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Chemigate’s Customer Magazine Issue 1/2017

“Things do not change, we change.”

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Asshole – The importance of not being one About two years ago I attended a class held by Ben Nothnagel. The class was the first in a series concentrating on self-development. About two years ago I attended a class held by Ben Nothnagel. The class was the first in a series concentrating on self-development. One of the main points of that first lecture was that the mentality of there being one winner and many losers is an outdated one. These days customers, suppliers, interest groups, financiers all have to find ways to co-operate to do business. This also means that there can be many winners. You have all heard about networking, well that’s what it is. During this week while I was reading a very serious book about a seemingly light subject called Assholes: A Theory by Aaron James*, I was reminded of that lecture by Ben. To be able to collaborate we have to start by not being assholes. The way business is being done today has changed from back when I got into the game. Back then customers and suppliers where divided into different casts, with some assholery involved. That has changed for the better and Chemigate is betting on that change continuing to happen. The theme of this year’s Bridge is metamorphosis, which is an irreversible process. This year Chemigate will also turn seven years old. A lot has happened since the first steps were taken in October 2010. We have gradually established our position and evolved into a serious player in our field. It’s anyhow not any excuse to remain standing. Last year we interviewed a number of decision makers from our current customer base to find out what they hope us to be. The response highlighted the importance of experience and expertise (in addition to cost of course). This was actually a bit what we have been thinking as well. As a

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consequence, Tom, Atte and Janne, who you will be getting to know as you continue to read the Bridge, have joined the team to strengthen our technical expertise and process excellence. What we also found out, was that our value proposition needs to be communicated more broadly and more specifically. The good work done on mill level is not always talking for itself and word does not travel well between different functions and levels within the customer organization. Emphasis on resourcing and changes in internal processes will hopefully help to fill this gap as well. We have chosen to give this metamorphosis the project name Evolver. When a strapping lad or las turns seven years of age you can already see the potential of what he or she can become. We believe this to be the year of our metamorphosis which will turn us into an even better and improved Chemigate, which will gradually also benefit all our partners. Meanwhile we do our best to be a good employer and a good corporate citizen. In other words not an asshole. * Aaron defines an asshole as being a person who feels entitled to act in a morally reprehensible way. He does not quantify assholery. A person who irresponsibly sends hate tweets from a position of power is an asshole just as the guy in the brand new beamer who cuts in front of you in traffic is one.

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Tom Schauman Business Director, Chemigate

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The Bridge 1/2017 4

The best bits

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Tailored luxury

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Paper recovery changes with the rest of the world

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Does paper have a future?

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Super-Techie, Paavo Vallas: When brand teams took over

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The all-star line of the national economy

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Regards from Arkhangelsk!

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Towards stronger expertise and better service

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The impact of surface size cationizity on starch behavior in the wet end

The Bridge is Chemigate ’s customer magazine Edition: 1000 pcs Editor in Chief: Tom Schauman, tom.schauman@chemigate.fi Ideas and editing: Tom Schauman and Maisa Kantola Printing house: ProPrint Paper: Lumisilk Stora Enso Texts: Tom Schauman, Maisa Kantola, Timo Kankaanpää, Timo Laine and Paavo Vallas Pictures: Tom Schauman, Maisa Kantola, Seppo Lamminmäki, Timo Laine and Paavo Vallas Translations: Lingoneer Cover picture, layout: Mainos- ja viestintätoimisto Propaganda We welcome any feedback you may have and suggestions for articles at: marketing@chemigate.fi

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THE BEST BITS

When Tarmo’s around, there’s a riddle to be found Could your brain do with a good workout? Has the novelty of crosswords worn off? Do you always complete the sudoku puzzle before your spouse does? Have you always dreamt of being the smartest person where you work? In that case, it’s Tarmo to the rescue! We’re talking about not a help line but a series of puzzles designed by Tarmo Korpela, Chemigate’s product development chemist, to give our readers a mental workout every other month. Exactly how did Chemigate’s in-house riddle-solving mastermind get interested in brainteasers? “Riddles and puzzles are something I’ve been interested in since primary school. I was into crosswords, sudokus, and problem-solving puzzles,” he says. “I always looked at the puzzle pages of Reader’s Digest too,” explains Korpela, who holds a Ph.D. in materials chemistry from the University of Eastern Finland.

helps stave off memory disorders,” he explains, adding that his puzzle column will feature a wide range of riddles to solve. He says, “The puzzles are going to include both verbal and mathematical brainteasers. A good puzzle is the kind you can solve without tools. It should also let you enjoy that eureka moment: ‘I got it!’”

“Studies have shown that solving puzzles helps to keep your brain healthy. The activity improves short-term memory and

A new puzzle will be published on the Doctor Tarmo’s Puzzles page every other month. Don’t be shy – let us know your solution to the brainteaser by e-mailing marketing@chemigate.fi. A winner will be drawn from among those offering the correct answer or an otherwise laudable solution.

Treasure hunt

Seppo 60 years

The winner of the ‘Aarrejahti’ treasure hunt 2015 has finally got a plate onto the side of Stefan Lindfors’ ‘Symbiosis’, protecting the Finnish Archipelago. Take a look whether you can locate it! There is still room for new plates. Take part in the voluntary work for a cleaner Baltic sea.

At the end of last summer, we celebrated the 60th + anniversary of our CEO, Seppo Lamminmäki. To mark TC the day, Seppo and co. went for a hike on the island of (U Raippaluoto near Vaasa. After the hike, we tried out stand 8 :2 up paddling, which went well in spite of the windy weather. a 3 The main character of the day, Seppo, is standing an :5in the h middle in the back. The other guys in the picture u 14 are Ykä, ,J 2Harri. Tom, Mika, Markku, Stickan, Kalle, Akiaand All the 0 censored. a were pictures of the group wearing wet suits 5

He enthusiastically recommends puzzles as a hobby for everyone, for health reasons if nothing else.

