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CHEN LU

PORTFOLIO


LEVEE T-TOWN LAND-SCAPE LAND-FORM URBAN-FORM Prototyping the City GSD1211 Fall2015

Landscape Architecture Third Semester Core Studio

Final Project

Instructor: David Mah Parterner: Lu Wang Date: Nov. 2ed - Dec. 7th, 2015 My Role: Designed the site and pier iterations; Built the site in 3D Rhino; Rendered pier iterations and axonometric analysis, section perspective, sea level map; Made physical models

The project focus on how active and performative landscape can shape new urban development and what ways might the operational, the formative, the physical, and the social aspects of landscape, landform, and urban form collude with one another to create provocative new models for urbanism. The triangle site locates in Allston defined by Cambridge Street, the Charles River, and is owned by Harvard University and is conceived as a mixed used neighborhood that would include research and institutional uses. Most of the land is private and the riverside public space is very limited. The massive highway interchange is being redesigned and reworked into a slimmer and more efficient layout. The railway separates the site and the neighborhood at south. The concept of design is to create a levee infrastructure to deal with the flood and storm issue while providing big public landscape for surrounding to increase land value for further investment. The sea levels will rise two feet by mid-century and six feet by 2100 in the coastal landscape of Greater Boston. The levee is created to deal with the increasing probability of a major storm devastating the metropolitan region. It separates the site into two parts: the wet part is the extension of Charles River and will be full of water all the year round. The inside part is a dry place at most time and a tunnel under the level is the connection between the two parts. When storm comes and water in the dry part exceeds the highest level, the tunnel will be open and the overflow will fulfill the dry part. The infrastructure can work as a reservoir and slow down drainage speed when flood comes. The urban development will be concentrated on levee and piers which will leave larger public space for the surrounding neighborhood. The neighborhoods on the piers are private low residential complex with close relationship to the water edge and pedestrian deck. The two big public spaces have different ecological habitats and functions according to their water level and which can provide citizens more outdoor experience.

2


SITE ANALYSIS

CONSTRUCTION SEQUENCE

CONCEPTUAL DIAGRAMS

FINGER ITERATIONS/MODELS

3


PIER ITERATIONS/MODELS Super Block

4

Linear Neighborhood

Curved Neighborhood

Wateryard


OVERALL LANDSCAPE DESIGN STRATEGY

SOILDERS FIELD ROAD VIEW

Sold

iers Fi

URBAN PARK/DRY SEASON

WETLAND EXPERIENCE/WET SEASON

eld Ro

ad

Urban Park

Wetland/Waterfront Experience

5


WHOLE SITE EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC ANALYSIS

6


DETAIL SWATH PLAN

Urban Park

Railway

Finger Drainage

Highway

High Rise Neighborhood

Tunnel

Wetland Condition

Station

Bridge

Urban Park

Railway

Finger Drainage

Highway

SERIAL SECTIONS

High Rise Neighborhood

Tunnel Wetland Condition

Wetland Condition

Wetland Condition

Urban Park

Station

Bridge

Deck

Low Rise Neighborhood

Urban Park

Urban Park

Railway

Highway

Finger Drainage

Railway

Highway

Finger Drainage

Railway

Highway

Finger Drainage

Wet Landscape

High Rise Neighborhood

Tunnel

High Rise Neighborhood

Serial Sections Scale 1:500

High Rise Neighborhood Tunnel

Tunnel

7


SWATH EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC ANALYSIS

PHYSICAL MODEL

8


SECTION PERSPECTIVE

PHYSICAL MODEL

9


STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

SITE PLAN

DESIGNING A COMBINED DRAINAGE/ INFILTRATION SYSTEM GSD 6143 SPRING 2016

Ecologies, Technologies, And Techniques II

Final Stormwater Assignment

Instructor: Laura Solano, Tom Ryan Parterner: Yijia Chen Date: Apr.20th - May.11th, 2016 My Role: Designed site plan, water flow analysis, zone division, pipe profile and calculation and section of infiltration basin, rain garden and bio-swale The site engineering assignment is to design an open drainage system based on the existing closed pipe drainage system. The purpose of the open drainage system is to reduce runoff quantity, treat water to improve the water quantity, and make the stormwater system as landscape elements for better view and experience. The designed open drainage system consists of five strategies: green roof, rain garden, bioswale, porous pavement, main wetland and infiltration basin.

Main Wetland: The size of wetland is determined by the calculation to hold 50-year-storm flood. It is placed in front of the building so that we could use the two mounts as background for to create water front view. Wetland performance is enhanced when the wetland has multiple cells, longer flow paths, and a high ratio of surface area to volume. Infiltration Basin: The basin is placed in between the existing trees. The purpose for this basin is not only for infiltration but also to create an enclosed space to lead people to the path by the stream. The platform covers the outlet of the pipe and provides people better access to the small pond. Rain Garden: Rain garden is place at the center of the building for better view. It collects water from the green roof, and then goes into the tanks that are partially covered by metal perforated plate. Finally the water fills into the rain garden with a small fall. Bioswale: The bioswale collects water from the parking lot for conveyance, filtration infiltration and create habitat for wildlife. The bioswale is divided by the stepped checking dams so that the water stayed in each detention pocket before entering the next one. For most time, the bioswale will be dry and the repeated pattern of pockets and gravel dams will be revealed.Porous Pavement: It increases infiltration and reduces rate and volume of runoff. Green Roof: The green roof is also an additional element for the whole drainage system that helps increase the water quality and reduce rooftop runoff. 10

STRATEGIES

WETLAND

BIOSWALE

RAIN GARDEN

POROUS PAVEMENT

GREEN ROOF


ZONES

SURFACE WATER FLOW

PIPE FLOW

ASSIGNMENT 1 CLOSED DRAINAGE SYSTEMS ECOLOGIES, TECHNOLOGIES, AND TECHNIQUES II

79 80 MH

79

7

9

GSD 6143 -SPRING 2016 LAURA SOLANO, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR IN PRACTICE TOM RYA Y N, LECTURER

8

0

81

WETLAND2

82

0'

30'

60'

120'

83 84

27

1%

6

8

5

REMOVE CUR URB B

Q=0.580

H P 8 2 .5

POROU OUS S PA PAV VEMENT

8

Zone 7

Zone 6

5.4%

85

Q=0.764

80

2%

8 8

GREEN ROOF 2

86

Q=2.080

80

5

5

Green roof 2

75 3.3% 3%

8

6

82

9.7% 9.7

80

79

81

78

77

79 78

78

80

81

82 8 2

83

87

84

86

8 9

8877 888

75 76

88 8

90 0

89 9

85

86

90 0

88

89

8

88

7 8

84 8

83

82

8

80

79

H P 8 4 .5

80 79

81

7

8

89

8

4.5%

8

77

78 7 8

79

80

81

82 8 2

9

9

0.8%

83

84

90

8

89

9

0

75

90

Q=0.528

77

6.5% %

78

Q=2.139

79

WE WETLAN ETLAN TLAND1 77

Zone 4

80

GREEN ROOF 1

Q=2.080

Zone 3

81

78

4.0% 4.0 %

Green roof 1

82

80 81

8

1.3%

Q=0.738

89

87

6

Zone 8

Q=3.069

RAIN RAI N GA GARDEN N

85

8

Zone 5

1% %

8 9 1%

90

Zone 1

Q=2.774

Q=1.329

1.5% %

8

88

9

6

Zone 2

88

1.4%

80

85

89

88

GSD 6143 ECOLOGIES, TECHNOLOGIES, AND TECHNIQUES II - SPRING 2016

WETLAND AREA Required storage at 5 min increments i Storm Duration Intensity Q=6.338(pre‐development) Frequency Min. inches/hour Q=12.1(post‐pipe) 50 10 50 15 50 20 50 25 50 30 50 35 50 40 50 45 50 50 50 55 50 60

