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Issue 244

June 2019

Two Biggest Morning Teas...

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A barrel of laughs among all the conversations in the Chewton Town Hall at Chewton’s biggest Morning Tea! And packed it was. Photographer Marion Williams was on hand with her camera, trying to squeeze between tables, chairs and patrons. Chewton was blessed with rain on Friday, May 24, the day of our Biggest Morning Tea. However, the Town Hall was warm and welcoming with the tables once again set with ...and continued on page 2

Fryerstown hosted its first BMT at the Fryerstown School House. Melanie Mitchell of Fryers Tea House gathered her friends and Fryerstown community to host the event. Talullah of Castlemaine Secondary College (CSC) joined the team and the weather pulled off a wondrous autumn day for the inaugural Fryerstown BMT. There was an array of attendees including CSC students, Thompson House residents with Alan Robinson, a past pupil of 1931 recalling his prep days. Phoenix CWA joined Fryerstown for its BMT along with many Fryerstown, Chewton, Castlemaine and Taradale residents. There was a good spread of food for all, a raffle and a lucky number game. The day could not have occurred without the invaluable generosity of the many sponsors including Coffee Basics, Theatre Royal, Black Jack Wines, Fryers Tea House, Maxi IGA, Top Meats, Castlemaine Fresh, Stoneman’s Bookroom, Hot and Crusty, Castlemaine Secondary College and Fords Dairy.

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...and continued on page 3

CHEWTON DOMAIN SOCIETY Inc Reg # A0034364L PO Box 85, Chewton. Victoria. 3451

www.chewton.net

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white cloths, pretty china and tasty food. Diane Frape-Linton’s quilt was hung on display and the “Rafferty’s Rules” raffle prizes were laid out where they could be seen by everyone. Sixty people participated during the morning including two very large Castlemaine police who called in to show the flag and have their morning tea. Their appearance caused a tiny flap among some of our guests but everything settled down quickly and we enjoyed their company. Jess Saunders, the Guest Speaker, arrived shortly after the police, in time for a cup of tea before she addressed the company. Jess is the Manager of the Castlemaine Library . She is also known by children in the area as “the bubbles lady” because when she ran story time sessions for the littlies she used bubbles to amuse them. She held her adult audience’s interest too describing the workings of modern libraries, so we all learnt something from her enjoyable and informative talk. Jess also proved to be a skillful drawer of raffle tickets she kept the ball rolling and the lucky winners had the pleasure of choosing their prizes, all of which were donated. We appreciate all the support we receive, particularly from the local business people who have so many requests for donations. The proceeds from the morning were very satisfying and we will be able to send $1,012.50 (with the quilt raffle raising nearly half of that) to the Cancer Council BUT should you wish to donate to the cause of Cancer Research please contact Marie Jones on 5472 2892 or Barbara Dry – 5472 3385 either of whom will make sure your donation is included and sent to the BMT organisers at the Cancer Council. Barbara Dry.

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Thanks to Marion Williams for this photographic coverage of the 2019 BMT. There are many more photos on chewton. net Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/ Chewtonnet-288889464550308/


On the day $731 was raised for cancer research and the Fryerstown School House decided it won’t be its last BMT. Thank you to everyone who joined us for the day to make it the success it was. Melanie Mitchell. First 4 photos (and page 1) are from Fryerstown photographer Alison Shirley. And below are two more photos of the BMT Fryerstown Style. Firstly, organizer Melanie Mitchell welcoming everybody. And a photo of Alan Robinson and Lynne Bird who were present. Alan remembers attending the school in this room when he was 5 years old in 1931 and spilling ink on Jimmy Cole’s shirt! Tim Todhunter.

Yoga classes leave you with a deep sense of relaxation on all levels - physically, mentally and emotionally...

Come and join the yoga course in Chewton. • • • •

If you have never done yoga before, feel free to come and try the gentle class. If you have experience then join the progressive course. We do body postures, breathing practices and guided meditation. Wednesday afternoon/evenings in the Chewton Town Hall.

YOGA IN CHEWTON For enquiries or enrolment forms, please call Iris on 0419 110 125.

Chewton Yoga term 3 dates: 24th July to the 19th September 2019 3


Local government education Councillor Max Lesser launched a series of colourful and eye-catching educational resources that will be used to help explain the role of local government to children. The resources include a card game, mazes, colouring activities and more. They have been developed independently by Cr Lesser as part of the charity Goldenhope Foundation. “I saw a need to introduce local government in a way that makes it interesting,” said Mount Alexander Shire’s Cr Lesser. “The games and activities help young people to understand what rates go towards and what local government does.” The Councillor’s PEG Project stands for People, Education, Government and the resources use mathematical and geometrical designs that were developed by students from the region. Cr Lesser has worked with the state’s peak body for

local government, the Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV), to refine the messages and information. The launch was attended by community members, along with representatives from Mount Alexander Shire Council, City of Greater Bendigo and Castlemaine Historic Society Inc. Taken from a Press Release.

Lifecycle Gym & Massage 732 Pyrenees Hwy, Chewton

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Carl - Gym Spin & Massage 54705500 or 0438 246 164 Libby - Gym & Massage - 0439 653389 Lachy – PT, Spin & Circuit classes 0418 758459 Eve - PT & 5 Minute Fitness 0450 797837

Email - lcg@aapt.net.au Website - www.lifecyclegym.net Lifecycle Gym is a pin code entry system and staffed part time so calling first recommended.

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The federal election - how Chewton voted We now know the Coalition has been returned to government, and Lisa Chesters has retained the seat of Bendigo, increasing her margin from 3.87% to 9.03%. This was swing of 5.16%. At Chewton, 488 votes were cast, with only 8 being informal. The 480 formal votes were spread among the candidates... BUDDE, Sharon Rise Up Australia Party 3 HOLIAN, Robert The Greens (VIC) 108 CHESTERS, Lisa Australian Labor Party 252 VEITCH, Adam United Australia Party 13 GAYED, Sam Liberal 77 WILLIAMS, Vaughan Pauline Hanson’s One Nation 17 HOSKIN, Julie Fraser Anning’s Conservative National Party 10 In two-party preferred terms after other candidates were eliminated the result was: CHESTERS, Lisa Australian Labor Party 376 78.33% GAYED, Sam Liberal 104 21.67% Interesting to note that the two-party preferred Labor vote in Chewton at the state election in late 2018 was 82.3% and that was the highest Labor vote in the Castlemaine district booths. The 78.33% Lisa Chesters received this month was not as high as Castlemaine North 82.92% and Winters Flat 78.52%.

The 2019 June Maldon Swapmeet is being held on 9th June. This event regularly gets over 200 stalls as well as a large number of exotic, modified and very rare cars. This year we will have a special area set aside for these cars for the first time. Site size has been increased to 6 x 6 metres but the sites fees will stay at $20 per site. Stallholders can set up on the day before to make life a bit easier. As usual we DON’T require any pre-booking or any paperwork, just rock up, set up and sell up! Can it get any simpler? Gates open to the public at 7ish and it runs till about 2ish… Stallholders can set up on the day but must be set by 7 am or run the risk of being turned away. Public admission is $5 per person and kids are free. This is a family friendly, dog friendly event and is a great day out for anybody who loves cars, antiques and collectables.

For enquiries call Mark or Bonnie on 0414 244 842

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From Llanon Chat to Chewton Chat! It was Scrabble night at the Red Hill Hotel and I was enjoying a cold beer waiting for the game to begin when I spied a copy of the Chewton Chat on the bar. What a coincidence I thought, I help produce a bi-lingual newsletter called Llanon Chat and I was keen to see what tips I could pick up. Several hours later I was well and truly hooked and keen to find out more about the history of Chewton. During the evening I was fortunate to meet the editor of the Chewton Chat and among the stories he told me about Chewton, I was amazed to hear about the ruined Welsh Village near Golden Point. We had very little time left before flying home to Wales, but managed a visit to the ruins next day. What a fascinating place and well worth seeing, particularly as some of the people who lived there originated from Merthyr Tydfil which is not far from Llanon. So what else does Chewton and Llanon have in common? Well, my nephew is the publican of The Red Hill Hotel, and of course, newsletters! So in return I Cloncan

Rhifyn 4: Gwanwyn 2019 4th Edition: Spring 2019

LLAN-NON

Llanon - rainbow’s end!

Chat

Croeso i rifyn gwanwyn 2019 o Cloncan Llan-non!

Welcome to the spring 2019 edition of Cloncan Llan-non!

Wrth i ni groesawu’r gwanwyn, dyma gyfle i ni ddathlu Dydd Gŵyl Dewi, ar Fawrth y cyntaf. Mae’n aml yn gyfle i blant yr ysgol gynnal eisteddfodau a gwisgo’r wisg draddodiadol.

As we welcome the spring, on 1 March we celebrate our patron saint – St David, or Dewi Sant. This is often a good excuse for the school children to wear the traditional Welsh costume and enjoy a day of singing, reciting and literary competitions at their local eisteddfod.

Mae llawer o gymdeithasau’n cynnal cawl a nosweithiau Cymreig o ganu a hwyl o gwmpas y dyddiad hwn, ac mae sawl tre yng Nghymru wedi dechrau cynnal Parêd Gŵyl Ddewi – efallai y gallwn gynnal un yn Llan-non rhywbryd! Ond pwy oedd Dewi Sant? Wel, roedd yn Gristion ac yn esgob yng Nghymru yn y 6ed ganrif, ac ef yw nawddsant ein cenedl. Mae ganddo gysylltiad hynod agos â Llan-non, wrth gwrs, gan fod ein pentre wedi’i enwi ar ôl mam Dewi, sef y santes Non! Un hanes sy’n gysylltiedig ag ef yw bod y tir wedi codi dan ei draed pan fu’n pregethu yn Llanddewi Brefi, er mwyn i’r dyrfa enfawr allu ei weld a’i glywed. Rydym yn dathlu Dydd Gŵyl Dewi ar 1 Mawrth oherwydd, yn ôl y sôn, dyna’r dyddiad y bu Dewi farw. Roedd Dewi yn credu yn gryf y dylai pob un ohonom “wneud y pethau bychain” i wella ein cymuned a’n cenedl. Felly beth am fynd ati heddi’ i wneud pethau bach bob dydd i wneud gwahaniaeth i eraill? Dyma rai syniadau – croeso i chi feddwl am ragor a’u rhannu â ni:

thought you might like to read a little about our newsletter and something of Llanon and its history. Our newsletter, Llanon Chat (Cloncan Llan-non) was launched last year and our 5th edition is at the printers. Run by a small group of volunteers, it is a quarterly newsletter, free of charge, relying entirely on income from advertising to fund its printing. We have a print run of just 600 and a copy is hand delivered to every house in the community - no mean feat! But now, more about Llanon for anyone interested in a bit of history.

Many local societies hold traditional Welsh evenings full of fun and food during the beginning of March, and many Welsh towns have started holding St David’s Day Parades – maybe we could hold something similar in Llanon one day! But who was Dewi Sant? Well, he was a Christian and a bishop in Wales in the 6th century. He has a close connection with Llanon, as our village was named after his mother, Non! One interesting story associated with Dewi Sant was that the ground beneath his feet rose in Llanddewi Brefi, in order for the enormous crowds to see and hear him preach. We celebrate Dydd Gŵyl Dewi on 1 March each year because legend has it that Dewi died on this day. Dewi firmly believed that each and every one of us could do the ‘little things’ in order to improve our community and nation. How about having a go at it today and every day – doing those little things to make life better for others? Here are a few suggestions:

• ymweld â’r henoed yn lleol • dweud ‘shwmai’ wrth bobl ar y stryd • siopa’n lleol • codi un darn o sbwriel a’i roi yn y bin • sgwennu pwt yn Gymraeg ar Facebook

• visit the elderly • learn one word of Welsh each day – “shwmai!” • shop locally • pick up one piece of rubbish and put it in the bin • wear red for Wales!

Croeso i chi awgrymu rhagor o “bethau bychain” i’w gwneud!

You are welcome to suggest other small things to do!

Llanon is a village in Ceredigion on the west coast of Wales. It is named after St Non, mother of St David, Patron Saint of Wales who was born around 500AD and is said to have been brought up in the village. It is part of the parish of Llansantffraid which consists of three communities, Llanon, Llansantffraid and Nebo. With a background of farming and seafaring the community is steeped in history and tradition. Llanon has a medieval strip field system made up of 140 narrow ribbons of land, known as furlongs or slangs that were once farmed by serfs on behalf of the bishops of St Davids. At low tide, medieval fish traps can be seen near the shore and along the coast. Built by the Cistercian Monks of Strata Florida Abbey, the traps had low walls on three sides topped by wattle fences. They became submerged at high tide, trapping fish when the tide went out. The monks would then walk the 20 miles from the Strata Florida Abby to collect their harvest. Bountiful harvests indeed! In 1888, three donkey-loads of herrings were removed from local traps!

Castlemaine

On the coastal path from Llanon to Aberystwyth

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End of an era - the remains of a jetty on Llanon beach Generations of master mariners were raised in the parish and in the 18th and 19th centuries many ships were built on or near the beach in Llanon. Today many houses still bear the names of these vessels and of distant lands and ports. Navigation schools were held in local cottages and houses, and boys and girls learned navigation. In those days women went to sea sometimes with their husbands and in times of sickness or emergency, they could bring the ship home. Visitors can be seen exploring the gravestones in the local churchyard which also reveal Llanon’s seafaring heritage. And, of course, the rugged coastline was perfect for storing and trading contraband brought ashore by local smugglers. Today, Llanon is a seaside village with a population of around 2,400. It is an active Welsh-speaking community with a range of clubs and activities to suit all ages and interests.

