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Monrovia Style: Presents THE BOUNDARY BREAKER Mark Rios, Landscape Architect" and Architect. Mark crosses the lines between open and enclosed spaces, natural and geometric, hard and soft, using plant material to create i emorabie modem spaces.

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■ Garden Design/ASLA Residential Awards As co-sponsors along with the American Society of Landscape Archi­ tects, we're proud to present the winners in the residential design cat­ egory of ASLA's 2006 Professional Awards. From a cozy shoebox-sized modern gem in Venice, California, to an elegant and expansive estate in Greenwich, Connecticut, these eight gardens represent the best of America's contemporary design—smart, sustainable, inspiring. THE W I N N E R S 54 Painterly Desert Gem 64 Beach-Side Beauty 66 Greenwich Elegance 76 Japan in Texas 78 Serene Mini-Terrace

On the Cover A trim pool fits neatly beside a Venice, Califor­ nia, garden designed by Marmol Radziner and Associates (see page 80). Photo by Steve Gunther.

4

OCT/NOV2006

80 Venice Tight Squeeze 88 It's a Passage 90 Tables of Water


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contents Departments 10 ASLA Letter 13 D i r t America's first landscaped cem­ etery. L.A.'s latest garden boutique. Fashion that grows on you. A prize-winning green park. Cozy fire pits. Festive floral design. Bulbs in Battery Park. And much more.

28 Growing Bark does more than sustain tree life. It's also an artful garden element.

36 Decor Outdoor lighting, berried branches and a cloak of snow turn a garden into a magical holiday place.

40 Style Garden benches, containers, art and other products that truly rock.

44 Abroad Wall-to-wall tropical foliage and flowers make Puerto Rico a mecca for the garden-minded visitor.

48 Groundbreaker Among his legacies, surrealist/ socialite I Iarvev Ladew left us a beautiful yellow-themed garden and elegant, jaw-dropping topiary.

92 Sage Advice Hort Q&A by Jack Ruttle. Attracting birds, butterflies and other critters. A Charleston garden combines mod­ ern Italy with the Old South.

112 Details Two French designers unveil a series of garden spaces that bring together wildness and subtle order. ■ For more, check out

www.gardendesign.com P O S T A L I N F O R M A T I O N Gorden Design, Number H I (ISSN 0733-4923). Published 7 times per year (January/February, March, April, May, June/|uly, September/October, November) by W o r l d Publications. LLC, P.O. Box 8500. Winter Park, FL 32790. ©Copyright 2006, all rights reserved. The contents of this publication may not be reproduced In whole o r In part without consent of the copyright owner. Periodicals postage paid at Winter Park. FL. and additional mailing offices. SUBSCRIPTIONS: U.S.: $23.95 for one year, $39.95 for 2 years. Canadian subscribers add $6.00 per year, foreign subscribers add $12.00 per year. For subscription information, please call 800/513-0848. P O S T M A S T E R : Send address changes to garden design. P.O. Box 421145, Palm Coast. FL 32142-1145. For faster service, please enclose your current subscription label. Occasionally, we make portions of our subscriber list available l o carefully screened companies that offer products and services we think may be of interest to you. If you do not want to receive these offers, please advise us at I -800-513-0848. EDITORIAL: Send correspondence to Editorial Depart­ ment, garden design, P.O. Box 8500, Winter Park, FL 32790: E-mail: gardendesign@worldpub.net. We welcome all editorial submissions, but assume no responsibility for the loss or damage of unsolicited material. ADVERTISING: Send advertising materials to RRDonnelleyS Sons Company, Lancaster Premedla Center. A t t n : Garden Design Ad Management Module, 216 Greenfield Road, Lancaster. PA 17601. Phone: 717-481 -2851. Retail sales discouncs available: contact Circulation Department. Following are trademarks of garden design and W o r l d Publications, Inc., and their use by others is strictly prohibited: The Golden Trowel Awards: Dirt: Growing: Style: Sage Advice; Details.

() O C T / N O V

2 0 0 6


Luxury you can grow.

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ESTATE GARDENS BY VALLtYCBBST

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from the editor

<VW>,EJ\l EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Bill Marken EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joanna F o r t n a m CREATIVE DIRECTOR M i c h a e l Bcssirc ART DIRECTOR Eric Powell STYLE EDITOR Donna Dorian MANAGING EDITOR Jenny A n d r e w s DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY Larry Xighswander

And the winners are... WHAT A PRIVILEGE IT HAS BEEN TO PREPARE THIS SPECIAL ISSUE FEATURING THE WIN-

ners of the Residential Design category in the American Society of Land­ scape Architects 2006 Professional Awards. Thanks to our partnership with ASLA and Landscape.Architecture magazine, we have the chance to share some of America's most groundbreaking, idea-rich gardens with you. Garden Design has been co-sponsoring the residential portion of ASLA's esteemed awards for the past two years, and we're happv to note that the number of entries has increased since our involvement. As you'll see begin­ ning on page 53, we devote 35 pages, more than ever, to the eight winning gardens. (Of course, this issue also contains all the usual good stuff—Grow­ ing, Decor, Anatomy Lesson, Landscape Solutions and much more.) We want to make our coverage of the winning gardens as useful and in­ spirational as possible to all our readers—including backyard and armchair designers. Please take advantage of the design plans and tips from the landscape architects ("Make the house and garden seem as one— matching their lines and styles") that you can apply at home. You may not have the space for the whole four-acre Stephen Stimson design (page 66), but feel free to steal his fountain idea or the bor­ der of Russian sage and grasses. It has also been a privilege to work so closely with so manv tal­ A w a r d s jury, left t o right (all are landscape architects ented landscape architects. The except as noted): Andrea C o c h r a n , editor Bill Marken, annual judging of the winners is Rodney Swink, Todd Johnson, Janet Rosenberg, critic like a crash course in landscape David Dillon, Malcolm Cairns, landscape historian Eliza­ architecture. At the jury session beth Barlow Rogers, Pamela B u r t o n , preservationist in Washington, D C , I couldn't Karen Jessup, Paul R o o k w o o d , Kenneth Brooks. help but think, "Where else on a Saturday morning would I be a part (a rather silent part, I should note) of a discussion of Vitruvius' principles of architecture—instead of the usual weekend discussions around my house involving cartoons and football?" I'm always impressed with the jury's dedication and with how seri­ ous they are about design that is sustainable, appropriate for the site and the owners, and compelling. Not all is highbrow, though. You also hear plenty of down-home observations about gardens, like "Texas vernacu­ lar gone nuts" and "Well done but an Italianate throwback." See what you think of the winning gardens, and let us know—es­ pecially about ideas that you can put into action around your garden some Saturday morning.—BILL MARKEN, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 8

OCT/NOV2006

PHOTO EDITOR Jason U p r i g h t COPY EDITOR Malthew Miller ONLINE EDITOR'WEB PRODUCER Brent Schmierbach SENIOR ADVISER Ken Druse HORTICULTURAL CONSULTANT Jack R l i t t l e CONSULTING EDITORS Charles B i r n b a u m , Dr. M a r c Cathey, R u t h Chivers, James D a v i d , Dick D t m m i r e , A m y G o l d m a n , R i c h a r d Hartlagc, Christy H o b a r l , AdamLevinc, Michael MacCaskcy, D e b o r a h M a d i s o n , David M c M u l l i n , Dcnisc O l i s , Diane Dorrans Sacks, I v e l t c Solcr, A l t * T i n g l e , Emily Y o u n g , David W i n s t o n

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W RLD PUBLICATIONS PRESIDENT Tcrrv Snow DIRECTOR OF CORPORATE SALES RussChcraini ADVERTISING CONSULTANT M a r t i n S.Walker VICE PRESIDENT, CONSUMER MARKETING Bruce M i l l e r BUSINESS DIRECTOR. CONSUMER MARKETING Dean Rsarakis SUBSCRIPTION DIRECTOR. CONSUMER MARKETING Leigh B i n g h a m SINGLE COPY SALES DIRECTOR VickiWcston DIRECTOR OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT. CONSUMER MARKETING Peter W i n n DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION OPERATIONS Lisa E a r l v w i n e DIRECTOR OF NEW MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES Jay Evans DIRECTOR OF NETWORK « COMPUTER OPERATIONS

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WORKING WITH RUSIDENTIAL CLIENTS IS AMONG THE MOST SATISFYING AND PER-

sonal design experiences for landscape architects, so it is particularly re­ warding for Landscape Architecture magazine to partner with Garden Design in presenting the 2006 ASLA/Garden Design award-winning projects. Three years ago, the American Society of Landscape Architects in­ vited Garden Design editor-in-chief Bill Marken to serve on its profes­ sional awards jury. At that time, residential projects were juried among literally hundreds of commercial, institutional, public and other types of projects. At most, only one or two residential projects—if any—would receive awards each year, despite the fact that residential design is the largest market for landscape architecture services, constituting 40 per­ cent of billable hours for private-sector firms. Bill astutely observed that residential design was quite different from other types of design in scope, scale and budget and that many amazing resi­ dential projects were probably not being recognized each year because they were getting lost in the crowd. His colleagues on the jury agreed, noting that residential design is the richest area of practice with regard to innova­ tion—spawning and testing new ideas that will become standards for the next generation of landscape architects. The planets were aligned and the very next year, ASLA partnered with Garden Design to establish a new Residential Design category within its professional awards program. Landscape architects took notice and in just two short years, it has become the third largest of ASLA's six professional awards categories. Garden Design magazine has long been a strong advocate and loyal friend of the landscape architecture profession. Much of the success of the new awards program is due to Garden Designs distinguished reputation for show­ casing landscape architects' best residential work. I have no doubt that this program will continue to grow, improve and delight us in the years to come. — B I L L T H O M P S O N , FASLA, E D I T O R . LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

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M O U N T A U B U R N CEMETERY

left to right: 19thcentury headstone sur­ rounded by Scilla sibirica; John Murray Monument under the golden glow of a sugar maple in fall. Below: Rhododendron.

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Living Legacy America's first landscaped cemetery is livelier than you'd think. It's packed with fascinating history and plants TRY TO PICTURL WHAT CLMUTliRILS WLRL LIKli A

couple hundred years ago—maybe you bet­ ter not.The standard practice in Europe and the United States was interment in church­ yard burial grounds, and by the late 1700s these places had reached a critical level of overcrowding, with bodies even stacked atop one another. In an effort to ease this appalling situation, and as an extension of the popular "picturesque" style of landscape design, the rural or garden cemetery move­ ment began, in which large park-like set­ tings were designed as non-denominational burial sites. Pere Lachaise, founded in 1804 near Paris, became the model. Mount Auburn Cemeterv, outside Bos­ ton, was the first of its kind in the United States, founded bv the Massachusetts Hor­

ticultural Society in 1831, setting the standard across the country. Early visi­ tors flocked to Mount Auburn, not just to honor the dead but to stroll, picnic and socialize, a need met today bv places like Central Park in New York City. And the comparison is not coincidental—garden cemeteries inspired landscape architects of the day and sparked the Urban Parks Movement beginning in the 1850s. Now a National I Iistoric Landmark cel­ ebrating its 175th year, Mount Auburn is as much arboretum or botanical garden as cemetery, a goal at its inception that was reinforced in a 1993 master plan, initialed by cemeterv president William C. Clendaniel. Its 175 acres are graced by some 5,000 trees representing 630 species (including GARDEN