PIPE Ca 6.5 5.5 4.9 4.5 4.1 3.9 3.6 3.4 3.2 3 2.8

CA 1.25 1.25 1.25 1.25 1.25 1.25 1.25 1.25 1.25 1.25 1.25

Qpre Qpost Pre‐development Max InFlow (add 2)max InFlow Max OutFlow Inflow Vol. Outflow Vol. Req. Storage CF/sec CF/sec CF/sec CF CF CF 2.4 19.47 21.47 6.338 11682.94 3802.8 7880.14 2.4 16.48 18.48 6.338 14828.34 5704.2 9124.14 2.4 14.68 16.68 6.338 17614.28 7605.6 10008.68 2.4 13.48 15.48 6.338 20220.47 9507 10713.47 2.4 12.28 14.28 6.338 22107.71 11408.4 10699.31 2.4 11.68 13.68 6.338 24534.17 13309.8 11224.37 2.4 10.78 12.78 6.338 25882.2 15211.2 10671 2.4 10.19 12.19 6.338 27499.84 17112.6 10387.24 2.4 9.59 11.59 6.338 28758 19014 9744 2.4 8.99 10.99 6.338 29656.69 20915.4 8741.29 2.4 8.39 10.39 6.338 30195.9 22816.8 7379.1

longest concentration time TOC

32

Q

9.586

i

4 2.3965

CA

Earthwork calculations for storage volume contour number

77 78 78.4

Total volume

contour intervvolume in CF 1 1896 8439 1 8439 11418 0.4 4567.2 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 14902.2

Structure Numbers labeled on the plan CB‐4 to MH‐1

DI‐4 to MH‐3 MH‐3 to MH‐4 MH‐4 to MH‐5 MH‐5 to MH‐6 MH‐6 to Infiltration basin WL‐2 to Stream

Q=CIA Rim Elevation Pipe***must always have a minimum of 2 feet soil cover overtopof pipe AND inverts calculate using existing % slope pipe number size in diameter length‐measure on Plan % slope Invert Out (upstream) Invert In (downstream) 89.42 A 12" 125' 1% 86.42 85.17

89.8 88.94 89.86 86.23 83.8 77.7

A4 B C D E W2

12'' 12'' 18'' 18'' 18'' 12''

47.69' 105.942' 116.13' 184.35' 100.7' 78.1'

2% 1% 1.50% 1.40% 2.50% 0.50%

86.8 85.8462 84.287 82.54505 80 74.5

85.8462 84.78678 82.54505 80.019455 77.4825 74.1095

DI‐3 to MH‐3 DI‐2 to MH‐4 DI‐1 to MH‐4 RF‐1 to MH‐4 RF‐2 to MH‐4 CB‐5 to MH‐6 CB‐6 to MH‐6 CB‐7 to MH‐6

89.8 89.8 89.8 Roof Roof 84.5 84.4 83.9

A3 A2 A1 RF1 RF2 L M N

12'' 12'' 12'' 12'' 12'' 12'' 12'' 12''

47.69' 64.63' 64.63' 50.78' 50.78' 66.59' 39.9' 16.49'

2% 2.50% 2.50% 2% 2% 1% 1% 1%

86.8 86.3 86.3 86.05 86.05 81.18 80.92 80.68

85.8462 84.79 84.79 84.79 84.79 80.51 80.51 80.51

CB‐2 to MH‐2 MH‐2 to MH‐1

87.5 F1 88.9 G

12'' 12''

108.84' 184.17'

1% 2%

84.5 83.4116

83.4116 79.7282

CB‐3 to MH‐2 CB‐4 to MH‐1 CB‐1 to MH‐1 MH‐1 to MH‐9 MH‐9 to Wetland WL‐1 to Stream

88.3 88.8 87.5 89 85.1 78.4

F2 I1 I2 J Q W1

12'' 12'' 12'' 18'' 18'' 12''

52.67' 41.38' 103.62' 206.82' 129.88' 86.6'

1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1%

83.9367

70.4

69.967

CB‐0‐1 to MH‐7 MH‐7 to MH‐8

84.9 O1 84.4 P

12'' 12''

42.66' 168.02'

1% 2%

81.4

80.9734

80.9734

77.613

CB‐0‐2 to MH‐7

84.9 O2

12''

42.66'

1%

81.4

80.9734

12''

211.62'

1%

80.81

78.7

contour area

1896

11224 1.328

MH‐4 to RG‐1 RG‐2 to MH‐9

CHEN LU and YIJIA CHEN

89.86 R 86.5 K

80.142 80.7644 79.23 78.2

83.4116 79.7282 79.7282

78.2

77.55

Q name of invert

Watershed Zone (label on plan)

=

peak runoff rates in cfs

use excel formulas

Zone 1

1.95

1.425

3.375

Total CB (on road) CB-1

Zone 0 Total

1.481

0.047

Total

1.329

Zone 2

2.774 2.139

CB-4

Zone 4

0.528

CB-7

Total

2.846

Total

0.764

Rain garden

Zone 8 Total

Roof Total All

0.133

0.155

0.425

0.15

2.08

and

avg grass woodland asphalt and concrete

avg

grass

avg

grass

asphalt

asphalt and concrete dense grass

0.559

1,2

asphalt concrete

porous

0.58

0.028 0.738

and

avg grass woodland asphalt and concrete

0.597

Total

and

asphalt concrete

3.069

0.164 0.004

Zone 7

Roof

0.09

Zone 6

Porous pavement

and

asphalt concrete

Zone 3

5

grass

avg grass asphalt and concrete

CB-2

Zone

avg

type

1.282

CB-3

SW-1

surface

heavy woods asphalt concrete

0.74

Zone 1

C

1.04

data needed to solve for intensity (i)

Coef�icientof Runoff (C) (from runoff chart)

green roof

0.1 0.1 0.85

C

TOC Subtotal and Total (use nomograph)

Data (use the nomograph)

hydrologic value distance

200' 160'

398'

character cover

woodlands avg

asphalt concrete

ofgradient (%)

grass

2%

and

4%

minutes (from nomograph)

22 mins 13 mins 35

0.0138

7 mins

158'

avg grass 0.008 asphalt and 0.015 concrete

10.5 mins

0.85

227'

and

0.85

198'

asphalt concrete

0.85

139'

asphalt concrete

and

0.85

107'

0.1

0.85

0.1 0.1

0.1 0.1

0.85 0.1

37'

263' 74'

279'

23'

146'

asphalt concrete

asphalt concrete

0.25

96'

42'

avg

grass

0.1

46'

avg

grass

porous asphalt

50

0.48 0.37

mins

50

0.022 0.02

0.014 0.022

20'

49'

asphalt and 0.025 concrete dense grass 0.02

0.5

329'

dense grass

0.01

4 mins 34.5

12.3 mins 7.3 mins

19.6 mins 9 mins

1 mins

12.5 mins 22.5 mins 32 min

4.75

0.13

6.8

5

and

3

6.7

6.8

0.01

0.012

6.5

0.29

50

39

3

0.09

50

20 mins 10.5 mins

on rainfall graph= measure yearsintersection of TOC plan and storm year

5.2

mins

3.5 mins

A Area (A) acres 1 ac=43,560 SF

5.2

6 mins

19.5 mins 16 mins

i Intensity (i)

50

50

6

0.85 0.1

50

10 10

0.01

grass 0.016

woodland

15.5

use

0.014

and

avg grass 0.016 woodland 0.015 asphalt and 0.022 concrete avg

5 mins

Storm Event (Yrs) (from rainfall intensity graph)

6.9

0.09

50 50

3.6 3.6

0.37 0.25

50

3.6

0.93

50

3.9 3.9

0.42 0.01

3.9

0.18

50

5

50

50

50

1.55

0.61 0.31

5

0.34

4.7

0.32

0.65

4.7

0.14

50

4.7

0.06 0.52

50

4

0.52

50

14.001

11

on


Section - Main wetland SECTION - MAIN WETLAND Section - Main wetland A Section - Main wetland A

B

C

B

C

Embarkment Beehive

Inlet

A

HP 80.9

Flood control Inlet Permanent pool

B

C

HP 82.2

HP 80.9

HP 82.2

Forebay

HP 80.9

1%

Section across the wetland 0

10

20

30

0.5%

Beehive

Flood control Inlet Permanent pool

Forebay

Low marsh and High marsh

78.4

Embarkment

1%

Flood controlSection across the wetland Permanent pool 0 10 20 30 40 Feet

Embarkment Beehive

78.4 To Stream

Micropool

HP 82.2

0.5%

Low marsh and High marsh

78.4 To Stream

Micropool

1%

0.5% Forebay

40 Feet

Low marsh and High marsh

Micropool

To Stream

Section across the wetland 0

10

20

30

40 Feet

Surface

Flood control (50 years) Permanent pool Flood control (50 years)

