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Creative Portfolio Chelsey Johnson South Dakota State University

Major: Dairy Production & Agricultural Education, Communication, and Leadership (Communication Specialization)

Hoard’s Dairyman Articles Hoard’s Dairyman Farm Flashes Hoard’s Dairyman Blogs Skyscraper Ads Photography SDSU Dairy Digest Dairy Shrine Display


Hoard’s Dairyman Articles A NEw cAlf fAcility is one of many projects Boyd designed for Plymell Dairy. His son Ryan will take over managing the calves.

at this dairy, but the operation wasn’t large enough to support another family member. After spending 18 years away from the farm and working as an equipment manager for John Deere in Garden City, Kan., Boyd started thinking about how he could become connected to the dairy industry again. “I worked with many farmers while at John Deere. I found the right crop farmers interested in diversifying their operations,” explained Boyd. the first week of December 2002, Boyd proposed a business plan and design to area farmers Dick Strandmark and Dean Kleystuber. Between Christmas and New Year’s, they met to flesh out the idea further. “After discussing for a long time, one of them had a pencil in his hand and said, ‘Ah, let’s build it,’” recalled Boyd. they purchased a dry land wheat field near Strandmark and Kleystuber’s land, and in March 2003, they ran a disc through the field. “We called that our groundbreaking,” smiled Boyd. Now,Each nearlymanagement 10 years later and after rebuilddecision is made with the well-being of cows in mind at ing from the tornado, the siteDairy. is almost comWilson Centennial Through a team effort, the 160-year-old Michigan plete. Cows are milked in a double-24 parfarm strives to maintain comfortable cows. allel parlor, and all lactating and dry cows After a tornado ripped through Plymell Dairy, Boyd Sigafoose was devastated. are housed on dry lots with shades. When But, it would take more than a tornado to keep him from rebuilding and weather allows, heifers are let out to graze by Chelsey Johnson improving his dairy. on a pasture beside the dairy. A heifer grower currently raises most of the calves. “My business partners raise the crops, but by Chelsey Johnson for the most part, I take care of the dairy,” where the Wilsons have taken extra measures fter our working said Boyd. “I manage 1,800with cowscows with his an whole to assure that cows are comfortable. Large life, Brent Wilson feels the aches 80-cow mentality.” fans run constantly while two zones of six and pains from hours of standA triage system was set up to treat and sort as t 7:40 p.m. on April 29, 2009, Boyd Always buildinging and sprinkler heads douse cows for increments of on engineering cement each day. He and many cows as possible. More than 100 cows were Sigafoose, manager and part owner a minute and a half on, and eight minutes off. his son strive to is assure theirwith cows don’t the office at tyler Plymell dairy furnished put down that evening and more than 300 total of Plymell Dairy near Garden “We are intense about managing cow comexperience the same discomfort. and HOnEsty are the two things twowOrk hand-painted desks that Boyd Clark builtVilter himwere eventually lost. By morning, the debris Hard City, Kan., was talking on the says young dair need for a successful career. These fort in the heat,” said tyler. “We know that if “I ymen feel the wear and tear in my knees and self. Unique contraptions can be found across was cleaned up and Boyd had to move forward. attributes phone with his friend Kyle Averhoff, manager were key to Clark and his family’s showing the temperatures are uncomfortable enough hips, and I don’t spend every hour my day on the dairy including a steel conveyer calf of bottle “there was never a question in my mind success of a nearby operation. Suddenly it got dark over the years. for us to have trouble sleeping that our cows washer and a portable lift for down cows. A about rebuilding,” said Boyd. “the only thing and he lost reception. are uncomfortable, too.” custom-made steel blade pushes up feed. In we questioned was putting shades back up Sprinkler heads are also installed on the the milking parlor, steel framesJOHNSON hold the prepbecause they were what hurt the cows in the dairy character. Wetowel weren’t necessarily out feed mangers in the free stall barns and large JOHNSON ping equipment and hampers. tornado. But shades are necessary to keep cows with The author is the 2012 Hoard’s to set a national class-leading Dairyman record but the cow fans are hung every 24 feet. In addition, water Editorial “We always need special