DESIGN

13


dirt 50 Massachusetts state champions), shrubs and groundcovers, all of which are being catalogued, mapped and labeled, includ­ ing the cemetery's signature (and massive) beeches, oaks and sugar maples. Proximity to Arnold Arboretum has likely contributed to the line collection ol plant material. Mount Auburn is an outdoor museum, and a walk through its grounds is a walk through the history ol cemetery styles, di­ vided into "character zones" that reflect the decades thev were built—from woodlands to ornate Victorian to simple lawns. Primar­ ily designed in-house, the gardens have also had contributions from landscape designers like Julie Moir Messervy, Reed Hilderbrand and the Halverson Design Partnership. And visitors arc still coming—an esti­ mated 200,000 a year. Picnicking is no lon­ ger allowed, but bird-watching has become a popular pastime at the cem­ etery, which prides itself on being a wildlife habitat. And there are a variety ol guided tours, of plants, sculptures and famous people, including Dor-

shopping

TAKE TWO Fondly k n o w n as the "garden tarts," Mary Gray and Annette Gutierrez, a set decorator and a screenwriter, joined forces after meeting on a film set 18 years ago.Their shop, Pot-ted, in the groovy area of Los Feliz in Los Angeles, reflects their passion for decorating outdoors. "For Mary it was a natural extension of w h a t she did as a set decorator," explains A n nette,"and for me it was a form of procrastina­ tion f o r when I didn't want t o be writing." The pair offers a range of distinctive tiled pavers and tables that evolved o u t of "die junkie" Annette's experiments."lt all started w i t h my fig tree. I always hated how barren the space under the tree looked when it had no leaves. Mary and I got the idea t o d o a patio under it w i t h really cool tiled pavers. But w e couldn't find any—so w e decided to make them ourselves. Eventually w e came up w i t h something w e really liked." The store followed almost by accident. Once full of plaster Davids and clamshell foun­ tains, the roadside space captivated the pair, and

fyi

For more information, call 617-547-

7105, see mountauburn.org, or look for the book Silent Gty on a Hill: Picturesque Land­ scapes of Memory and Boston's Mount Auburn Cemetery by Blanche M.G. Linden (Univer­ sity of Massachusetts Press, spring 2007).

they reinvented it as a gallery f o r things they

othea Dix, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Henry Cabot Lodge, Bernard Malamud, Winslow Homer and R. Buckminster Fuller. Still an active cemetery, Mount Auburn is using non-traditional concepts as it goes forward, creating spaces and structures that preserve and enhance the existing landscape, while paying tribute to those buried there. According to vice president of operations and horticulture David Barnetl, Mount Au­ burn embodies "history and the future at the same time."—J E N N Y A N D R E W S

liked."Our vision was Smith & Hawken meets Anthropologie. It was a store, as far as w e knew, that didn't exist," says Annette. Customers appreciate the handpicked selec­ tion of pots, iron spheres, unique tiled tables and pavers, chairs and fountains and refurbished vintage furniture (typically one-of-a-kind). "Everyone seems t o want a fountain," says Annette. " A n d again and again people come in t o 'get ideas.' It's really flattering."—jF

■ Pot-ted: 3158 Los Feliz Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90039. Call 323-665-3801

14 O C T / N O V

2006

or visit pot-ted.com.


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FLORAL TRINITY IN RECENT YEARS, AMARYLLIS HAS BECOME THE

shining star of the holiday season. With all the new delicately colored varieties avail­ able for forcing, there is even more rea­ son to keep an open mind to its possibili­ ties in holiday decorating. Using it as a cut flower, Hiroko Takeshita who has just opened Ilanaya Floral Design in Cam­ bridge, Massachusetts—has combined it with samplings of what the winter garden has to offer. Combining it with winterberry, hypericum, holly leaves, edgeworthia (or, if it's easier, white birch twigs), apples (held in place bv chopsticks) and cranberries, she exploits its architectural grace and builds a tower of flowers, fruits, berries and branches that is as lush as it is minimal.—DONNA

DORIAN

■ l:or more information on Hanaya Moral Design, call 617-547-1770 or see hanajafloral.com.


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WILSON LEMON I'll admit I'm not a huge fan of citrus as ornamental plants: Most can be big and gawky; some are wickedly t h o r n y ; and they must be schlepped in and o u t o f w i n t e r storage here in N e w Jersey. O f course the scent o f their blossoms sends me t o olfactory nirvana, and I enjoy the fruit. Normally, they are large but not-so-showy players in the garden scene. fyi

For Royal Oak

Seeds for Thought lectures, call 800913-6565x201 or e-mail lectures^

N o t so the W i l s o n lemon (Citrus ichangensis). Small, barely thorny and contained in an easily moved p o t , it's the one citrus t o have if you have only one. Large numbers of scented flowers p o r t e n d an abundant c r o p of medium-sized, bright yellow f r u i t that causes

royal-oak.org. For

the branches t o arch. W h e n perfectly ripe, the

lectures

G r e a t Dixter, see

fruits "are like water balloons:The sweet juice

Seeds for Thought

greatdixter.co.uk.

comes gushin' outta them," in the evoca­

THIS OCTOBKR FHRGUS GARRKIT, HKAD GAR-

clcner at Great Dixter in England, who worked alongside the legendary Christo­ pher Lloyd for 1 3 years before Lloyd's death last January, is the Royal Oak's featured speaker for their annual Seeds for Thought lecture scries in Los Angeles, Chicago and New York (October 22, 25 and 30). Garrett traces the creative evolution of Great Dixter from its roots in die Edward­ ian era of Lloyd's parents and their associa­ tion with Edwin Lulyens and William Rob­ inson to its present-day status as a mecca for adventurous gardeners: "Christo brought zest and excitement to gardening. Brilliant

plant combinations were his forte," Garrett explains. Lloyd traveled all over the States and found many kindred spirits who shared his iconoclastic, high-energy style: Ruth Bancroft in California, Dan Hinklcy at Hcronswood, Marco Polo Stufano at Wave Hill, Dan Benarcik at Chanticleer, and Wayne Winterrowd and Joe Eck at North Hill. Lloyd could be ornery about Great Dix­ ter—"I've done my bit, I don't care what happens to it now," he once said grumpily— but he did later reveal, at least to Garrett, that he cared greatly. A charitable trust is now raising the necessary 2 million pounds to guarantee the future of the garden.—JF

tive (and c o r r e c t ) w o r d s o f Ken Selody, w h o showcases and propagates the W i l s o n lemon at A t l o c k Farm in central N e w Jersey. Given well-drained, moist soil or potting m i x in the garden o r in a r o o m y p o t in full sun, a foot-high cutting will become a 3- t o 4 - f o o t specimen in a couple o f years (up t o 15 feet in time).You can g r o w it as a shrub, o r gradually remove the side branches and prune the top f o r a handsome topiary. Provide a balanced fertilizer during the growing season, and a shot of chelated iron if the foliage be­ gins t o yellow.Watch f o r mealybugs and scale insects. Outside of areas w h e r e it can g r o w o u t d o o r s year-round ( Z o n e 8 and w a r m e r ) , keep y o u r plant happy during cold weather in a greenhouse, sun porch, conservatory or very bright w i n d o w . Enjoy it during frost-free weather o u t d o o r s as a specimen in a garden bed o r on a patio. A n d every n o w and then

exhibits

Bronze Age y-vge

squeeze one of those balloons into y o u r favorite drink. Like figures discovered in an

ancient temple, wich plants still clinging t o cracks and crevices, the sculptures of Living Bronze combine the spiritual with the organic. O n display through January 22 at Denver Botanic Garden, 26 pieces by sculptor Robert W i c k reflect transcen­ dent themes from a variety of traditions—two Buddha-like forms balance head-to-head (Balance I, Still Figure, at left); a walking man combines Egyptian and pre-Columbian imagery; Johnny Appleseed morphs into a Shiva.The tallest piece is 18 feet, the longest 11 feet-AII of them sport plants native t o the Denver region tucked into niches and fissures. It is a traveling exhibit, and at each location plants particular t o the area have been used, connecting art and nature. For more information, call 720-865-3500 o r visit botanicgardens.org.—JA

18 O C T / N O V

2006

RAY ROGERS


When Robert

Mondavi founded Woodbridge Winery twenty-five years ago, he knew great

grapes don't grow all by themselves. You need the right land, the perfect climate, and a whole lot of love, That's whv we care for our vineyards with small winerv techniques, and vou can taste

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it in our crisp, delicious Chardonnay. (As you can tell, 1 get a little wrapped up in my work.)

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dirt A T R I O FIRE

BASKET

From German-based Blomus comes the A t r i o O u t d o o r Fire Basket, designed by Fried Ulber. Crafted of stainless steel, this space-age w o o d - b u r n i n g fire pit stands just 12 inches tall and 21 inches wide. From Living C o m f o r t s : $609.90. See livingcomforts.com. CONMOTO Designed by Carsten Gollnick for C o n m o t o in Germany, this cute contemporary stainlesssteel fire pit is only I 1.5 inches high and 27 inches wide, with a 15-inch pit. From Designstore .com: $720. Call 303-333-0067 or see designstore.com. DESERT

SUNSET

A handsome 30- to 32-inchsquare, 16-inch-tall fire pit made of red, b r o w n and orange slate on a frame of galvanized steel and aluminum. Uses gas and a steel, doublering burner. From Fire Science outdoor

living

Inc.: $1,799. Call 716-5682224 or see fire-science.com.

FIRED UP

Cozy, primal, mesmerizing fire-â&#x20AC;&#x201D;-stylish, mobile new Tire pits aad warmth and charm even to small spaces

ORE Made of Cor-Ten steel, the Q r a t e r campfire dish develops a protective layer of rust that adds an attractive weatherresistant finish. Large enough (over 57 inches across and over 9 inches tall) for sev­ eral guests t o sit around, the Q r a t e r has optional skewer and grill attachments t o add t o the fun. From Extremis: $ 1,950. Visit extremis.be t o find dealer locations in the United States.

20 OCT/NOV 2 0 0 6


here are places you w a n t to go. to leave.

"Hi

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Creote the backyard of your dreams with the help of Sundance Spas. Sculpted for comfort. Designed for the

Sundance Spas

ultimate in nydrotherapy. Engineered to last, visit our website to request a brochure or to locate a dealer near you.

www.sundancespas.com or call 800.899.7727


environment

Taking the LEED UNITED

park is supplied entirely by renewable pow­

States has been awarded LEED certification for e n v i r o n m e n t a l sustainability, achieving a Silver rating from t h e U . S . G r e e n Build­ ing C o u n c i l , based in W a s h i n g t o n , D . C .

er, and even the paint, w o o d and c a r p e t arc

Designed by Koning Eizcnbcrg Archi­ t e c t u r e of Santa Monica and Spurlock Poiricr Landscape Architects of San Diego, Virginia Avenue Park in Santa Monica, California, was redesigned and expanded t o create a 9.5-acrc facility that is both carthand community-friendly. T h e park utilizes such sustainable features as a system t o cap­ ture and use rainwater, construction w a s t e recy­ cling, efficient irrigation

a strip mall was designated for part of the

F O R THK FIRST TIMK, A PARK IN THK

ecology

Agricouture In the June/July issue of Garden Design we ex­ plored a range of ecology-conscious concepts, but the more we looked, the more we found. And we discovered that sustainability is more than smart; it's fashionable. Imagine a haute couture dress made from corn or bamboo, with sequins made from recycled soda cans. Last year's watershed FutureFashion show, the brainchild of Earth Pledge, a nonprofit or­ ganization dedicated to promoting sustainable living, combined the hottest fashion designers with eco-friendly fabrics. Luminaries like Oscar de la Renta, Diane von Furstenberg, Halston (who designed the dress above) and Karen Walker, and younger labels like Derek Lam and Heatherette sent a full range of attire down the catwalk, from couture to sportswear, using materials like organic cotton, wool and hempsilk, corn and bamboo fibers, and recycled polyester. More FutureFashion shows are planned for next year on the East Coast,West Coast and in Europe, and a materials resource book targeted to fashion and home-furnishings designers is set for publication in 2007. Though designers like Los Angeles-based Linda Loudermilk are producing what she calls "luxury eco" and high-end stores like Barneys and Saks have taken the plunge into sustainable clothing, Nike.Whole Foods, Pacagonia.Timberland and Wal-Mart have also entered the arena. It might take a little effort to find, but ecofashion is entering the mainstream.And you don't have to sacrifice style for conscience. For more information visit earthpledge.org.—JA

22 OCT/NOV

2006

and cicctricitv, droughttolerant plantings, natu­ ral ventilation, and four recharging stations for alternative-fuel vehicles. T h e energy used by the

sans volatile c o m p o u n d s o r formaldehyde. T h e local c o m m u n i t y was an integral p a r t of the process. Prior to park planning, site, b u t the neighborhood opposed it. In­ stead locals can n o w enjoy a weekly Pico F a r m e r s ' Market, a water-play area called the Beach Blanket, n e w playgrounds, g r e e n spaces for sports and picnics, Wi-Fi Inter­ net access throughout the park, c o m p u t e r labs, fitness gyms, a r e c o r d i n g studio, and a r a n g e of courses and activi­ ties. T h e initial idea t o put a n e w face o n this 30-plus-ycarold park began I 5 years ago, t h e delay enabling

planners

t o acquire adjacent pieces of property.

