehome resources, meet other parents and enjoy a free meal.

Taken from a Press Release.

Bring your business ideas to life

Mount Alexander Shire Council’s small business workshop series continues in May, with two three-hour sessions that will help you get your idea to market. You’ll learn everything you need to know to take your innovative idea from drawing board to market launch. Get help to assess the feasibility of your idea,

decide its business potential and develop a clear commercialisation strategy over two inspiring workshops led by an experienced innovation and commercialisation expert Dr Brian Oldland. Commercialising your new idea: Strategies to get to market 9.30am to 12.30pm Monday 6 May and 9.30am to 12.00noon Monday 13 May in the Council Chambers at the Civic Centre. Cost: $75.00 and book at: www.mountalexander.vic. gov.au/BusinessResources Council is delivering these low cost workshops in partnership with Small Business Victoria. The sessions aim to support local business people to network and build their knowledge and skills across a range of areas. And why not consider attending the session in June on taking your business online? Tickets are only $20. To book visit the Business Resources page on Council’s website. Taken from a Press Release.

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2019 Active Living Census - will you respond???

Mayors and Chief Executive Officers from the City of Greater Bendigo and the Shires of Campaspe, Loddon, Mount Alexander, Macedon Ranges and Central Goldfields came together in Bendigo in April to launch the Healthy Heart of Victoria 2019 Active Living Census. The census, which can be filled out online at www. srcentre.com.au/ALC from May 20 until June 16, will also be delivered to more than 117,000 homes in the Loddon Campaspe Region in late May. The City of Greater Bendigo was the first Australian Council to undertake an Active Living Census in 2014 which was completed by an impressive 16% of the population. Importantly it provided hard data that helped secure funding for a range of major recreational and health and wellbeing projects including local walking trails, water fountains and local health improvement programs. It also helped other agencies and organisations to make decisions based on what the community said they wanted The Loddon Campaspe Region has some of the worst health outcomes in Victoria with higher rates of smoking and poorer diet behaviours than other parts of the state. The aim of the census is to seek valid local and regional level data on the community’s health behaviours, activity levels, preferences and needs.

“People can be active in lots of different ways. It’s not just about those who participate in organised sport. Through the census we want to find out what people do to stay active, what stops them from being active and what would it take for them become more active,” said Darren Fuzzard, Chief Executive Officer, Mount Alexander Shire Council. “The findings from the census will be used to produce a report for the Loddon Campaspe Region and we’ll also receive an individual report specifically for our shire. No other region in Australia will have this type of data. This means the Loddon Campaspe Region will be in a powerful position to advocate for the community’s needs. It will be a powerful tool for supporting projects that provide better future outcomes and help drive ongoing change in our region. It’s an exciting initiative for our region because it will help local Councils, health agencies, sporting clubs and government departments to better plan, develop and enhance recreational facilities and health promotion services to improve the future health and wellbeing of our local communities. I encourage all residents to take the time to fill out the Healthy Heart of Victoria 2019 Active Living Census.” The Healthy Heart of Victoria 2019 Active Living Census will be backed by an extensive marketing campaign. In addition, a total of $12,000 in prizes is up for grabs for those who complete the census - with extra incentives provided for those who complete it online. Prizes include gift cards and sporting equipment. The 2019 census is being funded by Healthy Heart of Victoria, an initiative of the Loddon Campaspe Regional Partnership that aims to improve health outcomes for residents living in Central Victoria. Taken from a Press Release. Photos: Health Broker for Healthy Heart of Victoria Simone Hoopell and MAS CEO Darren Fuzzard promoting the Active Living Census...

...and Active Living being demonstrated locally at the CSMP!

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Wheel Cactus Field Day 2019 Launch

The Tarrangower Cactus Control Group (Cactus Warriors) field days for 2019 will be formally launched on Sunday 26 May at 10.30 am. For the venue, please see our website www.cactuswarriors.org closer to that date and click the News and Events tab. The launch will be followed by a demonstration and a talk for newcomers, after which we will set off suitably equipped for a happy morning killing cactus, finishing at midday with a yummy BBQ lunch, a cuppa and a chance to chat. The equipment, protective gloves and goggles will be provided for the morning. Children will be welcome but must be accompanied by a responsible adult. For more information about Wheel Cactus and what we are doing about it, please see our website or ring Ian on 0412 015 807.