For further information, please visit: http://www.suojelemerta.fi/

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Do you recognize Chemigate’s employees?

The marks left by the metamorphosis can also be seen in our sales team. The posers are: Mikko Nieminen Tom Schauman Kalle Kainu Markku Nurminen Maisa Kantola Solveig Fredriksson Tom Lundin Atte Leinonen ... but who is who?

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Text: TIMO KANKAANPÄÄ

Someone’s luxury item is another person’s raw material. Jyrki Rehumäki from A-lehdet and Karel Nieminen from Paperinkeräys are browsing magazines.

Tailored luxury Print media has been transformed. A hectic rhythm of life and digitalization has brought new operators to the sector. Paper is nonetheless an unbeatable user interface.

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Rumors about the death of print media are strongly exaggerated. At least if Jyrki Rehumäki, Director of A-Lehdet is to be believed. And there is good reason to believe the man, as Rehumäki has more than 20 years of international experience from different sectors of the media business.

is difficult to displace. This goes for both periodicals and books,” says Rehumäki.

”Despite the development of digitalization, paper is still unbeatable as a user interface. The quality of the printed impression, precise images and carefully considered content create luxury, which

”The major reason is time. It is not so much about developing technology or devices. People’s rhythm of life has become more hectic, and this is also reflected in consumer habits,” says Rehumäki.

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Traditional commercial print media is undeniably in trouble. Advertising volumes and income streams have declined, but the electronic media revolution is not the only reason for this.

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“Rumors about the 0) death of print media are 10 0 strongly exaggerated”C+ T

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A well-made magazine is a matter close to Jyrki Rehumäki’s heart.

“Magazines in 2040 will give completely different experiences from what we’re used to.”

MAGALOGS AND RED BULL According to Rehumäki, the crisis in the traditional print media has brought operators to the sector from outside traditional media houses. ”A hot topic these days is the magalog, which combines the product catalogue with high-quality storytelling. Major brand names such as Red Bull are constantly producing increasingly high-quality magazines that are challenging traditional printed publications. The arrival on the market of such ”luxury publications” is a megatrend which, combined with the reduction of the available time, has created quite a stir in the markets of printing houses.” Digitalization and a change in consumer habits have also got the people at A-lehdet thinking about their business from new perspectives. It is essential to remain at the cutting edge, but the focus must also constantly be on the future.

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been built. This group offers A-lehdet an efficient practical crystal ball. ”The printed edition of Demi has maintained its popularity ever since the 1990s. In a network around the magazine, a Demi community has been built in which about 200,000 registered girls over the age of 10 discuss topics that interest them. They are the media users of the future, so we are very interested in what they do. We can monitor how they behave now, and evaluate what to offer them in the future. This is also crystallized in our strategy in a very central way. The customer is always king, not the product or the brand.”. FROM VOGUE TO PORTALS The future of print media is difficult to forecast, but there are certain signs. Rehumäki thinks that in 20 years we will have a print media that we just can’t imagine at the moment.

”In A-lehdet’s strategy, the customer is king. We used to set out from the premise that we would innovate new products and then find customers for them. Now things have been turned upside-down. Thanks to digital technology, we can follow people’s media behavior and consumption habits. The massive volume of available data helps us find out what works and what doesn’t.”

”Magazines in 2040 will give completely different experiences from what we’re used to. The format will still be print-like, but through it the reader will get moving images, sound, sensory experiences and even smells and tastes. A product tailored precisely to its user will be created to correspond to the likes of that individual and to meet the consumption needs of the me0) 0 dia. The physical form will be a somewhat 1 packaged version of the present form,” +0 predicts Rehumäki. TC

As a good example of this, Rehumäki mentions the magazine “Demi” wellknown to families with adolescent girls, around which a massive community has

A taste of the future is already being intro8 :2 duced by Blendle from the Netherlands, a 3 in whose operations all major an publishers :5 h are interested. u 14

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”Blendle is a good example of a portal-type solution in which the user can order the most interesting articles for themselves for a payment of just a few cents. The articles come with a price guarantee, so you get your money back if you don’t like the article. This constantly-growing portal with more than 100,000 subscribers is an example of a new form that, in the coming years, is guaranteed to raise its profile.” When considering future perspectives, it is also good to return momentarily to the past. Rehumäki becomes almost emotional when he recollects the 2009 September issue of Vogue. ”The 916-page issue of Vogue weighed almost 3 kg. When it thudded through the letterbox, I thought that, in terms of its effectiveness, this was some kind of ultimatum from the print media. A documentary film called ”September Issue” was also made about the magazine, which did a fine job of presenting the birth of the publication.” You have to know the past and try to forecast the future. What is certain is that print media too will have to adapt to the changing conditions and to the undulations that sometimes crop up in the sector. ”In America, for example, there are many publications that have begun online and later been transferred to print solutions. Print is becoming trendy again, focusing on high-quality publications and discriminating customers. Targeting is a key phenomenon enabled by digitalization and understanding consumer behavior.”

A-lehdet • Founded in 1933, A-lehdet is the parent company of the A-lehdet Group • The A-lehdet Group is a major Finnish media house comprising A-lehdet and Finnish Design Shop. In addition, A-lehdet owns half of Oma Terveys and is a minority shareholder in StyleRoom AB and Sayduck. A-lehdet Dialogi merged with A-lehdet. • A-lehdet ´s vision is to be a growing and profitable media house that is considered the most interesting in the industry. • Dialogi, the unit of A-lehdet specialized in content, tells its clients’ stories and sharpens them up into unique solutions for digital channels and customer magazines. It is one of the most awarded customer media houses in the Nordic countries.