Bowls and Boxercise, Coffee Clubs, Judo, History Society, Merched Y Wawr and Women’s Institute are all supported, and our local pub The White Swan, is the scene of many a Quiz and music night, but unfortunately no Scrabble yet! In August each year the village hosts a carnival and our Carnival Queen and Attendants must be 60 or over to participate. For wider activities, a short car journey takes you to the nearby University town of Aberystwyth which boasts several theatres, cinemas, museums, hotels and restaurants and other places of interest Many tourists visit Llanon, including walkers on the Wales coastal path, an 870 mile walking adventure, which can be walked in enjoyable sections, or as part of the Dylan Thomas Trail. Dylan Thomas was a regular visitor to the village where he enjoyed a pint in the Central Hotel with his friend and local vet Tommy Earp. Perhaps we will have the opportunity to welcome visitors from Chewton to this lovely part of Wales one day, and I can only hope that we are able to extend the same warm welcome we received on our first visit to your lovely town. Who said you can never visit the same place twice..... Dymuniadau gorau o Llanon (best wishes from Llanon) Sheila Davies

Sheila at the Scrabble board in the Red Hill Hotel

Llanon beach from the coastal path Beach cleaning events are held regularly to try and tackle the problem of plastic on our beaches. Bingo,

• • • • • •

Andrew Pitcher

Small building Repurposing & repairs Shed rescue & restoration Plane blade & chisel sharpening Plane reconditioning Carpentry & metalwork

p 0488 318 525 e pitcherthisbuilding@gmail.com w facebook.com/pitcherthis

Pi tch er this 7


Know Your Neighbour Have you met Duang Tengtriat? Duang Tengtriat was born in northern Thailand, the youngest of 11 children. ‘My parents moved to a small town where they sold anything they could to make a living. They had many children because they wanted more hands to help them. They taught us from a very young age how to do business. At the age of six I was given the task of creating a market garden, growing and harvesting vegetables to sell. I would get up at 5am, carry two big baskets of vegetables to the market, set up and sell these until 7.30am, then come home, have breakfast and go to school. Duang attended a Protestant school begun by missionaries. She says she was a good student. ‘Play was not part of my life, it was school and work. I would say I didn’t have a childhood, but I don’t look back with bitterness. I am very grateful for the way I grew up because it meant I learnt to do so many things, including to be very good at maths. Growing vegetables is second nature to me. I am completely dedicated to growing vegetables.’ She finished high school in Thailand then went abroad to study further, training in many things. When she was 16 she won an American Field Scholarship to study in America for one year. ‘I went from a little town with no running water, no electricity, no cars, to New York city.’ Duang later came to Australia to learn nursing, obtaining an RN degree from Adelaide, then returned home to teach nursing. A visiting American professor assisted her to get a scholarship to study counselling at a university in Nebraska. ‘I studied there for two years, obtaining a BA in Psychology, then went on to do a Masters degree in Psychology.’ During this time she met an American doctor. ‘We married and settled in Seattle where I lived for the next 30 years, and where my son and daughter and four grandchildren live.’ How did she end up in Chewton? I originally met my partner Rob 50 years ago in Adelaide. We went our separate ways and married others, meeting again many years later. For some years we commuted between Australia and Seattle, then I decided to move to Australia. We lived for a few years in Research where we had a large

0433 448 036

bush block and I had a large vegetable garden. I converted the whole tennis court into a vegetable garden.’ During this time Duang became a caterer in Eltham, using the vegetables from her garden for this. ‘I catered for meetings, conferences, particularly conferences to do with the environment, with sustainability. My catering business was not glamourous, but it was earth friendly. My philosophy is that we should all eat food that is in season, home grown and locally grown, and no waste or low waste. I also became a trainer for Sustainability Victoria. Their motto is ‘love food, hate waste’. She did that for three years, conducting some 20 workshops. Eventually their 18 acre bush block became too big for them, plus it was near bushfire territory, so they decided to move. ‘We chose Chewton because we knew people here and they absolutely loved Chewton. We looked for two years for a property until we found one and moved here six months ago. The first thing we did was rebuild the garden.’ Duang’s impressions of Chewton: ‘I have met some wonderful people and I have made connections in ways I least expected. Because I am so dedicated to food, I became a member of the CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) in Harcourt, where I purchase our fruit.’ As someone who is dedicated to eating and cooking healthily, Duang has been cooking for sixty years, and now plans to ‘dedicate my last years to sharing what I know. So many people have taught me so many methods of cooking. My classes will include vegetarian food, vegan, seasonal cooking, with an emphasis on Thai.’ She also emphasizes that she plans to donate $20 from each person who registers

GIFT VOUCHERS AVAILABLE

duangd1@gmail.com facebook:duangsmastercookingclasses www.duangscooking.com.au

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for each class to the Asylum Seekers Resource Centre, adding that over the years she has benefited greatly from contact with refugees and immigrants. ‘I have learned more from them than they have learnt from me.’ To this end Duang will be running regular sessions in her beautiful Chewton kitchen teaching Thai vegetarian cooking. Classes of eight at a time will commence in May.

P.S. Prior to doing this interview with Duang I attended her initial Thai cooking class. She not only taught us how to make a Thai curry, soup, salad and dessert, all dishes made from her garden crop, but shared valuable insight into utilizing food to its potential. I’m looking forward to attending more of her classes. Gloria.

Gloria Meltzer.

Have your say on plan for the botanical gardens Council invites the community to have a say on a draft plan to guide management of the Castlemaine Botanical Gardens. Two drop in sessions will help park users find out more. The much loved botanical gardens are one of the oldest in Victoria, and part of an important collection of provincial gardens in the state. The draft Castlemaine Botanical Gardens Conservation Management Plan (CMP) identifies the heritage values and significance of the gardens in a local and state-wide context. It includes an assessment of the significant features of the heritage-listed gardens, with policies and actions to manage, renew and protect them for decades to come. The plan covers the area gazetted as the Castlemaine Botanical Gardens Reserve, which includes the caravan park and sunken oval as listed on the Victorian Heritage Register. “This conservation management plan is an important document as it will guide how we manage and use the botanical gardens into the future,” said Stewart Campbell, Coordinator Parks and Gardens, Mount Alexander Shire Council. “Previous plans have done us well in helping us conserve our built heritage. This plan includes a strong focus on managing the gardens as a living landscape, which is strongly influenced by seasonal and operational changes. It considers real challenges for management such as climate change and drought, and balancing recreational use with protecting heritage values.” Recommendations include the continued management of significant trees, maintaining a diverse

collection of large trees in the heart of the gardens, propagation of rare and unusual species, introducing a botanical record keeping system, consolidating the rose collection, reestablishing planting programs and adding contemporary displays to our annual plantings. Built heritage like the kiosk, entrance gates and curator’s residence at the caravan park should be restored while retaining reconstructed elements such as the rotunda, summerhouse and fountain. Park infrastructure like the lower and middle bridges, stone weir, historical pathways and the 4Cs club tables are to be conserved. The vacant fish hatchery could be documented and removed. The plan includes a new statement of significance and will be reviewed by Heritage Victoria. It highlights botanical and interpretive signage as a priority, along with more tours, furniture and water fountains to improve the visitor experience. The draft plan can be viewed at www.mountalexander. vic.gov.au/HaveYourSay, as well as at the Civic Centre, Castlemaine Library and local Visitor Information Centres. To find out more head along to an information session at the Botanical Gardens Tea Rooms from 12.30pm to 1.30pm on Wednesday 29 May, or from 10am to 11am on Saturday 1 June. Send your feedback titled Draft Botanical Gardens CMP to info@mountalexander.vic.gov.au or Mount Alexander Shire Council, PO Box 185, Castlemaine VIC 3450, by Friday 21 June. For more information contact Council on 5471 1700. Taken from a Press Release.

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Business of the Month...

Mount Alexander Animal Welfare

There are a few good op-shops in Castlemaine but Mount Alexander Animal Welfare (MAAW) have taken their op-shop to a whole new level. Brian Heydon who is secretary of MAAW proudly waves his hand and calls it “The Emporium”. There is a large range of quality merchandise from affordable clothing to second hand books, craft supplies, kitchenware and collectables. There are antiquarian books, antiques and interesting treasures. There is even the newly opened “Pause Coffee Bar” and an art gallery wall to complete the retail experience. Brian Heydon explains that it was two years ago that the RSPCA announced in the local paper that they were

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closing the Castlemaine Animal Shelter. The volunteers at the op-shop and shelter were shocked as were a large proportion of local residents. This would have left the shire without anywhere to take stray dogs or re-home animals. In true feisty Castlemaine spirit, people came together and did something about it, and MAAW was founded. They not only replaced what the RSPCA were doing but have excelled in setting up an outstanding op-shop to raise funds and developing a very efficient system of dealing with stray animals. Brian is a highly qualified retired lawyer and his expertise has been extremely valuable with sorting out all the legalities of setting up MAAW and taking over the running of the shelter. Brian says that since MAAW took over the animal welfare services in the shire there has been enormous community support. Mount Alexander Shire Council, various Castlemaine businesses, State and Federal members of Parliament and organisations such as the Lions Club of Castlemaine and Rotary have given support. Also, individuals wishing to support the service have been generously donating quality items for the op-shop, and when especially nice things are donated MAAW honours the donation by putting a fair but decent price on it. The MAAW “Emporium” has a great atmosphere. It has a fresh clean feel and there are happy and friendly volunteers who obviously greatly enjoy their roles. The coffee bar really adds to the happy atmosphere. In my last few visits to the MAAW op-shop I have found something really nice to buy each time, from a possum fibre scarf to an Anna Hoffman kid mohair jacket that I happily plucked from the racks. It is great to know that when you spend money there, that it is going straight to supporting local animal welfare. Another way of supporting the organisation is by shopping for pet supplies at the Langslow Street shelter. There are a good range of collars, leads, bowls and dried foods.


The people at MAAW are thrilled that they will soon be able to expand their services as they have just recently signed the contract for a $150,000 cattery to be built alongside the existing shelter. Since opening MAAW in December 2017 there have been 71 dogs adopted and 180 reunited with their owners, 177 cats adopted and 39 reunited with their owners. There have been horses, birds, sheep, chickens, ducks, rabbits and goats helped too. The shelter is at 24 Langslow St Castlemaine and the op-shop is at 12 Johnston St Castlemaine, opening from 10am to 4pm Monday to Friday and on Saturdays from 10am to 1pm. Phone 54725277 or visit the website www. maaw.org.au Jackie McMaster.

Winter Solstice Community Lunch Date: 21st June, 11.30 - 1.30 Cost: $6.00, 2 course meal Venue: Chewton Town Hall Presented by the Phoenix Chewton branch of the CWA

Dallas Giles, Phoenix Chewton CWA

Chewton General Store... Wick-ed things now at the shop...

...gorgeous, luxurious soy candles! Special quality double porcelain coffee keep-cups Dishwasher and microwave safe - $16.50 filled with your first coffee! Using a keep-cup saves you 30 cents on each coffee!

Chewton Domain Society The CDS May meeting had reports relating to a number of events that had happened and also ones that were coming up. Bookings for the Chewton Town Hall show that there’s always something going on: Chewton Pool Committee, POHAG, Chewton Phoenix CWA, Chewton Film Society, CDS Meetings, Chewton Book Club, Yoga with the Biggest Morning Tea on Friday 24th May and the Heritage Festival debrief in the afternoon. The most entertaining event was part of the National Trust Heritage Festival with Jan ‘Yarn’ Wositzky’s Bundle of Sticks performances held on 10th,11th, 17th and 18th May. The performances were all sold out, the audience thoroughly enjoyed being involved in the story and the hall was a great venue to tell the story of the Monster Meeting. A presentation was made to the committee members who provided such wonderful support to help make this event the success it was. CDS also had a display for MASC Volunteers Week in the Market Building which was open to the public on May 22 and 23. In the correspondence there was a request of support for a nomination to the Victorian Heritage Register of the Mopoke Water Wheel ruins – if successful this would mean the iconic symbol, the Garfield Water Wheel would be at the northern end of the Castlemaine Diggings National Heritage Park with the Mopoke Water Wheel at the south. The Treasurer’s Report showed an income for the previous month of $1,683.40 from hall hire, Chewton Chat advertising/mailout, CDS memberships, rental, Monster Meeting flag/book/CD sales, and interest. Expenditure of $4,409.99 was for insurance, Chat printing, reprint of Monster Meeting books and gas. The balance in the general account as of the 8th May was $13,271.11 with the Savings Account Balance at $27,853.91, totalling $41,125.02. The park tidy up continues with CDS committee members and park neighbours piling up all the dead bushes/rubbish ready for removal, quotes will be sought for the remaining branches that require chainsaw work to be done. The next stage would be to re-define the paths and new plantings to be considered. Quotes are also being sought for the heating and cooling of the post office residence. The Chewton Chat has received a generous donation of $1,500 to help with the paper and printing costs – this is also an acknowledgment of the value placed on a community newspaper. Thanks Diane!