Completed

after

t w o years of c o n s t r u c t i o n , the park r e o p e n e d in N o v e m b e r 2 0 0 5 . And the n e i g h b o r s have ©

b e e n j u m p i n g (and r u n n i n g , splashing and picnicking) for


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animal art architectural details garden elements gates firescreens Dirdbaths

design

CLEAR CHOICE

For more informa­ tion, call 800783-8236 or see steuben.com.

Making the invisible forces of nature visible, glass artist Jeff Zimmerman has created a collection of works enti­ tled Soft Explosion for the renowned company of Steuben Glass. Ingeniously elegant yet organic, seedpods perch on

welded JabrictUed bronze & stiihiUfs steel ?' h /fish - 20'' w bom width 6' 6"

spiny legs and tree trunks and flowing water come alive as light moves through the hand-polished surfaces.Two bowls, Splish and Splash, evoke the landmark photograph

SCULPTOR

of a splattering milk droplet, frozen in the light of an electronic flash, taken by Harold Edgerton in the 1950s. Zimmerman's first works in lead crystal, Soft Explosion

36Q 871 7635 I ditarando@aol.com www.ditarando.com

includes six designs and an ongoing series of one-of-a-kind pieces. Prices range from $1,900 to $21,000. —J A


places

Battery Recharger IF jACQUKLINli VAN DliR KLOLT HAS HER WAY,

bulbs will no longer be held hostage by rib­ bon borders or mass plantings. One of Hol­ land's foremost landscape designers, Jac­ queline has devoted much study and time to integrating daffodils, tulips and other bulbs seemlessly into perennial gardens.

ture Impressionist and naturalistic drifts of grasses, natives and loliage plants (known as the New Wave approach) have lit a fire on the doorstep of design. Supplying consid­ erable crates of tuberous goods was Frans Roozen, technical director of the Interna­ tional Flower Bulb Centre. Also on hand was a crew of volunteers from the Battery Conservancy, each scurrying to beat the squirrels and bury the bulbs.

So that's why Jacqueline happened to be in New York City's Battery Park one un­ seasonably cold October day when 70,000 Dutch bulbs were tucked into the Batterv Together, they hatched a plan i that added Bosque. By her side, trowel in bulbs simpalico with the hand, was the mastermind of setting and offered New Battery Park bulbs the overall design, Piet Oudolf, Yorkers plenty of eye can­ amidst emerging the internationally famed land­ dy. Enhancing the hues of perennials, top scape designer and author from emerging foliage, the bulbs t o bottom:'Lilac llu- Netherlands, whose signa are meant to ratchet up the W o n d e r ' tulip;'Blue volume while the perenni­ Festival' hyacinths als and grasses are break­ and 'Jenny' daffodils. ing ground, then discreedy disappear amidst the latespring and summer display—a ploy in keep­ ing with the Oudolf philosophy that plants should live well and die back with interest. The experiment made a great showing, \ despite the appetite of New York squir­ rels. Framing the Statue of Liberty and near the site where the World Trade Cen­ ter once stood, the Battery seemed the perfect venue to introduce a brave new bulb c o n c e p t . — T O V A H M A R T I N


dirt

floral

design

New From Nico W E PROFILED BELGIAN FLORAL DESIGNER NICO De Swert, AND HIS HIP YET

classical style, in our May 2006 issue ("Belgian Wow"). Now six of his arrangements are available through 1-800-FLOWERS, three to be released in the fall of 2006 and three for the holidav season, with more to come next year. Nico is the latest to join the lineup of noted floral arrangers as part of the Expert Floral Designer Collection for 1 -800-FLOWERS. Other participating designers include Jane Pack足 er, Preston Bailey, Jane Carroll and Julie Mulligan. Because contain足 ers are very important to Nico, he has designed those as well, five made of durable resin and one of tin with a faux-leather finish. The containers can be filled with flowers over and over again, though they're pretty enough to stand on their own. Prices range from $ 105 to $ 160. For more information, see 1800flowers.com. j A 26 OCT/NOV

2006


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H. POTTER Distinctive Home and Garden Accents

Showrooms: ATLANTA

CHICAGO

NEW YORK

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The Art of Bark Look to the ornamental qualities of bark for a surprising wealth of four-season texture and color MUCH MORE THAN THE SCHEMATICS OF ITS LAYERS IN A FRESHMAN BIOLOGY BOOK, BARK IS THE ARMOR,

the life support and the face of a tree, indelibly etched with its years of bounty and hardship. Each species has its own unique bark pattern, often distinctive enough to serve as a means of identification. It can be red, green, gray, white, orange or striped; thorny, smooth, rough or deeply furrowed; or it can peel away to create a multicolored tapestry. Seen close up and in isolation from the rest of the plant, bark invites comparison to abstract art. As a design element in the garden, bark is the last frontier, interesting in the winter certainlv, but also a bonus of texture and pattern all year that enhances foliage and flowers.

JENNY ANDREWS

Appeal: Bark can add color and texture to a landscape throughout the growing season and will con足 tinue to create visual interest even into the depths of winter. Zones: Refer to individual plant descriptions for hardiness zones. Exposure: When planting a new tree or shrub for a bark display, avoid a hot western exposure. Tender bark can be damaged in late winter when it is subjected to fluctuations of hot and cold, freezing and thawing. Several of the plants shown here are understory trees that need light shade. Others, like the eastern red cedar and dogwood, can take part shade to full sun. Soil: Bald cypress and sycamore are often found near water in their native habitats, though they do not require a wet site to thrive. The other plants here are satisfied with adequate moisture and good drainage. Current thinking is not to amend soil at planting time, using native soil to backfill the hole. Dig the hole only as deep as the root ball and two to three times as wide. 28 OCT/NOV

2006


PLATANUS DENTALS

OCCI足 (SYCA足

M O R E ) A striking tree often seen along streams. Bark is grayish b r o w n and scaly at the base; f u r t h e r up the t r u n k it breaks off in irregular plates, revealing a creamy w h i t e , m o t t l e d layer beneath. A macro view brings t o mind aerial images of cropland. Zones 5-9.


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50 O C T / N O V 2 0 0 6

CHERRY)

A common wild tree in the eastern United States with white spring flowers and wine-worthy red fruits changing to black in late summer and early fall. Dark, flaky bark has been likened to burnt potato chips. Zones 3-9.


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F U R N I T U R E

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[ l ] CORNUS DA

FLORI­

(DOGWOOD)

A

small tree popular f o r its large, w h i t e spring flowers and purplish red fall color, the d o g w o o d also has unusual bark w i t h small blocky plates. In w i n t e r the tree's t e x t u r e and graceful silhouette are most visible. Zones 5-9. [ 2 ] ACER SPICUUM NIX'

X

CON'PHOE­

(SNAKE

BARK

M A P L E ) O n e of the very best small trees ( t o 15 feet) for bark c o l o r in the winter.The pink­ ish summer tones t u r n t o brilliant orange-red striped w i t h w h i t e as the season wanes. Bright yellow autumn leaves tend t o fall early, revealing the treasure beneath. Needs light shade and good drainage. Zones 5-8.

[ 3 ] HALES RAPTERA NA

IA

TET-

(CAROLI­

SILVERBELL)

A beautiful, small native tree, best suited f o r shady locations w i t h acidic soil. W h i t e , pendulous flowers emerge in A p r i l and May. From youth t o maturity, bark changes f r o m light gray w i t h dark fissures t o dark gray o r b r o w n w i t h scaly plates. Zones 5-9. [ 4 ] CARYA

OVATA

(SHAGBARK

HICK­

O R Y ) O n e o f the most distinctive barks f o r large shade trees. Strips pull

52 O C T / N O V 2 0 0 6

C a r e : To keep a tree and its bark

tree.This holds t o o much moisture

away f r o m the t r u n k at

healthy, mind the weed-eaters

near the t r u n k and can encourage

t o p and b o t t o m , staying

and m o w e r s . Gashes and cuts are

diseases, bark-chewing insects and

attached in the middle t o

unsightly and can serve as an e n t r y

rodents t o make themselves at

create a shaggy appear­

p o i n t f o r pests.And completely

h o m e . T h e r e is usually no need t o

ance.Tree usually reaches

girdling a tree is certain death. O n e

fertilize trees, except at planting

60 t o 80 feet but can

solution is t o create a bed around

time t o give them a head s t a r t . W a ­

g r o w much taller. Native

the tree o r p u t d o w n a mulch ring

t e r new trees once o r t w i c e a week

t o the eastern half o f the

3 t o 4 inches deep. But don't pile

f o r the first couple of summers

U n i t e d States. Zones 4-8.

the mulch up on the base of the

unless there is plenty of rainfall.


66

THE BEST AZALEA IVE EVER PLANTED!"

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\ IUNIPERUS

VlftGIN-

IANA ( E A S T E R N RED C E D A R ) Conifer native to the eastern and central United States that thrives in limestone soils. Mature trees can be 50 feet tall and have great presence, but with a delicacy in their swags of evergreen foliage, small blue summertime fruits, and silvery gray and brown bark. Zones 3-9.

d e s i g n i n g w i t h b a r k ■ Use trees w i t h i n t e r e s t i n g bark as specimens, w h e t h e r smaller trees like paperbark m a p l e , dogwood and s t e w a r t i a , or large ones like beech. ■ L i m b up trees w i t h good bark t o reveal m o r e of t h e t r u n k s . ■ Plant in f r o n t of a hard surface w i t h a c o n t r a s t i n g color or t e x t u r e ( p i c t u r e the red stems of snake bark maple against gray stone or w h i t e f e n c i n g ) . T h i s w i l l also make the tree's s i l h o u e t t e easier t o see in w i n t e r . ■ U n d e r - p l a n t w i t h l o w - g r o w i n g groundcovers so the t r u n k is not obscured and to provide p r o t e c t i o n f r o m overzealous m a i n t e n a n c e . ■ R e p e t i t i o n can e x p o n e n t i a l l y increase t h e display value of handsome bark, as w i t h a row of crape m y r t l e s or a g r o u p i n g of bald cypress.


THINK R O S E S ARE TOO F U S S Y ?

Think Again!

Visit our website at www.honie-run-rose.w


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C R E A T I V E IDEAS I N E X T E R I O R

DECORATING

White Magic Dramatic garden lighting combined with evergreens and a fresh fall of snow says "party season"

DURING THE HOLIDAY SEASON, WHEN FRIENDS,

family and neighbors are visiting, the ex­ terior approach to your house is as much on show as the inside. For the garden this is the worst possible time to be judged— in northern climates the lawns and bor­ ders are either looking bare and desolate or are obliterated under snow.

a focal point fro.

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house and a table fit for an ice queen. Icicle lights

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are held in place under the glass table top.A bird

--— -

cage hangs from the tree, draped with lights, and net lights cover the yew.

56 O C T / N O V 2 0 0 6

To counteract the dullness of the land­ scape, winter lights have become a compet­ itive tradition in many parts of the country, with light-up Santas and a full team of rein­ deer galloping across front lawns and wav­ ing from chimneys. But in the historic New England town of Woodbury, Connecticut, shown on these pages, such an exuberant approach is, shall we say, discouraged. \ e \ e i t h e l e s s , even here it is possible to make a festive, magical garden display that is also low-kev and sophisticated—more Narnia than Downtown Disney. Stylists Karin Lidbeck Brent and Elizabeth Burdick used cut evergreens, ordinary string lights


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Top left: Table made from old shop dis­ play items and luminarias.