Jyrki Rehumäki • Managing Director of A-lehdet Dialogi since 2012 • Over 20 years of experience in the media business

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• Previous posts: Managing Director at Image Kustannus, Publishing Director at A-lehdet, Marketing and Communications Director at Finnet Com and KPNQwest

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• Education: EMBA degree from Aalto EE Linkedin  Jyrki Rehumäki

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Text: TIMO KANKAANPÄÄ

Paper recovery changes with the rest of the world Throughout history, Finland and its citizens have been model examples of taking part in the collection of paper. Over 70 % of the paper used in Finland is recycled which is a top achievement considering the population density. Paper collection has long traditions in Finland. Our parents and grandparents sometimes think back on times when a hardworking school class earned money for the most sought-after television set by collecting wastepaper. However, this recovered paper has now become an endangered species. – People from the older generation tell stories about earning money for a television set by collecting a railway wagon full of recovered paper. Rewards also included items like wrist watches or wonderful Meccano toys. Some wastepaper was traded off against vouchers that could be spent in groceries. However, the digitalization and media consumption habits have had a radical influence in the use of newspapers, advertisements and magazines. This naturally reflects on the volume of wastepaper and the amount of recycled fiber utilized from it, says Karel Nieminen, Director of Paperinkeräys. The recycled fiber is one of the essential raw materials in modern board and paper manufacture. Recovered paper is one of the best secondary raw materials for recycling as it can stand reuse for an exceptionally long time. – The fiber structure can be recycled for about seven times before it splits up. After this, its strength properties are not suitable for recycling anymore. However, the energy contents of the product can still be utilized as fuel. In this sense, the recycled fiber is an excellent raw material in terms of the environment and usability, stresses Nieminen. ADAPTATION TO CHANGES Reduction of paper use is a fact and the reduction causes effects that multiply. Since the start of the recession in 2008, there has been a clear downswing in the volume of recycled fiber, with no end in view. The amount of recovered paper has decreased, arousing a need to consider use of substitute alternatives in the industry utilizing this raw material. This is unfortunate because, as noted, utilization of recovered paper is one of the oldest and best methods to support recycling. The use of graphic paper, i.e., newspapers, magazines, advertisements and office paper, is reduced along with the digitalization and the change of consumption habits. This

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has resulted in a massive closure of paper machine capacity during recent years. In the packaging and board sector, the outlook for the forest industry is more favorable as such, but we have not yet seen any substantial growth in the cardboard and package collection volumes. People’s consumption behavior and trade sales are directly proportional to the amount of the created package waste, tells Nieminen. According to Nieminen, the paper collectors must adapt to the change of the world and the digitalization as well. – We at Paperinkeräys have realized this change already several years ago. There is no use fighting the change, you just have to change with the rest of the world. We have to offer solutions and products that are necessary in the modern world. We should remember that paper will not vanish during our lifetime. This kind of horror scenarios are not worth considering. The importance of paper in the recycling economy will decrease but it continues to be a significant product in terms of volume. Despite an annual reduction of 10 %, the volume would still be really high. The volume of the collected waste paper in Finland is about 630,000 tons, which provides some perspective of the current amounts.

Paperinkeräys • a nationwide company that offers environmental and recycling services, covering paper, wood, plastic, metal, glass, and WEEE, among others • The ‘Encore’ processing units in 21 locations in Finland

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• turnover of €75.2 million (2015) • 227 employees

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• services directed to companies can be identified by name C T ‘Encore’: Encore Jätehuoltopalvelu (waste management U ( service), Encore Tietoturvapalvelu (data security), 8 Encore Kuormalavapalvelu (pallet service) and :2 a Encore 3 n Tuottajavastuupalvelu (producer responsibility a :5service)

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Paperinkeräys is the pioneer of RFID technology in Finland. The microchip installed primarily in pallets rented to food industry tells the location of the pallet and the point of time for returning it to circulation. Paperinkeräys also uses RFID in secure data containers where the customer can drop confidential documents for destruction. The RFID can be used to identify the container and the customer using the container which ensures a complete destruction process and efficient service.

See more!

paperinkerays.fi encorepalvelut.fi

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Director Karel Nieminen from Paperinkeräys.

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Text: TOM SCHAUMAN

Does paper have a future? Does paper have a future? We have acquired a very biased view of different paper grades in our day-to-day work. The future of graphic grades gives cause for concern, while at the same time the expanding range of packaging papers offers hope – but how do future generations see the issue?

Let’s find out. The third graders at Haga School in Vaasa agreed to give us their opinion. Erlan, Benjamin, Tilde, Sanni and Victor agreed to be interviewed. I began the discussion by asking them what they know about paper. Sanni knew right away that paper is made from wood. The youngsters were unable, however, to explain how we get from pine trees to paper, even though Benjamin knew that wood is chipped and cooked. Tilde thought that magic powder is also sprinkled into the mix. It seems that there might be a Harry Potter book on Tilde’s night table. There is something to what she said, though. Together we concluded that chemicals play a role in the process. Next, we discussed various paper grades, in other words, different paper applications. Erlan said that paper is needed at least for drawing and making 8 :2 boxes, and for wrapping gifts. At this point, everyone a 3 nodded in agreement. Yes, gift wrapping is important. an :5 h 4 On the classroom wall was a beautiful folded u paper ,J 2 1 it. I decoration, and we all turned around toaadmire a -0to it as believe it was Sanni who correctly referred 5

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“An interesting aspect of the discussion was that there was no sign of a conflict between smartphones and paper.”