MH-9 RIM Elevation=85.1 RG-2 Invert In=78.70 MH-1 Invert In=78.20 MH-9 Invert Out=78.20 RIM Elevation=85.1 RG-2 Invert In=78.70 MH-1 Invert In=78.20 MH-9 Invert Out=78.20 RIM Elevation=85.1 RG-2 Invert In=78.70 MH-1 Invert In=78.20 Invert Out=78.20

Permanent pool Flood control (50 years) Permanent pool

Section A Section A Section A

6’’

18’’

6’’

18’’

6’’

8

12

16 Feet

0

4

8

12

16 Feet

8

12

16 Feet

Section B

High marsh

Section B 0

12

4

18’’

High marsh

4

Fill in with soil to cover the pipe

2’ offset from surface

Fill in with soil to cover the pipe

Pedastrain path Fine gravel Coarse gravel

Coarse gravel

Fine gravel Coarse gravel

Coarse gravel

Pipe Q 129.88' of 18'' ''RCP''@ 0.5%

Fine gravel Coarse gravel Outlet Elevation=77.55

Pipe Q 129.88' of 18'' ''RCP''@ 0.5%

Outlet Elevation=77.55

Pipe Q 129.88' of 18'' ''RCP''@ 0.5%

Outlet Elevation=77.55

Low marsh

Low marsh

Low marsh

Infiltrated with water

Infiltrated with water

Infiltrated with water

Pedastrain path

Pedastrain path Coarse gravel

Embarkment HP 84.5

Plants grow into the big gravel

High marsh

0

2’ offset from surface Surface

Plants grow into the big gravel

Rough gravel Coarse gravel

Section B

Fill in with soil to cover the pipe

Plants grow into the big gravel

Rough gravel Coarse gravel

Rough gravel Coarse gravel

2’ offset from surface Surface

Fine gravel Coarse gravel

Retaining wall

Fine gravel Coarse gravel

Retaining wall

Fine gravel Coarse gravel

Retaining wall

Embarkment HP 84.5 Embarkment HP 84.5

Pond Drain

Section C Section C Section C

Pond Drain

Fill in with soil to cover the pipe Fill in with soil to cover the pipe Fill in with soil to cover the pipe

WL-1 RIM Elevation=77 Invert Out=70.4 WL-1 RIM Elevation=77 Invert Out=70.4

Pipe W1 86.6' of 12'' ''RCP''@ 0.5%

Outlet Elevation=70

To Stream

Pipe W1 86.6' of 12'' ''RCP''@ 0.5%

Outlet Elevation=70

To Stream

WL-1 RIM Elevation=77

Pipe W1 86.6' of 12'' ''RCP''@ 0.5%

Outlet Elevation=70

To Stream

Pond Drain Invert Out=70.4 GSD 6143 ECOLOGIES, TECHNOLOGIES, AND TECHNIQUES II - SPRING 2016

CHEN LU and YIJIA CHE

GSD 6143 ECOLOGIES, TECHNOLOGIES, AND TECHNIQUES II - SPRING 2016

CHEN LU and YIJIA CHE

GSD 6143 ECOLOGIES, TECHNOLOGIES, AND TECHNIQUES II - SPRING 2016

CHEN LU and YIJIA CHE


Small wetland Small Small wetland wetland Section - Infiltration Basin SECTION- -Infiltration INFILTRATION BASIN Section Basin Section - Infiltration Basin

Wooden platform Elevation 83 Wooden platform Wooden platform Elevation 83 Elevation 83

Flood control (50 years) Permanent pool Flood control (50 years) Flood control (50 years) Permanent pool Permanent pool

Pipe E 100.7'E of 18'' ''RCP''@ 2.5% Pipe Pipe E of 18'' ''RCP''@ 2.5% 100.7' 100.7' of 18'' ''RCP''@ 2.5%

16 Feet 16 Feet

2’’ Polystyrene insulation 2’’ Polystyrene 2’’ Polystyrene insulation insulation

6’’ Pea gravel Fine gravel 6’’ Pea gravel Fine gravel Fine gravel Coarse gravel Coarse gravel Coarse gravel 4’

Concrete foundation Concrete Concrete foundation foundation

10

4’

Invert Out=77.4 4’

PVC Lining 4’’ Sand base PVC Lining Compacted soil PVC Lining 4’’ Sand base 4’’ Sand basesoil Compacted Compacted soil

Invert Out=77.4 Invert Out=77.4

Section A Section A Section A

16 Feet

6’’ Pea gravel

10 10

Pipe W2 78.1' W2 of 12'' ''RCP''@ 0.5% Pipe Pipe W2 78.1' of 12'' ''RCP''@ 0.5% 78.1' WL-2 of 12'' ''RCP''@ 0.5% RIM WL-2Elevation=77.7 Invert Out=74.5 WL-2Elevation=77.7 RIM RIM Elevation=77.7 Invert Out=74.5 Invert Out=74.5

Section - Rain Garden SECTION- -Rain RAIN GARDEN Section Garden Section - Rain Garden Berm as needed Compacted Berm as needed structural fill Berm as needed Compacted structural fill Compacted structural fill Planting medium Porous metal panel Canal Canal Canal

RM=89.86

Planting medium Planting medium

Porous metal panel Porous metal panel

Raingarden outlet_RG-2 RM=85.5 Raingarden outlet_RG-2 Invert Out=80.91 RM=85.5 outlet_RG-2 Raingarden Invert Out=80.91 Max depth 1 feet RM=85.5 Invert Out=80.91 Max depth 1 feet Max depth 1 feet

Flood water level Flood water level Regular water level Flood water level Regular water level Regular water level

RM=89.86 RM=89.86

MH-4 RM=89.86 MH-4 In=86.86 Invert RM=89.86 Invert Out=86.86 MH-4 Invert In=86.86 RM=89.86 Out=86.86 Invert In=86.86 Invert Out=86.86

Undisturbed and uncompacted soil Undisturbed and uncompactedand soil Undisturbed uncompacted soil

Section B Section B Section B

2’ Coarse gravel 2’ Coarse gravel 2’ Coarse gravel

Coarse sand

0.3 Mulch

Coarse sand Crushed gravel Coarse sand Crushed gravel Crushed gravel

0.3 Mulch 0.3 Mulch

1.5’ Min Sump

Invert Out=80.91

1.5’ Min Sump 1.5’ Min Sump

Invert Out=80.91 Invert Out=80.91

221.07' of 12'' ''RCP'' @ 1% 221.07' of 12'' ''RCP'' @ 1% of 12'' ''RCP'' 221.07' @ 1% Impermeable liner Impermeable liner ExcavateImpermeable at stable slope liner angle for native soil Excavate at stable slope angle for at native soil Excavate stable slope angle for native soil

Section SECTION- -Bioswale BIOSWALE Section Section -- Bioswale Bioswale

Max depth 1.5 feet Max depth 1.5 feet Max depth 1.5 level feet Regular water Flood water level

Regular water level Regular water level

Flood water level Flood water level

25’ to 33’ Bioswale basin

2’ Check dam

25’ to 33’ Bioswale basin 25’ to 33’ Bioswale basin

2’ Check dam 2’ Check dam

Coarse gravel

Check dam hole

Check dam Coarse gravel Coarse gravel

Check dam hole Check dam hole

Check dam Check dam

Parking lots

Grass buffer strip

Side slope

Parking lots Parking lots

Grass buffer strip Grass buffer strip

Side slope Side slope

Regular water level Flood water level Flood water level Regular water level Regular water level Invert Out=80.6

0.3 Mulch

Invert Out=80.6 Invert Out=80.6

0.3 Mulch 0.3 Mulch

Road Road Road

Section C Section C Section C 0

4

8

12

16 Feet

0 0

4 4

8 8

12 12

16 Feet 16 Feet

Bioswale outlet_SW-1 RM=83.6 Bioswale outlet_SW-1 Invert Out=80.6 RM=83.6 outlet_SW-1 Bioswale Invert Out=80.6 RM=83.6 Invert Out=80.6