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page: Red dogwood is, berries and everns fill empty planters; reath on a table is filled with mercury balls and circled with lights.

GARDEN

DESIGN

37


decor /

'H

T h e path t o the ga d o o r gets a touch o magic—Christmas t in stands are decora w i t h lights and wind| o u t d o o r candles line way. Far right:A mirr tree o r n a m e n t . Belo r i g h t G l o b e lights an spruce stems fill a te cotta w i n d o w trougl

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and outdoor candles to transform the ter­ race of Elizabeth's Woodburv home. F U N C T I O N : In summer the red brick garden terrace formed by two sides of the house is a pleasant sitting area with a view of the whole garden. It incorporates a border, pond and seating—but in winter all these features vanish under a blanket of snow. FORM:The path around the house leads through the terrace and like an arrow to the back door. All Elizabeth's friends and neighbors use the garden door rather than the more imposing front door off the street, and in summer the journev is a pleasant tour under trees and around flowering shrubs and pots of annuals. In winter all this de­ tail is gone and the path takes on a "railroad" look from feet tramping through the snow, s T Y L E: A traditional New England holiday look. Evergreens, lights and Elizabeth's col­ lection of garden accessories and furniture were used in a low-tech yet sophisticated way to create a magical landscape of twin­ kling lights and sculptural forms. F U R N I T U R E : A veteran flea market col­ lector, Elizabeth leaves her vintage wroughtiron garden chairs and a glass-topped table out vear-round. Frost-proof terra-cotta troughs, urns and a wire bird cage, all used in summer for displays of annuals, lie empty in winter. By grouping together the furni­ ture and filling the containers with longlasting stems and evergreens, Elizabeth and Karin gave the terrace a pulled-together look. The lights and outdoor candles add­ S O U r c e s

For designer o u t d o o r

line lights see Via Motif: 4 1 5 - 4 5 4 - 8 8 4 2 ;

ed sparkle much appreciated by passing company for spreading the party spirit. P L A N T S : The sculpted shapes of ev­ ergreen yews and low boxwood hedges hold their form and give the terrace some "bones" once herbaceous plants have died back. These were used as a backdrop for lights, either spread with a twinkling net or set with vine balls of various sizes that make interesting shapes under snow. An avenue of cut Christmas trees was created for the approach to the garden door, all decorated with lights. Stems of red dogwood, winterberry and spruce filled urns along the path. B O N U S : A special welcome for guests that promises a great party and from inside the house, the terrace looks like a winter wonderland,

JOANNA

v i a m o t i f . c o m . For string, globe, n e t and icicle lights t r y W a l - M a r t , T a r g e t , Sears, Lowe's, H o m e D e p o t and o t h e r major stores. F o r W i n d f l a m e o u t d o o r candles, call 6 5 1 - 2 0 4 - 0 7 6 4 o r see w i n d f l a m e . c o m . For m i r r o r tree o r n a m e n t s , see seasonsof cannonfalls.com. For silver leaf o r n a m e n t s (seen o n t r e e left of d o o r ) , visit tideline gallery.com. For an u p d a t e d list o f garden accessories available f r o m Elizabeth Burdick's c o l l e c t i o n , call 2 0 3 - 2 6 3 - 0 0 3 6 o r e-mail ebcollection(5)aol.com.

FORTNAM

GARDEN DESIGN 39


BY D O N N A

DORIAN

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Writ in Stone ■Mi ■

A match for the snazziest of new industrial materials, stone, as tough as it is poetic, still serves a multitude of functions in the garden IT COULD Bli SAID THAT STONE POSKS A StRIliS OF PHILOSOPHICAL

questions: For millennia it remained the sole element able to withstand the ravages of time. The Japanese understood this as rocks evolved into seminal elements in their gardens, their permanence, solidity and improbability balanced against the transitory world of nature. So, too, did the Chinese, whose connoisseurs contemplated the aesthetic and spiritual quali­ ties of scholars' rocks as early as the 7th century. In the West sculptors carved them in search of their souls. Todav stone still poses the same timeless questions, and it continues to take us by surprise. Eating at a stone table, sitting in a stone chair, walking on stone pathways, we reenter our primal relationship with nature.

[ l ] B A L L BENCH: A true balancing

[2] FEMINA PLANTERS:

act, this bold contemporary British-

signed by noted Spanish architect/ designer Oscar Tusquets Blanca, this stunning red marble planter exemplifies how these days Spanish design can do no wrong.The planter and lid are separate, making plant maintenance and transfer quick and easy. From Urs Oeggerli Garden Ornaments: $2,500 to $3,250, de­ pending on size. Call 214-219-7887 or visit uogardenornaments.com.

made French limestone bench was designed by the celebrated British landscape architect Michael Balston. Natural beauties whose color and texture take on a patina over time, the benches are made to order and can be tailored to specifications. From Landscape Ornament: starting at $6,040. Call +44 1380 840533 or visit landscapeornament.com. 40 OCT/NOV

2006

De­


or

is

it

the

it ys in to other wciu

be out' around?

EMU Retail 494 Bridgeport Ave No.390 - Shelton, C l 06484 phone: 888.502.5749 - fax: 888.502.5752 www.emuretail.com - info@emuretail.com Slink 104


take a philosophical stand—linking us back t o nature itself. From AguaFina Gardens & Imports: $450 t o $8,500, depending on size and piece; available in grey o r dark finish. Call 248-738-0500 o r visit aguafina.com. [6]MATKA

PLANTER/BASIN:

T h e sensual f o r m of this urn, w i t h its hand-hewn t e x t u r e and polished r i m , was inspired by the w a t e r p o t that Indian w o m e n have used since

*

[ 3 ] C O R N G R I N D E R S : Made

ancient times t o carry water f r o m

during the 19th century in the Phil­

the well. From Sana Stone: $650 t o

ippines, w h e r e they w e r e used f o r

$ 1,000, depending o n size. Available

grinding c o r n , these once-utilitarian,

in w h i t e , yellow o r green marble

150-pound objects are now appreci­

and custom sizes. Call 212-228-

ated as glorious artifacts that have

8396 or visit sanastone.com.

found new life as w o r k s of sculpture.

[ 7 ] A N T I Q U E MILL WHEELS:

F r o m T A M A : $4,500. Call 212-566-

Made f r o m granite in the Shandong

7030 o r visit tamagallery.biz.

Yellow River Valley region of China,

[ 4 ] GUJARAT W A L L L A M P S :

each o f these stones has developed

Salvaged f r o m o l d houses in the

a unique patina during 500 years of

Gujarat area of India, each of these

exposure t o the environment. From

one-of-a-kind, hand-carved—and

Rhodes Architectural Stone: $150 t o

very heavy—sandstone lamps is

$300, depending on size. Call 206-

80 t o 150 years old. Holding vo­

709-3000 o r visit rhodes.org.

tive-sized o r larger candles, they

[ 8 ] R A B B I T D R U M S T O O L : Based

have been translated into beautiful

on a Chinese decorative object and

decorative objects f o r the garden o r

carved f r o m Chinese w h i t e marble

table. From W i s t e r i a : $ 169. Call 800-

(Han BaiYu), this whimsical piece by

320-9757 o r visit wisteria.com.

Robert Kuo promises t o carry its

[ 5 ] G R A N I T E S E A T I N G : Rock

o w n (hefty) weight in the garden for

y o u r w o r l d w i t h furniture carved

decades t o come. From Sutherland:

o u t of natural granite boulders.

Available t o landscape architects

Permanent, playful, provocative,

and interior designers. Call 800-717-

these chairs, sofas and ottomans

8325 o r visit sutherlandteak.com.


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O N THE ROAD W I T H G A R D E N DESIGN

Tropics Next D o o r Exploring Puerto Rico for rampaging tropical plants and historic gardens LAST JULY MY HUSBAND INVITED ME TO JOIN HIM IN SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO, WHERE HE WAS

working for a few months.Though he was home alternate weekends, it didn't take much persuading to book myself a ticket for a visit to the Caribbean. Palms, vividly colorful tropical trees in bloom, houseplants run rampant as garden-grown perennials—it's like being inside the world's largest glasshouse, only without the glass. You can't get more tropical on a flight that is about four hours from New York-area airports. San Juan, the main jumping-off point, is on the northeastern, moister side of the island. Look for gorgeous trees, shrubs and vines in bloom as you walk along the streets: mussaenda with pink poinsettia-type flowers; pink allamanda vines and its more famil­ iar yellow counterpart; lavender jacaranda; and spectacular huge, coral-red, cup-like blooms of Spathodea carnpanulata, African tulip tree. The rest of the island is well worth exploring if you have gardens and tropical plants on your mind. Wherever you go, re­ member that sunscreen, a hat and a bottle of water are necessities for garden visits.

IN SAN JUAN The 300-acre Jardin Botanico of the Uni­ versity of Puerto Rico opened in 1971, and holds more than 200 species of tropi­ cal and subtropical plants.You'll find a palmetum (most of us have no idea how manv different palms there are) and a collection of bamboo with a glade-like bamboo cha­ pel used for weddings. Also look for heliconias attractive to the five species of hummingbirds found on the island—sunloving orchids, a diversity of gingers, a grassy knoll with sculpture by a dozen re­ nowned Puerto Rican and Hispanic artists, an aquatic garden, and a garden with plants useful in the daily life of the indigenous Taino Indians. A taxi or rental car provides the easiest access to the botanical garden. Old San Juan is a popular tourist desti­ nation, accessible by city bus or a scheduled tour. A free tram circles the old walled citv; just get on and off as the mood strikes you. I was delighted by the tropical plants filling pots along the streets and on balconies of 44 O C T / N O V 2 0 0 6


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GETTING AROUND ■

University of P u e r t o Rico Botanical

G a r d e n : Route I at Route 847, at entrance t o Barrio Venezuela, Rio Piedras. N o entry fee. Call 787-767-1710 (information office, recording is in Spanish) or see upr.clu.edu. ■ C a s a Blanca: Calle San Sebastian No. I .Viejo San Juan. Garden is open all week; museum is closed on Mondays. ■

E l Y u n q u e : Route 191 off Route 3,

about an hour's drive east of San Juan. El Portal visitors' entrance open 9:00 a.m. t o 5:00 p.m.Admission fee only at visitors' center; the preserve itself is free. Call 787888-1880 o r see fs.fed.us/r8/caribbean. ■

Pinones: in Loiza, Route 187 East.

■ V i e q u e s Island by air: Cape A i r flights leave f r o m San Juan Cape. Several flights daily, on small airplanes. (I was on an eightpassenger Cessna 402.) A n t o n i o Rivera Rodriguez A i r p o r t on Vieques' n o r t h w e s t coast is a 15-minute ride f r o m Isabel Segunda.An inexpensive publico (whose drivers frequently speak at least some Eng­ lish) can drive you there and/or take you around the island. Call 800-352-0714. ■

V i e q u e s Island by f e r r y : Ferry is

operated by Puerto Rico Ports A u t h o r ­ ity f r o m a terminal in the Fajardo p o r t zone, which is about a 90-minute drive f r o m San Juan.The f e r r y runs f r o m Fajardo t o Vieques three times a day.There is a schedule, but it is wise t o call and confirm departure times. From the Vieques f e r r y dock, you can walk t o d o w n t o w n Isabel Segunda. Call Puerto Rico Ports A u t h o r ­ ity at 787-863-0705 o r 787-863-4560 f o r Vieques and Fajardo ferry information.

4 6 O C T / N OV 2 0 0 6

the two-story buildings with shops below. Plazas offer tree-shaded respite from the strong sunlight. Make sure to visit Casa Blanca, at Calle San Sebastian No. 1. Built in 1S21 for Ponce de Leon and his family, the home displays interesting plants such as zamia, heliconia and philodendron. An attractive side garden features fountains and a Moorish-stvle rill. Pinones (a pine forest, now a nature re­ serve) is just a 10-minute drive on Route 187 East from the citv's Isla Verde area. There's a parking lot at the boardwalk's western end, convenient to the rustic shacks selling traditional foods such as mofongo (mashed plantains), bacalaitos (deepfried codfish fritters) and empanadillas (turnovers filled with crab meat, beef or pork). A stroll along the boardwalk features sand and surf to your left and dense growth of sea grape and palm trees to your right.