Haga School third-graders’ concept of the life-cycle of paper. Pictured left to right: Erlan, Benjamin, Tilde, Sanni and Victor

origami. Tilde pointed out that kitchen paper is very useful too. Aha! Tissue paper has been spotted already. And then they all burst out laughing. You can´t wipe your bottom with a sheet of A4 paper featuring an important-looking logo. In the middle of giggles Victor pointed out that paper airplanes are made out of, well duh, paper. With the last shred of shyness gone, Erlan decided that it was time to swap roles. He asked me to tell them how paper was actually made. In the middle of my explanation Sanni decided to switch the discussion to metaphysics. “If, after dying, a creature can return to life as a tree, for example, could our dead cat now be living in that Chemigate paper bag?” As I hadn’t really studied philosophy, I thought that I should stick to what I knew and so I focused on answering Erlan´s question. Together we decided to clarify the topic by drawing the entire life-cycle of paper on the board. While the girls and Victor drew and Erlan and Benjamin showed off their breakdance moves, I summed up the

applications of paper and, somewhat overwhelmed, attempted to turn the discussion to paper’s “greenness” and the renewability of its raw material. If a plastic bag is so convenient, then why isn’t all packaging plastic? The girls pointed out that a gift wrapped in plastic is really ugly and that paper is much easier to reuse. To this Benjamin exclaimed that now we could save the world! Suddenly there was an explosion of enthusiasm. Everyone’s hands were up and everyone wanted to say something. Sanni was also able to tell us why paper is so much better than paper. Unlike plastic, paper decomposes. An interesting aspect of the discussion was that there was no sign of a conflict between smartphones and paper. Paper is clearly a handy and multifunctional commodity also in the opinion of the upcoming generation. On the other hand, the iPhone 7 in my pocket 8 :2 did arouse more respect than the white Chemigate a 3 paper bag I had with me. an :5

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Text: PAAVO VALLAS

Super-Techie, Paavo Vallas:

When brand teams took over Under what labels and where is the pulp and paper industry studied in Finland? University-level studies of the pulp and paper industry have been undergoing changes for a long time. Study places have been reduced, degree programs have been reformed and renamed, and nobody seems to have a clear picture of it all anymore. Fortunately, the Forest Products Engineers (formerly Paper Engineers) have compiled on their new website a list of where to study the subject in Finland. The list begins, in alphabetical order, with Aalto University, where it reads: Aalto University/School of Chemical Engineering. I study at Aalto University myself, and can confirm that this information is accurate. Unfortunately, just referring to the “School of Chemical Engineering” tells very little of the overall picture. That is why I have copied below the list available on the updated website of the Forest Products Engineers as it is, and then tried to supplement the information as far as possible. Naturally, as a student at Aalto University, I am most familiar with matters at Aalto; however, information is also available on the other options when you know where to look and who to ask. AALTO UNIVERSITY (SCHOOL OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING), ESPOO/HELSINKI Senior students apply for a place in Chemical, Biochemical and Materials Engineering. At the bachelor’s degree stage (180/300 credits), studies in pulp and

My degree program in bioproduct technology at Aalto University no longer exists.

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paper technology are limited or non-existent because a more precise specialization is not selected until the master’s degree stage. At the master’s degree stage, students interested in our industry can opt to major in Biomass Refining (biomass ~ pulp) or Fiber and Polymer Engineering (fiber engineering ~ paper engineering). The scope of the major is 60 credits UNIVERSITY OF JYVÄSKYLÄ (DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY) Examining the course selection of the Department of Chemistry reveals that you can study 12 credits worth of biomass processing within the advanced courses at the master’s degree stage. The selection also includes the courses “Wood processing chemistry” and “Structure and chemical composition of wood”, each worth 6 credits. From this perspective, the University of Jyväskylä would have 24 credits worth of studies strictly related to the processing of wood, i.e. less than half a major. Therefore, based on this review, it is not possible to attain very in-depth expertise in the field at the University of Jyväskylä. However, it should be noted that this conclusion is only based on looking at the course names; many courses whose names do not directly refer to our industry can certainly be very useful for it. LAPPEENRANTA UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY (DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING) Universally applicable studies are offered at the bachelor’s degree stage; a 3 credit course “Biorefineries” is available as an option. At the master’s degree stage, you can choose to major in “Chemical and process engineering”, which still seems quite universal. Under that program, you can complete a few courses that seem to somehow relate to our industry, such as “Processing of biomaterials”. It is hard to find specialization courses that would 8 :2 directly and clearly relate to wood processing. The a 3 Forest Products Engineers claim that our industry an :5 h 4 of can be studied at the Lappeenranta University Ju 2 1this , Technology. I did not find information regarding aa of-0general opportunity, but certainly professionals 5

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“University-level studies of the pulp and paper industry have been undergoing changes for a long time.”