Customer loyalty coffee cards are available too! • And don’t forget our special raisin toast and coffee • Or our egg and bacon toasties

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Vetrunning Great to hear from Michael Smith - via an article published in the May 19 Vetrunner. Michael has featured in the Chewton Chat often, particularly when he walked the 600odd kms from the Chewton Town Hall to Parliament House in late 2016 (see the earlier Chewton Chats and chewton.net facebook posts that covered this!) “This walk was about “raising awareness that the Prime Minister and Cabinet have an exclusive right to take Australia into wars and conflicts. Parliament has no role in the decision-making process. I believe Parliament should have a say. I carried with me draft legislation to that effect. The walk took 33 days. I walked between 25 and 42 km a day. It’s one of the most wonderful things I’ve done. I remember walking past Mt Kosciuszko (there was snow on top) and thinking ‘wow, how did I get here from Chewton on just two legs’.” A mammoth achievement that demonstrated great conviction! And that walk was covered by community newspapers along the journey. Michael has been the MC of recent Community Newspaper Association of Victoria conferences so his mission was followed keenly. Now a Canberran, Michael has joined the ACT Masters... and still on the move!

You're invited to a pleasant Sunday afternoon with tales of sculpting, forensic art and ancient Egyptian mummies

The Art and Science of Making Faces Join our special guest speaker, sculptor Jennifer Mann, as she when andjourney science collide takes us onart a fascinating through forensic facial reconstruction. Jennifer will talk about how her passion for portraiture set her on a path to become a highly skilled forensic facial reconstruction sculptor, and how she brought back the face of an Ancient Egyptian.

SUNDAY 16 JUNE 2019 2.00pm - 4.30pm

CASTLEMAINE TOWN HALL Lyttleton Street, Castlemaine

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TICKETS

$15

www.trybooking.com/BCHWK or call Heather Shill on 0417 003 444

Ticket price includes light refreshments

All funds raised at this event go to The Smith Family who provides long-term educational support for Australian children and young people in need.

Jennifer Mann Sculptor and Forensic Sculptor Jennifer Mann is an Australian sculptor based in the Macedon Ranges, Victoria, whose work includes figurative sculpture, portraiture, bas reliefs and bespoke awards. She works in bronze, terracotta, marble and silver, and has commissioned works on permanent public display throughout Australia and Italy. Having sculpted since childhood, she studied Visual Arts at Monash University, attended art school in Melbourne and travelled overseas to further develop her skills. She regularly spends time in Italy, carving marble sculptures. Jennifer’s passion for portrait sculpting led her several times to the U.S. to study forensic facial reconstruction sculpting at the Forensic Anthropology Centre at Texas State University with leading expert in this field, Karen Taylor. Drawing on these highly specialized skills, in 2016 she created a forensic facial reconstruction sculpture of an ancient Egyptian mummy for the University of Melbourne, which is now part of the permanent collection in the Harry Brookes Allen Anatomy Museum and in 2018 Jennifer became affiliated with the Department of Forensic Medicine at Monash University as Forensic Sculptor. www.jennifermann.com.au VIEW Club is a valued part of The Smith Family and all funds raised at this event will go to The Smith Family who provides long term educational support to Australian children and young people in need.


Chewton Brigade News May 2019 Earlier this month Chewton CFA led in a joint training exercise with members from Maldon and Campbells Creek brigades. Castlemaine and Harcourt brigades were to join us but were waylaid by a fire at the Cumberland Hotel en route. Fortunately the pub survived and the training exercise continued regardless. The exercise allowed us to practise relay pumping, where tankers pump from one to another to maintain a steady supply of water to a structure fire over a distance. For some of us it was a new experience, and for others a handy refresher. A couple of weeks later five of our members got to put this training into practice when Chewton was called to a house fire in Elphinstone on a Saturday night. The property was well ablaze by the time crews from Elphinstone and Taradale arrived. Wood from a combustion heater had fallen onto the floor while the occupant was out of the room, damaging half the house and destroying a work shed. A ute was also damaged. Fortunately the occupant was unhurt. Two of our members, including Rob Blaney (pictured top right), had to don breathing apparatus in order to work safely in the hazardous conditions. Obviously we have now reached the end of another long fire season, so we encourage people to take this opportunity to clean up around their property before next summer. It’s also time to change over those smoke alarm batteries. And, as ever, if you are interested in becoming a brigade member, have a chat to our Secretary, Postie Rob. Training photos (and Rob Blaney) courtesy Steve Womersley.

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An adventurous Real Estate story Scenes of Chewton could be seen in the final episode of the ABC TV program Restoration Australia which went to air a few weeks ago. The episode tells the story of the conversion of the old North Melbourne Gasworks building into a home for John Carruthers and his partner Dr Rosie Purcell. Instead of paying expensive Melbourne rents whilst the building works were under construction, John and Rosie decided to get right away and give their design team and builders the space they needed to get the work Photo courtesy of ABC and Restoration Australia done. When long-time friends with overseas work commitments decided to rent out their Chewton Red Hill Hotel and The Wesley Hill Market. They spent home, John and Rosie took the opportunity to make hours walking along the Goldfields track all the way to Chewton their tree change rural retreat for the two years it Castlemaine, treating themselves to an ice cream from Ice took to complete the project. Cream Social and then walking back to Chewton. After The North Melbourne Gasworks building is an iconic living in Chewton for a year they found themselves feeling industrial building overlooking the North Melbourne deeply connected to the Castlemaine district, the land, the Football Ground. Built in the 1890s it is a large brick ecology and the community. They looked at each other building with arched windows and ornate details. When and said “Why is it we are doing the North Melbourne John and Rosie bought the building it almost had the look home?” They knew that even though they loved their of a fancy ballroom. John explains that back in the late exciting North Melbourne home that they would stay 1800s Australia had the highest level of wealth per capita connected to the Castlemaine area and eventually live in the world due to gold mining and sheep grazing which here permanently. So, before The Gasworks building is why there was plenty of money to splash on ornate details in public buildings. John and Rosie decided upon an unusual central pod concept to give them a cosy space within a large open room. The project took longer than expected and there were difficulties in choosing a suitable material to clad “The Pod”, but eventually the project was finished and they moved in. John says that he wakes up every day feeling privileged to live in such an adventurous space. He says that the attention to detail by the architects is remarkable and that there is a space within the building for every season and activity they require. But there is another chapter to the story not told on Restoration Australia, which is the profound impact that the time spent living in Chewton had on John and Rosie. They found themselves enjoying the friendliness of local hubs such as the Chewton General Store, The Rosie and John among the vines at the Red Hill

AT THE SIGN OF THE UNICORN REG & SYLVIA EASDALE Antiques, Coins, Badges Open Friday & Saturday 67 Forest Street Castlemaine 3450 Ph: 0419 673 663

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• Florins pay $2 each • Shillings pay $1 each • Round 50 cents pay $5 Phone Reg 0419 673 663


was completed they chose a 70 acre parcel of land on the outskirts of Guildford that they would improve with the view to eventually build a permanent home.

Volunteering today Chewton Domain Society had a presence in the Market Building during the recent Volunteers display. Many groups were represented including Castlemaine’s Men’s Shed and Community House.

John has been doing lots of research about how to improve their land. He attended a permaculture course in Castlemaine and made a three-dimensional model of the block using beer cartons, steel wool, matchsticks and green paint. The process of deep ripping the land has been started to aerate the soil and get water into it. The plan is to plant up to 10,000 trees creating a windbreak as well as habitat for native birds and animals. Whilst still enjoying their North Melbourne home they are taking their time, slowly improving the land and researching building ideas with a view to building in 3 or 4 years’ time. This next home will be a home designed for thermal efficiency. They have ideas of having it partially dug into the ground. John says, “It will be a house that belongs to the landscape”. John says that he and Rosie feel deeply grateful to the community which has embraced them and inspired them to pursue a new lifestyle and, I believe, in return their environmental ethos, thoughtfulness and drive will be an asset to the community in which they choose to live. If you would like to view the program featuring The North Melbourne Gasworks the link is https://iview. abc.net.au/show/restoration-australia/series/2/video/ DO1529H006S00 Jackie McMaster.

40 Lyttleton Street Castlemaine P: (03) 5472 4622 A/H Txt: 0407 837 321

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Wesley Hill Community Market Every Saturday Now 9am – 1pm An old fashioned Country Market Opposite the Albion Hotel New stallholders always welcome.

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Real Estate Round Up Six new properties have recently come on the market including the historic 1800’s Old Chewton Butcher’s Shop next to The Red Hill Hotel. Here is the round up for June. Cantwell Real Estate: • NEW - 25 North St, Luxurious light filled 2 bedroom home with quality fittings and fixtures, 2 bathrooms and study. Separate self contained studio with split system. Nicely landscaped 3000m2. Price range from $740,000 to $790,000 Castlemaine Property Group: • NEW - 205 Main Road, Light filled 3 bedroom home. Carport as well as lock up garage with window. Solar panels back to grid, solar hot water, water tanks, gas cooking and heating. 1150M2 $415,000 • 4 Church St, Newly built home in Central Chewton, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, study, ducted heating and cooling, Also 2 older timber buildings on the 1340m2 block. $575,000 • 157 Golden Point Rd, unique and creative, stone, timber and brick cottage. 2 large living spaces, 2 bedrooms and a separate 2 roomed stone cottage. $535,000 • Lot 1/128 Fryers Road, Elevated land with mains water, sewer and power. 2440m2. $175,000 Keogh Real Estate: • No properties available at present.

Jellis Craig: • NEW - 3 George St, Stylish low maintenance home, 3 large bedrooms, En-suite to master with large walkin robe. 969m2. Underfloor hydronic heating as well as wood fire and split system. Quality finishes throughout. $835,000 • NEW - 100 Fryers Rd, 2000m2 elevated building block with views to Mt Alexander. Approved house plans and site already partially cut ready for building, power and water connected. $240,000 Waller Realty: • NEW - 160 Main Rd, Historic Old Chewton Butcher’s Shop and residence. 3 bedroom residence with gas heating and coved ceilings and 2 roomed shop with coved ceilings and fireplace. Brick paved courtyard and treed gardens. 888M2 on 2 titles. $498,000 • NEW - 74 Fryers Rd, 1239m2 building block zoned “Township”. Nice rural outlook. Power, water and sewer nearby. $205,000 • 22 Pitman St, Nicely renovated 2 bedroom home. Split system, gas heater, entertainer’s deck. Large 1548m2 block with potential to subdivide (STCA). $430,000 • Lots 1 to 6 Steele Street. New land release in the heart of Chewton. Sizes vary from 672m2 to 1174m2. Prices vary from $147,500 to $210.000. This land will be titled in late 2019. All town services available. Minus the Agent: • 48 Dinah Rd, Just under one acre of land with great views in a quiet valley. Electricity connected. $280,000 Property Now: • 734 Pyrenees Highway, large family home with 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, an indoor pool and recreation room. Set on over 1 hectare of maintained grounds, $600,000 to $650,000 Jackie McMaster. ADVERTISEMENT

Listening Post held in Castlemaine last Friday of the Month 10am to 2pm. Please phone for appointment. 8 Panton Street, Golden Square VIC 3555 P: 5444 4125 @mareeedwardsmp mareeedwardsmp www.mareeedwards.com.au Authorised by M Edwards, 8 Panton Street, Golden Square. This material has been produced by Maree Edwards MP using her Parliament’s Electorate Office & Communications budget.

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That old Chewton Butcher’s Shop and residence in some former roles... 160 Main Road

Photos from the People and Places display in the Town Hall, along with a cutting from the Age, 13th August 1977 when the property was up for sale once before.

Services for St. Johns in June • June1st 6pm Eucharist • June 8th NO SERVICE. There is a combined service celebrating Pentecost at 10 am at Christ Church on Sunday the 9th. This will be a Jazz Service in collaboration with the Jazz Festival. • June 15th 6pm Eucharist • June 22nd 6pm Eucharist • June 29th 6pm Eucharist Every Monday at 3.30pm there is Into the Silence , silent meditation and prayer. Everyone Welcome. There is a Healing Service at Christ Church on Sunday the 16th. Everyone Welcome.

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Community-Inclusion-Curiosity-Integrity

Nurturing the whole child in every child

Going… Going….Yangon!

Part 1

‘Travel is the best teacher. The only way to an open mind is by taking a plane out into the open world. C. JoyBell C With fifty dollars in my hand, I approached the money exchange booth at Melbourne airport. A young attendant swivelled on her chair and said through the holes in the reinforced plastic, ‘Where are you heading?’ ‘Myanmar,’ I replied. ‘Where’s that?’ she inquired through a chewing gum grin. Thinking for a bit I said, ‘It’s between Thailand and Bangladesh.’ She tapped on her computer and gave me a wad of crisp unfamiliar notes. ‘I’ve heard of Thailand’, she said. In that moment, I realized I was on my way to a place veiled in mystery and as we know, controversy. I was catching a flight to Yangon, formerly known as Rangoon, the capital of Scott, Thangyi, Helen (Principal Myanmar - the country formerly known as Burma. and fellow BRIDGE canditate) My adventure started in November 2017 when I applied on behalf of Hnin Chewton Primary School to the ASEAN - BRIDGE School Partnership Program. (Melbourne University Asia Education Foundation). After submitting a lengthy application stating why I thought myself and the learning community at Chewton would benefit from a partnership with a school in South East Asia, I hit send and didn’t give it another thought. Three months later the BRIDGE team contacted me, informing me of a successful application. This meant Chewton Primary School had been assigned an ASEAN country to build a partnership with, to share learning experiences and exchange cultural understanding. The program included training workshops in Sydney with our partner teachers. A week of hosting our teacher and finally a reciprocal visit for me. Our partner school was in View from my room in Yangon Yangon the capital of Myanmar. So what could we possibly gain from building a learning partnership with a school in Yangon? According to BRIDGE, the school partnership program ‘….recognises that global competence is essential if we are to equip young people to live and work successfully in the 21st century.’ BRIDGE also suggests that, ‘….students understanding their own cultural traditions, values and beliefs and engaging with the experiences of others, is a prerequisite to them becoming responsible global citizens. My primary school years were spent on the Autonomous Region of Bougainville in Papua New Guinea. My experiences there were enriching and have fuelled a passion to learn about other cultures. As a teacher, I am convinced of the importance in teaching inter-cultural awareness for young people and to provide opportunities for my students to engage in cultural experiences. According to Edward T. Hall, ‘One of the most effective ways to learn about yourself My first meal - massive is by taking seriously the cultures of others. It forces you to pay attention to those details of freshwater prawns life which differentiate them from you.’

