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Sixth Form Curriculum 2017 - 2019


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Contents Introduction�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 5 University Entry���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 7 Art����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 8 Art History���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 9 Business Studies������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 10 Classical Civilisation���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 11 Design & Technology - Resistant Materials�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 12 Design & Technology - Textiles����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 14 Economics��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 16 English Literature���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 17 Geography�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 18 History���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 20 Latin & Classical Greek���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 21 Mathematics & Further Mathematics��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 22 Modern Languages - French, German & Spanish������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 23 Music������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 24 Politics & Government����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 25 Psychology������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 27 Science - Biology, Chemistry, Physics��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 28 Sports Science������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 31 Theatre Studies���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 32 Theology, Philosophy & Ethics (TPE)��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 33 FLOREAT / Extended research projects��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 34 English as an Additional Language (EAL)���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 35 Learning Support����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 36 Higher Education & Careers���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 37 Appendix���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 38 1: A Level results 2011 - 2016


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Cheltenham College Sixth Form: A Level Choices Deputy Head (Academic) – Mr S J Brian Head of Upper College – Mr D M Evans

taking A Levels, so that students, teachers and parents have a full understanding of progress. The new system also has an AS Level, which has 40% of the content of a full A Level. However, this new AS Level does not contribute any marks to the A Level, and universities will continue to make place offers based on three full A Levels only. College does not intend to use the AS Level qualification.

Aims of Upper College

• For students to leave with three A Level grades that enable them to attend their first-choice university. • To cultivate intellectual curiosity so that students retain academic interests for life. • To develop in students the independent study skills that will allow them to thrive in a university environment where there is much less support than that available at Cheltenham College. • To acquire the ‘soft’ skills required to succeed in the world of work. Particular focus is placed on leadership and presentational skills. The two years in Upper College are an exciting, challenging and enjoyable time of study. They provide the opportunity to choose subjects that students really enjoy, to focus on their strengths and to get to grips with them in depth. Those students who invest time and energy into their Sixth Form studies truly experience the best days of their lives. The two years lay the foundations not only for university study but also for a whole life’s sense of interest and achievement.

A Levels at Cheltenham College

At Cheltenham College all students joining the Lower Sixth in September 2017 will pursue one of the following two options: 1. Study 3 A Levels and complete an Extended Research Project 2. Study 4 A Levels Universities make conditional place offers based on the grades likely to be attained in the subjects by the end of the Upper Sixth. Whatever a student’s subject choices, exams will be taken in all subjects during the Summer Term of Lower Sixth.

Subject Choice

Fifth Form pupils should make sure that they find out what each subject entails by reading this guide and, more importantly, by talking to subject teachers and Heads of Department where possible. The aim of this booklet is to introduce the courses on offer at the College and to help them make an informed decision with the support of parents, tutor and Housemaster or Housemistress.

The most important statement College would like to make is that students should choose the subjects that they wish to study on their own merits; this means that they should choose the subjects they enjoy most, and in which they have the best chance of achieving high grades. Our primary concern is that students achieve three good A Level grades which will enable them to attend their first-choice university.

The structure of the A Level

College positively encourages diversity and the logical mixing of arts, science, humanities and languages. Unlike other schools, we do not prescribe blocks of subjects, but try as far as possible to accommodate each individual’s choices, although we cannot guarantee this.

The main school-leaving qualifications in England are called A Levels. The structure of A Levels started to change in September 2015. However, as has been widely reported in the press, these changes were staggered into three phases. Therefore, your sons and daughters will be studying only ‘new’ (reformed) A Levels, where the only examinations that count are taken at the end of the Sixth Form, i.e. in Summer 2019.

GCSE grades

When making choices for A Level, students should consider their strengths at GCSE. These grades are a good indicator of a student’s ability and should help guide subject choice. In general, the minimum requirement for pursuing a subject at A Level is a B grade at GCSE, either in the subject itself or in a closely-related one. Certain subjects have higher entry requirements. This is because experience has shown us that the ‘step up’ to A Level (which is significant in all areas) is particularly high in some subjects, and that a strong foundation is required if students are to have a realistic chance of achieving a grade C or above at A Level.

A Levels: then and now

Until 2015, A Level was made up of two parts: AS (Advanced Subsidiary); and A2 (Advanced 2nd year). AS was of a less demanding standard than A2 and has stood on its own as half an A Level. To get a full A Level in a subject it was necessary to take AS and A2 in that subject. The marks achieved at AS level contributed to the total A Level grade a student achieved.

• To study Biology, Chemistry or Physics, an A grade is required at (I)GCSE. • To study French, German or Spanish, an A grade is required at (I)GCSE. • To study Mathematics, an A* grade is required at (I)GCSE. • To study Economics, an A grade is required at (I)GCSE Mathematics.

From September 2017 A Levels in all subjects are linear in nature. The only formal, public examinations for these will take place in the Summer Term of 2019, i.e. at the very end of the course. An advantage of this change is that teachers and students have two years to engage in more in-depth study of their subjects. College organises robust, high-stakes examinations during the Lower Sixth year for all students

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How to choose A Levels

• To study Psychology, B grades are required in Mathematics, English and Science. If pupils are in any doubt that they will achieve this minimum GCSE performance, they should discuss this with the relevant Head of Department, notably at the Fifth Form Parents’ Meeting on Friday 10 February 2017.

There are various things to think about: Some university courses require one or two specific A Levels. If you are set on a university course, such as Medicine, Engineering or Architecture, make sure that you seek advice. The best choices are those based on academic enjoyment and interest. Which subjects are most rewarding, fun and challenging for you?

Universities

Universities in the UK use A Level results to offer places. Some universities require specific grades (ABB for example); some require points (an A* grade counts for 140 points, A for 120, B for 100, C for 80 and so on). An increasing number of highly selective universities now use the new A* grade in their offers. The offer will also vary depending on the subject a student wishes to read.

You may wish to continue subjects where you have consistently achieved good results; after all, university places depend on good grades. Cheltenham College is an all-round school that takes pride in the all-round students that it produces. Whatever your choices for A Level, we will make sure that you achieve the best grades you can, while making sure you get the most out of the huge range of co-curricular activities on offer.

Beyond the Curriculum

With a genuine focus on independent yet structured and supported learning, the Sixth Form at Cheltenham College aims to set students up for university life, while also fostering interest and achievement in areas that go beyond the A Level curriculum. This is achieved in particular through an extended project in which students are encouraged to research and produce work in areas that help develop them beyond the confines of the syllabus. All students will be required to submit a project. They will research their topic and be taught research skills during Lower Sixth with the support of a mentor; the project will be submitted before the Upper Sixth. Finally, there is an eclectic lecture and elective programme to stimulate thought and prompt ideas for the future.

Contacts:

s.brian@cheltenhamcollege.org: Deputy Head (Academic) d.evans@cheltenhamcollege.org: Head of Upper College: c.rowland@cheltenhamcollege.org: Deputy Head of Upper College i.mech@cheltenhamcollege.org: Deputy Head of Upper College

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University Entry Head of Upper College and Head of Higher Education & Careers – Mr D Evans Deputy Head of Upper College - Miss C Rowland Deputy Head of Upper College – Mrs I Mech Higher Education & Careers Advisor - Mrs R Evans

Cheltenham College has an excellent record in placing candidates at the major universities with Birmingham, Bristol, Cambridge, Durham, Edinburgh, Exeter, Leeds, London, Manchester, Newcastle, Nottingham and Oxford being some of the most popular destinations over the last six years (precise details can be found on the Cheltenham College website www.cheltenhamcollege.org/higher). GCSE performance has become an important selection factor - e.g. a good grade in Latin or Modern Languages for English or History, and a good GCSE Mathematics standard for Business Studies, Estate Management and Economics.

Subject requirements for Higher Education

The usual minimum entry requirement for a UK university is three passes at A Level. GCSEs in Mathematics and English (or the IELTs qualification) are required and sometimes a foreign language is as well. A GCSE in a science subject is necessary for certain careers, such as teaching.

Contacts:

d.evans@cheltenhamcollege.org: Head of Upper College

At more competitive universities the minimum offer is likely to be BBB (and may of course be higher). Medical, Veterinary Science, English, History and Law courses usually require A*AA or AAA. Offers from Cambridge and Oxford are unlikely to be lower than A*AA in any discipline, and the A* is now becoming the norm. Pleasingly 16% of College’s A Level grades were at A* in 2015.

c.rowland@cheltenhamcollege.org: Deputy Head of Upper College i.mech@cheltenhamcollege.org: Deputy Head of Upper College r.evans@cheltenhamcollege.org: Higher Education and Careers Advisor

Specific subjects

Care needs to be taken over A Level choices for certain degree courses. There are guidelines that follow, but students (and parents) are strongly encouraged to use the UCAS website (www.ucas.com) which has the latest information about specific degree requirements. Chemistry is normally required for Agriculture, Biochemistry, Biology, Dentistry, Food Sciences, Medicine, Oceanography, Pharmacy, Physiology and Veterinary Sciences. Biology is highly advisable for Medicine (most universities now specifically request this subject) and Veterinary Medicine, though the third subject can be flexible. Most other scientific subjects at the top universities prefer two Science A Levels plus Mathematics. Engineering requires Mathematics and, in most cases, Physics too. On the Arts side, the main theme of the degree course is usually required at A Level with, in some cases, a foreign language. Grouping Arts and Social Science disciplines together, such as English and History, or Geography and Economics with Government and Politics, can often be both beneficial and interesting. Arts subjects with a Modern or an Ancient Language are always a potent combination. Pure Economics degree courses often require Mathematics A Level and, at the very top end, you will be at an advantage if you study Further Mathematics. The following areas do not usually require any specific pattern: Archaeology, Art and Design, Business Studies, Physical Education, non-European Languages, Law, Drama, Philosophy, Politics/International Relations, Psychology, Sociology, Theology, but benefit from a range of disciplines, i.e. for Archaeology: Fine Art, History and Mathematics plus a fourth subject. It is worth noting that Art and Design courses will require both a portfolio of work and a Foundation Course to be taken in a gap year.

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Art Head of Department – Ms Jo Millar

There is not a formal exam in Lower Sixth; however, we will run our own internal examination in the summer of Lower Sixth, in order to prepare students for the rigours of the 15 hour A Level exam.

Introduction to Art

A Level Art is open to students who have passed GCSE Art with Grade C or above.

Lower Sixth students explore and experiment with a wide variety of different materials, techniques and approaches. They will be taught the importance of purposeful research and investigations. Visits to galleries and opportunities to discuss works of art enable thorough exploration and development of personal ideas, to gain an understanding of the area(s) to be pursued in the Upper Sixth.

The A Level Art and Design course provides students with opportunities to develop personal responses to ideas, observations, experiences, environments and cultures in practical, critical and contextual forms, in a range of different media with the potential to specialise in 2D or 3D if desired. This is a time-consuming subject, and the use of free time is essential. Students must be personally committed to continue working whenever opportunities arise. The department is open every Monday and Tuesday evening, staffed by Art staff to enable students to work independently but with supervision and guidance. There will be compulsory Drawing workshops, including Life Drawing.

Upper Sixth students continue to produce increasingly sophisticated and in-depth artworks, and undertake an investigative research document related to their practical work (started over the summer holiday prior to Upper Sixth). The two elements (practical and research documents) make up 60% of the overall grade at A Level, are marked holistically, and must support each other. The research material will be presented as either a written and illustrated thesis of 10003000 words, a slide presentation or audio video. Students will demonstrate greater maturity and self-discipline as well as depth of skills, knowledge and understanding gained from Lower Sixth.

The course will particularly suit those who want to gain greater personal independence and voice by developing their own ideas. If you are imaginative, creative, enjoy experimenting and investigating, are thoughtful and questioning, then you will have the necessary skills to succeed. You will already have knowledge and understanding of the formal elements of Art - colour, tone, form etc, though above all, you will be driven by a desire to produce visual pieces in response to your personal journey. Students must understand that organisation, working to deadlines, and working independently is crucial to success in this subject.