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“Åbo Akademi seems to be THE UNIVERSITY”

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chemical engineering who are suited to jobs in our industry can graduate from Lappeenranta. UNIVERSITY OF OULU (PROCESS ENGINEERING) “There are rather few courses available on bioproduct technology” – My anonymous friend from Oulu. In relation to this comment, the University of Oulu offers surprisingly many courses in our field. At the master’s degree stage, you can choose to major in Bioproduct Technology that has 30 credits worth of courses available. Those courses seem to fit our industry and are titled, for example, “Manufacturing of fiber products” (fiber product ~ paper), “Chemical processing of biomasses”, and “Mechanical processing of biomasses”. What my friend’s comment probably refers to is the fact that the scope of the Bioproduct Technology major is just 30 credits, whereas the scope of other majors is 60 credits. Students who choose Bioproducts Technology as their major fill that missing 30 credits by studying the courses of other majors. Admittedly, it is a shame that there is not even one whole major (60 credits) worth of studies in our field available at the University of Oulu. TAMPERE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY, TUT (MATERIALS SCIENCE) ”“Research and teaching of the Materials Science laboratory covers (...) paper converting and packaging” – quote from the website of TUT’s Materials Science. It appears that there is still a research group at TUT that focuses on our industry, so TUT offers at least post-graduate students opportunities to specialize in our field. I cannot find an actual major focusing specifically on wood processing, and courses related to our field are also few and far between. However, there seems to be a commendable number of suitable courses with varying content depending on the student’s interest, such as “Laboratory exercises in material science”; this means that it appears to be possible for an interested student to study our industry quite extensively at the master’s degree stage, with the help of the paper converting and packaging research group. ÅBO AKADEMI UNIVERSITY (CHEMICAL ENGINEERING), TURKU Åbo Akademi University offers a major in Chemical Engineering. Unfortunately, I cannot tell you how many courses related to our industry are included in the major as such, but at least as regards the number of optional courses related to our field, Åbo Akademi seems to be THE UNIVERSITY! I would not have expected this result based on my intuition but, according to my research, Åbo Akademi offers more

extensive teaching in the field than any other university. Courses provided in English that are directly related to our industry are available in three different research groups. “Wood and paper chemistry” offers 49 credits worth of studies directly related to our field. “Laboratory of paper coating and converting” offers 22 credits and “Fiber and cellulose technology” 9 credits. There are even more courses available for those proficient in Swedish. Some of the courses are marked as intended for post-graduate students, but at least these courses are available at Åbo Akademi University. This result may also be partially explained by the fact that information on the courses is more readily available. In any case, based on this review alone, I would strongly advise students who are interested in the industry, after completing their bachelor’s degree, to check the opportunities to switch to Åbo Akademi University’s Chemical Engineering major, which is offered in English, for master’s degree studies. I also recommend looking into the possibility of obtaining a flexible JOO study right to Åbo Akademi University because even a semester or two in an environment that truly facilitates studying our industry may be more valuable than gold. JAMK UNIVERSITY OF APPLIED SCIENCES (TECHNOLOGY) The JAMK website was down when this review was conducted. Unfortunately, I do not have contacts with anyone at JAMK either. Therefore, I cannot introduce their selection of studies any further. SOUTH-EASTERN FINLAND UNIVERSITY OF APPLIED SCIENCES, XAMK, SAVONLINNA (BIOPRODUCTS TECHNOLOGY) “Bioproducts technology studies and develops sustainable production solutions from biomass for industry needs. The current products of the forest industry, paper, packaging, and wood products will constitute the foundation of the industry’s business for years to come.” – XAMK website marketing material. Ten points to XAMK! At their Savonlinna campus, they offer a degree program that directly prepares graduates for jobs in our industry. Although the name of the program is Bioproducts Technology, the marketing material explains outright that the focus is in the forest industry. Well done, Savonlinna!

TAMPERE UNIVERSITY OF APPLIED SCIENCES (BIOPRODUCT AND PROCESS ENGINEERING) “From the program in Bioproduct and Process Engineering, you will graduate as a Bachelor of Engineering who has versatile process skills in chemical and forest bio-economy engineering. Your study path 8 options are 1) Bioproduct engineering, 2) Process :2 engineering or 3) Paper and Packaging Technology.” a 3 – TAMK website marketing material. Ten points an :to5 h TAMK as well. They, too, offer studies thatJuhonestly 14 , 2 prepare graduates for work in our industry. Well aa -0 done, Tampere! m 5

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The all-star line of the national economy – the route of the Finnish potato and barley

Via Chemigate to the world

Through barley and potatoes, Altia Plc, Finnamyl and Chemigate form an economically important triad that moves euros and millions of tons of raw materials. At the same time, they provide employment for thousands of Finnish families. PLAIN BARLEY Altia’s Koskenkorva plant always uses Finnish barley as the raw material for its products. The integrated plant makes as efficient use as possible of its only raw material, husks and all. The main fraction in the process is starch, which is processed into grain ethanol using yeast or sold mainly to Chemigate for further processing. More than 56,000 tons of starch and approximately 23,000 tons of ethanol are produced annually. In 2016, the amount of barley used by Altia totaled 192,000 tons. Some 48,000 hectares under barley cultivation are required to produce this, calculates Kari Kiltilä, Grain Intake Manager at Altia. The area of barley produced under contract, which includes grain companies and direct contracts together, was approximately 40,000 hectares. Approximately 1,500 Finnish farms are required to cultivate this amount of barley. In addition to farmers, barley indirectly provides a great deal of employment for transport firms too. The amount of barley used by Altia corresponds to about 4,300 full truckloads, which perhaps provides a concept of the huge amounts in question. In addition agricultural merchants, among other groups, should be taken into account. Overall, barley provides

“The lion’s share of Chemigate’s revenue growth is founded on domestic raw materials.”