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Fancy a piece of Chewton’s history?

Call Pat 0422 759 661

Large new flag $100

Monster Meeting CD $30

Small flag $50

Monster Meeting book $20


Touching down in Yangon was a relief after circling for half an hour waiting for thick smog (air pollution) to clear. The musty smell of South East Asia greeted me as I walked towards the baggage claim. Yangon airport was stuck in 1975, an aging aunt of its hipster nephew Singapore. Coming down the escalator, crowds of people gathered waiting, watching. In the sea of faces was a familiar one, waving enthusiastically. It was Hnin (Nee) our partner school contact and year 2 teacher, who one of our parents generously hosted in Castlemaine nearly twelve months earlier. We greeted each other with a handshake (no hugs here) and shared the universal language of smiling and nodding. My Burmese was non-existent and Hnin’s English was actually pretty good but I’m thinking she didn’t have the words to comment on how much I’d aged in a year and how slightly bloated I was looking after a twelve hour flight. Standing beside Hnin was the Regional Director of Education for Yangon district who insisted we take a photo together before leading me to the front of 300 queued people, to walk straight through customs with a wave and a smile like I was Prince Harry. I like being a VIP! The VIP treatment did not end here. For ten days I was subject to the most generous and hospitable family and school communities I have ever experienced. I learnt very quickly that Burmese hospitality is actually a thing and they pride themselves on ensuring guests are well looked after. It was Hnin’s husband who picked us up from the airport, and insisted I sit in the front seat next to him. On the dashboard was a photo of his son in military formal attire and a flag of the army’s medical branch. We talked about soccer briefly but I could not drag my eyes from the bustling streets of Yangon. Like most South East Asian cities, it was chaotic, but there was something different about it that I could not work out. It had a different sound, quieter, cleaner, and actually beautiful. It was during that ride that I instantly felt the surge of excitement at the possibilities of building a relationship with and a deeper cultural understanding of this fascinating country. Motorbikes….that’s it! There are no motorbikes or noisy scooters in this city! Lastly, sightseeing with other Australian Teachers, Hnin and the Regional Teaching Director, Yangon.

Hnin and her husband. were incredibly kind, generous hosts

Scott Purdon.

Coliban Water visit - Tuesday 4 June 2019 Our Your Town program provides customers with an opportunity to meet with staff face to face. We understand that different communities have different needs and we value your feedback, as it helps us to better understand the communities where we provide services.

• Our team will be in Castlemaine onTuesday 4 June 2019 from 12pm to 2pm at the Ray Bradfield Room, next to Victory Park. If you have an enquiry or some feedback, please drop by and see us. • Information and free water saving items will be available on the day, including trigger nozzles, shower timers, tap connectors and our Smart Gardens for a Dry Climate booklet.

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Why not give it a fly?

Chewton’s May Community BBQ turned out to be a lot of fun. Chewton residents were joined by friends from interstate (including Castlemaine!) and the cool, windless night was just perfect for the brazier. The brazier’s first appearance for 2019 – and no doubt there will be many more calls on its services in coming months. The usual fine foods and wine were enjoyed, and the delicate array of cheeses was enhanced this month by a smoked variety that won many fans. And for those who found a seat at the table at different times during the evening, there was the atmosphere provided by twin glassencased candles. It’s amazing the lengths people go to on these wonderful community evenings!

So why not give it a fly? There’s always room around the BBQ, welcoming neighbours and a warmhearted brazier to offset the winter chills. Mingle with your neighbours in a relaxed and welcoming atmosphere – right in the heart of Chewton! Next chance to do this? First Saturday in the month… June the 1st from 6 o’clock. Watch for the reminder signs around the town… the ones that look remarkably like this!

Annual Winter Warmer at the Fryerstown School Saturday 29th June ‘The Fryerstown community - young and old - are celebrating mid winter at our famous fun annual ‘Winter Warmer’ on Saturday evening 29th June between 6pm and 8.30pm.

Gold coin donation, casual food, music, dancing and a short performance are all planned. Old friends and newcomers will be very welcome, especially families!

Buda Historic Home and Garden A property of national significance.

Home of the noted Gold and Silversmith ERNEST LEVINY and his family from 1863 to 1981, featuring authentic furnishings, arts and crafts collection, significant heritage garden and grounds. Nursery selling drought-hardy plants, many propagated from the garden. Open hours Wed - Sat 12noon to 5pm, Sunday 10am to 5pm. Groups by appointment. 42 Hunter Street, Castlemaine 3450, T/F: (03) 5472 1032 E: admin@budacastlemaine.org

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Upon My Word... MPs discussing the issues Of importance to the Nation To make things seem more friendly, say “We’re having a conversation.”.

P o e t r y The Red Hill’s June dates... • •

June 2 is Felix’s Sunday Afternoon Trivia Quiz from 3pm Friday 14th sees the New Settlers from 8pm

Reconciliation Week 2019 The theme of 2019 National Reconciliation Week is Grounded in Truth: Walk Together with Courage. There were many activities organised during Reconciliation Week in Mount Alexander Shire, Sorry Day commemoration, Reconciliation Exhibition, Indigenous history walk, film screenings, book readings and more. The Reconciliation Exhibition has historical displays, Indigenous artefacts, local stories and bush tucker. Open from 9.00am to 5.00pm until Sunday 2 June.

C o r n e r

Dismiss the merest hint of strife Between competing parties Dress alike, smile alike. Just different coloured Smarties. We won’t get riled or lose our cool We wear the same old school tie. And when we get to the hustings, We try to sound dinky-di. At last the turgid train of thought Reaches its destination, We step onto the platform still “Having a conversation”. What happened to the word “about”? Have they hidden it underground? Instead of discussing an issue Avoid it by skirting “around”. New verbal combinations Have a fairly short “use by” date Unless they are universal Like “G’day” and “Goodonya Mate”. They’re often coined by the “wordsmiths” Who lurk in Public Relations To con some Royal Commission With meaningless revelations. One thing for certain Dear Reader However hard they try If it sounds too esoteric It’s probably hiding a lie. David Watson 2019.

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A bundle of sticks The Chewton Town Hall is in recovery mode! “A Bundle of Sticks” jam-packed the Chewton Town Hall (and the parking spots around it!) for four nights. Local history celebrated, and brought to life in the best possible way. After the applause died down and the conversational buzz quietened it was time to ask for some impressions. Firstly, Mikael and Helle Hirsch… “Helle and I really, really enjoyed ‘Yarn’s’ (Jan Wositzky) newest show, “A Bundle of Sticks”. This is the story of the gold diggers’ Monster Meeting that must be told, time and time again, as it weaves together the history of the gold rush, the formation of the colony of Victoria, oppression and uprising and ultimately the birth of the Australian democracy; long before the Eureka stockade with the tragic and unnecessary death of people fighting for what is right. ‘Yarn’ skilfully engaged the audience to play some of the many characters making up the story, and the old Chewton Town Hall was throbbing with energy and applause. We have seen and heard ‘Yarn’ tell this story several times before; always delightful and humorous, but this time was the best! We all enthusiastically joined in on the songs we knew, and we got to hear some new ones. The way he brought the story to life through a dialogue with the late Doug Ralph, twisting the tale through a contemporary “on-location” narrative, close to our beloved Town Hall with its displays on show, truly added to the warm and jovial atmosphere. A memorable night for us all, and a lot to reflect on how the successful plight of the gold diggers against the oppressive authorities has shaped our world today.” And House Managers Julie Henchman and Gary Beaumont who managed all four performances and observed all full-houses… “Coming in from the cold, wrapped in Winter woollies the crowds packed into our little town hall last weekend. Keen to listen and learn about local history with plenty of encouragement provided to join in, cheer and sing. Jan kept us enthralled with stories about early residents, the gold rush and the unity of the Diggers here on Forest Creek and in Bendigo and Ballarat. We were

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pleased to be able to help welcoming the audience, taking tickets, offering a glass and a seat. We know that this show is full of information and characters from the past and it is now connected to us by Jan’s entertaining telling of tales accompanied by banjo, harp, bones, spoons and drum. This is the right venue, a simple setting for these stories, thanks for being here! Behind the scenes and the solo performer are a supportive crew. Sue Ingleton, as co-writer, put in many hours to help develop the humorous script. As dedicated director she saw rehearsals were professionally presented. Kerry assisted bringing and improving the props; flags and banners flew from authentic tree trunks. Pat was able to promote and sell the book of this story and the CD showcasing our local Monster Meeting songs. At the show’s conclusion Jan thanked Dr Marjorie Theobald for her fact-checking of the material used. A really worthwhile show, and thanks to all involved. It was great to be part of it.” And if you missed it? Just hope and pray there’ll be repeat performances somewhere. sometime!

At the last Chewton Domain Society meeting the invaluable contributions of Gary Beaumont, Julie Henchman and Pat Healy were recognised by acclamation - and a bundle of sticks each!


The Chewton Film Society is now taking bookings for Season 3: Thursday July 4 to November 7. All screenings have a mystery short film followed by the feature film, although occasionally, if the main film is longer than usual, we may forgo the short film on that night. Each film will be introduced by one of the CFS team or a guest speaker. Our May 2nd film night turned out to be a hugely successful night. Maybe it was the wine – served for the first time at CFS for a donation. We were treated to a glorious short film ‘Romancing the Wind” – a sound track of Dame Joan Sutherland singing an aria from Lakme and film of 3 kites magically controlled by one man – it had to be seen to be believed. The feature film was ‘The Sum of Us’ with Jack Thompson and Russell Crowe. Yes we have all seen it 20 years or so ago - the surprising experience was that most of us saw the film so differently this time. Perhaps we have all matured over two decades! A truly wonderful night of film and comeraderie. The next feature on June 6th is the long awaited Japanese film ‘Sweet Bean’.

I am off to Europe for two months – back in July, see you on my return. Margot Ryan.

The membership fee for the season is $40 During the colder months, join us early for a bowl of home-made soup and some crusty bread ($5) and socialise with other members. Wine is also available by donation. Doors open from 6:45pm for a strict 7:30 start to the film program. For more information, to see the trailers or to join Chewton Film Society, go to https://chewtonfilmsociety.wordpress.com July 4: Moonrise Kingdom An American coming-of-age film directed by Wes Anderson, written by Anderson and Roman Coppola. It features Jared Gilman and Kara Hayward leading a cast including Bruce Willis, Edward Norton, Bill Murray, Frances McDormand, Tilda Swinton, Jason Schwartzman, and Bob Balaban. It is about a young orphan (Gilman) who escapes from a scouting camp on an island to unite with his pen pal, a girl (Hayward). Feeling shunned by everyone around them for their disturbed behaviours, the two lovers retreat to an isolated beach they call Moonrise Kingdom, while the scouts, police and family members launch a search party to retrieve them. August 1: Monsieur Mayonnaise Monsieur Mayonnaise is an artist’s epic adventure into his family’s secret past. Australian artist and film-maker, Philippe Mora, investigates his father’s clandestine role in the French Résistance in WW2 and his mother’s (Mirka Mora) miraculous escape enroute to Auschwitz. Philippe, a Hollywood cult-horror movie director and pop-artist, adopts a Film Noir persona to tell his family’s story. He also packs his paints and easel, as he embarks on a journey to create an audacious comic book about his parents, their survival and the Holocaust. From LA to Berlin, Paris to Melbourne, Monsieur Mayonnaise is a richly layered, road

CHEWTON SERVICE STATION 37 Pyrenees Highway, Chewton, 3451. Phone: (03) 5470 5444 eastendservo@outlook.com * Trading hours 6am - 7pm every day * Winter diesel additive available on request * Premium 98 available * BULK FUEL DELIVERIES * Firewood, Ice, Swap N Go gas bottles, Grocery items * $1 SOFT DRINK CANS * Photocopy services * Slushy & Coffee now available * Like us on Facebook for a chance to win monthly fuel vouchers

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movie starring artists, real life heroes, Nazi villains … and baguettes with lashings of tasty French mayonnaise! September 5: Wings of Desire A 1987  romantic fantasy  film directed by  Wim Wenders. The film is about invisible, immortal angels who populate Berlin and listen to the thoughts of its human inhabitants, comforting the distressed. One of the angels, played by Bruno Ganz, falls in love with a beautiful, lonely trapeze artist, played by  Solveig Dommartin. The angel chooses to become mortal so that he can experience human sensory pleasures, ranging from enjoying food to touching a loved one, and so that he can discover human love with the trapeze artist. October 3: The English Surgeon This documentary offers a glimpse into the life of an English neurosurgeon, Henry Marsh and his partnership with Ukrainian colleague Igor Petrovich Kurilets, and their struggle with moral, ethical and professional issues and the against massive logistical odds and the wrath of the old Soviet health system. With a soundtrack composed and performed by Nick Cave and Warren Ellis, the film was shot in a Ukrainian hospital full of desperate patients and makeshift equipment. November 7:  Like Water for Chocolate In a forgotten Mexico village Tita and Pedro fall in love, but their marriage is forbidden because of her mother’s upholding of the family tradition: the youngest daughter cannot marry, but instead must take care of her mother until she dies. Tita is only able to express herself when she cooks. For more information, to see the trailers or to join Chewton Film Society, go to https:// chewtonfilmsociety.wordpress.com

Hot Rod… M.C. Ian Braybrook oversaw the unveiling of life-sized sculptures of Rod Hadfield and his dog Codie at Rod’s residence. The works were commissioned by Rod and created by Richard Yates. Ian went on to praise the effect of hot-rodding in Castlemaine; the industry creating employment, bringing visitors, and this area being the source of hot-rodding books and magazines and with Castlemaine claiming to be the hot rod centre of Australia. Rod’s daughter Allison has written a book about her father… “The Mad Scientist of Australian HotRodding – Rod Hadfield” A man with humble beginnings on the family farm, minimal formal education and no qualifications, but an enormous drive and vision. Along with a very smart, loyal and patient wife! He founded one of the most successful automotive small businesses in Australia, was the initiator of trends, creator some of the most radical, yet immaculately engineered cars this country (and all others) have seen and inspired thousands to modify their own cars. Often found observing and listening to reactions from a distance with what many misconstrue as a grumpy, dour look on his face, he prefers to let his cars do the talking, and boy do they do get people talking! Following is the story of a name well-recognised in the Australian automotive landscape, but a person who very few actually really know. The book is currently available for purchase, and a copy has been donated to the P&P collection. Prepared from material supplied by Elaine Appleton.