FIELD NATS Visitors are welcome at club meetings and excursions... Fri May 10th meeting: Speaker Chris Tzaros on Turquoise Parrot conservation in the Warby Ranges Sat May 11th field trip: Swift Parrot search Ordinary membership: Single $35, Family $50, Pensioner or student: Single $25, Family $30. Subscription includes postage of the monthly newsletter, Castlemaine Naturalist. General meetings - (second Friday of each month, except January) are held in the Uniting Church (UCA) Hall (enter from Lyttleton St.) at 7.30 pm. Field Trips - (Saturday following the general meeting) leave from the car park opposite Castle Motel, Duke Street at 1.30pm sharp unless stated otherwise. BYO afternoon tea. Outdoor excursions are likely to be cancelled in extreme weather conditions. There are NO excursions on total fire ban days.

CASTLEMAINE FIELD NATURALISTS, PO BOX 324, CASTLEMAINE 3450 http://castlemainefnc.wordpress.com/

Apparently there’s a Federal Election in the air! (and the answers always sought are...) 1. The Chewton Polling Booth is the Chewton Community Centre. 2. There is a pre-polling booth to be in Castlemaine - all election detail is available on the Australian Electoral Commission website - https://www.aec.gov.au/ 3. Nomimations for the Bendigo seat (7) in ballot paper order

1. BUDDE, Sharon (Rise Up Australia Party) 2. HOLIAN, Robert (The Greens (VIC)) 3. CHESTERS, Lisa (Australian Labor Party) 4. VEITCH, Adam (United Australia Party) 5. GAYED, Sam (Liberal) 6. WILLIAMS, Vaughan (Pauline Hanson’s One Nation) 7. HOSKIN, Julie (Fraser Anning’s Conservative National Party) 4. Nominations for the Senate (Victoria) total 82. They are listed in ballot paper order on the AEC website.

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The May Crossword to Chew_on 1

2

3

4

8

5

6

7

April’s answers were...

9 1

10

11

2 7

G 11

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13

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36

Across 1 A state of agitation or fuss. (3) 4 Guildford ***** Jamboree. (5) 8 A type of lizard. (5) 10 At a previous time. (4) 11 Australian plant named after Sir Joseph Banks. (7) 12 ************* Gully Road, Chewton Bushlands. (13) 16 To pass away. (3) 17 An extremely long period of time. (3) 18 Australia’s smallest bird. (7) 20 Agitate. (4) 22 Native plant common to the goldfields. (9) 26 Street in Castlemaine CBD (9) 30 Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning. (5) 32 Largest. (7) 34 The longest river of Asia (7) 36 Jan Wositzky’s latest show. “A ****** of Sticks”. (6)

34

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26

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I 35

23

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wers s n a s May’ month... next Jackie McMaster.

Down 2 The ***** Conservation Centre, Chewton. (5) 3 All good. (2) 5 Grandmother. (3) 6 Fertile tract within a desert (5) 7 Mineral common to the goldfields. (6) 8 A gold vein also known as a gold ****. (4) 9 Town West of Castlemaine. (8) 11 Important variety of plant and animal life. (12) 12 To lovingly care for. (7) 13 ***** Hill Road, Chewton. (5) 14 Nothing. (3) 15 Water dwelling creature. (3) 19 Street in Chewton. (6) 21 Play boisterously (4) 23 Farm animal. (3) 24 A long and distinct period of history. (3) 25 Local correction facility, ****** Prison (6) 27 Advertiser in The Chewton Chat, ***** Haylett Gardens. (5) 28 Befitting a supreme ruler (5) 29 Street on the western side of Castlemaine. (4) 31 A gradual decline. (3) 33 An evil spell. (3) 35 Popular electronic device. (2)