Filter fabric Filter fabric Filter fabric

Parking lots Parking lots Parking lots

Check dam

Flood water level

Pipe L 66.59' of 12'' ''RCP'' Pipe @ 1%L 66.59'L of 12'' ''RCP'' Pipe @ 1% of 12'' ''RCP'' 66.59' @ 1%

Imbed into 8’ Swale bottom side slope 3’ Imbed into 8’ Swale bottom side slope Imbed into3’ 8’ Swale bottom side slope 3’

Fine gravel

Planting medium

Fine gravel Fine gravel

Planting medium Planting medium

Check dam1:1 Slope Check dam Slope 1:1 Depth 3.5’ Slope 1:1 Depth 3.5’ Depth 3.5’ 3’ 3’ Planting medium

3’ 1.5’ 3’ 1.5’ 1.5’

Undisturbed and uncompacted soil Undisturbed and uncompactedand soil Undisturbed uncompacted soil

GSD 6143 ECOLOGIES, TECHNOLOGIES, AND TECHNIQUES II - SPRING 2016 Section C’ II - SPRING 2016 GSD GSD 6143 6143 ECOLOGIES, ECOLOGIES, TECHNOLOGIES, TECHNOLOGIES, AND AND TECHNIQUES TECHNIQUES Section C’ II - SPRING 2016 Section C’

3’ Planting medium 0.3’ Mulch 3’ Planting medium Filter fabric 0.3’ Mulch 0.3’ Filter fabric Mulch Filter fabric 1.5’ Fine gravel

CHEN LU and YIJIA CHEN CHEN CHEN LU LU and and YIJIA YIJIA CHEN CHEN

Undisturbed and uncompacted soil Undisturbed and uncompacted soil Undisturbed and uncompacted soil

GSD 6143 ECOLOGIES, TECHNOLOGIES, AND TECHNIQUES II - SPRING 2016 GSD GSD 6143 6143 ECOLOGIES, ECOLOGIES, TECHNOLOGIES, TECHNOLOGIES, AND AND TECHNIQUES TECHNIQUES II II -- SPRING SPRING 2016 2016

1.5’ Fine gravel 1.5’ Fine gravel

CHEN LU and YIJIA CHEN CHEN LU LU and and YIJIA YIJIA

13


DISSOLVED BOUNDRAY

THE AGRICULTURE REMEDIATION FOR GITMO LANDMINE BORDER GSD1212 Spring2016

Landscape Architecture Fourth Semester Core Studio

Final Project

Instructor: Fionn Byrne, Pierre Bélanger Parterner: Emily Allen, Andrew Taylor Date: Mar.20th - Apr. 27th, 2016 My Role: Designed the site plan; Built the site in 3D Rhino; Created diagrams, axonometric analysis, section perspective Guantanamo Bay Naval Base is a United States military base located on 45 square miles (120 km2) of land and water at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. U.S. and Cuban troops placed some 55,000 land mines across the “no man’s land” around the perimeter of the naval base creating the second-largest minefield in the world. The project is to image a remediation process that transform the landmine into an agricultureenergy field to dissolve the boundary between US and Cuba. The process of remediation has three steps: deming, agriculture and energy. Deming is a physical process. First, the land will be burn to clean the landmine. Some places are completely cleaned and some places not completely burned will still remain the landmines. The next step for deming is to use cleaning machine to check and clean the remaining landmines. After that, the landscape will develop into two different ways, natural and artificial. The natural process is the secondary succession, which means the pioneering plants like grasses or shrubs will occupy the burning land to form an ecological system. The better the burning, the faster the succession. The land without natural process will be developed into agriculture land. A gene-modified tobacco will be planted as the main crops which not only remediate the TNT in soil, but also produce economic value to export. Unlike common tobacco, the gene-modified tobacco can survive in TNT soil and remediate toxic chemical elements to environmental friendly substance. When the land become safe and healthy, human can start to urbanize the land. After more and more residents come in, the agriculture become prosper and provide jobs for Cuba migrants. Since agriculture consuming large amounts of water and energy, part of land still need to be prepared to transform into solar energy field in the future. Then, the landscape typology is a mixture of agriculture, energy filed and small villages, which dissolve the landmine border through the remediation process.

14

PHYTOMETABOLISM

Description: plant uses it in growth, incorporates it into biomass Contaminant type addressed: organic and inorganic

PHYTOVOLATILIZATION

Description: plant turns it into a gas Contaminant type addressed: organic and inorganic

PHYTODEGRADATION

Description: plant destroys it Contaminant type addressed: organic

PHYTOEXTRACTION

Description: plant takes it up, stores it and is harvested Contaminant type addressed: organic and inorganic

PHYTOSTABILIZATION

Description: plant caps and holds it in place Contaminant type addressed: organic and inorganic


UPLAND PHASING

UPLAND PLAN

BURNING DEMINING

MACHINE DEMINING

ECOLOGICAL SUCCESSION

AGRICULTURE REMEDIATION

PHASING: Burning Deming:

UPLAND DEVELOPMENT

Burn the site to clean the landmines

Machine Deming:

Check and clean the remaining landmines

Ecological Succession:

Pioneering plants occupy and recover the burning land

Agriculture Remediation:

The gene-modified tobacco remediation TNT in the soil

Urbanization Process:

The Low Lands

The High Lands

American Fence Cuban Fence

Cuban Fence

Watch Tower

American Fence No Man’s Land

Guantanamo River

Salt Pan

Arid Shrubland Marksmanship Training Area

Leeward Airport

More and more migrants reside in the site and prosper the land

Energy Field:

Part of the land is prepared to transform into energy field in the future

URBANIZATION PROCESS

ENERGY FIELD

15


LOWLAND PHASING

LOWLAND PLAN

DAM

MACHINE DEMING

ECOLOGICAL DESALINATION

ROAD INFRASTRUCTURE

LOWLAND PLAN PHASING:

AGRICULTURE REMEDIATION

16

IRRIGATION

Dam: Build the dam to change the water that flood the lowland area Road Infrastructure: Improve the road system to establish a strong connection with Cuba side Machine Demining: Check and clean the landmines Ecological Desalination: The fresh water fills into the salt plan and desalinate the salt water Agriculture Remediation: The gene-modified tobacco and rice remediation TNT in the soil Urbanization Process: More and more migrants reside in the site and prosper the land

LOWLAND DEVELOPMENT

The Low Lands

The High Lands

American Fence Cuban Fence

Cuban Fence

Watch Tower

American Fence No Man’s Land

Guantanamo River

Salt Pan

Arid Shrubland Marksmanship Training Area

Leeward Airport


GUANTANAMO BAY 50 YEARS FUTURE PLAN - THE DISSOLVED BOUNDRAY

17


UNLV CAMPUS PLANNING

Framework of campus development of University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Clients: University of Nevada, Las Vegas Location: Las Vegas, Nevada Status: finished the 2012 Campus Master Plan Update; Keep updating the 2016 Campus Master Plan Team: Doug Kozma, Tengteng Wang Date: May. 16th - Aug. 4th, 2016 My Role: • Participated the discussion of plan concept and design details with team • Create diagrams that analyze the campus system, like building use, transit, parking, pedestrian network, landscape framework and so on • Designed detail elements, like gateway structure, university tower, desert landscape, town square, pedestrian bridge and streetscape • Made 3D SketchUp model for the whole campus area • Rendered all the neighborhood and bird view perspectives with Photoshop skills • Assisted to finish the construction document, like calculating parking lot, building footprint and checking construction regulations • Skyped meeting with clients and government officers THE MASTER PLAN is a composite document of principles, goals, objectives, ideas, recommendations, and graphics that support and illustrate the concepts which guide the physical development of the campus for the next 20-25 years. This plan: • Is driven by the UNLV mission and strategic goals • Aligns academic, spatial and physical visions • Provides powerful ideas developed through a broad and inclusive process with campus, community and public/private partner input • Is opportunity-based and visionary yet realistic • Is implementable in initial, mid-term and longrange strategies • Is flexible • Is data-driven and rational THE CHALLENGES outlined in these previous plans prevail today; they are compounded by the recent addition of 80 acres of land on Tropicana to complement UNLV’s core academic, research, housing, campus life, faculty, and athletic mission, and potential future growth to 35,000 students. Additionally, UNLV seeks to enhance its regional impact through collaboration with public entities and private partners on several development opportunities which are included as a part of this comprehensive 2016 Campus Master Plan Update.