KALAMAZOO RESOURCES LIMITED Kalamazoo Resources Limited (ASX: KZR) is a gold and base metals exploration company with a primary focus on identifying commercial gold deposits within the central Victorian Goldfields. Kalamazoo’s Castlemaine Gold Project is located approximately 100 kms northwest of Melbourne. It consists of one granted licence (EL6679) which lies east and south of the town of Castlemaine covering most of the entire historic Castlemaine Goldfield for an area of 70km2 and one licence application (EL6752) covering an area of 218 km². Kalamazoo plans to conduct low-impact gold exploration activities within these licences, which is primarily across public rather than private land. Please refer to our website for further details (www.kzr.com.au) or contact our Exploration Manager Luke Mortimer on 03 9988 7796 or luke.mortimer@kzr.com.au if you would like to discuss any of our projects.

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Councillor’s Chat

Wellbeing census open

By now every household should have received a copy of the Active Living Census. This survey is an initiative of the Loddon Campaspe Regional Partnership, one of nine regional partnerships set up by the Victorian Government in 2016, to work on the most important priorities for people in their local area.Loddon Campapse comprises six councils: Mount Alexander, Bendigo, Central Goldfields, Mount Macedon, Loddon and Campaspe. You might have been to one of the regional assemblies that have been held each year. The first regional assembly, held in Bendigo, came up with five priority areas, one of which was health. By 2018, this priority area was refined to “Healthy Heart of Victoria Initiative: More people, more active more often”. Evidently people in the Loddon Campapse area are the unhealthiest in the state. A quarter of us are seriously overweight, half of us don’t eat the right food and don’t exercise enough. Against that sobering background, the aim of the survey is to find out from as many residents as possible what we do in the way of physical activity, where we like to exercise, a bit about our eating habits and general state of health and most importantly, what would help us to be more active, more often. I strongly urge everyone to do the survey. This kind of census survey is very rarely done because it’s expensive. But the information that comes out of it is very valuable for councils, helping us choose wisely between many competing priorities and supporting grant applications to State and Federal governments. Everyone who completes the census before 16 June will be in the running for a chance to win bikes, food and shopping vouchers from a prize pool valued at $12,000. The most popular form of exercise by far is walking. It’s certainly my choice. No equipment needed beyond a pair of serviceable shoes, a good hat, sunscreen, water bottle and some comfortable clothes. While Chewton doesn’t have a wealth of concrete footpaths, the local roads are not too busy and most are pretty safe to walk along. The network of tracks in our local bush provide great walking opportunities. If you’re interested in exploring the Castlemaine Diggings or other bush areas in our region, such as Mount Alexander, the community website cartography.id.au has a set of maps showing all walking tracks and features, put together by a local highlyskilled mapping enthusiast. It’s definitely worth a look. If reading a map on your phone is not your thing, hard copies of all maps are available from the Castlemaine Information Centre in the old Market Building in Mostyn Street, at the cost of a dollar or two per map. Also, if you think there’s a bit of public land that’s worthy of a map but which doesn’t feature on the website, you can contact the author and he’s likely to take up your challenge. Cr. Chritine Henderson, Coliban Ward.

Residents of Mount Alexander Shire can now complete the Healthy Heart of Victoria 2019 Active Living Census to help us better understand what our community needs to be active, healthy and happy. The survey will soon arrive in mailboxes of every household in the Loddon Campaspe region, but residents can save time and complete the survey online. “This survey will help us to understand how people in our region rate their own health and wellbeing, and will also help us to find ways that we can work with other levels of government to support better health outcomes,” said Bronwen Machin, Mayor of Mount Alexander Shire. This is the first time Mount Alexander Shire has participated in the survey. It was completed by residents of Greater City of Bendigo in 2014. “We understand that the survey results were incredibly useful for the Greater City of Bendigo, who used the data to secure funding and successfully apply for grants,” said Cr Machin. “The information will also help to guide our priorities on improving health outcomes within the community.” The survey is available online until Thursday 16 June at www.srcentre.com.au/ALC Everyone who completes the census before 16 June will be in the running for a chance to win bikes, food and shopping vouchers from a prize pool valued at $12,000. “We want to hear from as many people as possible, so why not get involved, no matter how active you are,” said Cr Machin. “This is the perfect time to tell us the activities you enjoy, where you do them and what would help you to be more active more often.” The survey takes around 15-20 minutes. Copies of the survey will be sent to all households in May. Other councils participating in the census are shires of Campaspe, Loddon, Macedon Ranges, City of Greater Bendigo and Central Goldfields. “Thank you in advance for your input and we look forward to receiving your responses,” Cr Machin added. Make sure you complete the Active Living Census by Thursday 16 June! Taken from a Press Release.

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Art Trail entrant? Chewton isn’t a grain growing area, hence no siloes. And hence no siloes to decorate like other towns. But we have a substitute… a mini-silo up at Expedition Pass Reservoir. Cookie’s Office! When Chewton ran to its own tip many years ago (before landfill became a dirty word!) it was up in Railway Street, and a mirror was installed on the Pyrenees Highway at the Railway Street corner to facilitate all the turning tip traffic. And Chewton legend, Cookie, was the tip manager. And he had an office – a converted concrete tank. Some unkind individuals suggested it was an old septic one, but the shape sort of belied that. And it was semi-habitable too. Then the tip closed, and council had a concrete tank/office in excess of needs. And at that stage Coliban Water had a reservoir in excess of needs. Council took over the reservoir. And appointed a Section 86 committee of management. And the committee were successful in getting an employment program work-crew. The crew did magic things around the res with their newly acquired tools. But they needed a base for protection, and for tool storage. So Cookie’s Office was trucked to the res., to a site below (and safely away from) the massive earth wall.

Council relinquished the res. to Parks Victoria and it is now a prime part of the Castlemaine Diggings National Heritage Park. As is Cookie’s Office! Cookie no longer lives in Chewton, but his office lives on… And obviously someone mistook it for a mini-silo and decided it needed adornment. Now it is camouflaged as a tree so do be very careful not to stumble into it. And the decorator? Perhaps the tag gives a recognizable clue…

Along the ridges - walking with FOBIF A small group of walkers embarked on FOBIF’s May expedition to the south end of the Diggings Park. The group followed one of the little known ridges between Helge Track and Sebastopol Creek before angling up Stones Gully to return. There are impressively large trees in this part of the park, and those on the higher ridges had suffered epic damage in recent storms: some had snapped off mid-trunk, others had virtually disintegrated as they fell. Wildflowers are still rare in this part of the bush, though there’s impressive moss cover after recent rains, and the large mats of Matted Bush Pea along Wewak track promise good displays in the coming Spring. Walkers survived a zig zag route around numerous fallen trees without mishap, and a, er, small miscalculation of the route length by leader Bernard Slattery has so far led to no litigation. Yes, it was 9 kilometres, not 7.

Fungi expert, Joy Clusker, took these photos of White Punk (Laetiporus potentosus) and Fringed polypore (Lentinus arcularius)

And there’s also Liz Martin’s Mallee Mouse Spider

Next FOBIF walk... The 16th of June at Whisky Gully, Mount Alexander. From the old Koala Park we’ll visit the Silkworm Farm before heading down to meet Whisky Gully near the park boundary. It is then a steady climb up this beautiful boulder-strewn gully to Dog Rocks and back along the Great Dividing Trail to the cars. Distance is only about 6 km but there are some steepish off-track sections. For more information contact Jeremy Holland 0409 933 046.

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and also Bronwyn Silver’s shot of the ruins of Charlie Sanger’s hut.


Cold Burning One of the advantages of having Renfrey Holmes trapped in the perpetual summer of a mathematical paradox at the Expedition Pass reservoir is that I am sometimes able to find the time to discuss my own pursuits. Recently I had the privilege of participating in a cold ecological burn. It was not a fuel reduction burn although there are fuel reduction benefits from doing cold burns. An expanse of Kangaroo Grass (Themeda triandra) had formed a thatch of dead material over the years. The grassland was not a remnant as such but had flourished due to loss of canopy. There are quite a few Themeda grasslands in Chewton that have come about in the same way and have developed micro-ecosystems of their own which are worthy of further observation. The spaces between the Themeda tussocks in the cold-burn location had a rich mixture of herbs and forbs but these were clearly disadvantaged by the density of the grassy thatch. It is said that Australian soil has a tendency to become more acidic over time and that fire ash could be a way of bringing soil pH up to a level that is more beneficial to plants. Thus our indigenous plants become fire tolerant and dependent. A perimeter firebreak was established with mower and rake and a band of the break closest to the burn area was wetted down thoroughly. Wind and humidity readings were taken and a prominent, high-viz wind sock was erected for continuous wind speed and direction monitoring. Professional firelighters began by burning a band of grass on the extreme downwind edge next

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to the wetted firebreak. This was allowed to burn then thoroughly wetted and a band of grass was set alight immediately upwind of the previously burnt band and so on until the last band was ignited at the extreme upwind end. The local CFA thankfully added a body of knowledge and security to the situation, because even though the area was wet on the ground, the dry thatch produced a ferocious and quick-moving fire. I visited the site the following morning. A cold front passed overhead, dropped sudden, sheeting rain and just as quickly moved on. The ash was mostly black carbon with 3 some white areas that had burnt longer and hotter. The rain returned the ash to the soil and suddenly the entire area was tinged with green from the exposed new shoots of grass! Food for many nibblers! Do not try this at home without talking to your local CFA and getting the benefit of their advice and experience. Fritz Hammersley.

POHAG June 2019 At the last meeting of POHAG one of the recommendations was to participate in the MAS Volunteer Expo in the Castlemaine Market building showcasing the work that volunteer community groups do. A number of specific programs to assist groups were also suggested. Information material about POHAG was prepared for distribution to the public. Any publicity offer such as this provides further opportunity for voluntary organizations, such as POHAG, to promote the roles played and the many activities in which groups are involved. One item discussed at the last meeting was the rehabilitation of the former tip sites in Railway Street. An on-site meeting was arranged with a MAS council officer to discuss the possibility of implementing this. From the information discussed there are many problems associated

with former landfill sites such as the depth of top cover put in place after de-commissioning, the limited range of plants which would be suitable for revegetation, the increased leachate from deep rooted plants into the subsurface layers to name a few. However to improve the appearance of the area, it was suggested that bollards and a plain wire fence be installed along the road-side to delineate a specific parking area. This would complement the plans POHAG has developed to enhance the area for visitors. It was also indicated that on-going funding is available, after approval by council, to assist with projects of this nature. Should you wish to discuss this issue, or have ideas to enhance the area, come to our next meeting on Sunday, 9th of June at 10:am in the Chewton Town Hall. Ian O’Halloran.

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Chewton’s People and Places Collection

Looking through the display books in the People and Places Collection there are glimpses into many aspects of life in Chewton decades ago. Today most households have their own car or cars and popping into Castlemaine can easily be a daily activity. In the early to mid 1900s many households did not have cars so a local bus service was an important service for Chewton residents. In 1926 Frank Scoles started a regular Chewton to Castlemaine bus service including a cinema run. The service also extended to picnic parties and tourist trips to Vaughan Springs. Here is an image of Frank’s bus outside the Castlemaine Market Building, a bus timetable, and from the 1940s a Val Mogan advertisement that was displayed at the Theatre Royal cinema promoting Scoles Bus Service to Chewton. Another great image from the collection is of the Chewton Garage, which according to Ken McKimmie’s book Chewton Then and Now, dates back to the start of World War Two. This building was originally a

blacksmith’s shop and was gradually converted to servicing the new mode of transport - motor vehicles! The business was owned by D.H.Symes and a taxi hire car service was also run from the premises. Ken McKimmie’s book Chewton Then and Now is a fabulous book about Chewton’s history. In fact, in 2012 it won a Local History award by the Victorian Community History Awards. In the Chewton Town Hall there is a display cabinet full of books relating to Chewton’s history. There is another cupboard full of large display books. There are maps, digital resources and much more to discover at the Chewton Town Hall. Opening hours are Sundays from 1pm to 4pm. Jackie McMaster.