Exam: 40%

The exam paper is given out in February of Upper Sixth, and contains several broad starting points from which students make a personal, independent response, informed by the work of appropriate artists. Idea development is carried out from the release date in February until the supervised 15hr exam in the summer term of U6.

Areas of Study, skills and practice:

The skills developed are varied and differ between all students, however, they will always include:

Art beyond A Level

• Researching the work of artists both historical and contemporary • exploring concepts • experimenting with a wide range of materials, techniques and processes. Students will have opportunity to develop their skills within all or one of the following areas: painting and drawing, print, ceramics and sculpture, glass, mixed media, digital. The ability to interpret and express personal ideas, to refine ideas through investigation and exploration, to challenge and analyse existing concepts and document all aspects of the project work and journey, will be made using specialist vocabulary and quality artworks will reflect this investigation. Milestone pieces and exhibitions will run throughout the year to coincide with peer assessment and formal assessment by departmental staff.

A Level provides the opportunity to produce a varied portfolio, showing evidence of independent ideas, sustained commitment, enthusiasm and ability. Applications to Foundation Courses are generally submitted in December/ January of the Upper Sixth. After this, candidates will be eligible to apply for degree courses in more specialised areas. Many careers are possible including advertising, marketing, design, illustration, graphics, fashion, architecture, publishing and the media. However, It is worth remembering that usually, but not always, universities will require a Foundation year in Art and Design prior to specialising at degree level.

Many managers are interested in individuals who have undertaken a creative subject. Creativity challenges and develops self-discipline and creative and divergent thinking.

Examination specification

AQA - A2 Art and Design: Fine Art (7202)

Structure of the Two Year A Level (Advanced Level)

Web address: http://www.aqa.org.uk7201

Coursework 60%

j.millar@cheltenhamcollege.org

Contact:

We run the course over two full years, with an external examination held in the summer term of the second year. 8


Art History Head of Department - Mr Nick Nelson

Course & Exam Structure

The course is designed to equip learners with the skills required to make a success of their studies at university. It is built on a core set of educational aims to prepare learners for university admission, and also for success in higher education and beyond. This is a linear subject, and students are assessed at the end of a two-year programme of study, like all A Level subjects.

Paper 1 Analytical Studies in Western and non-Western Art Candidates will be expected to study 40 named works of art divided into four separate sections: Section 1: Painting
 Section 2: Sculpture
 Section 3: Architecture


Aims:

Section 4: Drawing, printing, photography, collage and film

The course in Art History encourages: • independent and self-directed learning 
 • lateral, critical and creative thought & good problemsolving skills 
 • a comprehensive understanding of the subject through depth and rigour • a high level of visual and/or other forms of awareness 
 • a critical understanding of works of art from a range of familiar and unfamiliar cultures 
 • the skills of research and critical analysis • the ability to effectively communicate understanding and knowledge of art history, including an awareness of art historical terms, concepts and issues

Paper 2 Historical Topics Candidates will be expected to study at least two topics from a choice of eight. Topics range from classical antiquity to 21st-century contemporary art. Candidates are expected to demonstrate the skills of formal/visual analysis in a contextualised way Paper 3 Thematic Topics Candidates will be expected to study one topic from a choice of five Candidates are expected to develop a sophisticated level of argument and analysis

Subject Skills

• Learners develop a critical understanding of works of art, placing them in the context in which they are found 
 • Learners experience a choice of chronologically wideranging content, from the art of classical antiquity to cutting-edge 21st-century works of art and the opportunity to study the rich tradition of non-Western works of art • Learners study a wide variety of media including painting, sculpture, architecture, drawing, printing, photography, installation, film and video art. They can investigate a wide-ranging art historical theme, such as landscape, stilllife or the art and architecture of a city of their choice • The Personal Investigation enables learners to pursue a topic of their choice which engages their interest and imagination, enabling them to choose 25% of the qualification. It is a bridge to university in its use of academic protocols, emphasis on original and independent research, first-hand experience of the object of study, broad contextual reading and formation of an argument • A viva, which is an extra dimension to Paper 4, allows learners to convey their understanding in a different way, through an interrogative approach, facilitating debate and discussion • Learners are encouraged to study works of art from firsthand experience, by visiting galleries, public buildings, museums, etc. 


Paper 4 Personal Investigation Candidates will complete an independent personal investigation in an essay of approximately 3000 words (40 marks), which is followed by a viva (20 marks)

Contact:

n.nelson@cheltenhamcollege.org

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Business Resources and Wider Reading

Head of Department – Dr G Mallard Business is a dynamic and engaging subject that throws students into the heart of large organisations across the globe. A significant amount of time is spent keeping up to date with the latest developments in the business world alongside gaining an understanding of the latest cutting edge business theory. The course provides a superb grounding for those students considering a business related course at undergraduate level.

Recommended website: http://www.tutor2u.net/blog/ index.php/business-studies/ Post GCSE Summer Reading and Podcasts The time between the end of GCSE exams in June and the start of the A Level course in September provides a wonderful opportunity for students to engage with subject related material and to get a head start ahead of their next stage of study:

Students will consider on a local, national and international level:

Reading List

• the importance of the context of business in relation to decision making • the interrelated nature of business activities and how they affect competitiveness • the competitive environment and the markets in which businesses operate • the influences on functional decisions and plans including ethical and environmental issues • the factors that might determine whether a decision is successful e.g. the quality of data and the degree of uncertainty • how technology is changing the way decisions are made and how businesses operate and compete • the impact on stakeholders of functional decisions and their response to such decisions • use of non-quantitative and quantitative data in decision making (including the interpretation of index numbers and calculations such as ratios and percentages) • the impact of technology on strategic decision making • the influences of Corporate Social Responsibility, ethical and environmental issues on strategic decisions • the difficulties in forecasting future trends • the importance of assessing feasibility and risk when making strategic decisions • the impact on stakeholders of strategic decisions and their response to such decisions

‘Deep Sea and Foreign Going: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry That Brings You 90% of Everything’ by Rose George ‘The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon’ by Brad Stone ‘Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead’ by Sheryl Sandberg ‘The Virgin Way: How to Listen, Learn, Laugh and Lead’ by Richard Branson ‘Bounce: The Myth of Talent and the Power of Practice’ by Matthew Syed ‘How Google Works’ by Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenburg ‘The Apple Revolution: Steve Jobs, the counterculture and how the crazy ones took over the world’ by Luke Dormehl ‘The Winner of Effect: The Science of Success and how to use it’ by Ian Robertson

Suggested Podcasts

‘The Bottom Line’ presented by Evan Davis http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/bottomline ‘In Business’ presented by Peter Day http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/worldbiz

Contact:

g.mallard@cheltenhamcollege.org

Examination Requirements

There is a mix of final assessment methods including multiple choice questions, short answer questions, data responses and longer essays. Students sit three examinations, each lasting two hours. There is no requirement to have studied GCSE Economics or Business before undertaking the A Level course.

Examination specification AQA Business (A-level 7132)

Web address: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/businesssubjects/as-and-a-level/business-7131-713

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Classical Civilisation Relevance of Classical Civilisation to the Future

Head of Department – Mr T A Lambert

Introduction

Classical Civilisation’s value lies in the range of skills it will develop in you, and the breadth of new ideas and discoveries it will spark. It is a subject that encourages personal engagement and evaluation, recall of distant and sometimes confusing evidence, and an ability to discern the true value of sources in their context.

Classical Civilisation is a new A Level option at the school. It is open to all Sixth Form students; no prior knowledge or experience of the subject is required. There is no Latin involved in the course. Classical Civilisation is the study of the Ancient World in English. It is a subject of great diversity and interest, encompassing elements of literature, history, art, architecture and philosophy, and familiarising students with some of the foundational concepts of Western civilisation, such as tragedy, myth, comedy and epic.

The skills necessary to gain high grades will be those looked for by many universities and employers. Particularly useful to those looking to study literature or history at university, research shows that Classical Civilisation students have previously gone on to a wide range of university courses, from Economics or Geography to Theatre Studies or Art, and pursued a wide range of careers, from law or politics to journalism or diplomacy.

Studying in English allows us to cover large volumes of material, helping to scratch beneath the surface of the Classical past, and to get to grips with the concerns and interests of the Greeks and Romans.

Examination Specification

What to Expect

OCR A2 Classics: Classical Civilisation H408

The course covers the full breadth of the Classical world: we study tragedies such as Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex and Euripides’ Bacchae, the epics of Homer and Vergil, the poetry of Sappho and Ovid, the art and architecture of the Greeks, the history of Herodotus and the legal speeches of Cicero. Classical Civilisation is a source based subject, combining a good dose of literary and other written sources with artistic and architectural remains. Students read and examine the sources, learning about their significance, provenance and historical context; discussion and note-taking is encouraged. The skills of recall, understanding, evaluation and contextualisation are central to the course.

Recommendations

A Level Classicists are extremely welcome at the twicetermly Classical Society, and are encouraged to attend the annual lectures, overseas tours and theatre trips that the Department offers. Those wishing to enhance their knowledge of the Ancient World should contact their Classics teachers for further reading lists.

Contact:

t.lambert@cheltenhamcollege.org

Written work is the final product in the exam, and this is reflected in regular written tasks throughout the year, in and out of the classroom. Responses range from ten mark questions requiring around half a side of writing, to essay tasks which may require three or more sides. Students should take Classical Civilisation if they have an interest in the Classical World, enjoy studying topics which are surprising and unusual, and have some aptitude for writing their opinions about what they are studying. Prior success in essay writing subjects such as English, History or Classical Civilisation is generally a good indicator that students will do well. As there is no overlap between the GCSE and A Level courses, no prior experience with the subject is necessary, though those who have taken the subject lower down the school may well wish to find out more.

Classical Civilisation and other subjects

The subject combines naturally with literary subjects like English and Theatre Studies, and with those which develop writing skills, such as History, Philosophy, Religious Studies and Psychology. Equally, it is an excellent ‘third’ or ‘fourth’ subject for scientists, linguists, mathematicians, and others grouping two or more of their subjects. Needless to say, it combines seamlessly with Latin and/or Greek, for those looking to be thoroughbred Classicists! 11


Design and Technology – Resistant Materials Component 2: Independent Design and Make Project

Head of Department – Mr D J Lait We are surrounded by products which make our lives easier in so many ways, but are you interested in how they are produced, the technology which gives them a competitive edge, their aesthetic influences, how they could be improved and what happens to them at the end of their life? The A Level Product Design (Resistant Materials Technology) course aims to answer these questions, giving students an appreciation and understanding of the man-made environment we live in.

Non-examined assessment 50% of the qualification 120 marks

Content overview

• Students individually and/or in consultation with a client identify a problem and design context • Students will develop a range of potential solutions which include the use of computer aided design and evidence of modelling • Students will be expected to make decisions about the designing and development of the prototype in conjunction with the opinions of the user group or client • Students will realise one potential solution through practical making activities with evidence of project management and plan for production • Students will incorporate issues related to sustainability and the impact their prototype may have on the environment • Students are expected to analyse and evaluate design decisions and outcomes for prototypes/products made by themselves and others • Students are expected to analyse and evaluate of wider issues in design technology, including social, moral, ethical and environmental impacts.

Students should have a strong interest in designing, problem solving, modelling, making and evaluating products and production systems. Throughout the course students will be given the opportunity to develop their creativity, presentation and practical skills, to apply knowledge and understanding of technological activities and to develop critical analysis skills. Students will be expected to contribute in a much more active role than at GCSE. They will be given guidance, but ultimately must be self-motivated and determined to succeed at the highest level.

Syllabus and teaching method

We have not currently chosen the syllabus that will be used in 2017, however the content is generally similar between boards

Component 1: Principles of Design and Technology

Assessment overview

Written examination: 2 hours 30 minutes 50% of the qualification 120 marks

The investigation report is internally assessed and externally moderated.

Content overview

Students will produce a substantial design, make and evaluate a project that consists of a portfolio and a prototype.

1. Materials 2. Performance characteristics of materials 3. Processes and techniques 4. Digital technologies 5. Factors influencing the development of products 6. Effects of technological developments 7. Potential hazards and risk assessment 8. Features of manufacturing industries 9. Designing for maintenance and the cleaner environment 10. Current legislation 11. Information handling, Modelling and forward planning 12. Further processes and techniques.