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Strategic principles established in the 2012 Update were considered

Improve community connections and support economic development

Expand campus housing and quality of campus life

Enhance university athletics, recreation and open spaces

Optimize development capacity and maximize utilization

Embody sustainability and innovation in physical design


19


DESIGN PRINCIPLES

academic core

community connection

open space

athletic

campus life

capacity

academic and research

athletic and recreation

circulation

open space

parking

student life

CAMPUS SYSTEM

20


ATHLETIC

42 ACRES

RESIDENTIAL

MARYLAND

21


THE NEXUS

The city that connects inter-nally and intra-nally 2014 MUD Winter Studio

Vertical Cities Asia International Design Competition University of Michigan 2014 Team B Instructor: El Hadi Jazairy/Claudia Wigger Parterner: Huang Chengyu Yugo (MArch) Nung Sheung Chui Carol (MArch) Date: Feb. - May. 2014 My Role: Focused on the Urban and Landcape part; Designed the site plan; Created the phases; Drawn diagrams and rendering; Built site 3D model in Rhino; Made physical models

MUMBAI ISLAND - NAVI MUMBAI REGIONAL MAP Water Urbanism

Mangrove

India Oil Coperation Ltd.

BAY POLLUTION Worli End Node

Hindustan Petroleum Coperation Ltd.

Bhanat Petroleum Coperation Ltd. Oil Transportation (Leaking/Spill) Sewri Station

Sewri is a locality along the eastern edge of South Mumbai, in Maharashtra, India. It is also the name of a railway station on the Central Railway Harbour Line. Driven by soil washing as the initiator of the project, we aim at implementing new infrastructure as connectors that can upgrade the existing site condition and to maintain a sustainable and developing connection at various scale through different phases of the project.

SEA LINK

I. Elephanata Island (Tourism)

II. Butcher Island (Crude oil container)

Mangrove

One of the biggest issue, oil pollution in the site pose hazard to the natural habitat and the living environment in Sewri, but it also lead to the potential industry to boost the economy, through soil washing. As Sewri is mainly composed of underused oil refinery on the East side of the railway, which are to be removed due to the diminishing oil stock, the land value of the site can be greatly increased after soil washing. At the same time, soil washing involve a lot of low-skill workers, which can greatly lower the unemployment rate in Mumbai. Apart from that, the Trans-Harbour Link linking to Navi Mumbai is expected to attract a lot of business and visitors from Navi Mumbai as well as other parts of Mumbai. Commercial centres are created to host the business transaction; high density high-rise buildings are built to accommodate the influx of residence; while low-rise communities are implanted to maintain vivid streetscape and industries; mega transit hubs are made to facilitate the transfer of passengers between different modes of transportation; waterfront promenade is made to sustain the habitat for flamingos, as well as providing access to the recreational waterfront. Canals and wetland ponds are inserted to facilitate the stormwater discharge as well as filtering the water. These infrastructures are either inserted or evolved during different stage to help completing the connection internally and intranally. Reconnecting the segregated parts will provide a firm base for the future of Mumbai to enhance its connectivity internally and externally.

22

End Node

JNPT

Colaba NHAVA SHEVA

III. Cross Island (oil)

NAVI MUMBAI IV. Middle Ground Islet (Military)

IV. Oyster Rock (Military) 0

1000

2000

3000

4000

MUMBAI FIELD TRIP

Railway

Housing

Mangrove

Sea Link

Slum

Shipping

Warehouse

Fishing


EXISTING

CONSTRUCTION SEQUENCE

EXISTING

Existing

PHASE I (2015-2019)

slum

PHASE II (2019-2023)

Ecological Industry soil washing and water industry water reused reagents wash water soil washing process

treatment plant

Existing flood plain

slum

PHASE I (2015-2019) Existing warehouses are reused as soil washing factory. Channels are built from inland to the waterfront to discharge stormwater and supply water for soil washing. Soil washing begins with the manufacturing site. Dormitories are built to accommodate the workers, along with other communal facilities to upgrade existing community. Water centres are built in each neighborhood to collect and filtrate household grey water.

harbor line eastern highway

neighborhood

manufactory warehouse (MBPT)

harbor line eastern highway

neighborhood

manufactory warehouse (MBPT)

oil refinary (999 year long term leasing)

polluted soil and sea

neighborhood

manufactory warehouse (MBPT)

oil refinary (999 year long term leasing)

polluted soil and sea

neighborhood

manufactory warehouse (MBPT)

oil refinary (999 year long term leasing)

slum SEQUENCE harbor line SOIL WASHING Existing flood plain

eastern highway

Existing flood plain

slum

harbor line eastern highway

oil refinary (999 year long term leasing)

PHASE III (2023-)

Phase I

water infrastructure slum upgrade

neighborhood (soil washing)

ware housing | soil washing factory

oil refinary (remain)

Phase I

water infrastructure slum upgrade

neighborhood (soil washing)

ware housing | soil washing factory

oil refinary (remain)

Phase I

water infrastructure slum upgrade

neighborhood (soil washing)

ware housing | soil washing factory

oil refinary (remain)

Phase I

water infrastructure slum upgrade

neighborhood (soil washing)

ware housing | soil washing factory

oil refinary (remain)

flood plain

polluted soil and sea polluted soil and sea

clean water capping

polluted soil (sifted)

natural remediation polluted soil to second cleanup method

The existing neighborhood on the East is temporarily relocated to the West side of the railway, while the commercial buildings remains. The oil refinery will be demolished after negotiation.

clean soil

PHASE II (2019-2023)

CONNECTED CITY FABRIC

Soil washing starts after oil company is removed. The manufactory site have been cleaned, and the two soil washing factories will be transferred into water treatment plants. The uncleaned soil will be put at the waterfront for natural remediation. Five canals are build across the site to facilitate the water industry. More water research institution and local water filtration centres are implanted. A grid system of 100m x 100 m will be laid out and connects to the sealink by a transit hub. More low-mid rise program starts to establish, such as housing commercial centre and office.

PHASE III (2023- ) All soil are cleansed, including the soil at the waterfront, thus the waterfront park will be open to public. All soil washing factories are transformed into water treatment plants to supply water for industrial and residential uses. Spaces along the canals are mainly assigned as public space. The cleansed land with greater land value is expected to attract more private development, building office towers and residential clusters along the waterfront.

low rise

low rise

low rise

Phase II

low + mid rise (next to the factory)

cleaned soil (backfill)

oil refinary (remain)

low rise

Phase II

low + mid rise (next to the factory)

cleaned soil (backfill)

oil refinary (remain)

low + mid rise

Phase II

low + mid rise (next to the factory)

cleaned soil (backfill)

oil refinary (remain)

low + mid rise

Phase II

low + mid rise (next to the factory)

cleaned soil (backfill)

oil refinary (remain)

Phase III

high rise

soil washing factory | water center

oil refinary (no oil left)

natural remediation

Phase III

high rise

soil washing factory | water center

oil refinary (no oil left)

natural remediation

Phase III

high rise

soil washing factory | water center

oil refinary (no oil left)

natural remediation

Phase III

high rise

soil washing factory | water center

oil refinary (no oil left)

natural remediation

low + mid rise low + mid rise

high + mid + low rise

high + mid + low rise

23


ECOLOGY NETWORK

COASTAL ECOLOGY

DRY SEASON

The strategy is to establish a water network as the domain to solve the ecological problem and drive economic development and settlement replacement.

The site was divided by the railway into 2 parts. The West side filled with slum, high rise residential buidlings, chawls and dormitories; while the East side was mainly mainly occupied by warehouses and infrastructure of the oil company Indian Oil.

The large amount of water for soil washing comes from the flood water in lowland area in the city center. A new water network with canals and retention ponds should be established to connect the city center and eastern waterfront. The canals convey storm water to the site to support the new soil washing industry and also can be green corridors to increase the connection between eastern waterfront and city center. The water network on the ground increases the site resilience and water storage capacity to prevent flood water from city center and surge from sea. And it also reorganizes the open space system, circulation system, and increase the connection between different neighborhoods. During monsoon season, the site will “soak”; during dry season, the site will “emerge”. The open space will become diverse and productive as a result of the changeable water level.