Advertisers in this Chewton Chat Albion Hotel P 9 Blues music, jam sessions P 35 Buda Historic Home and Garden P 17 CAE Performance Products P 11 Cameron Stewart, Podiatrist P 28 Carole Kernohan, Bowen Therapy P 20 Castlemaine Mini-Diggers P 12 Castlemaine Office Supplies P6 Chewton General Store P 12 Chewton Service Station P5 Come Clean Window Cleaning P 5 Doug Drury, Carpenter and Handyman P 13 Drill Sharpening P7 Enviro Shop P 13 Fasom Plumbing P 17 Goldfields Concreting P 20 Lawson’s Gardening/Property Maintenance P 10 Lisa Chesters, Federal M.P. P 19 Maldon Swap Meet P 20 Maree Edwards, State M.P. P 23 Mark Mitchell, Plasterer P7 Newstead Natives, Native Nursery P 23 Ray Fowler, Master Painter P 20 Red Hill Hotel P 11 Robin Haylett, Gardens P 9 Rob’s Lawn Mowing P 28 Rob’s Carpet Cleaning P 7 Soldier and Scholar, 2nd Hand Books P 18 Tamsin Whaley Celebrant P 25 Taradale Wine & Produce P 27 Thompson Family Funerals P3 Unicorn Antiques P4 Waylaines Tiling P 26 Wesley Hill Market P 16 Wildlife Rescue P 10 & 34 Yoga in Chewton P2 Printing of the Chat is now generously provided courtesy of Thompson Family Funerals.

Chewton Chat • • • • • • • • • •

2007 - Winner - best editorial comment 2008 - Finalist - best hard news reporting 2009 - Finalist - best history article 2010 - Special mention - best community reporting 2011 - Finalist - best editorial comment 2012 - Winner - best editorial comment 2013 - Winner - best news feature story 2013 - Finalist - best editorial comment 2014 - Winner - best history article 2015 - Finalist - best editorial comment

Published by the Chewton Domain Society and produced on a voluntary non-profit basis

P.O. Box 85, Chewton 3451 goldenpoint2@bigpond.com or 5472 2892 A CDS subcommittee of John Ellis (Ed.), Gloria Meltzer, Debbie Hall, Phil Hall, Glen Harrison, Jackie McMaster and Beverley Bloxham is responsible for the publication. Many volunteers help with production and circulation. It is circulated on the first of each month, necessitating a deadline of about the 22nd of the month before. Material can be left at the Chewton General Store, with any of the sub-committee members, sent by e-mail goldenpoint2@bigpond.com or by contacting 5472 2892. Contributions of ideas, news items, articles, and letters are always welcome; as are advertisements that help meet monthly production costs. Circulation is via the Chewton General Store, Chewton Pet Supplies, Chewton Post Office, Chewton Service Station, Red Hill Hotel, Castle Automotive Enterprises and Tourist Information Board, as well as the Castlemaine Library, Market Building, CHIRP, Fasom Plumbing and Castlemaine Office Supplies. Mt. Alexander Hospital Residential receives monthly copies too. Whilst copies are free, there are donation tins at many collection points and donations can be mailed to the CDS address below. Subscriptions for mailed copies can be arranged. Circulation is now 600. A full colour Chewton Chat can also be read each month on www.issuu.com - as can some earlier issues. The State Library of Victoria has all issues digitally available at https:// www.slv.vic.gov.au/ and search “Chewton Chat”. Free email subscriptions are also available. Just request and forward an email address.

The Chewton Chat wishes to advise that the views or remarks expressed in this publication are not necessarily the views of the editor, the management team or the Chewton Domain Society and no endorsement of service is implied by the listing of advertisers, sponsors or contributors.

ELPHO JAM SESSIONS You are invited to our monthly Jam Sessions at Elphinstone These sessions are informal get-togethers of people who want to make some music and have some fun! Aimed at the over 50’s, but open to all.

The last word this month goes to the dedicated people who park their cars outside the CFA station each time there’s a call-out. Not a fire on this occasion, but an important mission nonetheless. The Good Friday appeal! And another $2,382.20 raised by Chewton CFA!