The portfolio will contain approximately 40 sides of A3 paper (or electronic equivalent). There are four parts to the assessment: • Part 1: Identifying Opportunities for Design Identification of a design problem, investigation of needs and research and specification • Part 2: Designing a Prototype Design ideas, development of design idea, final design solution, review of development and final design and communication of design ideas • Part 3: Making a Prototype Design, manufacture and realisation of a final prototype, including tools and equipment and quality and accuracy • Part 4: Evaluating own Design and Prototype Testing and evaluation.

The paper includes calculations, short-open and openresponse questions as well as extended-writing questions focused on:

Subject Combinations for University and Future careers

Analysis and evaluation of design decisions and outcomes, against a technical principle, for prototypes made by others Analysis and evaluation of wider issues in design technology, including social, moral, ethical and environmental impacts.

If pupils want to go on to complete Engineering or Architecture degrees, then they will need to study Physics and/ or Maths with Design and Technology. As degree subjects become less technical e.g. Product, Interior or 3D Design then 12


A Level Design and Technology can be combined with fewer/ if any technical subjects. Design and Technology can of course be taken just because a pupil enjoys the subject and will perform well in it and pupils have gone onto to study Law and Medicine with good A Level Design and Technology results.

Examination Specification Edexcel DT AS 8RM01

Edexcel DT A2 9RM01 Web address: http://www.edexcel.com/quals/gce/gce08/dt/product/ Pages/default.aspx

Head of Department recommendations

It is good for pupils to have an understanding of 20th Century Design and Materials. As such I would recommend visiting the 20th Century Gallery at the Victoria and Albert Museum and The Challenge of Materials section at the Science Museum, which are in London. Periodicals such as ‘Architectural Review’, and ‘Designing’ are also an excellent read and can help to inspire when it comes to making project choices.

Contact:

d.lait@cheltenhamcollege.org

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Design And Technology - Fashion and Textiles A Level Evidence Written or digital portfolio and photographic evidence of a final product

Head of Department – Mrs K Naish This creative and thought-provoking qualification gives students the practical skills, theoretical knowledge and confidence to succeed in a number of careers, especially those in the creative textile and fashion industries.

This is an example of the content that will be covered throughout the two year course:

Students will investigate historical, social, cultural, environmental and economic influences on design and technology, whilst enjoying opportunities to put their learning into practice by producing products of their choice.

• Materials and their application. This will include pattern grading, determining sizes and dimensions of fashion, clothing and textile products and the use of production of scale. They will also cover physical properties and working characteristics of materials, the function of products, aesthetics, cost, manufacture and disposal. • Practical methods for investigating and testing material properties to assess their suitability for a range of users. This will include developing knowledge of flammability, crease resistance, shrink resistance, colour fastness, strength and pilling. • Product development and improvement. Through study and critical analysis of existing products, students will develop an understanding of the requirements of design, development and manufacture of fashion, clothing and textile products including; • Meeting specification criteria • Aesthetics • Fitness for purpose • Target market user • Anthropometrics and ergonomics • Accurate and efficient manufacture • Students should develop the skills to critically assess products and develop new design proposals • Students should be encouraged to work with a variety of textile materials as well as two and three-dimensional forms in order to produce creative and original products, which satisfy the demands of the target market user • Inclusive design. The development of products that are inclusive so that they can be used by a wide range of users including the disabled, children and the elderly • Design illustration and communication • Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Computer Aided Manufacture (CAM) • Health & Safety • The protection of designs and intellectual property • Enterprise and marketing • Fashion cycles • Historical influences • Design movements • Designers and their work • Socio-economic influences: how product design has been influenced by changes in socio-economic circumstances during the 20th and 21st centuries • Major developments in technology • Social, moral and ethical issues • Environmental issues • Conservation of energy and resources

Students will gain a real understanding of what it means to be a designer, alongside the knowledge and skills sought by higher education and employers.

How will you be assessed?

This A Level will be broken down into three sections

Paper 1:

What is assessed? Core technical principles and core designing and making principles How is it assessed? 2 hour written exam 100 marks 25% of A-Level Questions Mixture of short answer, multiple choice and extended responses.

Paper 2

What is assessed? Additional specialist knowledge, core technical and core designing and making principles How is it assessed? 2 hour written exam 25% of A Level Questions Mixture of short answer, multiple choice and extended response questions Section A of paper: Product analysis: 40 marks Section B of paper: Commercial manufacture: 60 marks Mixture of short and extended response questions

Non-exam assessment (NEA)

This is the practical application of core technical principles, core designing and making principles and additional specialist knowledge How will it be assessed? Substantial design and make task 45 hours 100 marks 50% of A Level

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• • • • •

Critical path analysis Quality assurance and quality control British Standards Smart materials E-textiles

D & T and other subjects

A Level Design and Technology is designed to be either a complementary subject to Business Studies, Art and Design or Chemistry, or to be a contrasting subject with English, History and Modern languages. It also combines very well with Geography and History of Art.

Relevance of Fashion and Textiles to the future

The subject is particularly suitable for students considering a career in Art, Design or the Textiles or Fashion industry, but it is also likely to have a wider appeal to those wishing to gain a greater understanding of our man-made environment and to develop essential problem solving skills. It may also be of use to those wishing to pursue a career in Retail, Marketing and Merchandising, Fashion journalism and Business. An extremely wide range of Textile, Fashion and Interior Design degree courses are available. This course of study may also appeal to those who are interested in the Media, Film, Theatre and Television. Design & Technology Textiles Technology may also be of interest to some students who wish to go on to study Chemical Engineering.

Examination Specification:

AQA Design and Technology: Fashion & Textiles Web address: http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/design-andtechnology/specifications/AQA-7562-SP-2017-V0-1.PDF

Contacts:

k.naish@cheltenhamcollege.org d.lait@cheltenhamcollege.org

15


Economics Head of Department – Dr G Mallard

because it is a social science there is plenty of discussion and debate involved.

Introduction

Each and every society faces a fundamental problem: its population has an unlimited amount of wants and needs but it only has a limited amount of resources with which to satisfy them. As a result of this scarcity, it needs to find answers to three questions: What will it use its resources to produce? How will it produce these goods and services? And whose wants and needs should be satisfied and whose should be left unsatisfied?

Those considering taking their study of Economics to degree level are strongly advised that A Level Maths is usually a requirement of university courses, especially for pure Economics. In the first year there are two areas of study: Microeconomics focuses on how markets work, why they fail and what, if anything, the government should do to correct this failure; whilst Macroeconomics deals with issues of economic growth, inflation, unemployment, international trade and the government’s budget deficit.

Economics is the study of how a society addresses this fundamental problem and how effectively it answers these three questions. It is the study of the actual world around us, how policy-makers can make it function better and whether or not they should try to do so. It is about finding practical ways of improving the lives of each and every one of us.

In the second year these two areas of study are developed further. The Microeconomics course involves the study of individual decision-making, the theory of the firm, labour markets and issues surrounding income distribution. The Macroeconomics course further develops the ideas studied in the first year but also the study of the financial sector. The two courses in the second year require students to adopt a more global, and less UK-focused, perspective.

Studying Economics will help you to develop a critical and analytical approach to solving problems, which will challenge any preconceived notions held about what the economy is and how it functions. It explores how firms and individuals actually behave, touching on the fashionable areas of Behavioural Economics and Game Theory, and how the economy as a whole operates and how governments try to manipulate it to achieve their goals.

Examination Specification AQA Economics (A level: 7136)

• How is it that when you want something, it is often available conveniently for you to buy? Should the UK be a member of the European Union? Is it effective to tax the wealthy or will bankers simply move abroad? Do individual consumers and firms make rational decisions? Are the energy companies in the UK too powerful? Will the high growth rates in China and India destroy the environment? If these questions intrigue you, then Economics will provide you with a way of analysing and understanding them. You will be introduced to a number of formal, theoretical models, which you will be able to use to think independently and critically about issues such as these. You will develop the following:

Web address: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/economics/as-and-alevel/economics-7135-7136 Economics continues to grow in popularity, both at A Level but also at degree level. To enable you to cope with some of the more difficult concepts there are some very good and interesting books for the beginner, such as ‘The Worldly Philosophers’ by Robert Heilbroner, ‘The Undercover Economist’ by Tim Harford, ‘Freakonomics’ by Steven D Levitt and Stephen J Dubner, and ’23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism’ by Ha-Joon Chang. Textbooks (Year 1) 1. AQA AS/A-Level (Year 1) Economics, Malcolm Surridge & John Wolinski

• A good command and understanding of the language of Economics • An ability to explain how theories and policies are expected to work • Analytical skills that will enable you to interpret UK and global economic data, allowing you to analyse the nature of economic problems and to propose and evaluate solutions • An ability to evaluate the significance of issues and the effectiveness of proposed policies: to see through the theoretical arguments to the reality that lies beneath There is no requirement to have done GCSE Economics or Business Studies to study Economics at A Level (it is also worth pointing out that the A Level is not a requirement for studying Economics at degree level). Economics fits well with a wide range of choices. It has natural links with History, Politics and Geography; it develops scientific and logical arguments that fit well with the Sciences and Maths, and yet

ISBN: 978-1909592452 2. AQA A-Level Economics Book 1, Ray Powell & James Powell ISBN: 978-1471829789 Recommended websites: www.economicsonline.co.uk www.tutor2u.net www.anforme.co.uk

Contact:

g.mallard@cheltenhamcollege.org

16


English Literature Assessment

Head of Department – Mr T E Brewis English at A Level will attract all those who enjoy reading, talking and writing about literature, from the earliest texts in the English canon, by poets such as Chaucer, right up to contemporary work such as Owen Sheers’‘Pink Mist’ and Cormac McCarthy’s ‘The Road’. Students will begin to discover the breadth and diversity of literature, and to explore its relationships with history, culture, politics, art and critical theory.

Students study the OCR A Level in English Literature (H472). Assessment is 80% exam and 20% coursework. For more details, please see the web address. Web Address: http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/as-a-level-gceenglish-literature-h072-h472-from-2015/

Contact:

Lessons tend to be heavily discursive – this is a subject that thrives on lively debate; a willingness to investigate, share and interrogate ideas is therefore very important. Students should also be prepared to read widely and independently beyond the set texts in order to explore different critical and theoretical interpretations of the works they are studying in class.

t.brewis@cheltenhamcollege.org

In addition to reading and researching, essay writing is the main occupation for students outside lessons. A good deal of time is spent on this most important of skills – that of expressing oneself lucidly, fluently and stylishly in the written medium. Students will learn to plan and construct cogent, well-exemplified arguments in response to challenging questions, a valuable life skill that benefits their work in other essay-based A Level subjects, and equips them well for university and the professional world beyond. To complement our Sixth Form class teaching, the Department runs a number of co-curricular activities including a Literary Society. The aim of the latter is, in part, to support students who are considering reading an English degree; more broadly, its function is to nurture the literary passions of all students and staff in College. The Department also takes full advantage of the Cheltenham Literature and Poetry Festivals, and runs regular theatre trips to Stratford, London, Malvern, Bristol and Bath. Furthermore, where possible, we invite authors, speakers and workshop groups into College to give students a fresh perspective on the texts they are studying. English Literature is a versatile A Level in that it works well in combination with almost any other subject, enhancing students’ subject portfolios with its cultural richness, academic rigour and, of course, its nationwide reputation as a top calibre qualification; a good predicted grade in English Literature will normally markedly strengthen any UCAS application. Students wishing to prepare for the A Level English Literature course should read regularly and widely, seeking out poetry, drama and prose that interests them – a reading list is issued at the end of 5th Form. Furthermore, they should think deeply about what they are reading: about its style; about whether it communicates a message; about the influence of when it was written and where; about its relationship with other works of literature, and with other art forms; about how it makes them feel and why.

17


Geography Examination specification and codes

Head of Department – Miss Emily Hartley

OCR Advanced GCE in Geography H481. Papers H481/01, 02, 03 and 04.