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employment both directly and indirectly for thousands of individuals and families in Finland. According to Kiltilä, depending on the market price for barley, annual raw material net sales are approximately EUR 25-30 million. “Grain prices vary annually, but the total usually settles around this amount,” Kiltilä says. FINNISH POTATOES Finnamyl includes a plant in Kokemäki as well as Lapuan Peruna, whose entire output is sold to Chemigate, where it undergoes further processing. – “The raw materials for the company’s products, starch potatoes, are domestic and grown primarily in the fine sandy soil of the Satakunta and Southern Ostrobothnia regions,” says Ossi Paakki, Managing Director of Finnamyl. There are 210 contracted farmers in Finnamyl’s area in Satakunta and 160 in Lapuan Peruna’s area in Ostrobothnia, with the total number rising thereby to 360. Paakki points out that potatoes provide employment indirectly for a large number of other operators too, in addition to farmers. – For example, the role of transport companies is naturally considerable. Each year 100 million kilos of potatoes, of which transport companies deliver approximately half, are supplied to the Kokemäki plant alone.

8 :2 In Ostrobothnia, Lapuan Peruna produces starch a 3 from starch potatoes cultivated by its contracted an :5 h 4 Ju 2 1 , aa -0 5 m to 7-0 l Pe 01 2

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STARCH’S ROUTE TO THE WORLD Altia Koskenkorva Barley farmers Chemigate

T Paper industry

Potato farmers Finnamyl

farmers and from raw materials procured outside contracts for Chemigate. The starch is supplied to the paper industry where it undergoes further processing. Some of Kokemäki’s production is also sold to Chemigate. Recently, major investments have been made both at Kokemäki and at Lapua with the aim of more efficiently utilizing potato juice obtained as a by-product form starch production. – In 2015, the biggest investment in Finnamyl’s history was completed. This enabled the potato juice in potatoes to be utilized as feed protein and as organic potato molasses for fertilizer. Last autumn, Lapua Peruna also invested in the evaporation concentration of potato juice. The whole company’s turnover is slightly more than EUR 22 million and provides both directly and indirectly employment for hundreds, if not thousands of families. This is therefore a highly significant industry both economically and regionally.. THROUGH CHEMIGATE TO THE WORLD The barley starch produced by Altia and the potato starch available through Finnamyl also play a central role in Chemigate’s further processing operations. The company dedicated to manufacturing and selling modified starch-based adhesives for technical applications processes native barley and potato starch in significant amounts in its operations. Starch is processed in the company’s production facilities both in Lapua and in Kaipiainen.

“Our main product category in starches is wet end starches, surface sizing starches and coating binders. Other products include spray starches, but the three abovementioned products are clearly our main products. Barley starch and potato starch are our main raw materials, which we use in over half of our production,” explains Harri Heikkinen, Production Manager at Chemigate. In 2016, nearly 100,000 tons of starch-based products were exported as dry powder. This does not, however, reflect the whole picture of these transports as Kaipiainen, for example, supplies all of its products in liquid form, which means some 80,000 tons. The lion’s share of Chemigate’s increasing net sales also rests on starches. “Last year, the company´s net sales totaled approximately EUR 60 million, with the sales of modified starches accounting for 90 percent of this figure,” Heikkinen says. Five years ago, Chemigate invested in a new dry modification line in Lapua. The investment was a really important step in the company’s history and enriched its options in starch modification. According to Heikkinen, investments within the company have subsequently focused mainly on further development of the new production line. – All in all, the product plant´s development investments have nevertheless remained at around one million euros annually says Heikkinen. a

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Text: TIMO LAINE AND TIMO KANKAANPÄÄ Pictures: TIMO LAINE

The view of the factory from the scenic platform of the Arkhangelsk’s ”little Karelia” or Malye Karelii. The wide River Dvina flows in the middle.

Regards from Arkhangelsk! The home of JSC Arkhangelsk Pulp & Paper Mill (APPM) is located far away in northern Russia. The industrial complex in the small town of Novodvinsk, located right at the mouth of the River Dvina in the Arkhangelsk Oblast, is one of the leading European wood chemical enterprises. APPM is a leading container board manufacturer and one of the biggest pulp manufacturers in Russia. APPM is specialized in the production of bleached kraft pulp, board, various paper grades and exercise books. “Our location creates challenges and opportunities for us. The mill is close to key raw materials and the direct link to the sea provides good connections. Many of our customers, however, are located very far away from us. Reels, pulp and board are shipped semi-finished for further processing,” says Chief Technologist Ilja Filippov. According to Filippov, APPM’s plans for the future correspond to the general trend in the sector. “Board manufacture is the biggest sector, and the bulk of our efforts lie here. In paper manufacturing we are focusing more on packaging materials, as the offset market is in decline.” APPM cooperates with a number of chemical suppliers. The drive for excellence and the challenging location create their own requirements.

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“Pulp chemicals and fillers are sourced mainly from Russian suppliers, but we procure fine chemicals from abroad. The most important aspect for chemicals is quality and supply security. On account of our location, we have to be prepared for equipment breakdowns and, for example, there must be more than one wire.” More than one million people live in the oblast of Arkhangelsk. The region´s capital city of Arkhangelsk with a population of some 350,000 has, among other attractions, a university and a lively cultural scene.” “Residents of Arkhangelsk used to be characterized by the words Triska, Daska and Tuska. Cod on account of the fishing industry, board because of the sawmilling and melancholy owing to the location. That is no longer the case, and the town 8 is rapidly becoming more international thanksato, :2 3 5 among other things, students. For tourists who anfind h 4: their way to the city, the Malinki Karelia u museum 1 J 2 featuring Karelian handicrafts is well worth a, visiting,” 0 a says Filippov. 5-

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The quality control lab’s own lab cat as a paperweight next to the sample cutter. The fresh CD paper sample feels nice and warm.

Arkhangelsk was founded by the English and before St. Petersburg was founded in 1703, it was Russia’s only port to the West.

Pigeons are used to getting their share of the lab ladies’ lunch.