Sessions: 3rd Saturday of the month (1:00pm – 4:00pm) We play Electric Blues, R’n’B, ‘60s, Rock & more…. For more information:

Email: elphojamsessions@gmail.com

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It’s still dry, but not quite so warm “Rain has been at a premium for the whole of the month”. So I wrote last month, not really expecting to write it once again this month. But I am, though hardly necessary as we are all only too well aware of the continuing lack of rain. Looking for some good news on the rain front, I next turned to the Bureau of Meteorology in the hope of some wetter news from the Pacific Ocean and El Niño. The Bureau’s ENSO Outlook is still at El Niño ALERT. This means the chance of El Niño developing in the coming months is approximately 70%; around triple the normal likelihood. The Bureau states that “El Niño typically brings drier than average conditions for eastern Australia during winter–spring, and warmer days across southern Australia. During the autumn months, the influence of El Niño tends to be weaker, but can bring drier conditions to the south of the country”. Unfortunately, the models are somewhat neutral, and not very conducive to good rain. Not the most encouraging news for gardens, tanks and dams. The other major impact on our weather is the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD). The Bureau believes the current neutrality may become more positive in our winter months, leading once again to warmer and drier than average conditions. Turning to our own records, it will come as no surprise that I have recorded exactly five (5) millimetres of rain this last month. In every sense, not much to talk

about. Looking back on our 21st Century records, the average monthly rainfall in the first four months of the year (i.e Jan, Feb, Mar and April) is 33 millimetres, typically within a range of high-twenties and highthirties. Our total for the year so far is 43.6 millimetres, of which 26 millimetres fell in February, and most of that in one hit on the 6th of the month. Daytime temperatures have been gradually falling, this month the average is still above twenty degrees at 22.4 degrees Celsius. It has been all about the twenties this month. Twenty-three days of 20 degrees C. or above. The highest daytime temperature was 29 degrees C. And curiously, the mode and the lowest daytime temperature were both 20 degrees Celsius. The overnight low temperatures have provided an unusually wide range of temperature over the month. The highest overnight temperature was a balmy-nodoona 25 degrees C at the beginning of the month. The lowest overnight temperatures have been 4 degrees C, experienced on at least three nights. However the more “average-average” has dropped from 10.4 to 9.3 degrees Celsius, accompanied by a mode of nine degrees C. To conclude a rather cheerlessly dry month, a quick look at the Coliban Water reservoirs. When the three main storages are full they contain 69,594 megalitres. Currently they contain 41,535 megalitres representing 59.7 % capacity. This compares with this time last year when 47,598 megalitres was contained. John Leavesley.

Calendar of Events May 1st May 4th May 4th May 10th May 11th May 11th May 12th May 15th May 17th May 18th May 18th May 19th May 20th May 21st May 23rd May 24th May 25th May 25th May 26th May 31st

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Scrabble Red Hill Hotel, 6 p.m., (see page 1). Eucharist Service 6 p.m., St John’s Anglican Church, Chewton. Chewton Community BBQ, 6 p.m., Ellery Park (see page 18). A Bundle of Sticks, 7.30 p.m., Chewton Town Hall (see page 8). A Bundle of Sticks, 7.30 p.m., Chewton Town Hall (see page 8). Eucharist Service 6 p.m., St John’s Anglican Church, Chewton. POHAG Meeting, 10 a.m., Chewton Town Hall. Closing date for submissions on the Council Bduget. A Bundle of Sticks, 7.30 p.m., Chewton Town Hall (see page 8). A Bundle of Sticks, 7.30 p.m., Chewton Town Hall (see page 8). Eucharist Service 6 p.m., St John’s Anglican Church, Chewton. FOBIF Walk, Stones Gully, (see page 23). CDS Management Committee Mtg., 7 p.m., Chewton Town Hall. MAS Council Meeting, 6.30 p.m., Civic Centre, Castlemaine. Fryerstown’s Biggest Morning Tea 10 a.m., Old Fryerstown School House. Chewton’s Biggest Morning Tea, 10 a.m., Chewton Town Hall. Deadline for the June Chewton Chat. Eucharist Service 6 p.m., St John’s Anglican Church, Chewton. Fryerstown Community Lunch 12.30 p.m., Fryerstown School. Circulation of the Chewton Chat, 2.30 p.m., Chewton Town Hall (Friday).

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