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Oops! Doc Thomas was a school teacher at Sutton Grange in 1901 not 2001 as last month’s Chat published in the People and Places article.!

PEOPLE AND PLACES ROSTER 1pm to 4pm

June Sunday 2nd Sunday 9th Sunday 16th Sunday 23rd Sunday 30th

Jackie McMaster and Marie Jones Queen’s Birthday weekend - closed Allan Dry and Glen Harrison Marion Landy and Rose Darling Elaine Appleton and Frank Benbow


Previously in Chewton Mount Alexander Mail, Wednesday 9 June 1858. O. O. F. M. U. LOYAL CASTLEMAINE LODGE. VISIT TO THE LOYAL CHEWTON LODGE. BRETHREN of the Lodge and Order are informed that conveyances will leave the Clydesdale Hotel this evening at 7 30, and the Exchange Hotel at 8 p.m., sharp. G. FARROLL, N. G. Mount Alexander Mail, Friday 18 June 1858. The Chewton Gold Mining Company. From the prospectus issued by the provisional committee of this company, it appears that they contemplate more extensive operations than either of the other companies started in this neighbourhood. The capital they purpose raising is £5000, and with this they intend putting up an engine of at least 60-horse power, to drive a number of stamps in quartz crushing. They do not intend to confine themselves to quartz crushing; their machinery will also include apparatus for washing alluvial soil. The site which it is understood the company will select is in the neighbourhood of the Red Hill. According to the terms of the prospectus, no person will be permitted to hold more than 100 shares, which are fixed at 25s each. It is said by competent authorities that with an engine of 60-horse power, employed in driving quartz-crushing machinery, quartz may be profitably crushed at £1 per ton. If the calculation is correct, and there is every reason to believe it is, the establishment of the Chewton Company will prove of immense value to the district, as there are large quantities of quartz lying upon the abandoned reefs that it is known will yield at least one ounce to the ton. The prevailing scale of charges for quartz crushing do not, except in the case of machine proprietors, leave sufficient margin for profit to the owners of such quartz. A reduction to £1 per ton would induce quartz miners to resume work in claims that have been abandoned; and the Chewton Company, should it ever get into active operation, will then prove beneficial to the district, as well as profitable to the shareholders. The provisional committee comprises some men of practical experience in mining, and we have no doubt the shares will soon be taken up.

Mount Alexander Mail, Friday 18 June 1858. (ADVERTISEMENT) E D U C A T I O N. To the Editor, of the Mount Alexander Mail. Dear Sir, Foremost among the advantages enjoyed by the residents in the old country, and the loss of which have been most deeply regretted by those who with young families have adopted this new colony as their home, are the facilities of education, especially that, of females. When I arrived in this colony from England a few years ago, I should have felt thankful to anyone who could have informed me of a school in which I might have confidently placed my daughters, combining the essential requisites of a sound education, careful moral training, liberal diet, and healthy situation. I feel it a duty, therefore, I owe to others who may be similarly circumstanced, as well as to Miss Bennett of Kyneton, under whose care my daughters have just finished their education, to recommend her establishment; and I am more particularly disposed to do this by having observed lately in your columns an advertisement of the reduction of terms in that seminary, to a rate which supplies another great desideratum - that of bringing the cost of education of young ladies within the means of many worthy parents who have hitherto, perhaps, been unable, by reason of the great expense, to educate their daughters as their status in the old country required. With no desire to disparage other seminaries (for surely there is room for all), I beg leave, by your kind permission to bear public testimony to the excellency of Miss Bennett’s school, in all those particulars I have mentioned. Miss Bennett herself is enterprising and indefatigable, and spares no expense to provide all that is requisite in a really good school. Whilst maintaining a necessary discipline she attaches her pupils to her as friends and companions, and purveys for them with a liberality which shows she feels too deep an interest in their welfare to dream of making herself rich at the expense of their table. And with respect to the air of Kyneton, judging from the experience of my own daughters, I believe it to be the most salubrious in Victoria. I am, dear Sir, yours faithfully, R. S. NICHOLLS. Wattle Gully, Chewton, June 16th, 1858. Glen Harrison.

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Collections & recollections During the Australian Heritage Festival the Castlemaine Pioneers and Old Residents staged a display in the Castlemaine Town Hall. As part of that display, Elaine Appleton presented folders she had compiled of historical information to representatives of the communities presented in them. In a ceremony on the Sunday afternoon Lindy Ralph launched the presentation, outlining the interest in local history of her late father Doug. Doug Ralph had begun a popular local history site on Facebook and this site, since closed, had been one of the sources of information for Elaine’s collections. Elaine has been involved in collecting local history material over many years, being involved in the establishment of the People and Places collection in the Chewton Town Hall and creating 4 videos of historic information from Chewton’s past. Elaine acknowledged many people who had assisted in her compilations. Folders were presented to The Pioneers and Old Residents Association, Harcourt and Barkers Creek, Yapeen, Yandoit, Newstead, Guildford, Campbells Creek, Maldon and Muckleford and Chewton. Marion Landy represented the Chewton Domain Society at the presentation and accepted the Chewton folder. At the conclusion, Campbells Creek’s George Showell thanked Elaine for her efforts, commenting on the value they will have for future generations. Prepared from material supplied by Elaine Appleton.

Back: W.Bunton, G.Milford, M.Landy, E.Appleton, L.Ralph, W.Dunstan. Front: K. White, G. Showell, J.Hallett, D.Hartney. Photo courtesy Maryanne Murdoch.

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Museum makers… Interested in learning the age-old art of taxidermy?

Book a place now in a unique workshop designed to get participants exploring the ancient and fine art of stuffing animals. The workshop being held on Saturday 22 June and Sunday 23 June from 9am–5pm in Castlemaine is presented by Museum Makers, a new venture from two former Museum of Victoria colleagues, Dean Smith from the Mornington Peninsula and Castlemaine’s Ewin Wood. Brought together by a mutual respect for one another’s work and a shared love for the natural world, the pair joined forces in 2018 to create a space where they could impart their knowledge and skills in this rare and dying art. “Dean and I have been colleagues for more than 25 years, beginning at the Museum of Victoria, then the Melbourne Museum”, said Ewin. “We’ve worked on some of prized exhibits and collection treasures, including the original McCoy Hall Dioramas, the great Blue Whale skeleton, and thousands of old and new taxidermy mounts. Taxidermy allows us an intimate study and appreciation of animals and their anatomy. If done well it preserves and displays the animals unique form and beauty”. Each workshop is capped at 10 participants and suitable for beginners or advanced industry professionals. With step-by-step tuition Dean and Ewin guide participants in the process of museum quality taxidermy, how to skin, prepare and mount a bird for display. Taxidermy kits and ethically sourced bird specimens are provided. At the conclusion of two-days, participants will have created their own beautiful bird mount that is theirs to take home. Feedback from their inaugural workshop in December 2018 was overwhelmingly positive, with one participant saying, “That’s was the greatest weekend I’ve had in ages!”. Museum Makers are also planning future courses in moulding and casting, skeletal preparation techniques and advanced taxidermy of a fox. They also provide custommade workshops andpresentations for students of museum studies, fine arts, and science educators. Museum Makers taxidermy workshop Saturday 22 and Sunday 23 June, 9am–5pm Lot 19, McShanag Road, Castlemaine Cost: $850 for two-day workshop (catering included) museummakers.com.au or call Ewin on 0439 014 945 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0oNpnrMCYwU


Local newspapers? So much of our local history is recorded in the pages of newspapers published over the years. This interesting list has been forwarded to the Chat: • CASTLEMAINE YARNER AND DIGGERS GAZETTE (Dec 1853—Jan 1854) merged into the “VICTORIA TIMES AND GOLDFIELDS ADVERTISER” (Jan 21, 1854—April 29, 1854) • MOUNT ALEXANDER MAIL (May 6, 1854—Oct 1, 1917) name changed to CASTLEMAINE MAIL, Oct 1917. • THE MINER’S RIGHT AND CASTLEMAINE ADVERTISER 1856—1858 when The Miner’s Right section of title was dropped for the title of CASTLEMAINE ADVERTISER and COUNTY OF TALBOT CHRONICLE. • CASTLEMAINE ADVERTISER (Mk1) (Jan 1, 1859— Nov 15, 1862) • DAILY NEWS (1862—1869) This paper had 3 names at various times: • Our Daily News 31/3/1862—8/12/1865; • Castlemaine Daily News 22/12/1865—1868; • The Daily News 24/ 9/1868-31/12/1869. • CASTLEMAINE ADVERTISER (Mk2) (Aug 31—Dec 5, 1868) allegedly started by the M.A. Mail. • CASTLEMAINE REPRESENTATIVE & Chronicle For Chewton, Campbell’s Creek, Fryers, Guildford, Maldon, Muckleford & Taradale (March 29, 1870— Jan 30, 1883) • CASTLEMAINE LEADER & Advocate for Chewton, Campbell’s Creek, Fryers, Guildford, Maldon, Muckleford & Taradale (Feb 3, 1883—Feb 12, 1916) • CASTLEMAINE MAIL (Oct 1, 1917—)

Unique histories preserved with local history funds Castlemaine’s work to preserve our community history for generations to come has been recognized as part of the 2019 Local History Grants Program. The Castlemaine Billy Cart Challenge has received $7,800 for their work to document, preserve and display celebrating 70 years since the first billy cart race at Monument Hill. The Castlemaine Billy Cart Challenge was one of 49 community groups which shared in $350,000 worth of local history grants. Nuggetty Landcare Group has also received funding for collection of local oral histories as part of the Nuggetty Landscape History Project. The Local History Grants Program is part of the Public Record Office Victoria’s ongoing support for community organisations and volunteers who work to preserve, record or publish our shared local history. A full list of grant recipients is available at prov.vic.gov. au. “The Local History Grants Program is all about helping dedicated community organisations do the important job of collecting and preserving Victoria’s fascinating history for future generations,” said Bendigo West MP Maree Edwards. “The broad range of activities being undertaken by these groups shows that our stories can be shared in innovative and accessible ways, for the ultimate benefit of all Victorians.” Taken from a Press Release.

Words of encouragement! Advocate 22 July 1920 CHEWTON Our western suburb, where Chewton used to be, is coming on by leaps and bounds, and is trying hard to keep up with this city, says the “Kyneton Guardian.” They have stopped pulling down dwellings, and have struck gold in four places, and have made and planted a Park which will be an ornament to the suburb. In the summer- time later on, Cr. McMillan can recite under a shady tree odes to the Babbling Brook, to the accompaniment of the anvil from the village smlthy close by, and Cr. O’Grady may get a bar to his VC for some brave deed. Last, but not least, and here they’ve got the city beat for the present, they have started a band, which, judging by the sounds that on a calm night reach this far, is going ahead by leaps and bounds. They are holding socials every fortnight in aid of the same, and a plain and fancy dress ball is on the cards. Bravo, Chewton! Keep on going.

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The State budget and Bendigo West The Andrews Labor Government is delivering on its promises to Bendigo West with major investments in local schools, health and transport in the Victorian Budget 2019/20. As part of a massive $1.8 billion investment in schools around the state, this year’s Budget includes $6.4 million to make sure students at Marong Primary School have the learning spaces they deserve, delivering a new multipurpose Performing Arts Centre, repurposing buildings for Outside of School Hours Care, and reconfiguring office space for a general purpose classroom and staff lounge. Students and teachers at Winters Flat Primary School are also set to benefit from this year’s Budget, with the Labor Government delivering $2.92 million towards replacing older buildings with new architecturallydesigned permanent modular buildings. A further $58 million will expand School Breakfast Clubs. Building on the existing program, which provides free breakfasts in 500 schools across our state, this investment will see free breakfasts and lunches served up to students at 1000 primary and secondary schools every school day. An $882 million Budget investment will ensure that every three-year-old has access to at least five hours per week of subsidised kinder by 2022 – increasing to 15 hours per week. A further $28.5 million will see early childhood added to the list of Free TAFE courses, reducing financial barriers for students, encouraging enrolments and supporting the Labor Government’s rollout of universal three-year-old kinder. This year’s Budget also includes $33.6 million to build, expand and improve local kindergarten facilities. This year’s Budget begins that rollout, investing $321.9 million and delivering on our promise to bring back dental vans. This investment will save families around $400 a year per child in dental costs, as well as saving parents the inconvenience of taking time off work for appointments. Once fully rolled out, this initiative will also free up more than 100,000 places in the public dental care system each year. Because every Victorian should be able to get the care they need when they need it, this year’s Budget boosts the numbers of paramedics across the state as well as investing $59.5 million to build a new rehabilitation centre at Bendigo Hospital. Bendigo’s new rehabilitation centre will ensure patients recovering from accidents, injuries and illnesses will have access to the very best care close to home. The new centre will bring together health services such as physiotherapy, occupational therapy, social work, speech therapy, prosthetics and orthotics, clinical psychology and neuropsychology. Local patients will benefit from an extra 27,000 dedicated appointments with medical specialists. With a $136 million investment to deliver an extra 500,000 appointments across regional communities, this will help ensure patients get better access to specialist care.