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BEYOND THE CITY For the last 38 years, the little mountain town of Aibonito has celebrated Fiesta de las Flores from the last weekend of June through the first weekend of July. You'll need to rent a car for the approximatelv hourlong drive through the hilly country­ side past pastel-hued bungalows draped in bougainvillea. Aibonito's roughly 2,400foot elevation provides a year-round re­ freshing climate, and explains its sobriquet "the Garden of Puerto Rico." Held out­ doors, the popular event features attractive displays by local nurseries, with heliconias, gingers, orchids and hundreds of other tropical plants. Booths offer plants for sale, from marigolds to orchids to nepenthes. Piiia coladas served in a pineapple shell are a refreshing way to beat the heat.


El Yunque is absolutely fabulous, with the only tropical rain forest in the United States National Forest system—complete with tree ferns, huge bamboos, bananas, palm trees, hibiscus, ferns and impatiens. Rain is the operative word—El Yunque re­ ceives over 20 feet of rain each year in some places. There are many tours available, but for the most flexibility rent a car. The road, though narrow, is paved and there are sev­ eral parking areas along the way if you want to hike. Some trails are also paved, built by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the Depression. As you'd expect, there are fan­ tastic waterfalls. Take the easy 98-step cir­ cling climb inside the Torre Yokahu (Yokahu Observation Tower) at the 8.9-kilometer mark on Route 191 for a panoramic view. El Portal Visitors Center is attractive and modern, with exhibits, well-labeled plants and a gift shop—your best bet for a book on Caribbean plants. You'll find a casual restaurant, and some hamburger-type food stalls along Route 191. Try the sweet fried plantains—they're yummy. Located just 8 miles to the southeast of Fajardo, where the ferry docks, Vieques is fondly known bv locals as Isla Nena (Little Girl Island)—it is just 5 miles wide by 21 miles long. The flight from San Juan's Luis Mufioz Marin International Airport lakes only 30 minutes. Now that the U.S. Navv no longer uses the island as a bombing range, a portion of the western end and all of the eastern end are administered as the Vieques National Wildlife Refuge, much of which is closed off while unexploded ord­ nance is removed. Life here has a slower pace—white sand beaches, wild horses walking down the road, mangrove swamps with endangered brown pelicans and a centuries-old kapok tree (Ceiha pentandra) revered by theTaino. Cottages clearly show Spanish and French influences, reflecting the varied history of the island. Tamarind and mango trees drop their fruit along the roadways; allamanda and bougainvillea clamber over fences. Refrigerated trucks serve as produce stands, dispensing green coconuts with their tops lopped off as a re­ freshing, if somewhat sweet, drink. If you take the ferry, watch for whales, dolphins and manatees.There are guest houses avail­ able and a full-scale resort on Vieques for longer stays.—JUDY GLATTSTEIN

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acre retreat in 1929, he and his close friend society decorator Billy Baldwin and others set about converting the modest frame house ("no plumbing and one old lilac bush") into a party palace. From a Long Island establishment background, Harvey (1887-1976) was an eccentric social exile, seeking a place not only to foxhunt but to live his life free of narrow-minded cons­ traints. Ironically, he and his entourage en­ ded up in the center of one of the oldest parts of Maryland, populated by Old World conservatives who embraced Ladew for his talents it would have been beneath them 4 8 O C T / N OV 2 0 0 6

to define their friend by his unconventional nature. Ladew had no idea that his friends w'ere so devoted that thev would preser­ ve his Monkton estate, or that in the next century visitors from all over the world would enjoy his eccentric topiary gardens, which he'd intended for a select few. During the almost 50 years Ladew lived on his estate, he shaped 22 acres into more than 15 gardens. But the wild and whimsi­ cal animals he cut and pruned out of privet, hemlock and yew, for which the Ladew To­ piary Gardens are so well known, are in fact onlv part of the prize. As one who has been involved in garden restoration for decades,


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I was invited over 15 years ago Japanese maples; la­ to participate in documenting burnum arch er and researching the various tree peony bli gardens of Ladew. Since then, the gardens' wide range of the­ atrical spaces has become the focus of one of the largest restoration projects on the East Coast. Better yet, new research has produced remarkable findings, confirming that this de­ signer was not merely well versed in the great 18th-century English gardens, but was also one of the most forward-thinking American gardeners of his time. In his fusion of painting, sculpture, topiary, topography and horticul­ ture, Ladew was among the first to approach garden design with a surrealistic vision. Ladew's garden rooms are like over-the-top shop windows or magazine layouts. Research shows that in the Yellow Garden alone he in­ serted innumerable visual props, from a colorcoordinated kiosk to beehives. At the entrance a pair of topiary vases held pots of (lowers, filled with peonies in spring and geraniums in summer. Each evergreen "vase" was enclosed by a shell-shaped carved niche crafted out of chamaecyparis. One vase form still remains, deep inside a large shrub. Ladew's friends al­ ways thought this garden to be his best work, and we can see why today. Its many entrances

and exits act like theatrical links, activating adjacent garden rooms and creating circuits that deliver amusing visual essays on gardening as one walks from room to room. Ladew was one of the first great "mixers"— juxtaposing in his house a fantastic collection of antique English and continental furniture with strange and wonderful creations. Among them was Salvador Dali's magical Portrait of an Exciting Woman, featured on a table in the in­ ner sanctum of Ladew's oval library. I Iis gar­ den outdoors carried the same progressive, avant-garde artistic power.The painting shows forearms, hands and bright red nails reaching out of the earth like two tree trunks with ar­ ching branches and red fruit. It has a parallel

"To concentrate on a single interest strikes me as bei very dull and even dangerous in its possible effect on our future happiness"—Harvey Ladew 50 O C T / N O V

2006

9


in Laclew's wild Mimosa Pic g a r d e n — a w e e d y m i m o s a tree with pink powder-puff flowers

(which has since b e e n replaced bv

a Sophora japonica)

sat within a bright r e d

w r a p a r o u n d b e n c h , encircled by a round ot c o m m o n privet, broken d o w n i n t o quar­ t e r s like a pie cut in fours. Ladew w a s n ' t trying t o r e - c r e a t e t h e Dali painting in the landscape, ol c o u r s e , b u t it's clear that Dali's surrealistic spirit guided Ladew's in­ c o n g r u o u s , t o n g u e - i n - c h e e k design. Indicative ol L a d e w ' s h i g h b r o w i r r e v e ­ r e n c e are t h e so-called "inferior p l a n t s " wild pin c h e r r y , silver m a p l e , Canadian hemlock

that h e s u b s t i t u t e d for m o r e

e x p e n s i v e p l a n t m a t e r i a l , s u c h as b o x ­ w o o d s , w h i c h can m a t u r e at a painsta­ kingly slow r a t e . As w a s typical of m o d e r n d e s i g n e r s , L a d e w was n o t m u c h i n t e r e s ­ ted in the l o n g - t e r m effect of a given plan. R a t h e r than b e i n g an e x p e r t p l a n t s m a n , h e w a s a set designer, a s t y l i s t — a m a s t e r of a t m o s p h e r e . — B A R B A R A

PACA

UeoHartwig 190/-1288

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left behind an extraordina museums.Throughoui her long and respected career she had an enduring fascinaiion with the multi-faceted forms of nature. Olivia Smith Design Editions is proud to have been awarded the task of reproducing these remarkable works of art. View and shop our collection al www.oliviasmithdesigns.com or call 800-573-6883.

■ Barbara Paca, a landscape architect with a PhD in history of art and architecture, runs a private.Jamily practice in landscape architecture and preservation planning information Topiary

on

Gardens

410-557-9570 ladewgardens.

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ASLA/GARDEN DESIGN RESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARDS

AMAZING SPACES THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS JOINS WITH GARDEN DESIGN MAGAZINE TO PRESENT THE

winners of the 2006 Residential Design Awards. From Greenwich, Connecticut, to Seattle to Dallas to Venice, California, these eight gardens grow in startlinglv diverse climates (ocean-side to mountains) and sites (tiny urban to expansive suburban). They represent the wide-ranging talents of America's top contemporary designers. What the gardens all have in common is how well they suit their situations and please their owners. Thev serve as inspiration for all of us who admire amazing landscape design and want a bit of it in our backyards and daydreams.

BILL MARKEN, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

GARDEN

DESIGN

53


Painted concrete walls, serving as elegant backdrops f o r native desert plants like agave and prickly pear cactus,

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double as sculpture in this Phoenix, Arizona, garden designed by landscape architect Steve Martino.

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RESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARD OF EXCELLENCE PARADISE VALLEY, ARIZONA // STEVE MARTINO & ASSOCIATES

DESERT ADAPTED The clever mechanics of this design for a Phoenix house and garden won Steve Martino the highest honors from his ASLA peers

GARDEN DESIGN 55


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make the world smaller every day, the pendulum has begun to swing back toward appreciating and preserving the lo­ cal—native plants, local materials, locally grown produce, local craftsmanship. Steve Marlino, a Phoenix, Arizona, landscape architect, realized the necessity of this more than 25 years ago when, working his first job in landscape archi­ tecture, he couldn't ignore how Phoenix, with its prolifera­ tion of green lawns and foreign plant materials "was spend­ ing millions of dollars every year to look like something it is not." So, in response, he became a champion of desert plants. In the process of reinterpreting them as elegant de­ sign elements, he brought the desert back to the desert. Martino received the highest honor in the 2006 ASLA/ Garden Design Residential Design award category for this Quartz Mountain residence in Phoenix. The award recog­ nizes not only the great ingenuity and grace of the project, but also the widespread respect the landscape architecture community holds for Martino. Applving an economy of means in every aspect of the design, from regional ecology to hardscape, this project offers up a multitude of lessons that can be applied to any climate anywhere. The storv of the Quartz Mountain resi­ LefcAt the entrance t o dence started like so manv others in Phoethe house, a r o w of pipes nix, with the house and landscape cut off

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creates a fence line while a thin wall of metal becomes the garden gate. Right: T h e o u t d o o r fireplace nestles

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from each other: Even in the blazing heat of Phoenix, there was not a single covered outdoor space in the yard. And Martino was incredulous to discover that a collection of non-native trees obscured the homeowners' view of Camelback Mountain the jewel of the local desert terrain. But the project did have its allure—back in the 1960s the house had been designed by architect Blaine Drake of the Taliesin school founded by Frank Lloyd Wright. Martino, armed with a background in architecture, had been intrigucd by Drake's designs for years. So he took over the renovation of both house and garden, crafting two outdoor spaces linked to each other only via the house—thus eras­ ing the boundaries between indoors and out. It's a complicated, sculptural design. For all the work that Martino has done in pioneering desert plants—here he replaced non-native trees like ficus, pine and oleander with palo verde, mesquite and ironwood—he is also a master of the hardscape, and marrying the two is his forte. Painted concrete walls, which pay homage to Mexican landscape architect Luis Barragan, have become Martino's signature. Intimately incorporated into his vocabulary, each wall is drenched in a single rich color grape, dark blue and rust—a strategy that complements the desert's complexion while simultaneously creating a scries of abstract canvases.

GARDEN

DESIGN

61


the

Built at varying heights and angles the walls stand like mi­ nor monuments in the landscape. Constantly pushing the envelope, Martino promotes the modernity of his work through the use of contemporary, industrial materials that he manipulates with clever, artistic mechanics. The fence at the entrance is articulated by upright metal pipes in a row; a slim metal plate became the gate. Consider the large screen that shades an outdoor room near the pool. To keep costs down, Martino and his team found sheets of perforated aluminum in a salvage yard that precisely matched the task at hand. Edgy and cost effective, the sheets create an extraordinary effect, acting as a sun screen while the holes in its grid allow air to circulate in­ side the space. "There are all sorts of perforated metal," says Martino, "but this one is 50 percent opaque. It makes a huge difference in the heal—and like our desert trees, it's trans­ parent." Martino has created his own language, and every material, every plant, every construct is a part of its speech. It's fair to say that for Martino, design is all about process and problem-solving, about exploiting the opportunities of a site. In the end it's not only that virtually everything in a Mar­ tino landscape does double duty as a functional and artistic object it's also that the abstract relationships between the parts make the whole an almost endlessly interesting land­ scape. That's why, for all the sense he makes out of the desert, his private language is a common language. "And now," as he says, "they have a great house." — D O N N A D O R I A N ■ lor more information on Steve Martino &_Associates, call 602-957-6150 or see stevemartino.net. (> 2 O C T / N O V 2 0 0 6

martino

message

THE MEDIUM is T H E MESSAGE:

teccure already in place.