The flood plain is in the city center and the stormwater is difficult to be drained out because of the existing water system can’t work well in monson season and the sewer and stormwater is not seperated. A range of infrastructure are used to deliver and store water in Mumbai. Due to poor maintainess of the infrastructure and water pilferage, a large amount of fresh water are wasted. The water networks in Mumbai are over 100 years old. The water is still conveyed from the reservior sources located at a distance of 100 km away from the city. On top of the existing sources, the government has targeted a few areas for potential water source.

MONSON SEASON

The water way can be designed as green corridor, boulevard, canals and urban park. The land value will be increased by these open space and attract more private real estate investors to improve economic development. The water network will generate new water industry in the site, such as water institution, water plants and water recreation center to provide new and formalized employment.

In addition, slums installation are usually found along the aqua pipe for its easy access to fresh water. However, the accumulation of trash and unprocessed stormwater in the Nalla may lead to the spread of disease and bad smell in the city. Oil pollution threaten the habitat of flamingos and mangrove. The drawing shows how important mangrove ecosystem supports the local fishing economy and environment quality; how oil pollution makes negative impacts on the balance between ecology and local economy.

EXISTING COASTAL ISSUE Oil pollution threaten the habitat of flamingos and mangrove. The drawing shows how important mangrove ecosystem supports the local fishing economy and environment quality ; how oil pollution makes negative impacts on the balance between ecology and local economy.

Oil, Mangrove and Fishing

Precipitation may result in surface runoff

Money

Pollution

Money

Oil Exploitation

Living Aqueous fraction enters water table

Seal should be impermeable - if it is inadequate, cracked or absent, chemicals may seep into groud

Market

Fishing Economy Cycle

Lighter hydrocarbons float on water table, enter on surface makes mangrove can’t breathe

Polluted water makes fishermen get rash and fish die Flamingo come here every winter for breeding

Storage or dump site

River bank

Gravel (fill) Gravel

Gravel

Light fraction

O2

Sea Surge

Aqueous

Heavy fraction

High Tide

Sediment

Fish migration for breeding in mangrove habitat

Debris

Shrimp Bedrock Shellfish

Mangrove Ecosystem Cycle

24

Corpse

Microrganism

Low Tide


WATER SYSTEM to connect flood plain with the sea in order to discharge runoff through channels during monsoon season. runoff is filtered through wetland ponds along the way and also be used as water supply for residential and industrial use.

TRANSPORTATION NETWORK To re-connect the private and public mode of transportation, to enhance the walkability of streets through connecting overpass and podium.

COMMUNITY AND

1. Entertainment Centre 2. High Rise Housing 3. Waterfront Park 4. Waterfront Plaza 5. Pavilion 6. Dock 7. Low Rise Housing 8. Roof Garden 9. Financial Center 10. Transportation Hub 11. Canal 12. Parking Structure 13. Retention Pond 14. Office 15. Overpass 16. Existing Neighborhood

17. Mixed Use Area 18. Bus Terminal 19. Gallery 20. Flamingo Pier 21. Remediation Pond 22. Harbor Line 23. Water Treatment Plant 24. Sea Link 25. Eastern Highway 26. Upgraded Informal Housing 27. Existing Housing 28. Upgraded Low Rise Housing 29. Public Housing 30. Wetland

WALKABILITY To re-connect to diverse job opportunity and sustaining working environment, healthy living condition, and sufficient learning opportunity.

25


PROGRAM BREAKDOWN

On the West side of the railway is mainly existing neighborhood, with additional public housing and upgraded low rise residential community. A mega transit hub is situated at the intersection of the sea-link and the railway. In which facilitates the development of a financial centre nearby. High rise residential clusters are built close to the waterfront. Along the sea-link are mainly buildings with mixed use program and low rise residential buildings. Entertainment and recreational programs are located along the waterfront. At the two edges of the sites are equipped with water filtration infrastructure, with each serving half of the whole site.

LAND USE

LOW RISE Existing Housing (m²) Area/Person (m²/p) Low Rise (m²) Area/Person (m²/p) High Rise (m²) Area/Person (m²/p) Site Area (m²)

Low Rise (m²) Area/Person (m²/p)

5885.333333

100 m

4.5

Existing Housing (m²) Area/Person (m²/p) Low Rise (m²) Area/Person (m²/p)

8 /

High Rise (m²)

/

Area/Person (m²/p)

10000

GFA

5885.333333

FAR

0.588533333

Total Residents

Population Density (p/km²)

FAR CLIMAX = 5.83

2478 3407.333333

High Rise (m²)

TOTAL SITE AREA = 1.1 sq km

Low Rise (m²)

977 97658

100 m

100 m

4.5

Existing Housing (m²) Area/Person (m²/p) Low Rise (m²)

3407.333333

Area/Person (m²/p)

8

Area/Person (m²/p)

/

High Rise (m²)

Area/Person (m²/p) GFA FAR Total Residents Population Density (p/km²)

/ / / /

Site Area (m²)

10000 55200

FAR

5.52

Total Residents

1840

Population Density (p/km²)

Area/Person (m²/p)

/

184000

/

Area/Person (m²/p)

/

Low Rise (m²)

/

Area/Person (m²/p)

/

100 m

165600 30

High Rise (m²) Area/Person (m²/p) Site Area (m²)

/ / 9443

30 10000

10000

GFA

58347.66667

5885.333333

GFA

55200

FAR

5.834766667

0.588533333

FAR

5.52

Total Residents

977 100 m

Population Density (p/km²)

Total Residents

1840

Population Density (p/km²)

100 m

8 165600

Site Area (m²)

10000

97658

100 m

30

HIGH & LOW RISE

HIGH RISE

2478

High Rise (m²) Site Area (m²)

100 m

165600

GFA

Existing Housing (m²) Area/Person (m²/p)

977 97658

100 m

LOW RISE Existing Housing (m²)

/

0.588533333

Area/Person (m²/p) Site Area (m²)

/

HIGH RISE

LOW RISE Existing Housing (m²)

8

GFA Total Residents

100 m

4.5

10000

FAR Population Density (p/km²)

Area/Person (m²/p)

2478 3407.333333

2233 223346

184000 100 m 100 m

26 HIGH RISE

HIGH & LOW RISE

LAYERS


1. High Rise Housing 2. Waterfront Park 3. Waterfront Plaza 4. Pavilion 5. Dock 6. Low Rise Housing 7. Roof Garden 8. Financial Center 9. Transportation Hub 10. Canal 11. Parking Structure 12. Retention Pond 13. Office 14. Overpass 15. Existing Neighborhood

16. Mixed Use Area 17. Bus Terminal 18. Gallery 19. Flamingo Pier 20. Remediation Pond 21. Harbor Line 22. Water Treatment Plant 23. Sea Link 24. Eastern Highway 25. Upgraded Informal Housing 26. Existing Housing 27. Upgraded Low Rise Housing 28. Public Housing 29. Wetland 30. Commercial Building 31. Boating Pier 32. Upgraded Slum

27


ROOFSCAPE IN COMMON

Water infrastructure and public space in Worlikoliwada 2014 MUD Spring Studio University of Michigan

Instructor: Mclain Clutter/Kit McCullough Date: May. - Jun. 2015 My Role: Idividual Work This speculates on ways that privileging the motion of storm water in the design of urban form might disrupt the legibility of individual property ownership, opening up the possibility for new forms of collectivity and urban life around the commons. It is the traditional belief that people living in fishing villages should be at odds with the monsoon and the land should be separated from the sea. However, the book Soak, suggests transforming Mumbai into a place that absorbs the monsoon and sea, a place that accommodates uncertainty through resilience. Following this idea, this project proposes the construction of a network on roof scapes covering the whole fishing village that would disperse and hold monsoon waters. The design recalls the historic practice of site water collection for the daily water requirement of the fishing village. Since the village doesn’t have storm water system, the design connects and collect the water at the moment when it flows on streets, alleyways, terraces, and any place. The harvested rainwater becomes an accessible water resource to resolve the current water shortage issue. The roof scape is like a kind of natural landscape topography added on the exiting building typology in a cultural, social, and economic way. The water infrastructure will become the main public space that people can share with each other and also the roof can generate public goods – water. There are walkways to connect the roof gardens and terrace to form a circulation, slopes for people go up and down, and also have pipe and gutters to connect the rooftop water with the ground drainage system. The multi- functional roof infrastructure approaches water, transport, communication space, so the endogenous and exogenous monsoon processes can no longer be perceived as isolated incidents but rather as part of large, constructed hydrological ecology that is entirely and irreversibly connected to the process of urbanization.