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This budget will see a new parenting centre in Bendigo, part of a $213.7 million Budget investment to provide extra support to new mums and dads. Delivering on a key election commitment for one of Victoria’s fastest growing regional cities, this year’s Budget invests $49.6 million towards the next stage of Bendigo Metro. Creating up to 150 jobs, this project enables planning to begin on the re-opening of Harcourt Station and the upgrade of the track on the Bendigo line between Bendigo and Kyneton to allow trains every 40 minutes during off peak times. Continuing the transformation of central Bendigo, this year’s Budget invests $152.4 million for a multijurisdictional court facility for Bendigo and the wider region giving the community the safe and modern facilities they need, while creating hundreds of local jobs. Our young athletes will be one step closer to becoming the next basketball legends, thanks to a brandnew high-performance basketball hub in Bendigo. One of seven across our state, this year’s Budget includes funding to establish the hub, giving local kids access to the very best training programs with a clear pathway to playing elite level basketball. With this Budget, the Labor Government is ensuring local sporting stars have the facilities they deserve, with $330,000 to deliver stage 1 of the masterplan and towards the installation of a new synthetic green for the Kangaroo Flat Bowling Club. This year’s Budget delivers on the Labor Government’s positive plan for solar, investing $1.3 billion to make sure more Victorians can take control and cut their power bills. This includes rolling out solar panels, solar hot water or solar batteries to 770,000 homes over the next decade, expanding the program to renters and ensuring the safety and sustainability of the rollout, with funding for training, safety and quality audits. Honouring our promise to the Newstead community, the Budget is also investing $1 million towards the Newstead Community Solar Project to help the town transition to 100 per cent renewable energy. In last year’s Budget payroll tax was cut for regional business to 2.425 per cent, and as part of the Budget, we are going even further, reducing regional payroll tax to a quarter of the metro rate – down to 1.2125 per cent by 2022-23. This is a Budget that delivers for all Victorians. “Labor Governments are all about investing in the infrastructure and services that build strong communities, and that’s exactly what this budget does,” member for Bendigo West Maree Edwards said. Taken from a Press Release.

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Chewton and Castlemaine Pools gain disability access Member for Bendigo West, Maree Edwards visited the Castlemaine indoor pool at the Castlemaine Fitness Centre to announce the installation of the first hydraulic lift chair for Castlemaine, with a second to be installed at Chewton outdoor pool in the near future. The $36,000 for both swimming pools is thanks to the great community support for the Andrews Labor Government’s Pick My Project. The funding for this project is being used to install hydraulic chair lifts for two swimming pools: one indoor pool in Castlemaine and one outdoor pool in Chewton. There are no disability accessible swimming pools anywhere in the Mount Alexander Shire. A nyone with a physical disability needs to travel between 40-57km to either Bendigo or Kyneton to get in and out of pools safely. Providing disability access includes the aged and less able population and reduces significant travel time and expense”.

“The local community will benefit directly from the upgrades, particularly our seniors and anyone with a physical disability,” Maree dsid. Swimmers who previously had to travel outside the Shire to use a pool will benefit through saving travel time and expense. They will also benefit by feeling more included and socially connected to the local community. The chairs will enable more community members to get active through water exercising. “Thanks to the dedication of the Chewton Pool Committee, the Castlemaine Community House and Mount Alexander Shire Disability Advocacy Group, this project was one of 237 projects chosen by locals across Victorian communities to receive funding,” Maree added. Pick My Project funded 16 projects in the Loddon Campaspe region. Taken from a Press Release.

Taking your business online Get ready to launch your business online at this essential digital session as part of Mount Alexander Shire Council’s Small Business Workshop series. “In this day and age it makes sense to take your business online. The internet provides a wealth of advantages and this workshop will help you navigate those early steps,” said Eva Parkin, Economic Development Officer, Mount Alexander Shire Council. “Come along and find out how to make informed choices about websites and social media, get across search engines and online advertising. You’ll be able to size up the options and understand which tools are right for you.” Taking Your Business Online: What you need to know Monday 3 June, 9.30am – 11.30am Civic Centre, Cnr Lyttleton and Lloyd streets, Castlemaine Cost: $20 Book: Via www.mountalexander.vic.gov.au/BusinessResources.

Local arborist Wes Martin from WM Environmental said he’s taken away a lot of information from recent workshops. “These sessions have given the team opportunities to spend time on our business with subject matter experts,” said Mr Martin. “The workshops are time considerate, well facilitated and packed full of strategies, skills, tips and tricks. They have provided me with an opportunity to reflect, revise and learn. I can always take a gem of information back to my team for better business outcomes.” Council is coordinating the workshops in partnerships with Small Business Victoria. Taken from a Press Release.

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New play space underway at Victory Park Preparation works will begin this week on a new and larger play space for children and families at Victory Park in the centre of Castlemaine. The play space has been designed to provide fun for children of all ages and abilities, and should be ready for action in October. Mount Alexander Shire Council’s Director Infrastructure and Development Phil Josipovic said there is plenty to look forward to, with lots of different elements that kids will love. “There’s a zip line by popular demand, an accessible wheelchair carousel, a basket swing, ping pong table, musical play, chess table, cubbies to explore and more,” said Mr Josipovic. “We want to provide an inspirational place for children to come to play, explore and imagine.” The design includes nature-inspired elements like climbing boulders, low rock walls, logs and gardens. Indigenous elements including a grinding stone, yabby sculpture, shadow wall and images of Bungil will recognise the rich Aboriginal cultural in the area. There’ll be lots of seating and the beautiful mosaic Maia seat will be relocated. Council worked with landscape architects and the community to develop the design, with input from experts in play – young, local kids. “Local children have told us the kind of things they wanted and we’ve checked back in with them along the way,” said Mr Josipovic. Council received ideas and input on the designs through community surveys, mood boards, displays and pop-up play spaces. It also held discussions with local kindergartens and childcare centres, as well as community organisations like Windarring and Nalderun. “Thanks to all the children and community members who shared their ideas and feedback to help us develop a design that will make this play space truly special,” said Mr Josipovic. “Victory Park is a popular location for local families and visitors to enjoy in the shire. This is going to be a wonderful asset and we look forward to seeing everyone get outdoors and play.” The upgrade of the playground from local level to a district level play space was a recommendation in Council’s Let’s Play Strategy, and the relocation was

also recommended in the Victory Park Conservation Management Plan. Children will be able to play on the existing playground until just a few weeks before the new play space is ready. Stay tuned for updates on Council’s Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/MountAlexanderShire/ Taken from a Press Release.

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New female friendly pavilion at Wesley Hill Castlemaine’s passionate footballers now have significantly improved facilities, thanks to a funding boost from the State Government. Member for Bendigo West, Maree Edwards has opened the new female friendly pavilion at Wesley Hill Recreation Reserve, made possible with a $100,000 grant from the Labor Government’s Community Sports Infrastructure Fund – Female Friendly Facilities. “Grounds like Wesley Hill Recreation Reserve are a vital asset in any community and Castlemaine’s residents deserve appropriate, modern and fit for purpose facilities they can be proud of,” Maree said. Ms Edwards also launched the competition standard lighting at Doug Powell Oval, thanks to a $100,000 investment from the Government’s Country Football and Netball Program. The reserve is home to the Castlemaine “Magpies” Junior Football and Netball Club and Castlemaine Cycling Club - widely used by the local football and netball competitions.The Magpies club history goes back more than 150 years, and in the junior club has significantly expanded in recent years – especially with growing numbers of girls signing up. The old pavilion however was in need of an upgrade to accommodate the growing number of female participants and to provide adequate change facilities. The new pavilion features female friendly and fully accessible change rooms for players and umpires, first aid, meeting rooms, and storage space for football, netball and cycling equipment. The installation of 100 lux lighting around the oval will also significantly expand the Magpies options for scheduling training and competition. The Government is getting on with supporting sport and active recreation, gender equality and encouraging all Victorians to get out there and get active. Across Victoria the Government has invested more than $630 million in community sport and recreation facilities since 2014. The Government acknowledged project partner Mount Alexander Shire Council for its commitment and significant investment in the project, and Maree thanked the Magpies, the Mount Alexander Community Enterprise and local community for their financial and in-kind support to progress the new pavilion and lighting. Taken from a Press Release.

Community grants awarded Mount Alexander Shire Council is pleased to announce more than 30 local community groups will share more than $100,000 in grants to deliver community projects, events and initiatives throughout the shire. “We have some fantastic projects to look forward to throughout the year including Waste Wise Workshops by The Hub Foundation, a Volunteer Leadership Development program for Mount Alexander Animal Welfare Inc. and a pilot program called Talking with our Elders run by Nalderun,” Lisa Knight, Director Corporate and Community Services, Mount Alexander Shire Council. Some of the other projects will include a community outreach project at Newstead Arts Hub, new equipment for the No Lights No Lycra Castlemaine dance event, development of an interactive website for the Climate Flags project, videos by Fryerstown Rural Fire Brigade and a Respect Ambassador Program to address family violence. This year Council announced changes to its Community Grants Program which now includes two rounds per year and two streams of grants – Small grants (up to $3,000) and Partnership and Grants (up to $10,000), along with a simpler application and acquittal process. An example of one of the four new partnership grants is The Magpies Nest: Building An Ecosystem of Support. The partnership is between Castlemaine District Community Health, Central Victorian Primary Care Partnerships, Sports Focus and the Castlemaine Football Netball Club. It aims to assist the club to continue to build a culture which is safe, healthy and welcoming to support the mental health and wellbeing of its community. “We received more than 50 applications in this round, which went through our rigorous assessment process to determine which are funded,” said Ms Knight. “Many projects over the next six to twelve months will focus on education, awareness and organisational sustainability. Re-use and recycle projects were just some of the new emerging themes. Community grants are a great way for us to support local organisations and volunteers, and to help deliver exciting projects and activities in partnerships with the community,. A list of funded projects will be available on the Community Grants section of Council’s website www.mountalexander.vic.gov.au by the end of May. All applicants will soon be notified regarding the outcome of their submission by email. The next round of Community Grants opens in July. For more information about community grants contact Sharna Cropley, Youth and Community Development Coordinator, on 5471 1700 or grants@mountalexander.vic.gov.au Taken from a Press Release.

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Catchable cod for Barkers Creek Reservoir Catchable sized Murray cod have been stocked into Barkers Creek Reservoir to accelerate the development of its mixed fishery and provide kayakers with a native fish target species immediately. The Victorian Fisheries Authority released 200 Murray cod weighing an average of 2kg each with the help of local anglers. These Murray cod complement the recent opening of Barkers Creek Reservoir to canoes and kayaks, which delivers on the key commitment of better on-water access in Labor’s $34 million Target One Million plan to get more people fishing, more often. Anglers who prefer fishing in kayaks and canoes, including paddle-craft with electric motors, are now permitted to use their vessels on Barkers Creek Reservoir. The reservoir was recently stocked with thousands of golden perch fingerlings; however, these will take several years to reach catchable size. The stocking of larger Murray cod now provides an immediate opportunity for anglers and builds on the established trout stocking program and self-sustaining redfin population in the reservoir. The Victorian Fisheries Authority expects Barkers Creek Reservoir to become a year-round fishing destination for freshwater anglers of all skill levels, ranging from families with children wetting a line from the shore to keen kayak fishers casting lures for cod and perch. The creation of new mixed fisheries in central Victoria with better on-water access will increase fishing participation and bring regional economic benefits through fishing-related tourism. For more information visit vfa.vic.gov.au/targetonemillion2 “We can’t wait to see Barkers Creek Reservoir mature into a fantastic fishery in coming years that offers great fishing for natives in summer and wonderful trout fishing in the cooler months,” Member for Bendigo West Maree Edwards said. Taken from a Press Release.

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Unattended campfires Three people face possible infringement notices for unattended campfires in recent weeks. Officers from Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) and Victoria Police found the breaches while patrolling state forests. DELWP Senior Forest & Wildlife Officer, Glenn Smith, said Authorised Officers spoke to more than 130 forest users over recent weekends and most people were doing the right thing. “It was great to see everyone collecting firewood was complying with the rules including collecting in the designated firewood collection area and only taking the two cubic metre maximum (per load). Most campsites inspected were well maintained but it was disappointing to see people still leaving their campfires unattended,” he said. Since 1 July 2018, 138 illegal campfires have been recorded by DELWP within the Loddon Mallee region. This includes 30 illegal campfires along the Murray River near Gunbower and Torrumbarry. “We also spoke to several people who were trail bike riding and reminded them that bikes must be registered and to stay on the formed tracks in the forest. While we are pleased that everyone enjoyed themselves and most people were doing the right thing, we hope people are always respectful of others and the environment when visiting our forests, parks and reserves, not just when patrols are happening,” Glenn added. If you see any suspicious or illegal behaviour in state forests, please report it to DELWP on 136 186 or Crimestoppers at 1800 333 000. For more information on visiting state forests, campfire safety, trail bike riding and firewood collection go to www.ffm.vic.gov.au Taken from a Press Release.