Introduction

Geography is a hugely popular A Level choice at College and results continue to be excellent, achieving 97% A*-B in the 2015 A2 examination season. Geography aims to exploit the students’ natural curiosity and concern about the major contemporary issues in an increasingly interconnected world. It is important to note that a GCSE in Geography is not a prerequisite to taking Geography A level; we have had numerous new entrants at this level who have gone on to get A*s.

Physical Systems – H481/01

Studying the interdependence between humans and the land, oceans and atmosphere on which they depend we investigate how human activities are influenced by a complex range of physical factors, and in turn how these landscapes are affected by such activities. Studies are focused on coastal environments and the water/carbon cycles.

Areas of study, skills and methodology

Assessment: 1.5 hour written exam, 66 marks (22% of A Level total)

An A Level geographer can expect to develop transferable key skills including numeracy, literacy, IT, investigation and research, problem posing and solving, logical reasoning, teamwork and statistics to help assess and clarify everyday issues. The Geography Department is staffed with experienced, enthusiastic teachers who are passionate about the world and the role young people can play within it.

Human Interactions – H481/02

This topic investigates interactions of people and place at a range of scales. Urban landscapes, inequality, rebranding, global migration and human rights are used to exemplify the need for well-conceived sustainable management.

Across the two years of A Level study, topics will be investigated through independent research, structured questions and the fundamental skill of writing evaluative, synoptic essays is fully developed.

Assessment: 1.5 hour written exam, 66 marks (22% of A Level total)

Fieldwork is an integral part of the course and there are two field days during each of the Autumn and Spring Terms, and one residential field trip during the Summer Term which prepares students for the Independent Fieldwork Project. They encourage learning but also provide a valuable educational and social experience.

Candidates draw together their synoptic understanding from a range of topic areas to explain dynamic events facing the planet. Both environmental and economic issues are investigated through the Future of Food and Hazardous Earth topics. Students investigate globalisation, demographics, resources and development, with significant crossover to A2 Economics.

Geographical Debates – H481/03

Subject combinations

Assessment: 2.5 hour written exam, 108 marks (36% of A Level total)

Geography possesses both scientific and literary elements but also combines well with both the Sciences (e.g. Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Maths) and the Arts (e.g. English, History, and Modern Languages), as well as with other applied subjects such as Economics and Politics.

Investigative Geography – H481/04

The non-examination assessment comprises an independent investigation, with students developing a range of skills demonstrated through a written report. The 3000-4000 word report is based upon data collected on the Summer Term residential field trip to Nettlecombe in Somerset and a title will be developed from visits to Saunton Sands for psammosere and tourism investigations, and from Taunton for rebranding, inequality and urban land use models.

Relevance to the future

Geography is recognised by Oxford, Cambridge and other leading universities as a challenging academic discipline and is listed by the Russell Group “Informed Choices” guide as a facilitating subject, which is preferred by admissions tutors. Geography A Level is therefore accepted by universities as an entrance qualification for both Science and Arts courses, as well as for vocational courses such as Law, Medicine and Veterinary Science.

Assessment: Non-examination assessment, 60 marks (20% of A Level total).

Word from the Head of Department

Geographers enjoy one of the highest rates of employment as they demonstrate a range of critical skills and analytical abilities. Geographers work in almost every field of employment and can be found using their skills and knowledge in a wide variety of careers, such as financial services, medicine, law, planning, conservation and environmental consultancy.

The Geography Library is well resourced and has its own ICT suite, extension texts and DVDs. Students can participate in a vibrant Bingen Geography Society which attends or hosts numerous seminars with opportunities for UCAS and Oxbridge mentoring, reading groups, a Film Society, extended essay prizes such as the Fitzwilliam College Cambridge Land Economy Essay Competition and the yearly the Royal Geographical Society Young Geographer 18


competition which combine to produce excellent results and global citizens. A biennial trip to Iceland combines experiential Geography with the opportunity for glacial trekking, climbing volcanoes, dodging geysers and swimming in geo-thermal pools.

Contact:

e.hartley@cheltenhamcollege.org

19


History Head of Department – Miss J E Doidge-Harrison

The History Library and classrooms are open throughout the day and into the evenings, for one-to-ones, consolidation and extension activities, or simply as a place for students to settle down to independent study. Stock is regularly replenished, allowing all in the Department to access the latest twists and turns in wider historical debate.

History is an enthusiastic and energetic department where we relish a collaborative engagement with the past. We believe that what we teach is vitally important. History allows our students to access both the heady sense of escapism to be found in the ‘rich tapestry’ of the past, at the same time as it develops in them the means to participate intelligently in the world.

For students interested in applying to Oxford or Cambridge and other universities that have high entry requirements, or those who simply love the subject, the History Department offers a range of extension activities. These include seminars, lectures, members’ papers and the Presidential Quiz, as hosted by the Morley Society at our Annual Dinner, alongside the treats of the Cheltenham Literature Festival: 2015 featured talks by Niall Ferguson on Henry Kissinger, the ‘legendary but controversial’ American statesman, plus Don McCullin, one of the greatest of war photographers, meditating on recent dilemmas as to how one has ‘to bear witness… you cannot just look away.’ We were similarly impressed by Rachel Billington, Carl Bridge and Peter Hart’s investigation of ‘Gallipoli: Australia’s Western Front’, in the run up to our October commemoration of the 41 OCs who lost their lives serving in Gallipoli, or died on their way home of wounds. 2017 will see Sixth Formers invited to visit Berlin, site of such divisive histories across the 20th century.

It teaches skills of selection, inference, synthesis, interpretation, analysis, evaluation, argument and judgement: all of which are widely respected in the working world and provide the necessary intellectual backbone for a host of careers including law, journalism and even medicine. Historians enjoy access to many fulfilling roles in the media, arts, heritage, research, management consultancy, politics and the civil service, as well as commonly entering managerial roles in commerce, industry or the public sector. History is widely respected as rigorous and sits well with other Humanities subjects, notably complementing the study of English, Economics, Politics, History of Art, Geography and Classics. The courses that the Department delivers reflect the strengths and interests of the teachers. The new specifications running from 2015 require that History be studied in both breadth (with topics drawn from across 200 years or more) and depth. Hence a typical combination could be The Tudors: England 1485-1603 paired with The American Dream: Reality and Illusion 1945-1980. The later depth courses link well with the Modern World IGCSE as sat by the Fifth Form, and also offer a striking contrast with the richness and difference of Tudor England. The Tudor study also enhances the breadth of the British Empire coursework.

Examination Specification

AQA History AS 7041 / AQA History A2 7042 Web address: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/history/as-and-a-level/ history-7042

Contact:

The Historical Enquiry (coursework) forms 20% of the full A Level and consists of a short introductory course, which also covers historical skills of research and referencing, to deliver an end piece of around 4,000 words. This is delivered as an independent piece of work, and is highly valued as such by universities. Supportive teaching and one-to-one help continues through the research and writing stages. The subject cannot overlap with the other examined topics, so this adds to the breadth of the History studied, and allows for specialisation, including work with primary sources. Our current course covers the rise and fall of the British Empire, a topic peopled with extraordinary and entertaining individuals, set amidst exotic locations. Currently undergoing much historical reinterpretation, this topic permits students to explore a great variety of opinion as they trace a narrative arc of history around the globe, analysing key points of change worldwide from 1492 through to 1960, and indeed onwards, to consider the legacy of the British Empire in the present day.

J.doidge-harrison@cheltenhamcollege.org

Students should not be disconcerted should they be unable to cover a period in which they are currently interested for their A Level; we find that interest in new topics grows with knowledge, plus the College’s Lower Sixth independent project and external extended essay competitions additionally allow for the pursuit of specific historical interests. 20


Latin and Classical Greek Head of Department – Mr T A Lambert

direct; the importance of Greek is that we see there the start of History, Drama, Epic, Oratory and many other genres.

Introduction

Relevance of Latin and Greek to the future

The Latin and Classical Greek AS and A2 courses offer a rich blend of language and literature from the ancient world. Students will develop their linguistic skills so that they can understand and appreciate some of the finest literature mankind has produced. This will take them inside the minds of authors who were writing two thousand years ago.

Our students have been very successful in obtaining places on competitive university courses such as Oxford and Cambridge, in Classics itself, as well as courses. AS and A2 qualifications in Latin and Greek are rightly well regarded by universities and employers.

Alongside this, they will gain an understanding of the events, culture, and attitudes of Rome and/or Greece at significant periods in their history. Students will come to see ways in which the ancient world has shaped western civilisation, and understand the relationship between the classical and modern worlds.

They also demonstrate impressive breadth, as these courses offer the chance to develop skills which are at different times linguistic, analytical, empathetic, logical, creative, and critical. These are skills which will equip students for a very wide range of interesting careers, as well as helping them learn other languages quickly and effectively.

What to Expect

A background in this rigorous but varied study is well received in many areas; our students regularly go on to take degrees in subjects as diverse as Medicine, History, Modern Languages, Mathematics and Law, as well as the Classics and Ancient History degrees pursued by the real enthusiasts.

For both Latin and Greek, the A Level courses are evenly split between language work and the study of literature. Language work involves the study of the grammar, vocabulary and sentence structure of the languages, tested through translation and comprehension or composition.

Recent surveys of former university students show that they have found careers in the City, Accountancy, Business, Law, Journalism, Civil Service and the Foreign Office amongst many other fields.

Composition into Latin or Greek is an optional skill, but is usually one studied by students at the College. There is a vocabulary list of approximately 800 words, which must be learned thoroughly. The literature component of the course involves studying excerpts from ancient texts (440 lines for each year studied), so that students are able to answer comprehension, translation, and stylistic questions on them. The sort of response required from students ranges from short sentences or one-word answers to extended, essaystyle work, with an introduction and conclusion.

Examination Specifications OCR A2 Latin H443

OCR A2 Classical Greek H444 Web address: http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/by-subject/classics/

Skills Needed

Recommendations

The number one requirement for both Latin and Greek is prior expertise with the language. Candidates will need good linguistic ability, the capacity to soak up vocabulary, and an enjoyment of the way that languages work. An interest in the Ancient World is also a useful advantage, and students will be given the opportunity to study the Romans, Greeks and other ancient peoples beyond the confines of the exam course. Those with an interest in literature also tend to enjoy the detailed study of the Classical writers.

A Level Classicists are always welcome at the twicetermly Classical Society, and are encouraged to attend the annual lectures, overseas tours and theatre trips that the Department offers. Those wishing to enhance their knowledge of the Ancient World should contact their Classics teachers for further reading lists.

Contact:

t.lambert@cheltenhamcollege.org

An A or an A* grade in the appropriate OCR GCSE would mean that students are well prepared for A Level.

Latin, Greek and other subjects

Our students have studied Latin or Greek with a variety of subjects, including English, History, Modern Languages and Economics. The development of linguistic skills clearly complements Modern Languages, while the historical perspective extends the historian’s appreciation of many aspects of the past and present. Students of English will find many parallels and many contrasts in the Greek and Roman authors. The influence of Roman work on later European culture tends to be very

21


Mathematics

Further Mathematics

Head of Department - Dr B E Enright

Head of Department - Dr B E Enright

Introduction

Introduction and Areas of study

A Level Mathematics requires a definite mathematical aptitude, which will usually have been demonstrated by an A* at IGCSE (or equivalent). Those who have entered IGCSE early and have taken their studies beyond IGCSE Mathematics will be particularly well placed. Logic in thought and presentation, lateral thinking, mental tenacity, and the ability to deal with abstract ideas are all needed and developed by the course.

Further Mathematics A Level is available to those of high mathematical calibre who enjoy an academic challenge. This is a second A Level taken in addition to Mathematics. It extends studies of the same topics in greater depth, as well as introducing other more advanced areas. Students are given four extra periods of teaching per week. The syllabus extends that already required for Mathematics A Level. Mathematics and Further Mathematics counts as one choice but two A Levels. Students taking A Level Further Mathematics will sit A Level Mathematics at the end of the Lower Sixth and then will sit A Level Further Mathematics at the end of the Upper Sixth.