W h e n designing hardscape,

T H I N K DOUBLE DUTY: Imbue

look outside t h e box f o r unex-

each element in the hardscape

pected materials. Explore the

w i t h a m u l t i p l i c i t y of func-

exploding range of new indus-

tions. Let each privacy w a l l ,

t r i a l materials—or bring new

fountain and fence double as a

life t o c o m m o n materials like

w o r k of sculpture t h a t encour-

concrete and a l u m i n u m .

ages a play of the senses.

COLOR PLAY: Bold Colors — pur-

RIGHT PLANT/RIGHT SPACE:

pie, fuchsia, rust—draw o u t

Native desert plants may

the complexion of the sun­

t h r i v e in the city of Phoenix,

drenched desert landscape—

but look to your own unique

but they don't translate

region for a p p r o p r i a t e native

everywhere. Use colors t h a t

perennials, trees and shrubs

best exploit t h e colors of the

t h a t relate t h e garden t o the

surrounding e n v i r o n m e n t .

wider landscape around i t .

EXPLOIT SPACE: Approach the

A PERSONAL VOCABULARY:

design of outdoor spaces w i t h

Invent an individual style in

materials and spatial r e l a t i o n -

w h i c h , as w i t h grammar, each

ships t h a t extend the a r c h i -

element relates to the whole.

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ASLA/GARDEN DESIGN RESIDENTIAL AWARD OF HONOR EAST HAMPTON. NEW YORK // EDMUND D. HOLLANDER LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT DESIGN

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LAXOSCAPL \RCHITLCT EDMUND IIOLI WDIR

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of this East Hampton, New York, property recognized the site as a treasure, but the challenge was, how to polish it? Blessed with a maritime forest filled with native shadblow (Amelanchier canadensis) on one side and double dunes se­ veral hundred feet wide leading down to the ocean on the other, Hollander peeled away years of overgrowth and cre­ ated a progression from house to beach. Now cool, shady woods give way to bright, sunny living spaces with ocean views from every vantage point. O n the landward side, shads with their wind-sculpted trunks were utilized in situ or transplanted, making room for carefully sited paths, an entry drive and tennis courts, with an elegant understory added of shade lovers like ferns, astilbes and hydrangeas. On the seaward side the goal was to connect the house to the ocean, achieved by a series of stepped terraces and decks, and a boardwalk winding through the dunes, with the hardscaping, including stone and Ipe wood, becoming less architectural the farther it moved from the contempo­ rary house. Native dune vegetation replaced invasive exo­ tics that had encroached, and a variety of blue and silver plants (tough enough to withstand deer browsing and saltladen air) were used in beds and planters, complementing the colors of the deep blue sea.—j E N N Y A N D R E W S ■ bor more information, call Edmund D. Hollander Landscape Architect Design at 212-473-0620 or see hollanderdesign.com. GARDEN DESIGN 6 5


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ASLA/GARDEN DESIGN RESIDENTIAL AWARD OF HONOR GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT // STEPHEN STIMSON ASSOCIATES

ORDER O F PLAY

A subtle intertwining of function and form creates a restful yet highly active garden

GARDEN DESIGN 6 7


WHEN THE OWNERS OF AN EXISTING 1923 FARMHOUSE IN GREEN­

WICH, Connecticut, asked Stephen Stimson Associates of Falmouth, Massachusetts, to redesign the entire site of their four-acre property, they had already gutted the house and re­ invented the interiors in a very contemporary style, and they wanted to extend this vision into the garden. Introduced to Stephen Stimson through their interior designer, the clients spoke of their admiration for the work of Dan Kiley and his very understated, modern aesthetic. Stimson developed a rapport with the clients based on identical aesthetics: a mod­ ern sensibility respectful of the regional setting, fine materi­ als and craftsmanship. The landscape design strongly empha­ sizes formal arrangements and simple solutions. The plan took shape to create a year-round garden that would form a gracious extension of the house and provide circulation, parking, a swimming pool and spa, basketball court, play lawn, golf putting green, tennis court, tennis court shed and screening for Below left:The e n t r y gate privacy. "But I didn't want the garden to be consists of a mahogany all about the things," says the client, who has frame, bronze pipe, and two young children. "You should hardly know steel hinges supported

by a fieldstone wall. Rig T h e layering of walls and steps is repeated in the planting—rows of trees id bands of perennials.


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that they're there. We wanted an understated feelingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and what's great about this garden is there are so many different views, different feelings as you walk around." Some existing features presented opportunitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a can­ opy of mature northeast hardwoods along the boundary, a small pond and a wonderful old Chinese elm (Ulmus parvifolia) were preserved. In order to make the required number of recreational spaces, Stimson Associates created simple graded planes out of the gently rolling landscape using low stone walls in a series of terraces. A spare palette of plants leaves these spaces for specific functions clear and readable. As Stimson explains: "Our approach to planting is to get more out of less, rather than use a huge variety of plants. The definition of space is clearer when the palette is kept simple." The client likes plants used in linear arrangements, and the configuration of one species per row is used throughout. Water is an organizing factor in the design. A row of red maples, a bluestone walk and a holly hedge frame the entry court and lead to the front door. Nestled into the ground at the front door of the house, a rectangular fountain pool quietly sends water over a small bluestone weir into an 80foot-long bluestone runnel. "We felt we needed a distinction between the public and private spaces of the garden," says

GARDEN

DESIGN

71


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used areas of the new garden. T h e strong geo­

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Stimson. "The row of maples and the runnel functions as a defining element. You can cross it via bridges of pavers, hut it acts as a threshold between the two domains." Terraces at the south side of the house provide gather­ ing areas, anil there is a tea lawn on the east side. A grove ol river birches (Bctula mgra 'Heritage') shades a dry-laid blueslone walk that runs in an east-west axis parallel to the length ol the house. The birch grove's veil ol canopv and stems shades the house and forms a loreground lor viewing the gardens beyond. For the client this is one of the most successlul leatures: "I enjoy the birch grove—I love stand­ ing and looking through it to the water at the lar end," she sa\s. The lineai grove contains individual tires planted in various sizes and spacing to mimic a woodland's random pattern of growth. The groundcover is a continuous band of Liriope with sliipes of Spanish bluebells (Hyudalhuhles hispamea) and cinnamon lern lor seasonal color.

root a

B l j c H C-.HOV.

~ MAPLE a o w

from the

designer's notebook

■ G r a d e changes a r e key t o

■ S t i m s o n cites t h e Shaker

absorbing certain elements into

c u l t u r e of N e w England as an

a s i t e — a t t h e G r e e n w i c h resi­

influence on his w o r k — c o r n e r s ,

dence t h e p o o l was r e g r a d e d

intersections, levels and t r a n s i ­

t o push i t i n t o t h e slope a n d c r e ­

tions are i m p o r t a n t m a t t e r s t o be

ate a m o r e compact connection

resolved simply and beautifully.

w i t h t h e house and p o o l house.

■ G r o w i n g up o n a d a i r y f a r m in

" T h i s decision seemed t o free

Massachusetts a t t u n e d S t i m s o n

up t h e s i t e , " says S t i m s o n .

t o t h e slow changes t h a t affect

■ " Y o u arc led by w h a t y o u

t h e landscape and t h e way in

see," says S t i m s o n . M o v e m e n t

w h i c h f u n c t i o n a l p r i o r i t i e s create

t h r o u g h his gardens involves a

a kind o f o r d e r e d landscape t h a t

series of discoveries a n d sur­

can be b o t h classic and m o d e r n .

prises t h a t d e p e n d o n a very

■ T h e use of fine, t r a d i t i o n a l

subtle handling o f pathways and

m a t e r i a l s — p r i n c i p a l l y stone

t h r e s h o l d s . T h e e m o t i o n a l range

and w o o d — l i n k s Stimson's

of a g a r d e n — c o n t e m p l a t i v e ,

w o r k t o t h e historic past o f N e w

a c t i v e , e x p a n s i v e — d e p e n d s on

England, b u t his sophisticated

these t r a n s i t i o n a l e l e m e n t s .

m i n i m a l i s m avoids pastiche.

■ For further information see stephenstim.ion.eom.

A view f r o m the fountain p o o l includes the bluestone runnel and e n t r y walk, maple r o w and parking area. A viburnum hedge at the far end p r o ­ vides seasonal color.

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As the 2006 ASLA judges commented, this garden is one of "elegant restraint." The relative proportions of plants to hard materials and the precise vvav in which edges and thresholds are handled are a lesson in creat­ ing fluid transitions between indoors and outdoors, and active spaces versus contemplative areas. It's a place of beauty and discovery based on relationships of line, plane and pattern, employing subtle detailing, line craftsman­ ship and lush planting.—JOANNA FORTNAM

74 O C T / N O V Z 0 0 6

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ASLA/GARDEN DESIGN RESIDENTIAL AWARD OF HONOR DALLAS. TEXAS II MESA DESIGN GROUP LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

SUPER NATURAL A garden so finely attuned to nature and architecture is rare outside Japan

IT IS HARD TO BULIEVL THAT THIS GARDEN SITS ONE LOT AWAY FROM

a busy four-lane street in Highland Park, Texas, a township surrounded by the city of Dallas, and yet still feels quiet. Mary Ellen Cowan (above), lead landscape architect on the project, worked with the client, architect and interior de­ signer to achieve a dialogue between inside and out that is nev­ ertheless rooted in a "keep it simple" philosophy. "We decided to let the site speak to us and allow the creek to emerge. We didn't want 'look at me' solutions," says Cowan. The House by the Creek, as the designers call it, is a study in subtlety that invites comparison with a Japanese garden. The client was clear that she wanted a garden to experi­ ence, not simply to look at. Generous entertaining spaces surround the house, while the more natural areas down to the creek are for exploring with her grandchildren. One key design element is the detailing of the hard sur­ faces. Terraces, stairs, pools and ledges have the warmth of their rich materials: slate from India, Texas limestone and almendrillo wood. As Cowan says: "We used materials from the house at an appropriate scale for outside."—JF For further

76 O C T / N O V 2 0 0 6

information,

visit mesadesigng roup.com.


ASLA/GARDEN DESIGN RESIDENTIAL AWARD OF HONOR VENICE. CALIFORNIA // MARMOL RADZINER AND ASSOCIATES

REASURE ISLAND A raised island terrace is a special attraction in this tiny, efficient garden

LIKE AN ALLURING LITTLE ISLAND, A RAISED GRAVELED TERRACE

invites surrounding apartment residents into their cozy communal courtyard. As Ron Radziner (above), design principal in the firm Marmol Radziner, explains: "Usually the garden space is on ground level, but in this garden the main living space is elevated. By creating the podium, it feels like a stage and makes the small space feel more special." The raised terrace is the appealing heart of a creative landscape design that solved multiple challenges, including tight space and limited sunlight. The area amounted to just 975 square feet of courtyard enclosed by four apartments and a garage. Topped by a teak and stainless-steel dining table, the main terrace is edged with Cor-Ten steel and covered with Barstow Gold K-inch gravel. Clean, restrained lines create an uncluttered look that makes the area seem larger than it is. The plant palette is a soothing gray green, mixing shadetolerant natives with drought-resistant types for a bold, lush look that actuallv requires minimal c a r e . â&#x20AC;&#x201D; B ILL M A R K E N â&#x2013; For more information, see marmol-radziner.com. Furniture Jrom Marmol Radziner Furniture (marmolradzinerfurniture.com); gate, trellis and edging were custom fabricated by thejirm.