Wheel Cactus Field Day 30th June 2019

FIELD NATS Visitors are welcome at club meetings and excursions... Fri June 14th meeting: Speaker Alison Pouliot on fungi in the forest Sat June15th field trip: Fungi in the Wombat Forest with Gayle Osborne (check for leaving time on our website)

Our June field day will start at 10.30 with a demo and a brief talk for any new Warriors before we set off for an hour or so injecting cacti, winding up with our usual tasty BBQ lunch, a cuppa and a chat. The equipment – high vis vest, protective gloves and goggles – will be provided for the morning. You will just need a hat, stout shoes, long pants and long sleeves. Children will be welcome but must be accompanied by a responsible adult. To find out all about this interesting and aggressive weed and what we are doing about it, see our website www.cactuswarriors.org or contact us directly at info@cactuswarriors.org

BREAKING NEWS - BOOKINGS NOW OPEN for two lovely One-Act Plays

Bombshells &

Ordinary membership: Single $35, Family $50, Pensioner or student: Single $25, Family $30. Subscription includes postage of the monthly newsletter, Castlemaine Naturalist. General meetings - (second Friday of each month, except January) are held in the Uniting Church (UCA) Hall (enter from Lyttleton St.) at 7.30 pm. Field Trips - (Saturday following the general meeting) leave from the car park opposite Castle Motel, Duke Street at 1.30pm sharp unless stated otherwise. BYO afternoon tea. Outdoor excursions are likely to be cancelled in extreme weather conditions. There are NO excursions on total fire ban days.

CASTLEMAINE FIELD NATURALISTS,

PO BOX 324, CASTLEMAINE 3450 http://castlemainefnc.wordpress.com/

The Last Scene of All • under the umbrella title of STARBURSTS • FOUR MATINEES, @ 2pm • All serving High Tea with Bubbles • June 15, 16, 22, 23 • ONE EVENING SHOW @ 8pm • Friday June 21 – with wine and cheese • TICKETS - $25/20 – ALL SESSIONS Doors open thirty minutes before show time!

The last word this month belongs to Jess Saunders, the entertaining and informative guest speaker at Chewton’s Biggest Morning Tea. Highlights from that talk will be included in the July Chewton Chat.

VENUE: KYNETON MASONIC CENTRE 7 YALDWYN STREET WEST Enquiries/Bookings – CATPHONE HOTLINE – Brian/Katie 0490 485 850 www.trybooking.com/BB0QJ

Fryerstown July Lunch Another splendid community 3 course luncheon will be happening at the old Fryerstown School on Sunday 28th July at 12.30 ($12.50 adults, $5 for kids 12 and under) BYO: drink of choice! Bookings are requested please.

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The June Crossword to Chew_on 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

May’s answers were... 8

9

10

11

1

2

10

O N

14

15 17

16

18

8

C

G 12

H 17

E

H

22

S

36

26

31

30

32 34

33

Across 1 Personal attractiveness (8) 5 Chewton’s water storage, ***** Reservoir (5) 8 Quick and energetic (5) 10 Picnic spot near Vaughan, ******** Mineral Springs (8) 13 Road that leads to the Garfield Wheel, ***** St (5) 14 Embankment to stop a river overflowing (5) 16 A form of address for a woman (2) 17 Price charged for something (4) 19 Wesley Hill Market day (8) 20 ******* Swallow (7) 21 Street that runs off Mitchell St Chewton (6) 24 Castlemaine Office Supplies (3) 26 Edible pine forest mushrooms, ******* Milk Caps (7) 28 Eyelid infection (4) 29 Street in Castlemaine CBD (9) 32 The conscious mind (3) 33 ****** Wren (6) 34 Locality between Malmsbury and Daylesford (6)

Check our website:

wwwchewton.net

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18

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P

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D W E 29

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12 13

A

wers s n a ’s June month... next Jackie McMaster.

Down 2 Historic gold diggings on Vaughan-Chewton Rd, ****** Reef (6) 3 Similar type of person (3) 4 Abbreviation of one of the 12 months (3) 6 Landscape feature at Mt Franklin (7) 7 Talk incessantly (4) 9 Game night played at the Red Hill Hotel (8) 11 Newstead based business (advertises in the Chat) (10) 12 Endangered marsupial, the Brush Tailed ********** (10) 14 Flexible (5) 15 Arch construction seen on Chewton’s historic railway bridges (8) 16 Queen of the fairies (3) 18 An affirmative answer (2) 22 Not one or the other (7) 23 Symbol in the bottom right hand corner of the Monster Meeting Flag (6) 25 To incriminate someone on a false charge (5) 27 Extreme weather event affecting Chewton in 1889 (5) 30 Expression of surprise or dismay (3) 31 Abbreviated name of popular Australian dessert (3)


Advertisers in this Chewton Chat Albion Hotel P 13 Andrew Pitcher Building P7 Blues music, jam sessions P 39 Buda Historic Home and Garden P 20 CAE Performance Products P 28 Cameron Stewart, Podiatrist P 22 Carole Kernohan, Bowen Therapy P 25 Castlemaine Mini-Diggers P7 Castlemaine Office Supplies P 15 Chewton General Store P 11 Chewton Service Station P 23 Come Clean Window Cleaning P 31 Doug Drury, Carpenter and Handyman P 33 Drill Sharpening P 19 Duang’s Master Cooking Classes P8 Enviro Shop P 29 Fasom Plumbing P9 Goldfields Concreting P 10 Goldfields Electronics P 31 Kalamazoo Resources Limited P 24 Lawson’s Gardening/Property Maintenance P 34 Life Cycle Gymnasium P 4 Lisa Chesters, Federal M.P. P 36 Maldon Swap Meet P5 Maree Edwards, State M.P. P 13 Mark Mitchell, Plasterer P 19 Newstead Natives, Native Nursery P 29 Ray Fowler, Master Painter P 23 Red Hill Hotel P 21 Robin Haylett, Gardens P 33 Rob’s Lawn Mowing P 30 Rob’s Carpet Cleaning P 34 Soldier and Scholar, 2nd Hand Books P 36 Tamsin Whaley Celebrant P 16 Taradale Wine & Produce P 21 Thompson Family Funerals P 34 Ty Bryn B&B P 6 Unicorn Antiques P 14 Waylaines Tiling P 22 Wesley Hill Market P 15 Wildlife Rescue P 11 Yoga in Chewton P3 Printing of the Chat is now generously provided courtesy of Thompson Family Funerals.

Chewton Chat • • • • • • • • • •

2007 - Winner - best editorial comment 2008 - Finalist - best hard news reporting 2009 - Finalist - best history article 2010 - Special mention - best community reporting 2011 - Finalist - best editorial comment 2012 - Winner - best editorial comment 2013 - Winner - best news feature story 2013 - Finalist - best editorial comment 2014 - Winner - best history article 2015 - Finalist - best editorial comment

Published by the Chewton Domain Society and produced on a voluntary non-profit basis

P.O. Box 85, Chewton 3451 goldenpoint2@bigpond.com or 5472 2892 A CDS subcommittee of John Ellis (Ed.), Gloria Meltzer, Debbie Hall, Phil Hall, Glen Harrison, Jackie McMaster and Beverley Bloxham is responsible for the publication. Many volunteers help with production and circulation. It is circulated on the first of each month, necessitating a deadline of about the 22nd of the month before. Material can be left at the Chewton General Store, with any of the sub-committee members, sent by e-mail goldenpoint2@bigpond.com or by contacting 5472 2892. Contributions of ideas, news items, articles, and letters are always welcome; as are advertisements that help meet monthly production costs. Circulation is via the Chewton General Store, Chewton Pet Supplies, Chewton Post Office, Chewton Service Station, Red Hill Hotel, Castle Automotive Enterprises and Tourist Information Board, as well as the Castlemaine Library, Market Building, CHIRP, Fasom Plumbing and Castlemaine Office Supplies. Mt. Alexander Hospital Residential receives monthly copies too. Whilst copies are free, there are donation tins at many collection points and donations can be mailed to the CDS address below. Subscriptions for mailed copies can be arranged. Circulation is now 600. A full colour Chewton Chat can also be read each month on www.issuu.com - as can some earlier issues. The State Library of Victoria has all issues digitally available at https:// www.slv.vic.gov.au/ and search “Chewton Chat”. Free email subscriptions are also available. Just request and forward an email address.

The Chewton Chat wishes to advise that the views or remarks expressed in this publication are not necessarily the views of the editor, the management team or the Chewton Domain Society and no endorsement of service is implied by the listing of advertisers, sponsors or contributors.

New advertisers to fit in - and this has necessitated a shift for the last word! The last word is on page 37.

ELPHO JAM SESSIONS

Interested in joining this impressive list of advertisers (and community supporters!)? Call 5472 2892 or email goldenpoint2@bigpond.com

Sessions: 3rd Saturday of the month (1:00pm – 4:00pm)

You are invited to our monthly Jam Sessions at Elphinstone These sessions are informal get-togethers of people who want to make some music and have some fun! Aimed at the over 50’s, but open to all.

We play Electric Blues, R’n’B, ‘60s, Rock & more…. For more information:

Email: elphojamsessions@gmail.com

39


We got rain this month!! As autumn turns into winter, we tend to expect rain and cooler, if not downright cold, days and nights. Well, we’re getting them both. I can’t really go past the rain to start this month. It all started at the end of April with a little bit of rain here, and a little bit there. A couple of millimetres one night and another two mls the next evening. Gentle stuff, good for the garden and easy on the driveway. It waited until the first of the month, knowing it was May, then it let rip!! Forty millimetres in one fell swoop. The following week, it seems to have got the hang of it, with small falls occurring regularly, until another 14 millimetres turned up mid-month. And it still hasn’t given up. All told, I have measured 88 millimetres for the month. The highest daily fall was 40 millimetres, part of the thirteen days of monthly rain. Records show that so far this year we have had a total of 131 millimetres, and of the 44 millimetres for the first four months, 33 arrived in February. Our typical annual total of a little more than 500 millimetres looks decidedly unlikely to occur this year. Turning to the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) for some idea of the near future, some good news is around. The BoM outlook is for an El Niño watch. Whilst it still means a real chance that winter will bring warmer, drier weather. It is now a little less likely than it was a month ago. At least the dams and tanks have had a

decent refill, and for a while even the Rod Shop’s island returned to its normal state of watery isolation. This is further supported by the Indian ocean dipole that is currently at neutral levels. Perhaps a more usual winter weather will persist after all. Turning to temperatures, our highest recorded daytime temperature for the month was 19.5 degrees Celsius, leading to an average of 15.3 degrees Celsius. And, a mode of 17 degrees C. As I keep track of the number of days of less than 20 degrees C., I have been watching this monthly statistic decline since January. This month it is 30, having risen from 0, 1, 3, and 9 since the beginning of the year. The lowest monthly overnight temperature was just three (3) degrees Celsius this month. By contrast the highest was 15 degrees C. The average overnight temperature was 7.5 degrees and the mode just 6.5 degrees C. Whilst we had one relatively warm night, the overnight temperature has not been falling as quickly as might be expected. Probably due to the blanket of cloud that brought the rain and stayed long enough to stop the heat dissipating skywards as the sun sank below the horizon each evening. Cloud cover that ranged from the thin streaky ice-crystals that form cirrus clouds to the nimbo-cumulus that brought the rain. John Leavesley.

Calendar of events Jun 1st Eucharist Service 6 p.m., St John’s Anglican Church, Chewton. Jun 1st Chewton Community BBQ, 6 p.m., Ellery Park (see page ). Jun 2nd Felix’s Sunday Afternoon Trivia Quiz, 3 p.m., Red Hill Hotel. Jun 4th Coliban Water visit, 12 noon, Ray Bradfield Room, Castlemaine (see page 19). Jun 6th Chewton Film Society screens Sweet Bean, (see page 23). Jun 9th POHAG Meeting, 10 a.m., Chewton Town Hall. Jun 10th Queen’s Birthday Public Holiday Jun 12th MAS Council Meeting, 6 p.m., Civic Centre, Castlemaine. Jun 14th Live music with the New Settlers, 8 p.m., Red Hill Hotel. Jun 15th Eucharist Service 6 p.m., St John’s Anglican Church, Chewton. Jun 16th View Club talk, 2 p.m., Castlemaine Town Hall (see page 12). Jun 16th Closing date for the Active Living Census survey (see page 25). Jun 16th FOBIF Walk, Whisky Gully on Mount Alexander, (see page 26). Jun 17th CDS Management Committee Meeting., 7 p.m., Chewton Town Hall. Jun 20th Deadline for the July Chewton Chat (early because of weekend at the end of June). Jun 21st Winter Solstice Community Lunch, 11.30 a.m., Chewton Town Hall (see page 11). Jun 21st Submissions for the Castlemaine Botanical Gardens due. Jun 22nd Eucharist Service 6 p.m., St John’s Anglican Church, Chewton. Jun 28th End of Term 2. Jun 29th Eucharist Service 6 p.m., St John’s Anglican Church, Chewton. Jun 29th Winter Warmer at Fryerstown School, 6 p.m., (see page 20). Jun 30th Circulation of the July Chewton Chat, 2.30 p.m., Chewton Town Hall (Sunday).

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Profile for Chewton Chat

Chewton Chat June 2019  

Not 1, but 2 Biggest Morning Teas, Restoration Australia story aftermath, from Llanon Chat to Chewton Chat, and Chewton to Yangon, Duang Ten...

Chewton Chat June 2019  

Not 1, but 2 Biggest Morning Teas, Restoration Australia story aftermath, from Llanon Chat to Chewton Chat, and Chewton to Yangon, Duang Ten...

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