“APPM cooperates with a number of chemical suppliers. The drive for excellence and the challenging location create their own requirements.” )

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”You cannot predict the future, but everyone should have dreams and goals as well as a life philosophy”

Towards stronger expertise and better service Meet our new team players Tom, Atte and Janne.

We at Chemigate have great faith in the future and strongly believe that solid team play and good players are the key factors in this. In the last issue of Bridge, we introduced you to our new product development and safety specialists Tarmo, Raija and Jari-Jussi. Now it is Tom, Atte and Janne’s turn. They specialize in technical customer service and production processes. Tom Lundin, 49, Doctor of Science (Technology), began work at the Chemigate office in Mietoinen in early February. His duties include sales support and application development. Before Chemigate, Lundin served as a senior researcher at a Kemira R&D centre in Espoo for five years. His daily work at Kemira included product development and research projects related to water purification and paper and board strength. Tom found work with Chemigate partly by chance. “I happened to see the Chemigate job advertisement in the fall and thought to myself: ‘Could I fulfil those requirements?’ On the last day of the application period, I read the ad more carefully and decided to apply. I commuted from Turku to Espoo for a long time, so the location was also important for me and my family.” A new and more peaceful world unfolded itself, as Lundin swapped the clogged traffic lanes of Espoo to the beautiful rural landscapes of Mietoinen. “I have no qualms about operating in the countryside.

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I grew up in Ostrobothnia and I feel equally at home here,” says Tom. Tom has previous experience in the field of pulp/ fibre and paper technology as well as in surface and colloid chemistry, not to mention his solid competence in materials science and analytics. He completed a dissertation on the low-consistency refining of pulp at Åbo Akademi University in 2008. Before joining Kemira, Tom served as a senior researcher and academy lecturer at the physical chemistry laboratory of Åbo Akademi University. “Changing jobs always takes some adaptation and time for fi nding your bearings. However, I am already convinced that we will make great things happen and promote interesting new topics together at Chemigate.”

8 Tom’s 14-year-old daughter and 12-year-old a son :2 3 n 5 ensure that their father does not immerse himself hainter4: too deeply in his favorite pastimes. Tomuis 1 J , 2as the ested in all forms of technology as a well 0 a activities, wonders of nature. He also enjoys fitness 5m 0 lto 7e P 01 2

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The first meeting on Chemigate’s green couch in Mietoinen. From left to right in the picture: Tom Lundin and Atte Leinonen.

music and photography in his free time. Moreover, a 70s MB (W115 with an OM617 engine) awaits restoration in his garage. “I have been interested in nature and all kinds of technology since I was a child. I enjoy all music from classic rock to modern hits. Nature excursions in the beautiful Finnish wild are one of my favourite pastimes, too.” Tom’s interest in photography, technology and cars stems from his father, a chief engineer and man of many talents. Tom’s life philosophy relies on his educational and occupational background, seasoned with some common sense. When asked to describe himself, Tom humorously replies that his isn’t all thumbs, he rarely finds himself at a loss and he enjoys straightening question marks. “People need to live in the now and enjoy what each day has to offer while we are alive and well. I am a researcher, so it is clear to me that choices must be based on facts instead of assumptions. That is a solid foundation to build on,” says Tom.. HOCKEY MAN FROM IMATRA Atte Leinonen, Master of Science (Technology), 46, is the latest reinforcement to our sales team in Eastern Finland; he took on the position of Customer Service Manager with Chemigate in early March. Atte effectively commutes between his home office, the Chemigate office in Kaipiainen and customer meetings. He reports he feels comfortable with his new post at Chemigate. “The team is great and just the right the size, and I enjoy the atmosphere and high aspirations. Those

Process development engineer Janne Vähämäki at his post in Lapua.

are all quality ingredients,” says Atte. Atte graduated from the Imatra school of technology with a degree in paper engineering in 1993 and from the Lappeenranta University of Technology with a Master of Science degree in 2000. His merits include extensive experience in process engineering at the Tainiokoski factory of Stora Enso as well as the duties of sales development manager with BIM Finland before transferring to Chemigate. “The vacancy at Chemigate felt like a sensible next step. I was specifically interested in the product range and related opportunities. My goal is to quickly adopt the company methods and I feel I am off to a good start.” Atte lives in Imatra with his wife and almost 10-yearold son and spends much of his free time at the indoor ice rink. The car is rarely parked in the garage at the Leinonen residence because Atte also manages his son’s ice hockey team Ketterä, which is no minor task. “Our shared ice hockey hobby takes so much time that I don’t really need other leisure activities. I enjoy all aspects of hockey.

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You cannot predict the future, but everyone should have dreams and goals as well as a life philosophy.” “Professionally, I want to reach the level of the other sales professionals at Chemigate. On a personal level, I would like an apartment in Spain after retirement, 8 but this is not an imminent prospect. I try to enjoy :2 a 3 5 life one day at a time. Simultaneously, I try aton get h when 4: along with people both on and off duty, even u 1 J 2 they do not share all of my opinions. This a, approach a -0 will get you places,” says Atte.

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”I appreciate smooth collaboration both at work and in everyday life”

A FISHING DEVELOPMENT ENGINEER Janne Vähämäki, 31, Master of Science (Process Technology), started as a development engineer in Lapua in the beginning of December. Before joining Chemigate, Janne worked for Ruukki Construction in Alajärvi with development of new chemical processes and production technologies for about two years. Janne studied process technology in Oulu, graduating in 2013. He ended up in Chemigate after receiving a hint from his better half. – My spouse travelled from our home in Alajärvi to work in Lapua and, after getting tired of travelling, suggested that I should also find myself a job in this district. I noticed the Chemigate job advertisement and succeeded to clear my way to the company. The whole family moved to Lapua at the same time, Janne says. Vähämäki created his master’s thesis at Talvivaara, studying dependences between process components in the bioheapleaching process and effects of various run parameters on dissolution of metal sulphides. During his student days, he often worked for the Boliden Kokkola plant as an operator in summer. So far he has got only positive experiences to report about Chemigate.