28

AXONOMETRIC VIEW: WATER COMMUNITY


MUMBAI WATER DISTRIBUTION

29

29


WATER LANDSCAPE TYPOLOGY ANALYSIS

DECENTRAILIZED SYSTEM

PROPOSAL

For the proposal, the water infrastructure can generate water independently for the village. Each household will have water tank. In monsoon season, if there is extra water, the water will be stored in the community tank. In dry season, if people don’t have enough water, they can go toSrithe community tank to get water. The Sai Temple harvested rainwater is like a public good that people can share with each other. So there are some water communities in the village to organize the water distribution.

Sri Sai Temple

out flow 1.74

liter rainwater per sq foot

out flow

94.5

inches annual average rainfall

The storm water infrastructure along the existing main road into the village and restore the ecosystem in the waterfront as the buffer to protect the land and also to treat the runoff before it go into the sea. There are some retention open spaces, in market or temple area, which combine with the water infrastructure to form the whole system. In monsoon season, more resilient space will join in to absorb the water that helps to mitigate flood. 1.74

liter rainwater per sq foot

fishing market

94.5

inches annual average rainfall

fishing market

MIDDLE CLASS RESIDENCE

SLUMS

860sq ft

484sq ft

MIDDLE CLASS RESIDENCE

average roof area per household

SLUMS

860sq ft

140,000liters

80,000liters per household per year

484sq ft

average roof area per household

140,000liters

80,000liters

per household per year

380liters

220liters per household per day

380liters

220liters

per household per day

Shiva Mandir

Shiva Mandir

water community Monsoon Season (Water Collection)

Monsoon Season (Water Collection)

Drought Season (Water Returen)

Drought Season (Water Returen)

Home Tank

water infrastructure

water community

natural remediation water community

Small Community Tank

Large community Tank

Large community Tank

Cluster Tank

Cluster Tank

spatial intervention water infrastructure

Sri Sai Temple

Home Tank

Cluster Tank Water Pump

Small Community Tank

Cluster Tank Water Pump

spatial intervention RAIN WATER HARVESTING COMMUNITY

RAIN WATER HARVESTING COMMUNITY Source: Aakash Ganga (AG); Dr. BP Agrawal; Sustainable Innovations (SI)

Source: Aakash Ganga (AG); Dr. BP Agrawal; Sustainable Innovations (SI)

natural remediation

From the existing street view, we can see some potential of the rainwater. The rain touches the roof, terrace and then ground continuously. Because the village doesn’t have storm water system, the design is to find the way to connect and collect the water at the moment when it flows on streets, alleyways, terraces, and any place.

out flow

MONSOON HARVESTING 1.74

liter rainwater per sq foot

POTENTIAL

94.5

inches annual average rainfall

fishing market MIDDLE CLASS RESIDENCE

SLUMS

860sq ft

484sq ft average roof area per household

The water networks in Mumbai are over 100 years old and are poorly maintained. The water is now conveyed from sources located at a distance of 100 km away from the cities. On top of the existing sources, the government has targeted a few areas for potential water source. 30 % of the city’s population does not have access to in-home piped water, over 80% of slum dwellers do not have access to potable water. The data shows in Worli area the availability of tap water is less than 2 hours per day. From the picture, individual household use some small water tanks to keep the water for daily use, but still not enough.

140,000liters

80,000liters per household per year

380liters

220liters per household per day

30

wat


COURTYARD PERSPECTIVE

LAYERS

Water courtyard

Residence

Upgrading housing area

Water infrastructure

Open area

Continuous roofscape

Water corridor

Water terrace

Open space

Informal settlement Fishing market

Open market Fishing market plaza

Existing

Ground

Roof Structure

Water Infrastructure 31


TREATMENT IN CELL

MASTER PLAN

Industrial waste water treatment in Bell’s Brewery 2013 MLA Winter Studio University of Michigan

Instructor: Bob Grese/M’Lis Bartlett Date: Mar. 2013 My Role: Individual Work

Bell’s Brewery is a regional craft brewery located in Kalamazoo Michigan. The dedication to brewing flavorful, unfiltered, quality craft beers that started in 1985 is still with people today. The building is in a vacant land with forest and soccer field around. There are a lot of waste water be generated through beer production every day. The aim for the project is to treat waste water, make the vacant land productive, create playful players for the workers and also attract tourists. The way for wastewater management is to treat them through natural remediation. The industrial water will be treated through anaerobic digestion first and then be drained to machine and wetland for further remediation. The basic unit for natural remediation is a series of living machine cells. The bio-processing will be happened in the cells. The industrial water can be filtered through the cell from one to the other. Finally, the cleaned water will be stored in the retention pond or water tower for further use. The existing vacant land will be transferred into a productive agriculture land and the water will be redistributed to irrigate the farm. And the living machine cells can be well designed as a public park for people to have fun. Through the project, the land will be more sustainable and productive and attract more tourists to visit the site.

32

1. Building 2. Green Roof 3. Rain Garden

INDUSTRIAL WASTE WATER TREATMENT

4. Forest 5. Detention Pond 6. Farm

7. Anaerobic Digestion 8. Waste Water Treatment 9. Wetland

10. Retention Pond 11. Water Tank 12. Water Tower


TREATMENT CELL RENDERING

33


FLOOD HARVEST

MASTER PLAN

Water catchment storage and flood mitigation

2014 Gerald D. Hines Student Urban Design Competition

Honorable Mention

Instructor: El Hadi Jazairy Parterner: Sally Tsang (MArch); Xin Miao Yong (MArch); Jia Fang (MUP); Zhengkuan Gan (MUP) Date: Jan. 2014 My Role: Focused on design the landscape concept; Designed the green infrastructure and stormwater strategy; Rendered the plan; Participated to design the site section and building axonometric of rainwater harvesting

FLOOD HARVEST is an exciting new urban development that will create a distinct identity for a rejuvenated Sulphur Dell. Despite its lucrative location just north of downtown Nashville, the district is largely underused. This could be attributed to its location in a low-lying part of the city, rendering it extremely flood-prone. This project aspires to transform Sulphur Dell into an example of a midsized development that reimagines and leverages upon the city’s flood-prone riverfront sites by turning them into potentials for urban development. The design approach accepts the inevitability of water entering and collecting within Sulphur Dell during heavy rainfall, while endeavoring to control and control and exploit its potentials. The waterfront along the Cumberland River responds to this condition by transforming into a wetland park. This not only acts as the first line of defense to absorb water overflowing from the river, but serves as a place for recreation during the dry season. The second line of defense consists of several pocket ponds located along the existing Music City Bikeway. During the dry season, the ponds would appear as landscaped features of pocket parks dotted along the bikeway. These indentations are not only aesthetic but can also be used as play, leisure or performance areas. When sudden storms occur in the spring, the pocket ponds will fill up in succession as water flows from the wetland park through the bikeway, acting as buffers to slow down the movement of water as it heads inland towards the large retention pond and contributing to the resiliency of the development.

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PROPOSAL

lowest area

ground parking

wetland park

park/plaza (with pond)

existing recreation

green roof

existing recreation

new building

existing recreation

existing building

existing building

green corridor

courtyard

FEMA flood

local flood

existing recreation

green corridor and pockets harvesting area

new water harvesting center

Flood Reason Heavy rainfall River overflow Limited porous space Impervious ground parking Low land area

Green Corridor

In order to deal with the overflow coming from the river, the concept is to make a green corridor with storm-water infrastructures like ponds, swale, rain gardens and water plaza, in terms of flood mitigation and water management , as well as open space. Most overflow will be collected, kept and treated along the green corridor that reduce the burden on existing municipal storm-water system.

Green Pockets

In order to deal with the run-off from city itself, the green pockets like green roof and courtyard will also be designed to collect and maintain rainwater. These green pockets will also be connected to the green corridor that form a complete water network to control flood.