78 O C T / N O V 2 0 0 6


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ASLA/GARDEN DESIGN RESIDENTIAL AWARD OF HONOR VENICE, CALIFORNIA It MARMOL RADZINER AND ASSOCIATES

THE BIG SQUEEZE So much tightly wedged into a serene but highly used garden on a small narrow lot

80 O C T / N O V 2 0 0 6


PHOTOGRAPHS

BY

STEV


ALONG WITH INTERESTING NEIGHBORS AND PROXIMITY TO THE

beach, living in Venice, California, almost automatically gives you a small lot—and the urge to spend a lot of time outdoors. For their new home, Ron Radziner (of Marmol Radziner and Associates) and Robin Cottle wanted out­ door rooms that worked seamlesslv with the indoor spac­ es and with the modern architectural style of the house, also designed by Marmol Radziner. The total lot is only about 6,000 square feet, and the outdoor space measures a scant, slim 22 by 130 feet. Mar­ mol Radziner deftly squeezed in a series of outdoor rooms, plus a slender pool. The design emphasizes that the outdoor rooms are full-fledged members of the house. In fact, with no traditional front door to the house, you instead enter from the street by way of a hidden door in a hedge wall that screens off the first garden room. This entry garden is a sim­ ple grassy area that acts as an open play area for children. The outdoor dining room, directly beneath the master

oncrete paving ads from the entry irden along the house > the dining area (right) ith its cozy fireplace, ainless steel and teak table is from Marmol idziner Furniture's idoor/outdoor line.


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An overhead view reveals the geometry of the side yard.The 9-by-31 -foot pool echoes the rectangle of the front lawn. Giant liriope fills planters at left. Bamboo (Bambusa mul­ tiplex 'Golden Goddess') creates a privacy wall.

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A sculptural Japanese black pine screens the dining area. Opposite: Lounging area near the pool includes a stainless steel and teak table and a stainless steel and canvas chair, both from Marmol Radziner Furniture.

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bedroom, connects conveniently to the kitchen on one side; two sides are open, and the other side holds the outdoor fireplace. The 155-square-foot dining area is the hub of the home, bridging interior rooms, garden and the pool. The paving is colored concrete (Winter Beige by L.M. Scofield). The outdoor fireplace—the only fireplace in the home— adds to the area's drawing power and coziness on cool coast­ al nights. It has a gas supply, but is designed to burn logs. The design emphasizes strong lines and restrained use of materials. The geometry of horizontal planes—rectilinear lawn, planting areas, swimming pool—echoes the house and emphasizes connection between house and garden. I low well has the tight-space design worked for Radziner's family? He says, "The garden really has three main areas— the grassy front entry, the outdoor dining room and the pool in back. A family can flow through the different spaces throughout the day, playing in the front, swimming in the pool, eating lunch in the outdoor dining room. You can re­ ally stay outside all day. And as it gets dark, light the out­ door fireplace and eat dinner outside."—B ILL M A R K E N

designing

indoor-outdoor

spaces

Ron Radziner offers ideas for

tween indoors and outdoors—as

designing a house and garden that

the lone pine near the pool does,

work seamlessly together—and

almost like a transparent veil.

make the most of a small space.

■ Use plants to reinforce the

■ Create a natural flow from

house's architecture—as with the

indoor room to outdoor room.

bamboo wall screening the pool.

Make the house and garden seem

■ Choose a plant palette that

as one by matching their lines and

works with the house color. Here,

styles as appropriate.

the palette is dark green and

■ Employ interior features in

monochromatic to complement

exterior situations—as with the

the cool gray of the building.

outdoor fireplace in this garden.

These are the key plants used:

■ Make minimal transitions from

bamboo, ceanothus, coast live

indoors to outdoors, using similar

oak (Quercus agrifolia), liriope,

materials, colors and textures for

baby's tears, Japanese black pine

paving, walls and ceilings.

(Pinus thunbergii) and Carolina

■ Lightly break up the lines be-

cherry laurel (Prunus caroliniana).

I bor further information see marmol-raJziner.com.

GARDEN DESIGN 8 7


ASLA/GARDEN DESIGN RESIDENTIAL AWARD OF HONOR NEW ENGLAND II HORIUCHI SOLIEN INC.

SECOND NATURER A new translation of the Japanese garden in the wild woods of New England A LUSH NEW ENGLAND WOODLAND, WITH THE EFFECTS OF GLA-

ciation still apparent in the rolling topography and mas­ sive boulders shouldering through the earth, provides the ideal setting and plenty of inspiration for this subtle reinterpretation of the traditional Japanese tea garden. The contemporary-style house, originally built over 20 years ago by the current owners who are practicing Bud­ dhists, overlooks a 30-foot-deep kettle hole, a natural land formation created by receding ice millennia ago. The gar­ den, called The Passage, was designed by landscape architec­ ture firm Horiuchi Solien as a series of outdoor spaces en­ countered along a pathway—entry garden, stream garden, courtyard garden, perennial garden, woodland path and meditation circle—a typical tea garden, or "roji," conven­ tion. Along the way garden elements use forms and materials that bring new life to age-old symbols—an illuminated out­ door shower inspired by rice-paper lanterns, stepping stones of bluestone paving and an arbor made from copper pipe. The surrounding natural landscape serves as a frame, while within the garden, nature is abstracted—a rain catcher funnels water into a basin and ring of pebbles, and concrete water basins, or tsukubai, recall the boulders strewn about the site. Though at its heart The Passage represents a spiri­ tual journey, it is also practical, with spaces for everyday activities like dining and bathing, making it a garden that attends to mind, body and s o u l . — j E N N Y A N D R E W S ■ For more information on Horiuchi Solien Inc., call 508-540-5320.


A S L A / G A R D E N DESIGN RESIDENTIAL A W A R D O F H O N O R WASHINGTON // CHARLES ANDERSON LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

STIl WATERS Abstract art becomes reality in this Washington garden INSPIRED BY DE STIJL ARTIST PILT MONDRIAN'S 1915 ILLUSTRATION

Right: A collection of

Pier and Ocean, this landscape in Washington state blends the geometric with the organic, the solid, simple lines of mod­ ernist style with ephemeral, ever-changing nature. In Tables of Water, landscape architect Charles Anderson took advantage of the site's location on the shore of Lake Washington to create a seamless connection between interi­ or and exterior spaces, which extends even beyond the gar­ den to the breathtaking natural surroundings. At the front entry, under a canopy of parrotia, a series of outdoor rooms is delineated by boxwood and black bamboo. The stone en­ try walk continues through the house to a window wall with a view across terraces of black-granite-rimmed infinity-edge pools. The reflections in the flat planes of water blur the line between designed and natural landscapes, and seem to bring the lake right up to the house (designed by architect Jim Olson of Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects). Two less formal gardens occupy other areas. The Winter Garden has a multi-season collection of ferns, viburnums, rho­ dodendrons, mosses and tropicals, including tree ferns, palms and a wheel tree (Stenocarpus sinuatus).The Moon Garden has white flowers and silvery foliage. Bringing nature even closer, green roofs on the house and garage show an appreciation for

tropical plants, including

the land as well as good stewardship.—j E N N Y

Above: A series of ter­ races and infinity-edge pools characterizes Tables of Water in Washington.

ANDREWS

tree ferns, in the multiseason Winter Garden.

■ lor more information on Charles Anderson Landscape Archi­ tecture, call 206-516-4200 or see charlesanderson.com.


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Hot Heaths \^J My books say that the hybrid heath Erica x darleyensis needs full sun. 1 considered that good news because I want it for the front of my house, which gets intense sun all day. But at the local nursery, I was told it should get only part sun. Is full sun too much? KELLY MEARA, DOWNINGTOWN, PA

r\ Erica x darleyensis and the very similar winter heath (£. carnea) are full-sun plants, though they will tolerate a little shade. The important thing to remember is they need a soil that is well-drained vet never dry. In drv soils, the necessary sun can burn out the plants, especially during the establishment period. The most dangerous sea­ son for these shallow-rooted plants in vour area is winter. Although they are fully coldhardy there, they can't get water when the ground freez­ es, and the sun and wind drv them out. Snow would pro­ tect them, but snow cover is bv no means dependable in the mid-Atlantic region. While your site sounds marginal for E. x darleyensis, it also sounds like vou really want to grow it. I think you should go ahead and take a chance. Get several varieties—such as 'Mediterranean Pink', 'Mediterranean White', 'Furzey' and 'Kramer's Rote' (all Zone 6). If they succeed vou will have beau­ tiful blooms in late winter and early spring. Create a special heath bed. Work in a generous amount of peat or compost—to increase your soil's moisture-holding capac­ 92 OCT/NOV 2006

ity and open up the soil texture. Heaths prefer an acid soil so check the pi I; a pi I of 6.5 is the upper limit. Make sure the plants get water weekly from spring through fall, and keep them mulched with shredded bark, leaf mold or pine needles. I Ieaths do not need fertilizing. I suggest you also plant a few heathers (calluna), heath cousins. I leathers have basi­ cally the same needs but are more forgiving of less than ideal conditions. They bloom from late summer into fall, with even better color in December, January and through the winter, when their foliage becomes shades of gold, orange, chartreuse, red and plum.

\^J I am looking for tall evergreen shrubs to enclose my backyard patio. I have tried rhodies and azaleas, but the clay soil does not appear to be suitable. Are there any good alterna­ tives? MARY 11ARD1N, BOWLING GREEN, OH r\ There are a couple of dwarf arborvitae, Thuja occidentalis 'Holmstrup' and 'DeGroot's Spire', which would work very well for what vou want to do. These are both dwarf conifers that grow at less than half the rate of full-sized arborvitae. They are handsome plants, narrow and strongly upright with a pleasing sculptural look. To make a living screen, space the plants about 2 feet apart. After they have reached


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\H I O f t e n seen growing on conservatory walls, creeping fig can also be used o u t d o o r s in Zones 8 t o 11 t o cre­

the maximum height you want, prune back covering f o r walls. the tips once a year in midsummer. An­ other good choice, especially if deer might be a problem, is the columnar boxwood named Buxus sempervirens 'Graham Blantly'. It has beautiful deep green foliage, with a formal look even without shearing. Slow growing, it can take about 20 years to reach 10 feet tall. To achieve a screening effect, choose the largest plants you can locate and set them about 2 feet apart. Faster-growing choices that also feature beautiful flowers are Japanese andromeda (Pieris japonica) and mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia), both distant relatives of rhododendrons and azaleas, though they are not as fussy about the soil. Both have a more spreading form than the arborvitae and boxwood but are more compact than the rhodies. Japanese andromeda blooms in spring with long, graceful clusters of small white flowers; new leaf growth on varieties like 'Mountain Fire' is bright red or bronze. Mountain laurel is native to the eastern United States and blooms in early summer. The wild species type has white flowers, but plant breeders have given new­ er cultivars colors from soft pink ('Brides­ maid') to dark red ('Firecracker'). ate a tight, flat green


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V ^ / have a gray concrete wall around my house and am looking for a plant that will give it a smooth, green surface. Can you help? ROBERT IIOLDHN, HONOLULU, HI r \ Creeping fig (Ficus pumila) is a tropical vine that's just about perfect for what you want to do. It grows quickly and adheres well to masonrv of all sorts. The plant has tiny, heart-shaped leaves that lie flat on anv surface it grows over. So it will mirror the sharp edges of your wall, creating a formal look with very little pruning. To maintain a sharp edge at the top or ends of the wall, trim the new shoots monthly. Once the plant matures, it will start to make a different sort of foliage, pro­ ducing heavier branches that if unchecked will extend horizontally a foot or so. These mature branches have much larger leaves and eventually produce inedible fruit. With electric hedge shears, cut these back close to the surface two to four times a vear, leav­ ing just the small juvenile foliage. Also keep an eye on things at ground level. Though this plant strongly prefers climbing walls to creeping on the ground, keep it from spreading onto the soil surface where it will readilv take root. Keep it away from build­ ings where it could quickly climb out of your reach into upper windows and eaves.