Areas of study

Mathematics A Level is essentially split into two areas. Firstly, Pure Mathematics which is largely algebraic, and covers the topics: calculus, co-ordinate geometry, vectors and numerical methods. The second element is Applied Mathematics, this covers Probability & Statistics and Mechanics. In Probability & Statistics students learn the statistical skills necessary to analyse data which can be then be related to that predicted by the theory of probability. Contexts vary from calculating the chance of winning the Lottery to analysing quality control on production lines. In Mechanics students learn the skill of mathematical modelling; a complicated problem is simplified into one that can be solved using mathematical methods. Problems are associated with the motion of objects as a result of forces applied to them. Contexts can vary from the movement of cars to skiing. Mathematics and other subjects

Further Mathematics and other subjects Some aspects of Further Mathematics are also covered in Physics A Level.

Relevance of Further Mathematics to the future

Further Mathematics is valued by all universities for subjects which have a mathematical base; Mathematics, but also Physics, Engineering, Chemistry, Computing, Economics, Geography. The ‘better’ universities will be particularly interested in those who have taken this option. It counts as a separate A Level to Mathematics. Examination Specification to be decided in due course.

Contact:

Mathematics and other subjects

b.enright@cheltenhamcollege.org

Mathematics is popularly combined with science subjects, and increasingly appreciated as a complement to Geography, Economics, History, Modern Languages, English and Classics. The subject gives sound training and discipline for the mind, and an awareness of statistics and the methods of problem solving, which permeate our technological society. It is also taken as an intellectual challenge in its own right.

Relevance of Mathematics to the future

Mathematics A Level provides a sound basis for Higher Education and leads to a wide range of careers in Industry, Commerce, Finance, Computing and the Public Services, which increasingly depend on mathematical skills. It is also an entrance qualification for many post A Level vocational courses. Examination Specification to be decided in due course.

22


Modern Languages - French, German And Spanish Head of Modern Foreign Languages – Mrs E Leach

with additional digital support for independent study, to build grammar, vocabulary and translation skills to help students understand contemporary spoken language.

Languages at A Level

Speaking and Writing

Skills in foreign languages are a valuable asset in the world beyond College and studying French, Spanish or German will equip students with the ability to thrive both in the workplace and socially.

Students will learn how to write in a style that is more sophisticated than that required for GCSE and to hold conversations about matters of current interest in the target language. As well as class discussion, students will have one lesson a week in pairs or small groups with a native-speaking assistant.

Those who study languages at A Level need to have a sound knowledge of the grammatical basics of their chosen language and must have performed to a high standard at GCSE level or have reached an equivalent standard if they have not been following the English education system.

Examinations Students taking languages will sit four units in total, two of which will be oral examinations.

Students must be interested in developing their knowledge and understanding of the culture and way of life of the target-language countries and they should be prepared to spend some time outside the classroom improving their listening and reading skills.

Additional Languages

College can, where possible, offer additional languages such as Mandarin as an extra-curricular activity. Any student who is keen to progress to a higher level in a language not taught formally at College can arrange lessons with tutors via the Modern Languages department, but there is an extra charge for this. Any student interested in studying another language, Mandarin in particular, should contact Mrs E Leach.

They should arrange to spend a short period in a country where the target language is spoken, during the holidays. College offers a variety of trips to Sixth Form linguists and students may also seek financial assistance for independent travel by applying for a Calvert Memorial Award. Details of this award are distributed in the Autumn Term.

Modern Languages and other subjects

Syllabus Information

The study of a modern language combines well with any other subject taken A Level. Apart from the desirability of continuing with a foreign language beyond the age of 16, the skills acquired during a language course are applicable to all other disciplines. For those choosing the Sciences or Mathematics for A Level, the study of a language can provide a useful and welcome balance.

Students starting their A Level courses in September will work towards the AQA examinations. Specification: AQA (French 7652, German 7692 and Spanish 7662) Web address http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/languages/as-and-a-level Students study technological and social change, looking at diversity and the benefits it brings. They study highlights of French/German/Spanish-speaking artistic culture, including francophone music and cinema, and learn about political engagement and who wields political power in the Frenchspeaking world. Pupils studying German study its art and architecture, and how Germany’s political landscape was formed. Pupils studying Spanish focus on Spanish regional identity and the cultural heritage of past civilisations and will learn about aspects of the diverse political landscape of the Hispanic world.

Relevance of Modern Languages to future studies and career

There is a wide range of opportunities open to students who have studied a foreign language beyond the age of 16. Some students follow degree courses entirely focusing on languages, others prefer to pursue a Higher Education course in another subject but choose a language option alongside it. Having a language will certainly make students attractive candidates in the employment market. The following website gives a great deal of useful information regarding the relevance and usefulness of languages: www.languageswork.org.uk

Students also explore the influence of the past on presentday French/German/Spanish-speaking communities. Throughout their studies, they will learn the language in context and the issues and influences which have shaped them. Students will study texts and film and have the opportunity to carry out independent research on an area of their choice.

Contact:

e.leach@cheltenhamcollege.org

Reading and Listening

Students will be taught to listen to and read, understand and extract information from passages in the target language that are taken from authentic sources such as internet sites, magazines, newspapers, reports and books. They will be working with innovative digital resources and audio material, 23


Music Head of Department - Mr D McKee

This component will be externally marked by AQA examiners. Work must be completed between 1 March and 31 May and sent by post/uploaded.

The new A Level Music course offers an exciting combination of academic study, performing and composing. There is a good range of choice to suit the strengths of different candidates, but all candidates will need to be dedicated musicians as performance or music technology contribute a significant part of the course.

Students must be able to perform music using one or both of the following: instrumental/vocal: as a soloist, and/or as part of an ensemble

Syllabus and teaching method

production: via music technology.

The course is divided into three components, which cover academic music, harmony, listening, performing and composition. There is considerable variety of choice within the study areas, including both academic as well as performing. Composition and stylistic harmony are important elements of the course, and both the composition and performance components have the opportunity to utilise Music Technology.

Students must perform for a minimum of 10 minutes and a maximum of 12 minutes in total. Students must be able to interpret musical elements using resources and techniques as appropriate, to communicate musical ideas with technical and expressive control.

Component 3: Composition

The three course units involve performing, composing, listening, and academic music, which includes history and analysis work through the study of set works and areas of interest.

• What’s assessed Composition • How it’s assessed Composition 1: Composition to a brief (25 marks) Composition 2: Free composition (25 marks) • Questions A minimum of four and a half minutes of music in total is required (no more than six minutes). This component is worth 25% of A-level marks (50 marks in total). This component will be externally marked by AQA examiners. Work must be completed by 31 May and sent by post/uploaded to AQA.

Component 1: Appraising music • • • •

What’s assessed Listening, Analysis, Contextual understanding How it’s assessed Exam paper with listening and written questions using excerpts of music. • Questions Section A: Listening (56 marks) Section B: Analysis (34 marks) Section C: Essay (30 marks) This component is 40% of A Level marks (120 marks in total).

Music and other subjects

Music has always been a highly suitable subject to combine with other arts or humanities A Levels, and it is well known as a combination with Mathematics. More recently universities are showing more inclination towards broader mixtures of subjects at A Level and therefore Music is now more than ever an excellent subject to combine with almost any other.

There are seven areas of study, as follows: 1. Western classical tradition 1650–1910 (compulsory) 2. Pop music 3. Music for media 4. Music for theatre 5. Jazz 6. Contemporary traditional music 7. Art music since 1910.

Relevance of Music to the future.

Students intending to pursue a career in Music will normally read Music at university or apply to a music college. This can lead to a variety of related career paths including arts administration, media work, music technology, the recording industry and TV, teaching, performing etc. However Music as a degree subject is also widely recognised by other industries not connected with music, as the skills it engenders such as discipline, creativity, research, dedication, confidence and teamwork are vital transferable skills for all future employers.

Students must study Area of study 1: Western classical tradition 1650–1910 and a choice of two from Areas of study 2–7.

Component 2: Performance

• What’s assessed Music performance • How it’s assessed Solo and/or ensemble performing as an instrumentalist, or vocalist and/or music production (via technology) • Questions A minimum of ten minutes of performance in total is required (no more than twelve minutes) This component is 35% of A-level marks (50 marks in total)

Examination Specification AQA A Level Music – 7272

Web address: www.aqa.org.uk

Contact:

d.mckee@cheltenhamcollege.org

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Government and Politics Head of Department – Mrs A J Eldred

• Anarchism • Ecologism 5. Comparative politics: government and politics of the USA • The Constitution • Congress • President • Supreme Court • Democracy and participation • Civil Rights For a closer look at the Department for Education’s outline of course content please visit:

Why study Politics?

Studying Politics is a fantastic way to develop our understanding of the decision making processes that affect our daily lives. In learning about Politics, we gain knowledge of what shapes our world and we can understand better the choices available to our political leaders and the constraints upon what they decide. As a subject it is current, accessible and ever changing: the political world does not stand still and neither does the teaching of it. Studying Politics now, particularly the politics of the UK, is probably more exciting than it has ever been. The Scottish independence referendum and the referendum on membership of the EU have changed the political map. Due to the nature of the subject there has been a rapid increase in the number of students taking Politics as an A Level or as a university degree.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/ uploads/attachment_data/file/504014/Politics_A_level_ content.pdf

Current areas of debate:

There is a vast amount that is discussed and debated in lessons, and that students are ultimately examined on. 2016 has seen and is yet to see some momentous shifts in the world of politics. To name but a few issues, the fallout following the referendum on Britain’s membership of the EU, including its effect on The Union between England and Scotland; the changing leadership of the Conservative Party, and the instability within the Labour Party; the rise and rise of UKIP as they secure their first MP; the US presidential election and the last phase of Obama’s presidency; the nature of Prime Ministerial and Presidential power; querying whether there is a participation crisis in British politics, particularly amongst young people; the effects of finance on national elections; and finally the nature of pressure group and, in the USA, Political Action Committee activity on Presidential elections.

Politics has enjoyed a rapid rise in popularity and indeed the Politics department at College is no different. We currently have two sets at A2 Level and three at AS and this maximises the educational needs of every student. Employers respect the range of skills acquired by Politics students. These skills include research of topics and sources; analysis of evidence and argument; oral and written communication of ideas and argument and innovative learning. The Politics Department at College is a vibrant and exciting place to be. We have an active society, The Morley Society. We have recently hosted an American diplomat and in the past have hosted the MP for Cheltenham, Alex Chalk. Alongside this there have been annual trips to the Palace of Westminster. Politics is a good subject to study at A Level: it is fresh, accessible, stimulating and well worth consideration.

To be up to speed with these issues is of paramount importance and enables a young active mind to be able to engage in debate and to ensure that they are informed and in turn take an active part and engage as a citizen within a modern liberal democracy.

Areas of study:

Specification to be clarified in due course 1. From 2017, the A Level in Government and Politics becomes a linear course. According to the Department for Education guidance, the areas of study will include: 2. Government in the UK • Political participation in the UK • Democracy and participation • Elections and voting 3. Political parties 4. The European Union • Political ideas • Liberalism • Conservatism • Socialism • Nationalism • Feminism • Multiculturalism

Subject combinations:

Politics is a natural bedfellow for History, English, Geography and Economics. It is also a great subject to complement the Sciences as it offers something ‘a bit different.’ Most importantly, Politics is a subject that should be studied by anyone with a natural interest in the political process.

A note from the Head of Department:

Here are a few titles that may well stimulate your interest in this subject: ‘The Downing Street Years’, Margaret Thatcher ‘A Journey’. Tony Blair ‘The Third Man: Life at the Heart of New Labour’, Peter Mandelson ‘Coalition: The Inside Story of the Conservative-Liberal Democrat Coalition Government’, David Laws 25


‘Electing Our Masters’, John Lawrence ‘Who Runs This Place? The Anatomy of Britain in the 21st Century’, Anthony Sampson ‘Decision Points’, George W. Bush ‘Deeply Divided: Racial Politics and Social Movements in Postwar America’, Doug McAdam and Karina Kloos

Contact:

a.eldred@cheltenhamcollege.org

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Psychology Head of Department – Dr T A Norman

including Art, Biology, Business Studies, English, Mathematics, Music, PE and TPE.