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– The crew has welcomed me really warmly which is very important for coping at work. Introduction to work was very professional and I quickly became a part of the work community. I sort of felt that I could start from a ‘ready-set table’, Janne boasts. The family keeps Janne busy outside working hours. He likes to walk in the wild and enjoys the offerings of the forest with his 3- and 6-year-old children. – If I find some time, I go ice fishing in the winter and fishing in the summer. I usually relax with my family and love to go berry picking in the forest, among other things. The warm welcome at Chemigate and friendly attitude from the colleagues also touches Janne’s own principles in life. Working together provides the best results. – I appreciate smooth collaboration both at work and in everyday life. It has been great to watch that 8 :2 cooperation here at Chemigate and to learn froma 3 experienced workmates. They know how things an :5 h work in house and how to take care of their u du14 ,J 2and ties in an exemplary way. I like to watch athat a -0 learn from it. 5

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Until the last breath – well, not quite… When we at the advertising agency Propaganda got invited to Chemigate’s exercising challenge, I titled our internal e-mail ”We are so going to win this!”. The mail chain got longer and longer with messages of support and strategies, and the amount of good feeling amongst my colleagues was unbelievable. I dare say (in spite of the outcome) that in the level of team spirit, we have already won. I am highly interested in the philosophy of winning. As a former team sports player, I think the sense of solidarity within your team is the best feeling ever. I would even say that the summers spent on the field with my team have smoothed out my edges (sometimes pretty roughly) and also taught a thing or two about life. Even though at the time, it was all about pesäpallo, the Finnish baseball. A healthy competitive spirit is only a good thing, but what happens when it gets out of hands? When we at Propaganda gather together to play sports, we seldom manage to avoid little cuts and bruises – just having fun and playing around with no real purpose is out of question. Regardless of this, I mostly compete against myself and my mind. No matter the sport, your mind tells you to stop long before your body does. To me, the purpose of life is to be the best version of yourself every day. What I enjoy most about exercising, is the feeling that you get when your heart rate rises making you feel alive and ready to challenge yourself. Winning is all about attitude, but none of us can make it on our own. Take a look around you – the strengths of each and every one of you make all of you invincible as a team.

Sanna Kivimäki Project manager, Mainos- ja viestintätoimisto Propaganda

Fingerpori’s exercising challenge )

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The impact of surface size cationizity on starch behavior in the wet end CASE 1: Laboratory testing

CASE 2: Pilot paper machine trial

Paper samples were surface sized with three different surface size types in laboratory scale. The measured starch contents of the papers were:

Paper: 50g/m² MF-offset, Application unit: bond sizer Surface size dosage: 3,5 % Starch properties: 6 % Tested surface sizes: Raisamyl, oxidized (anionic) Raisamyl, DS 0.018 Raisamyl, DS 0.025 Raisamyl, DS 0.035 Raisamyl, DS 0.045 Raisamyl, DS 0.050

Raisamyl, oxidized Raisamyl, D.S. 0,018 Raisamyl, D.S. 0,035

1,44% 1,56% 1,57%

After surface sizing and drying the papers were pulped and the pulp was diluted to 3% The pulped stock was stored at 40°C and filtered after 1h, 4h and 24h. Both COD and starch content were measured from the filtrate.

The results were:

After surface sizing all the papers were pulped to 3% pulp and stored at 40°C or at 60°C.

The results were: COD mg/l, stored at 40°c

160

1200

140

1000

COD mg/l

Dissolved starch (mg/l)

DISSOLVED STARCH

120 100 80 60

Oxidized DS 0,018 DS 0,025 DS 0,035 DS 0,045 DS 0,050

800 600 400

40

200

20

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Time Oxidized

DS 0,018

COD mg/l, stored at 60°c

DS 0,035 1400

Oxidized DS 0,018 DS 0,025 DS 0,035 DS 0,045 DS 0,050

COD mg/l

1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0 1h

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“Surface size cationizity has a clear impact on starch re-solubility.”

DISSOLVED STARCH, stored at 40˚c 450

Dissolved starch (mg/l)

400 350

Conclusions: – Surface size cationizity has a clear impact on starch re-solubility / soluble starch content in water phase.

300 250 200 150 100

– Already a very low cationicity level (DS 0.018) has a remarkable impact on starch re-solubility and COD-load.

50 0 1h

4h

24h

Time DISSOLVED STARCH, stored at 60˚c

– Higher water temperature (40°C � 60°C) boosts the solubility. However, increasing the time delay to one day in 60°C will obviously turn the starch to sugar, which will reduce the measured starch content, but maintain the high COD-values.

450 400

Dissolved starch (mg/l)

– Further increase of the cationicity (DS 0.018 -> DS 0.050) does not provide any significant benefits

350 300

In addition: – As the cationicity improves the starch retention in broke systems the benefits will only appear via broke -> thus broke percentage should also be taken into account when optimizing the needed cationicity level.

250 200 150 100 50 0

8 :2 a 3 – It should be noted as well that cationic surface an :5 h 4 size does not only improve the starch yield Ju 2 1and reduce the COD-load, but also boostsa,strength a -0 & retention. 5 m to 7-0 l Pe 01 2 CHEMIGATE – Temperature and pH level also matter.

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Time Oxidized DS 0,018

DS 0,025 DS 0,035

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Don’t miss out on

grass this Easter

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