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sage advice

Vti My cottage and small front yard face open water. I need a small tree that will soften the lines of the house and screen me from the road hut stand up to the wind off the sea.—NATALIE BEAULIEU, NEWPORT, Rl r \ Since m o s t of t h e w i n d d a m a g e t o t r e e s and shrubs o c c u r s in w i n t e r , I w o u l d plant s o m e t h i n g that naturally d r o p s its leaves in a u t u m n . T h e p a p e r b a r k m a p l e (Acer (jriseum) will take m a n y years t o reach its m a t u r e 30 feet, a n d t h e colorful r e d d i s h , peeling bark and graceful b r a n c h e s will provide beauty t h r o u g h o u t t h e w i n t e r . T h e p e e g e e hydrangea (H. paniculata 'Grandiflora') b e c o m e s a heftv 20-foot-tall shrub but can be easily p r u n e d into a singles t e m m e d tree f o r m . It's a great seaside plant with magnificent flowers that start white at the e n d of Julv and slowly t u r n t o russet by O c t o b e r . T h e large leaves t u r n bronze before they drop. T h e branches can make a top-heavy thicket; t o reduce wind pres­ sure, thin o u t the branches in early winter. This hydrangea b l o o m s o n n e w g r o w t h , so the w i n t e r p r u n i n g w o n ' t defract from the flower show. T h e cultivar 'Tardiva' is one of t h e best, b l o o m i n g in S e p t e m b e r with panicles of w h i t e flowers 6 inches o r m o r e long. A few n e w e r types of H. paniculata on the m a r k e t are ' U n i q u e ' (white flower clus­ ters 16 inches long), 'Pink D i a m o n d ' (flow­ e r s t u r n a rich pink) and 'Limelight' (bright g r e e n b l o o m s t u r n i n g t o pink in the fall). For spring flowers, fall fruit and a grace­ ful spreading shape, consider a crab apple, which will g r o w well in y o u r area. It's i m ­ p o r t a n t to get a disease-resistant variety like 'Prairie Fire' (which is also salt tolerant), which has pinkish r e d flowers in spring and liny dark red fruit in the fall. Serviceberry is a n o t h e r good choice, with good fall color in addition t o its attributes of dainty w h i t e spring flowers and small purplish black s u m m e r fruits. T h e species .imelanchier arhorca and A. laevis, and the hybrid A. x qrandiflora, are lovelv single or m u l t i - s t e m m e d small trees t o about 20 feet tall, and there are a n u m b e r of cullivars available, ' A u t u m n Brilliance' being o n e of t h e most popular.


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sage advice

^ V w H n i i ' -

ANATOMY

fa* '•'• li'MM

LESSON

South Italian AN ELEGANT, CONTEMPORARY TAKE ON THE TOWN COURTYARD GARDEN IS

a rare find in the historic district of Charleston, South Carolina, which traditionally runs to the Southern palette of lacv ironwork, brick, and a busting-out-all-over love affair with camellias and boxwood. In this two-vear-old project, a collaboration between landscape architect Sheila Wertimer and her property developer clients Beth and David Simmons, the brand-new house was built along lines that conform to local architectural traditions, but in the garden a modern Italian/European sensibility prevails. Everyone involved had worked together before, so they could relv on a well-understood shorthand. Wertimer knew that fine-quality materials, for both hardscape and planting,

Top left:Vintage metalwork fur­ niture brings an elegant touch of la dolce vita co the terrace. Left: A long, shady, French-limestone walkway into the courtyard, lined with London plane trees and underplanted with autumn ferns, terminates in the refresh­ ing sight of sunlighc and water.

98 OCT/NOV 2006


SPACE SAVER A carefully organized circulation and clean, contemporary lines help to give the impression of space in this compact rear court­ yard garden. The color of the brand-new house was chosen by client Beth Simmons to match old Italian villas seen on her travels.

PRIVATE V I E W In a residential area like historic Charleston, where the old town houses sit cheek by jowl, privacy can be an issue.The raised hedge of Japanese timber bamboo takes up very little space but provides screening from overlooking prop­ erties around the courtyard.

S U N FLAVORS Giant handmade terra-cotta pots from Tuscany add volume and color to the courtyard. Filled with standard citrus trees and underplanted with trailing rosemary, they bring authentic Mediterranean flavors into this sunny outdoor living space.

F I N I S H FIRST High-quality materials and cus­ tom details were used through­ out—French limestone for the walkway and lower patio, im­ ported vintage French terra-cotta tiles for the seating terrace. Cop­ per gas lights by Yancy Lighting of Charleston flank the house wall.

GARDEN

DESIGN

99


sage advice

Right:Vintage '50s furniture sourced in Palm Beach, Florida. Below: Layers of texture—creep­ ing fig.Japanese timber bamboo and Chinese fan palm. Below left: The elegant gateway from the street features fine metalwork based on an old Italian pattern Beth Simmons saw in Florence.

H .I.'1*

4.

100 OCT/NOV

2006

were high on the agenda. An elaborate historical pastiche and complicated details were not. "We purposefully decided to use a narrow palette of plants and there­ fore use them with real strength," explains Wertimer. The first sign of this strategy is right up front—the entry to the garden from the street brings the visitor along a shady, French-limestone walkwav lined with pollarded London plane trees (Platanus x hispanica), specifically requested by Beth Simmons who had admired them in European cities. The trees are underplanted with a single groundcover of lush autumn ferns (Dryopteris erythrosora). The 60-foot walk arrives in an enclosed space of quite a different character—a sunnv open courtyard at the back of the house, about 40 by 40 feet, with a pool, a seating


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terrace of old French terra-cotta tiles and a guesthouse beyond the pool. The original brick boundary walls on each side of the garden provide pri­ vacy at head height, but to counteract the overlook from neighboring houses, Wertimer used one of Beth Simmons' fa­ vorite plants Japanese timber bamboo (Phjllostachjs bambusoides). The bamboo is trimmed into a raised screen—the long, flexible stems, which reach up to 15 feet high, are stripped of their lower leaves to reveal the yellowish jointed stems, but the lush foliage above the wall is left, like fluffy brush heads, to provide light cover and an overall softening effect.To prevent the no­ toriously invasive bamboo from running, Wertimer contained it in deep sheet-met­ al boxes. Chinese fan palm (Livistona chi-

nensis) at the foot of the bamboo provides an exotic texture at ground level. So refined it's barely there, the wrought-metal furniture on the terra­ cotta terrace dates from the '50s and was sourced by Beth Simmons in Palm Beach, Florida. It makes a conscious nod to the fine tracery of the metalwork balconies that run the width of the main house and guesthouse. Finally, enormous handmade Italian terra-cotta pots placed poolside are planted with standard citrus trees and rosemarv to add yet another dimension of texture and interest to this spare vet richlv detailed s p a c e . — J O A N N A F O R T N A M

■ For further information on landscape architect SheilaWertimer, e-mail sheila(Q}s\vlandarch. com. For Yancj Lighting visit jancjlighting.com.

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sage advice

LANDSCAPE SOLUTIONS

Taking Flight CERTAIN ELEMENTS ARE ESSENTIAL TO CREATING

a garden that engages every sense. Among the most fundamental are strategically placed hardscape, artfully arranged plant­ ings and just the right infusion of garden accessories. But I discovered long ago that even a well-planned garden is left wanting without the sights, sounds and motion that only wildlife can bring. Birds, butterflies and other creatures not onlv add a new dimension of color and inter­ est, they bring harmony to the garden and are essential to the ecology of the landscape. The pure enjoyment of watching wildlife in our kitchen garden was something my husband Rick and I had experienced daily. The only downside was that this garden was never visible from inside our home. So four years ago, when we were finally able to tackle the 40-by-60-foot barren patch of gravel and weeds in front of our house, at­ tracting wildlife was a high priority. Our goal was to create an area where we could entertain and relax in a "na­ ture-scaped" garden that was both visually pleasing and also somewhat unexpected, differing from the woodland gardens so common in the Pacific Northwest. Culi­ nary herbs within easy reach of the kitch­ en and a low-maintenance landscape were

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also musts. Inspired by a vacation we took years earlier to the Italian countryside, we knew a courtyard garden flourishing with wildlife-friendly Mediterranean plants was the perfect, out-of-the-ordinarv choice. I fervently began researching Mediter­ ranean plantings that would be appealing to us but not to our native deer. Fortunately, all my favorite culinary herbs rated high in that regard—thyme, rosemary, sage, oregano and marjoram, along with chives, lem­ on verbena, lavender and dianthus. A native oak was left on the outskirts of the garden to provide shelter for birds as well as food and nesting sites for a variety of wildlife. The blooms of wallflower, catmint, ver­ bena, scented geraniums and many of the other annuals and perennials would pro­ vide nectar for hummingbirds, butterflies and other beneficial insects, while seed heads, berries, insects and bird feeders filled with black-oil sunflower seeds set a bountiful feast for a variety of birds. j

Raised beds were a must since the ground beneath the gravel was hard-packed and difficult to work. Ambience was also key as I was striving for a careful balance between formal and relaxed. The solution was to design raised beds with free-flowing curves while using other elements to lend a sense of formality: a flagstone courtyard and walkwav (which also serve as basking stones for butterflies), five columnar Italian blue cypresses alluding to architectural pil­ lars, container plantings that include topiar­ ies, steps leading down the hillside, and a lion's head fountain with a water basin to be frequented by a host of insects and birds.

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Concierge Tour: March 9-25,200/ Explorer Tour: February 9-23,2007 four the mystical island of Bali with a small group led by AguaFina owner/designer Oaryl Toby, resident landscape architect John Pettigrew and cultural interpreters Kadek and Meghan Gunarta. • Visit private gardens, estates and villas ■ Meet local artisans, architects & designers • Experience traditional Balinese Culture A(TI J A F l N A

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Vermont Holiday Wreath a 28" balsam wreath which has become our "trademark" wreath. It is a perfect gift for the garden enthusiast Tor only S69.95 + 15% S/H. "Traditional Vermont Balsam 22" Wreath"$29.95 + 15% S/H. View photos online and other unique cedar/pine wreaths and centerpieces decorated with dried flowers. Swags & garlands. "Touch of Class"a 28" custom, mixed greens wreath decorated with gold and burgandy accents and N a t u r e . . . l n | DCSISM complimented with a graceful Port Orf'ord cedar swag dusted with gold, backing an elegant wire-edged bow. P.O. Box 499 • Barton, VT 05822 Fax: 802-754-2626 S89.95 + 15%S/H. www naturebydesiKn.com To order call: 1-888-552-3747 (Askfor a FREE Brochure)

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2006


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HEROES of HORTICULTURE The Cultural Landscape Foundation and Garden Design call for nominations LANDSLIDE Do you know a significant t r e e , orchard, park planting or other horticultural feature that has survived against all odds, miraculously demonstrating its ability to stand steadfast in the face of natural and cultural challenges? To honor and help preserve our nation's priceless horticultural heritage, the Cultural Landscape Foundation and Garden Design magazine present the second annual Landslide List—Heroes of Horticulture. What is a Hero of Horticulture? A sentinel tree can be a living wit­ ness or reminder that commands the same admiration that our culture bestows upon a brilliant artist, poet or scholar A significant horticultural feature may be associated with an important person, or it may j gain its value from its affiliation with an event that shaped the life of a community or a culture. It may be a tree, a collection of trees such as a formal parkway planting, or a special planting compo­ sition. It may be formal, informal, ornamental or vernacular

2007

The Cultural Landscape Foundation (TCLF), established in 1998, is the only not-for-profit foundation in America dedicated to increasing the public's awareness of the important legacy of cultural landscapes and to helping save them for the future.This isTCLF's second consecutive year partnering with Garden Design. Charles Birnbaum.TCLF founder; says,"If we truly aspire to under­ stand our relationship with the land, then the ornamental, social, economic and functional expressions of individual plants and plant groupings deserve serious interpretation, preservation and manage­ ment. These include allees, hedges, bosks, orchards, foundation plantings or thematic collections — the plants that define where our country has been and where it is going." If you would like to nominate a Hero of Horticulture or learn more about Landslide, follow the Landslide link at tclf.org.The deadline for applications is April 15,2007.


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