Introduction

Relevance of subject to the future

Psychology is the scientific study of the mind and behaviour. It is about you, the people around you, how you affect them, how they affect you and about the differences that exist between different people. It tries to understand human behaviour both at an individual level and group level.

Knowledge of the way people behave will benefit students personally, socially and in any job that requires them to interact with or understand other people. Psychology will prepare students for a variety of future professions and give them a skillset that will be useful in a wider arena such as their other learning and any interactions with other people. There are a number of employment opportunities in Clinical Psychology, Industrial or Occupational Psychology as well as many personal benefits to be gained from studying Psychology. There are many other jobs where psychology is indirectly used such as Nursing, Social Work, Teaching and Business.

The study of Psychology is underpinned by a long-running debate between nature and nurture. Are we the product of our genetic inheritance or are we the way we are because of our experiences? Psychology looks at both ‘normal’ and ‘abnormal’ functioning of people. It will not teach you to read other people’s minds but it will help you to understand both other people’s and your own behaviour better.

Areas of study, skills and methodology

Psychology can be studied as a degree in its own right or as part of a number of joint degree combinations

The AQA A Level Psychology course covers topics from a range of branches within Psychology.

Examination specification (and codes)

In Developmental Psychology we look at attachments including how these are formed and the effects of not having been able to form an attachment in childhood; in Cognitive Psychology we study memory models, theories of forgetting and factors that affect the accuracy of eye witness testimony; Biological Psychology covers the structure and functions of the nervous system, localisation of brain function, ways of investigating the brain and biological rhythms including the sleep/wake cycle; Individual Differences looks at how we define abnormality, characteristics of phobias, depression and OCD as well as looking at some causes and treatments for these disorders.

AQA GCE Psychology A Level 7182

Web address: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/psychology/as-and-alevel/psychology-7181-7182

A word from the Head of Department Psychology is a fascinating and exciting subject to study if you have an interest in human behaviour. It is a social science and as such follows the scientific rigours of any science course.

Research Methods teaches students to be practical psychologists including how to design, carry out research and analyse results. Students will also be introduced to different approaches or perspectives within psychology allowing them to see the History of Psychology as a discipline and to compare different approaches.

It demands a good level of ability in English as essay-writing skills are needed in the examinations. It also requires a sound ability in Science as there is a biological element in the course; Mathematical ability to B grade at GCSE is also important as students have to analyse and interpret data. There is a flourishing Psychology Society at College that students are encouraged to join to hear visiting speakers or perhaps even present topics of their own wider interest relevant to Psychology.

In the second year of the course a number of topics are covered in more detail including Schizophrenia, Relationships, Aggression, Issues and debates underlying psychological theories including ethical issues involved in research and further Research Methods. For the full A Level students will need to understand how psychologists choose which statistical test to use on their data and to be able to interpret the results of statistical analyses.

As an introduction to the subject students are urged to read ‘The Rough Guide to Psychology’ by Christian Jarrett or ‘The Mind’s Eye’ by Oliver Sacks.

Contact:

Although there is no coursework in the exam, students will carry out practical activities throughout the course to teach them both research design and about topics within the course. Students will learn about theories and research and how to evaluate these.

t.norman@cheltenhamcollege.org

Critical analysis and evaluation skills are essential in Psychology and a good psychologist does not take things at face value and likes to ask ‘why’?

Common Subject combinations

Psychology can complement a number of subject choices 27


Science at Cheltenham College Areas of study and A Level structure

Head of Department – Mrs I C E Mech It is the aim of the Science Department at Cheltenham College that all students gain the qualifications and depth of knowledge they require in order to fulfil their career ambitions, develop the range of skills essential for scientific thinking and the personal qualities needed to make them resilient learners and excellent scientists.

The new linear Biology A Level course is composed of three units, which are assessed as two theory papers and a separate paper which assesses all the experiments undertaken over the two year course and includes the use of synoptic skills. All three papers assess knowledge and the application thereof. The first year allows students to gain a detailed understanding of cell structure, biological molecules, an overview of disease, immunology and biodiversity. To support this aspect of the course, students attend a weekend field trip in Dorset. Students are also introduced to genetics, evolution and classification.

Students are taught to the highest standards by subject specialists and all of them are challenged to achieve the best possible academic results. They are encouraged to enter national competitions, read extensively and the department arranges trips to conferences to expose the students to cutting edge scientific developments and research. The teaching within the department develops learners who have the ability to read scientific literature critically and ensures that all students become scientifically literate citizens of society.

During the course of the second year, advanced biochemistry is studied with specific reference to photosynthesis and cell respiration. Environmental issues are also discussed. This unit covers the latest scientific advances including epigenetics and microbiology. It also looks into the coordination of the human body, delving into nervous system and hormonal control.

Across the three scientific disciplines students will develop the essential scientific skills required to plan and undertake investigations and interpret and analyse their results.

There is also a strong practical focus, which is integrated throughout both years. Students will keep a logbook which will evidence 12 core practical skills. These will be given a Pass or Fail grade as required by the new A Level specifications.

Students who show an interest in continuing with science at university level are mentored and regular debates and discussions are undertaken. University preparation classes are held during which challenging academic concepts are examined and rigorous debate takes place.

Areas of study, skills and methodology

In an ever-increasing demand for excellent scientists, the Science Department produces students who are able to compete successfully for places at competitive universities, become successful scientists and consequently make a worthwhile contribution to the society they live in.

Studying Biology involves four main elements: understanding and learning new theories, conducting experiments, analysing data and applying knowledge to answer new problems. Students develop the following key skills: the ability to recall a significant amount of biological theory, to be able to carry out practical experiments recording data accurately, numeracy to allow them to analyse data and to conduct statistical tests and finally to be able to apply their knowledge to answering novel problems, expressing their ideas using the specific terminology.

Contact:

i.mech@cheltenhamcollege.org

Biology

Subject combinations

Head of Department – Miss R Kramer

Biology complements other science subjects well. Mathematics is a useful addition to support the data-analysis and statistical elements of the course.

Introduction

Biology is the science and study of living organisms and it ranges from the study of ecosystems to the specific interactions of molecules in cells. It teaches students how to test theories by forming hypotheses, planning experiments, recording data and drawing conclusions from their findings and, critically, to appreciate the limitations of their experiments.

Relevance of subject to the future

Biology is an excellent choice for those considering many different degrees other than biological sciences, including medicine and other medically-related degrees, veterinary science, dentistry, biochemistry, environmental science and pharmacy. An understanding of biology is of great use in certain areas of law, politics, statistics, education, business and scientific journalism.

Biological research and understanding is progressing at a rapid rate making it a fascinating subject to study. To name a handful of advances since the turn of the millennium we have seen the complete sequencing of the human genome, advances in the therapeutic use of stem cells and further analysis and understanding offered to explain climate change.

Examination specification

The Biology Department will be following the new OCR Biology A specification.

Each week our news is filled with greater medical or environmental understanding, much of which is a direct result of biological research. 28


A note from the Head of Department:

calculations involving free energy and entropy. We follow the OCR Chemistry A specification, and there will be three papers taken at the end of Upper Sixth Form. At the end of the Lower Sixth there will be a rigorous internal examination. All students will be entered for the demanding Cambridge Chemistry Challenge exam (C3L6).

Biologists are encouraged to join the Natural Sciences Society, which aims to attract students who are hoping to apply to Oxbridge or the Russell Group of universities to read science-related, medicine, veterinary or dentistry courses. Through this society, students gain advice on interview practice, giving presentations and discussing their areas of interest in detail – all aimed at enhancing their chances of making successful university applications. Special preparatory sessions are conducted with students specifically applying for Medicine, dentistry and Veterinary Science. During these the entrance examinations are considered and extensive interview practice takes place.

‘Almost like a whale: The Origin of Species’ updated by Steve Jones. (Black Swan, 2000)

Practical work is central to our scheme of work and there will be opportunities for practical activities most weeks. Students will be required to learn specific practical skills and to apply these competently in the laboratory. The assessment of practical work will be undertaken in the form of questions about practical activities undertaken during the year posed in each of the written papers at A Level. Laboratory skills will be acknowledged in the additional practical endorsement, which will not be part of the overall awarded grade but which will appear on the candidate’s certificate, confirming that the student has engaged in live laboratory-based practical work. Students will report their experiments and analysis of results in a laboratory notebook that will provide the evidence for the development of skills.

‘The invisible enemy: A natural history of viruses’. Dorothy Crawford (OUP, 2002)

Chemistry and other subjects

Recommended reading

‘Genome: The autobiography of a species in 23 chapters’. Matt Ridley. (Fourth Estate Ltd 2000)

Chemistry is central to the Sciences and fits well with A Levels in Physics, Biology and Mathematics. However, we also welcome an approach where Chemistry is chosen with a more diverse mix of subjects. Many students have successfully studied A Level Chemistry with subjects as diverse as English, History or Economics. Chemistry taken in combination with a modern language opens great opportunities to study and work in Europe. Students wishing to pursue pure Chemistry or Chemical Engineering at university must also take Mathematics A Level.

‘One renegade cell: The quest for the origins of cancer’. Robert A Weinberg (Phoenix, 1999) ‘Francis Crick: Discoverer of the genetic code’. Matt Ridley (Harper Perennial, 2008) ‘The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks’. Rebekka Skloot. ‘Extremes’ Kevin Fong. ‘How we live and why we die’ Lewis Wolport

Contact:

Relevance to work and careers

r.kramer@cheltenhamcollege.org

A good Chemistry A Level has great currency in the employment market place being regarded as a rigorous academic subject with relevance to modern society. It supports degree courses and careers in Chemistry, Natural Sciences, Engineering, Pharmacy, Environmental Science, Materials Science, Geology and is compulsory for Medicine and Veterinary Science.

Chemistry Head of Department – Mr D M Townley Introduction Chemistry is that branch of science that investigates the chemical composition, structure, properties and interactions of matter and so has a bearing on everything that goes on around us. The A Level course aims to equip Sixth Form students with a detailed knowledge of modern chemistry and introduces both traditional ‘wet’ methods of analysis and synthesis alongside modern analytical techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry.

Examination Specification OCR Chemistry A (H432)

Web address: http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/as-a-level-gcechemistry-a-h032-h432-from-2015/

From the Head of Department

Mode of study

To widen the scope of the course the Chemistry Department contributes to evening Science society events at College and participates regularly in university outreach activities. Students have opportunities to visit university research departments and to participate in competitions such as Schools Analyst, Chemistry Olympiad and the Cambridge on-line Chemistry Challenge Competition (C3L6). Specialist tutorials are given to those wishing to apply for Chemistry or Natural Sciences at Oxbridge and other competitive universities. Chemistry is an interesting and engaging subject but it is challenging, requiring an ability to assimilate

The A Level course will build on the skills and technical aspects of (I)GCSE. In the Lower Sixth Form students will undertake a foundation course in the first unit, studying atomic structure, chemical amounts, bonding and the Periodic Table, rates, equilibrium and energy. The Upper Sixth Form will address advanced topics in physical chemistry, inorganic chemistry and organic chemistry including modern methods of chemical analysis and mathematical aspect of chemistry including the rigorous use of pH and

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abstract concepts and solve problems with numerical accuracy and understanding. As such a minimum A grade at (I)GCSE Chemistry or AA in IGCSE Double Award Science and A in Mathematics is required to enter the A Level course. Pupils anticipating joining the course after (I)GCSE could do some prior preparation in the summer holiday by reading widely, particularly from the following books:

and Quantum Physics. The second unit covers Further Mechanics, Fields and Nuclear Physics.

‘Seven Elements That Have Changed The World’ by John Browne

Unit 3 is about practical skills and data analysis as well as an option topic chosen by the students depending on their personal interests. Throughout the course, students will develop a variety of practical skills such as experimental design, problem solving, processing data and evaluating their results including quantifying uncertainty. Students will be required to achieve a level of practical competency that will have to be endorsed by their teacher to pass the course. 15% of the questions in the A Level examinations will test a student’s practical skills.