Water Harvesting

The water in the pond can be purified through living machine or filtration system and then redistribute and harvest the city. The ponds include retention pond and detention pond. For retention pond, the water feature can be kept all the year round. For detention pond, it also can be a recreation park or open music theater if there is no water.


PROGRAM BREAKDOWN

cooperated with Sally Tsang

WATER SPACE CROSS SECTION

cooperated with Xin Miao Yong

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SEA OUR LAND

FLOATING CITY

Between the Roof of the World and the Mouth of the Ganges

2014 Jacques Rougerie Competition

Short List

with DESIGN EARTH Parterner: El Hadi Jazairy, Cheng Xing, Jia Weng, Shuqi He Date: Aug. 2014 My Role: Create the master plan for the site; Designed the neighborhood typology; Built site 3D model in Rhino; Rendered perspectives Climate change is no longer a distant possibility but an ominous reality. Global temperatures have recorded unprecedented increases. The frequency and severity of floods and cyclones accompanied by rising sea levels are increasing and exceeding all predictions. It has become a development, investment, economic, and social issue, which affects most sectors. The South Asia Region will bear the brunt of climate change impacts. SEA OUR LAND is a city for a changing world. It is a prototype urban structure that addresses physical and social needs in view of the growing challenges of climate change in a heavily urbanized South Asian context. It is a floating structure moored to a linear backbone of shelters on piles, a structure that adapts to the tidal changes and varying water levels, making it invulnerable to flooding, storms and sea level changes. It is designed to use renewable energy, harvest hydroponic vegetables and rainwater, and to encompass aquaculture. In order for the island population to develop a sense of ownership of this project, the idea would be to organize through local authorities an interactive dialogue with the island inhabitants of both genders. It is important for the viability of the project, beyond its technical features outlined above, that it is so developed as to be made fully responsive to the culture, traditions and way of life of the islanders. Floating power units, water tanks and food storage units will be riveted to this infrastructure. These structures will be the material mediators between nature and the community. They will provide a perpetual through-pass, a circulatory conduit for a material flux and reflux of people and goods. Discrete floating units such as housing communities will be constructed by people and moored to the backbone constituted by the linked refuges built on piles. Generic hexagonal barges will ensure a perfect resistance to ocean forces while allowing an easy assembly of the elements into an infrastructure. A light urban superstructure will be erected according to pre-defined types and modules.

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ten elevated fixed shelters

wave breaker hard protection floating barges

mangrove soft protection

bridge connection

floating barges for resources and houses

aquaculture wave breaker hard protection floating barges for resources

existing island totally flooded


WHOLE ISLAND

Step1: Programed Shelter

Step2: Neighborhood

Step3: Resources

SHELTER TYPOLOGIES

2. Hotel/Retail

3. Community Center

4. Hospital

5. School

6. Sports

7. Research

8. Logistic

9. Retail

10. Lighthouse

1. Ferry Teminal/Police

NEIGHBORHOOD TYPOLOGIES

Shelters along the linear backbone receive specific public programs. In case of storm, populations find refuge in these units.

Type B

Type C

Type D

Generic hexagonal barges create a perfect resistance to ocean forces while allowing an optimal urban organization. Type A

RESOURCE TYPOLOGIES

Agriculture

Energy

Fresh Water

Resources units allow the autonomy of the community. Their capacity is calculated for the daily requirements of the island current population (3500). Their design allow the usage of renewable energy, hydroponic vegetables and water harvesting, as well as aquaculture. Aquaculture

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SANTA CLAUS’ PLANETARY GARDEN

MASTER PLAN

Rautaruukki Corporation’ logistics center

Honorable Mention with DESIGN EARTH Parterner: El Hadi Jazairy, Kelly Koh Date: Nov. 2014 My Role: Participated the design of planetary garden; Rendered the master plan, site plan and cross sections

A costume doesn’t change a bad person into a good one. Santa Claus has decided to quit his job and trade his redand-white outts and expeditions around the world selling hyper-sugared carbonated refreshments for the costume and life of a planetary gardener. His logistic center for goods and toys will instead resemble a botanical garden dedicated to the collection, cultivation and distribution of plants from various climatic regions of the planet. Santa Claus will bring back from his adventures stories of plants: tropical plants with large leafs to capture light, trees with large fruits to attract animals, plants adapting to seasonal ooding, aromatic shrubs surviving in poor soils, cacti with defensive mechanism against thirsty animal. He will share his collection with the people of Finland and encourage them to come with their family and friends to discover the world in open-air and interior theatrical and musical performances. He will work with scientic and artistic units from the university to document, classify and display all plant varieties. Once a year, he will travel the world and oer plants to children hoping to create an awareness of the threat to ecosystems from human development. It is up to humans to organize their territory and life, to consume without defacing, produce without depleting, to live without destroying. The Santa Claus Planetary Garden tells the tale of a global gardener who acts in the name and the interest of the planet. The project proposes to shi the focus of the program from the logistic center to the botanic garden, rethinking the relation of humans to their environment. The Santa Claus Planetary Garden is a political project based on ecological humanism, emphasizing the diversity of species on the planet and the role of humans in it. lt reveals the delicate nature of the planetary biomass casting the fragility of life on Earth. The word garden comes from Germanic “Garten”, which signies enclosure. Historically the garden is the place to build the “best:” best fruits, best owers, best vegetables, best trees, better living conditions, better thoughts .The Santa Claus Planetary Garden is the place for the collection of all varieties of plants and stories produced by geographies and cultures.

CONCEPT

‘’Together, let us assume that the Earth is one small garden.” This statement by the Landscape Architect Gilles Clement radically alters humans’ relationship to the environment. By encompassing in its vision the entire planet - a fragile, autonomous enclosure - the proposal calls for the utopia, of a world protecting its beauty, health and future. SITE PLAN

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ONE GARDEN FOR NINE CLIMATES

KALEIDOSCOPE OF BUILDING AND GARDENS


CROSS SECTION 1-1’

RECEPTION

LOBBY

TROPICAL RAINFOREST

SANTA’S POND

TEMPERATE RAINFOREST

LOUNGE

SAVANNA

DESERT

CROSS SECTION 2-2’

TROPICAL RAINFOREST

SAVANNA

DESERT

TEMPERATE RAINFOREST

SANTA’S POND

TROPICAL SEASONAL

SMALL OFFICE

LANDSCAPE OFFICE

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OCEAN METABOLISM Planetary Urbanism Competition, 2015 with DESIGN EARTH Parterner: El Hadi Jazairy, Larisa Ovalles, Christopher Reznich, Aaron Weller, Muneerah Alrabe, Shuqi He, Yu-Hsiang Lin Date: June. 2014 My Role: Create the master plan for the site; Designed the neighborhood typology; Built site 3D model in Rhino; Rendered perspectives

The ocean is the next great frontier, as countries race to claim resources made newly available through anthropogenic climate change (such as melting ice caps) or technological advances. The instrument of this territorial expansion is the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), an imaginary line drawn 200 nautical miles into the ocean from the edge of a political entity, traditionally defined as the limit of dry land. Since countries have some rights to the exploitation of their EEZ under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), they have a vested interest in expanding their EEZ to include these newly accessible or newly discovered resources. A case study is China, which is attempting to extend its territorial claim over the East China Sea by defining its land boundary not through what is dry, but rather by the extent of its continental shelf. What if the race for the deep ocean were made through the technical legality of the EEZ, where worthless territory is added to a nation-state only in order to extend the 200 mile offset that is the EEZ so that it encompasses desirable resources? What if technologies for island-building advanced to the point that it became impossible for observers to detect whether an island is existing or new, allowing countries to construct artificial archipelagos and claim they allow for an extension of the EEZ? The design of new island archipelagos would become important not because of the inherent qualities of the islands themselves, but because of their relationships to each other. An ideal “pioneer� archipelago would consist of minimally sized islands, secretly constructed, 400 nautical miles from one another, arranged strategically so that their 200 mile offsets encompass desired resources. What if those islands could move, replicate, breed? Island-building as manifest destiny.

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900 Memorial Drive, 11 Peabody Terrace #706 Cambridge, MA-02138 clu2@gsd.harvard.edu 734-834-3193


Chen Lu_Portfolio_2016 Fall