Contact:

Resources, support and enrichment

‘Periodic Tales’ by Hugh Aldersley-Williams ‘Elegant Solutions’ by Philip Ball

D.Townley@cheltenhamcollege.org

Student learning is supported by textbooks written specifically for the course, as well as a College subscription to ‘Doddle’, a useful on-line resource. Regular clinics are run several times weekly to support students experiencing difficulties with prep or preparing for university entrance tests or interviews.

Physics Head of Department - Mr S R Cooper

This specification is designed to encourage candidates to

Our most able students are encouraged to enter the national Physics Challenge and Olympiad competitions, for which extension classes are provided. The department puts on regular trips and Physics evenings. Budding engineers are urged to attend a ‘Headstart’ course where they stay at a university and find out much more about Engineering as a degree course and a career. This also provides excellent material for their UCAS personal statement.

develop in-depth knowledge and understanding of the principles of physics

Why Physics?

The subject is suitable for students who have an interest in Physics, want to find out how things work in the physical world and enjoy applying their mind to solve problems. Students will study the AQA Physics A Level, course 7408, which is the successor to the AQA Physics A syllabus successfully taught by the department for a number of years.

A Physics qualification provides evidence of numeracy and an ability to think logically, analytically and to solve problems. A good grade in Physics is thus held in high esteem by admissions tutors for any course for which these skills are at a premium, and by future employers. The holders of Physics qualifications thus tend to enjoy a salary premium.

gain hands-on practical, and data analysis skills appreciate how science works and its relevance beyond the laboratory see how physics links to other sciences and how the subject underpins important technologies.

Physics is a key subject for engineers and for most scientists.

Entry requirements and mathematical content

The majority also study Mathematics and many also take Chemistry. However, several combine Physics with Economics, Geography or a Language. Besides being a necessary stepping-stone to their career objective, the course has much to commend it in its own right, helping students develop vital skills. It should therefore be considered as an option for those who have no intention of continuing in a Science discipline. In 2015 more than half of College’s A Level Physics students achieved either an A* or A grade.

Students who work hard and who have already attained GCSE grades at A* or A in Mathematics and in Physics or Dual Award Science should thrive on this course. Those who have only managed B grades may struggle to achieve respectable grades at A Level. It is helpful, but not required, for students taking A Level Physics to continue to study Mathematics. 40% of the marks available in A Level Physics will require the use of GCSE standard mathematics.

Examination Specification

For those intending to continue with Physics or Engineering at university, an A Level in Mathematics is essential, and Further Mathematics is strongly advised for the best mathematicians.

AQA Physics A Level Award 7408

Web address: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/science/as-and-a-level/ physics-7407-7408

Structure of the course

Contact:

The Physics course consists of three units assessed by written examinations, each of which lasts two hours. In the first of these, students will study many of the core areas of Physics including Mechanics, Electricity, Waves and Materials as well as being introduced to more esoteric aspects such as Particle

s.cooper@cheltenhamcollege.org

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Sports Science Head of Department – Mrs R K Faulkner

included Sports Psychologist Alison Smith, Olympic Silver medallist Robert Hounslow and Paralympian Mel Nicholls.

Introduction

The Society helps to raise the profile of Sports Science within the College and opens people’s eyes to what it really entails. Students will take part in practical experiments looking at the following questions; ‘How does exercise affect our breath and breathing?’, ‘How does the body respond to changing energy needs?’ and ‘What are the implications for sporting training programmes?’

The Sports Science course follows the AQA Physical Education syllabus. However, the College describes the course as Sports Science, because this reflects more accurately the content of the syllabus. The course takes a multi- disciplinary approach, actively encouraging different methods of enquiry and learning. Within the classroom students learn about the physiological, psychological and sociological factors that influence the performer and their performance.

Students will have the chance to calculate the power they generate, estimate their V02 max, and measure the CO2 they breathe out, as well as blood pressure and pulse rate before and after exercise. We have also organised a visit to Bath University and the National Football Centre for hands-on laboratory testing and a workshop from Bristol University’s Mobile Anatomy and Physiology Unit.

Students will address contemporary topics including the impact of ergogenic aids, sports psychology, sports technology and the increasing commercialisation of sport. Combining theory with practical performance, students are given an excellent basis to develop their understanding of sport science as an academic discipline. It is not necessary to have taken Physical Education or Sports Science at GCSE Level but a good science background is very beneficial for both the AS and the A2 courses.

Sports Science and other subjects

It is possible to combine Sports Science usefully with most other subjects. The multi-disciplinary nature of the subject means that it combines well with both the liberal arts (especially History and Geography) and the sciences (particularly Biology for those who are strong enough scientists to take A Level Biology).

Areas of Study

Physical Education A Level is examined at the end of the Upper Sixth year. The theory examinations form 70% of the overall grade and the Non Examined Assessment (NEA) marks the additional 30%. Modules taught include, Physiology, Skill Acquisition, Sports Psychology and the role of technology in Sport.

Examination Specification: AQA GCE Physical Education A2 7582

Web address: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/physical-education/asand-a-level/physical-education-7582

Students are assessed on their ability to apply theoretical knowledge to practical situations to optimise performance. This includes answering multiple choice, shorter questions and writing extended essays to draw together the different modules.

The future of Sports Science

With the new A Level starting in September we are excited to embark on a more challenging and interesting course. The majority of the topics remain the same but there are some new modules to replace the dated initiatives. The examination has changed slightly due to the course being of a linear structure. The pupils will sit two exams, both lasting 2 hours. The mark scheme will focus on the following skills of explanation, application and analysis through a variety of multiple choice, short and extended questions. The practical element (NEA) involves assessment in one sport/ activity (15%) and a written piece of coursework (15%)

Practically they will be examined on their performance as well as their capabilities to analyse and evaluate their own and others’ performances. Students will be assessed in just one sport. As it is modular-based Sports Science will interest students with numerous perspectives: physiological (Sports Technology, Energy Systems or Newton’s Laws and their Application to Sporting Performance), psychological (Arousal and Attitudes, Aggression and its Relationship within Sport or Attribution Theories and their Effect on Performance) or sociological (Factors affecting the Nature and Development of Elite Performance or Sport and Ethnicity and Functions & Policies of Sport Organisations).

Relevance of Sports Science to the future

Sports Science is excellent preparation for a Higher Education course in a related sphere, e.g. Sports Science, Sports Studies, Exercise Science, Physiotherapy. It is also useful as a second or third subject to support university entry in an unrelated subject. It is an acceptable qualification for entry to all universities.

Learning in a dynamic way helps secure a sound understanding of the course content and enables students to apply theory to their own sporting performances in order to reach their full potential.

Contact:

Societies and Visits

r.faulkner@cheltenhamcollege.org

The Sports Science Society hosts a variety of debates, presentations and guest speakers. Recent lecturers have

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Theatre Studies and Drama Relevance of the Subject to the Future

Director of Drama – Mrs S M McBride

Whilst some who opt to take Theatre Studies do so with the intention of forging a career in the arts as a performer, writer or director, many more see it as a means to demonstrate to future employers and other educational institutions that they have an invaluable set of transferable skills.

Introduction

Theatre Studies is a highly practical course, which is designed for students who enjoy exploring plays practically, as well as watching and performing a diverse range of drama. It will interest students who have had some performance experience already and now wish to build upon this experience in a more focussed way.

An A Level in Theatre Studies suggests to the world that you are a confident ‘people’ person, indeed, universities have indicated that they especially value its emphasis on group co-operation, which is at the heart of the practical element of this course.

This is an exciting, but often exhausting subject to study - one that will rarely see students sitting quietly behind a desk in a classroom, but will more often see them up and about, interacting and improvising, talking and planning, and hopefully, laughing and applauding.

Examination Specification

Please note the new Theatre Studies specifications are still in draft form.

By choosing this course students are making a firm commitment to contribute actively and practically to every lesson as part of a series of stimulating exploration workshops and production processes.

AQA Drama and Theatre Studies – 7262 Component 1: Drama and Theatre Component 2: Creating Original Drama [practical]

What to Expect

Component 3: Making Theatre [practical]

The practical focus of the A Level course is preparation for the two Performance Assessments (60%). The first assessment includes the performance of three extracts each from a different play, directed and produced entirely by the students. For this element of the course students are required to use the ideas, theories and practical exploration of an established theatre practitioner to interpret their chosen play for performance. In the second practical unit they are asked to devise a piece of original theatre.

Web address: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/drama/a-level

Word from the Head of Department

The best way to prepare successfully for this course is to watch, read about and be involved in a diverse range of live theatre productions.

As well as honing performance skills and increasing knowledge and understanding of specific practitioners, this unit develops vital group communication and interpersonal skills. Due to the emphasis placed on student direction and creative control, to succeed, students must be highly focussed, totally committed and self motivated.

At the heart of our methodology is a commitment to providing work that has a core of great emotional truth, so a working understanding of the ideas of both Katie Mitchell and Stanislavski would prove invaluable to any student embarking on this course. Stanislavski’s ‘An Actor Prepares’ and Mitchell’s ‘A Director’s Craft’ provide an accessible insight into the work of these two practitioners.

The written A2 examination explores Drama from a distinctly practical point of view. As part of the examination candidates will be required to answer two questions on two set texts they have studied and complete a review of a specific element of a theatre production they have seen as part of the course.

Contact:

s.mcbride@cheltenhamcollege.org

During the study of the set text candidates will be encouraged to explore the text as practically as possible. They will consider ways that they might stage particular scenes, use a range of dramatic and design elements in performance, as well as interpret characters and relationships as performers. As preparation for the review question, candidates will be expected to see a diverse range of theatre productions during the year, including a trip to London’s West End, as part of the College’s extensive programme of extra curricular trips.

Subject Combinations

The study of Theatre at A Level complements a diverse range of other studies; common combinations have included History, English and Psychology. 32


Theology, Philosophy and Ethics (TPE) The nature of the soul, mind and body (Dualism, Materialism & Descartes)

Head of Department: Mrs R Mace

The possibility of life after death – (Embodied & Disembodied existence)

The study of Theology, Philosophy, and Ethics at A Level encourages students to develop their philosophical and critical thinking skills. Students are encouraged to read and evaluate the arguments of philosophers and theologians and to test their relevance to the world today.

Ideas about the nature of God (Boethius, Anselm, Aquinas, Swinburne & Plantinga) Issues in religious language (Dionysius, Maimonides, Aquinas, Tillich, Ayer, Phillips & Wittgenstein)

A Level TPE classes provide excellent preparation for university, as students are encouraged to become independent learners. Students may find themselves in lessons discussing a range of issues from the lives of medieval mystics to the Taliban, or even Tom Cruise and his conversion to Scientology.

B. Religion and Ethics

Normative Ethical theories – (Aristotle, Aquinas & Joseph Fletcher) The application of theory to contemporary issues of importance (Sexual ethics and Euthanasia) Ethical language and thought (Hobbes, Kant, Singer, Naturalism, Intuitionism, Emotivism)

The study of Philosophy, Theology and Ethics can complement a wide range of subjects at Advanced Level. As a companion to the arts and humanities it provides an understanding of the history of thought, facilitating understanding of subjects such as History, Art History and English Literature.

Debates surrounding the significant ideas of Conscience 
and Free will (Dawkins, Aquinas & Freud) The influence on ethical thought of developments in religious beliefs and the philosophy of religion

For the potential medic, economist or lawyer, it provides a rigorous training in the ethics pertaining to these disciplines and imparts a number of valuable transferable skills, especially the ability to construct compelling and coherent arguments. Advanced Level TPE students are encouraged to attend the Philosophy Society which is run in conjunction with Cheltenham Ladies College

C. Developments in Religious Thought

This is a dynamic and exciting modern syllabus, which may appeal to those who wish to pursue theology or philosophy at university, as well as those with an interest in the key issues of life and how they relate to religion in the 21st century. The emphasis on the acquisition of philosophical skills, thought and reasoning is important for all those entering higher education.

Nature of Jesus Christ (Chalcedonian definition, Historical Jesus and the Christ of Faith)

Human nature and purpose of Life (Romans and Augustine) Self and immortality (Matthew 25 and Aquinas) Revelation (Natural and Revealed & Calvin) The Bible (Source of Wisdom and Authority, Interpretation & Demythologization)

Presentations of Jesus (Zealot, Moral teacher, black Christ) Challenge of Secularisation (Materialism & God as Illusion) Responses to secularism (Liberation theology) Pluralism in Theology (Barth, Rahner & Hick) Pluralism (Interfaith dialogue)

Students of Theology, Philosophy and Ethics will follow the OCR A Level course in Religious Studies.

Gender in society (Bible, Church teaching & Christian understanding of human nature) Gender in theology – (Feminist theology)

A. Philosophy of Religion

Students who are considering this course at A Level may consider reading Keith Ward’s ‘The Existence of God’ or David Bentley Hart’s ‘Atheist Delusions’.

Ancient philosophical influences (Plato & Aristotle) Arguments about the existence or non-existence of God (The Teleological, Cosmological, Ontological arguments & David Hume’s challenges to belief )

Contact:

The nature and impact of religious experience (Mystical, conversion & corporate experiences)

r.mace@cheltenhamcollege.org

The challenge for religious belief of the problem of evil (Augustine, Irenaeus & John Hick) 33


Floreat

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ)

Led by Dr Mary Plint, Deputy Head (Learning and Wellbeing)

The Lower Sixth Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) is a key part of the College’s Sixth Form curriculum. It represents an opportunity for students to step away from the confines of A Level syllabuses, and to engage in an extended, in-depth study of a topic of interest to the individual.

Floreat is the name of the College wellbeing programme. College aims to help students to flourish personally, socially, and physically and to grow in their understanding of themselves and their world. The Floreat programme aims to help students to develop resilience, enable them to explore and make considered decisions about topical issues and about their future plans and help them build strong relationships with parents and the wider family during the time of transition to living more independent lives when they leave College.

The project provides excellent preparation for undergraduate study, which makes the project extremely attractive to universities. Students identify, plan and research in depth, developing knowledge and understanding beyond the curriculum and managing their own learning. Information about the project supports university applications by individualising the personal statement, enabling students to showcase their depth of interest in a subject, their knowledge and their research skills. Project information also provides possible discussion points for interview.

During the year, Upper College students will have a series of sessions designed to address matters that are relevant to them. For example, topics for Lower Sixth include ‘Joining Upper College and coping with increased workload and expectations’, ‘Academic resilience’ and ‘Making the right decisions’. Upper Sixth seminars include topics such as ‘Hopes and fears for the future’, ‘Moving on from College’ and ‘Discovering my core values’. The programme provides opportunities for students to explore their thoughts in a structured and supportive environment. Tutors, the Head of Upper College and College counsellors are instrumental in implementing the programme.

The Extended Project Qualification (EPQ), is externally assessed and for which tariff points are able to be accrued. Some universities may take an EPQ into consideration in making offers, reducing required entry grades accordingly. College follows the scheme offered by Edexcel: www.edexcel.com/quals/project/level3/ In the EPQ the skills of reading, research, review, analysis, writing and evaluation are developed. These core skills mirror the skills important to successful university study and careers:

Contact:

to think logically about arguments which are encountered in personal research

m.plint@cheltenhamcollege.org

to gather and handle source material critically to appreciate the importance of precision in the use of language or data when building a case for their point of view to show sensitivity to counter-arguments or rival theories to develop skills in presenting the project in a persuasive, cogent fashion to undertake a reflective study of what has been learned during the course of research or the significance of the results. Students will be taught these essential skills as normal timetabled lessons and are then expected to investigate their specific research question independently with the assistance of an EPQ supervisor. Isabella Mech co-ordinates the Extended Research Projects at College.

Contact:

i.mech@cheltenhamcollege.org

34


English as an Additional Language Head of Department – Miss H C Davies Students for whom English is not their first language sit an English as an Additional Language (EAL) examination as part of the admissions process. They may also be interviewed by the Head of EAL as part of the entrance procedure and /or on arrival. There is a residential induction programme for new EAL students prior to the start of the academic year. New EAL students are strongly advised to attend. Upper College students who do not have the prerequisite language qualifications for university entry are entered for the IELTS examination, usually in the Lower Sixth form, and classes are held to prepare students for this. The IELTS examination is an internationally accepted university entrance qualification, designed to grade students’ level of English using bands from 1.0 – 9.0. The grade needed for university entry depends on the individual university or course, but most require a minimum of 6.5 – 7.5. The IELTS exam consists of four modules: Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening. Conveniently, the examination targets relevant academic skills required for courses in further and higher education through a wide range of academic subject areas such as the Environment, Education and Technology. Scientific journals, newspapers and lectures represent common sources from which materials are taken. The ability to present and develop a balanced and objective argument, together with efficiency of communication and use of time, are regarded as key skills for success. As the course progresses, the students’ competency in the English language improves which, in turn, helps with their main subjects. In addition to IELTS preparation, the department offers additional EAL support to those who require it and this takes the form of individual, shared and small group lessons. Lessons are tailor-made to address each individual’s needs and areas of weakness in each of the skill areas, with an additional focus on English for academic purposes and study skills.

Contact:

hc.davies@cheltenhamcollege.org

35


Learning Support Head of Department: Miss S Marquis Many students who have received additional support for learning in Lower College feel that their skills are sufficiently developed for working independently in the Sixth Form. The greater demands and higher expectations of A Level work lead others to seek additional support, especially in Lower Sixth, as they make the transition to Sixth Form. The Learning Support Department can help with the following skills: • time and task management skills • note taking and note making • advanced level reading and comprehension skills • planning and structuring of essays • developing clarity of expression in written work • spelling and grammar • revision and examination techniques. Individual extra lessons are offered and arranged in consultation with parents where regular, ongoing support is desired. Charges usually apply for regular lessons. Students are also welcome to seek help informally from the Learning Support Department, without charge, should they wish to have a few lessons targeting specific skills. The Learning Support Department provides advice regarding special arrangements for examinations. Students who have had special arrangements for GCSE examinations are reassessed at College by specialist teachers. Current data is needed to determine if a student remains eligible for special examination arrangements in light of the current criteria as laid down by JCQ, the examinations board. The criteria are amended annually. Students joining College in the Sixth Form who wish to be considered for special examination arrangements at College must send assessment reports for the attention of Dr Plint, Deputy Head, Learning and Wellbeing, so that post-16 assessment and other requirements can be discussed.

Contact:

s.marquis@cheltenhamcollege.org

36


Higher Education and Careers Careers

Head of Upper College and Head of Higher Education & Careers – Mr D Evans Deputy Head of Upper College - Miss C Rowland Deputy Head of Upper College – Mrs I Mech Higher Education & Careers Advisor - Mrs R Evans

Careers guidance and personal skills development are considered central aspects of a pupil’s education at College. In Upper College there is continued support, encouragement and help with CV writing, interview skills and work experience placements. At the end of the Summer Term in Lower Sixth all pupils attend the department’s PreUniversity Week.

The department is located in the Symondson HE and Careers Library. This impressive resource centre consists of purpose built offices, a meeting room, specialist library and a projector for group presentations. It has been developed as part of the major refurbishment to the 1865 building incorporating the main College library and theatre.

The department works closely with tutors, PSCHE and Leadership and Life Skills delivery as well as department heads. We actively support the Science Department and a number of our students regularly attend events at local universities run by Headstart and the Smallpiece Trust. Other options, such as the excellent Year in Industry gap year placement scheme, exist and these opportunities are promoted at all times throughout the academic year.

In today’s workplace, success often starts with achieving a good degree at the most suitable university. Some will choose a subject because of the career they wish to pursue whilst others will know the discipline that they wish to study but be a little unsure as to where it may lead. Work experience can prove to be vital when securing a place at university, as well as providing inspiration regarding the choice of future career and degree to be read.

The department fosters a range of contacts with local and national businesses, professional bodies (such as RIBA, the Royal College of Surgeons and the Law Society), hospitals and charities. We continue to work with the Cheltonian Association to offer diverse and exciting opportunities for our students to learn more about a chosen profession.

Higher Education

College handles a large and diverse range of university applications. These are made, via UCAS (Universities & Colleges Admissions Service) to British universities as well as to foreign institutions principally in North America, Australia, Europe and the Far East. There is a series of termly meetings with Mr Evans, six in total, to cover all issues. Matters relating to admissions and applications are aired to parents at the Students’ and Parents’ Universities Meeting in March. A comprehensive booklet is produced annually ensuring the most up to date information is available about this dynamic area and issued to all students at the end of their Lower Sixth year.

Contacts:

d.evans@cheltenhamcollege.org: Head of Upper College c.rowland@cheltenhamcollege.org: Deputy Head of Upper College i.mech@cheltenhamcollege.org: Deputy Head of Upper College r.evans@cheltenhamcollege.org: Higher Education and Careers Advisor

Individual students see any member of the Upper College team to discuss their particular circumstances and to seek advice over personal statements and choices about degrees and institutions. A comprehensive mock interview programme is in place to cover those subjects and students likely to be called; Oxbridge, Imperial, medical, dental and veterinary medicine applicants particularly. The department coordinates College departments’ preparations for the increasing number of university tests such as the national ones for Medicine (BMAT and UKCAT) and Law (LNAT) and any individual one for particular universities, most notably Oxford. The department also invites university representatives from across a range of disciplines and backgrounds to speak to students and parents about the UCAS process and personal statements. Members of the department regularly attend training conferences at UCAS Headquarters and keep up to date with other events in London, Oxford and Cambridge. All students who have left and subsequently wish to reapply to university are overseen by Mr Evans. Overseas/ International applications are dealt with by the department; offering advice, guidance and support throughout the year.

37


U6 A Level Results 2011-16 SUBJECT

ENTRIES

A*

A

B

C

D

Art

54

22

13

15

3

1

Biology

163

20

45

44

27

20

Business Studies

134

17

20

40

29

Chemistry

153

20

59

33

22

Chinese

43

1

23

16

Classical Civilisation

4

0

1

DT: Materials

78

4

DT: Textiles

36

Economics

A*-A %

A* - B % A* - E %

64.8%

92.6%

100.0%

5

39.9%

66.9%

98.8%

18

1

27.6%

57.5%

93.3%

11

1

51.6%

73.2%

95.4%

2

0

1

55.8%

93.0%

100.0%

2

1

0

0

25.0%

75.0%

100.0%

24

31

8

1

35.9%

75.6%

87.2%

4

10

15

7

38.9%

80.6%

100.0%

204

23

74

38

24

8

4

47.5%

66.2%

83.8%

English Literature

147

21

51

48

21

5

1

49.0%

81.6%

100.0%

French

77

12

23

24

13

4

1

45.5%

76.6%

100.0%

Further Maths

52

14

18

12

5

3

61.5%

84.6%

100.0%

Geography

178

27

80

56

13

60.1%

91.6%

100.0%

German

25

6

16

3

88.0%

100.0%

100.0%

Gov. & Politics

111

4

26

42

27.0%

64.9%

100.0%

Greek

9

2

7

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

History

177

25

61

59

26

4

2

48.6%

81.9%

100.0%

History of Art

37

1

14

12

5

3

1

40.5%

73.0%

97.3%

Italian

2

1

1

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

Japanese

3

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

Latin

22

10

10

1

1

90.9%

95.5%

100.0%

Mathematics

245

76

97

37

24

8

70.6%

85.7%

99.2%

Music

20

7

7

4

1

1

70.0%

90.0%

100.0%

Physical Education

78

4

22

17

18

11

6

33.3%

55.1%

100.0%

Physics

106

21

34

23

18

5

3

51.9%

73.6%

98.1%

Psychology

78

8

15

23

17

12

3

29.5%

59.0%

100.0%

Religious Studies

59

8

13

23

13

2

35.6%

74.6%

100.0%

Russian

22

14

8

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

Spanish

48

7

14

14

10

43.8%

72.9%

100.0%

Theatre Studies

58

13

20

20

5

56.9%

91.4%

100.0%

Total

2423

392

809

652

336

49.6%

76.5%

97.3%

Cumulative percentage

23

E

2 11

5

0

3 1

3 130

38

16.2% 49.6% 76.5% 90.3% 95.7% 97.3%

38


39

Sixth Form Curriculum 2017-19  
Sixth Form Curriculum 2017-19