things forIntern the and is comfortable, so we decided to rebuild them.” The author is the 2012 Hoard’s had to be profitable. junior majoring in agricultural is available to cows every 50 feet. A large Dairyman Editorial Intern and is dairy,” explained Boyd. “Iacommunications can build aat lot of South Dakota junior majoring in agricultural An 80-cow mentality water tank is located a few yards away from bya Chelsey Johnson things from a thousand dollarsUniversity. worth of steel.” communications at South Dakota Of Four Winds’ 17 National State Grand Champion where the cows exit the parlor and warm Boyd hasone a knack formemorable? building, but he also Boyd approaches all decisions on his dairy titles, State University. which was most water from the plate cooler flows into it. has a the vision for designing dairy facilities. with the same mentality he used when decid- Probably first time that Westlynn Tom Dee was “the cows like the warm water, and the Each Sundayat morning heshow. spends hours at his ing to put shades back up for his cows. Grand Champion a national She was a oncetank can hardly keep up with as much as the concrete,” Brent. “A cow never computer using turboCAD to design elabo“the cows are my number one priority,” in-a-lifetime cow. Tomexplained Dee was the first animal that gets off cows drink,” said tyler. concrete from hutches onward. We dairy facilities. designs the farms “All I could see was hail, and about the time explained Boyd. “Our second priority is our werate ever showed that wasthe a He national champion. We put rubthe Wilsons also noted that the climate in mats down try to 20 didn’t breed her. Weinpurchased hercalculates asremove a 2-year-old. with aber region mindtoand thehours cost out of I lost him, a scoop shovel lifted off the ground employees, then profitability.” Michigan contributes to the comfort of cows the that cows have stand on concrete.” Dee put us on the map, so totospeak. She wassee to build it.day then he uses Google Earth to and started to spin,” recalled Boyd. “I drove Boyd has surveillance cameras throughout Tom oldAt theWilson first will time she won. She four on their dairy. Centennial Dairy, how the designs work based onwon thenear lay ofCarson up to a stand of sweet bran in the commodthe dairy and can watch each camera live from 4 years Madison at 4,even 5, 6 designed andmats 7 years of age. “We have found the climate to be great,” City,He Mich., rubber cover the Ifree the in land. has facilities for stall ity shed with my pickup. I called my wife who a large screen mounted on the wall in his office. times know the last year that I showed her my daughter, said Brent. “We average only about five days barn, holding and milking parlor floors. regions in Brazil andarea Argentina. One facility was up at the milking parlor and told her to If an issue arises, he can watch the tapes to see Tina, said I was nuts to take her out and risk it. above 90°f and five days below zero.” mentality of comparing on he hasthis spent hours engineering is ahow $47standing milget in the hallway.” if any management problems occurred. That conversation firmly rings my mind. concrete cowsinis a key management tool lion dairy with affects twin rotary parlors. Just as Boyd had done years ago during “My employees know that the cows come Brent probably and tylerwon’t at their 600-cow dairy. “thefor designs be used by anyhurricanes in Florida, he rode out the tornado first, and they know that if I see anyone misWhat made Tom Dee so impressive as a cow is absolutely a focus one but I“Cow enjoy comfort it,” explained Boyd. “I know howfor us,” that shredded through his farm. His wife, treating the cows, they won’t be working here and so successful as a transmitter? saidfacilities Brent.like to design based on how cows move.” Beverly, and the milking employees were safe, anymore,” explained Boyd. She transmitted no other Guernsey cow Boyd’s projects is currently but many of the structures and the cattle on this cow-first mentality stems from grow- had.One Thereof have beendesign cows of other breeds that Comfort at the forefront breakingher. ground at transmitted Plymell Dairy. drew their 1,800-cow drylot dairy weren’t as lucky. ing up on an 80-cow tie stall dairy north of surpassed But she the He most reli-up a design for a calfcow facility that bring of dairy. is not anwill option this Shortly after the tornado ripped through Pensacola, Fla. Boyd’s father is still farming ably of any Overcrowding Guernsey that I am aware of. atall thethecalves to farm. the facility feathe farm, hundreds of neighbors arrived to the back Wilsons place tremendous emphasis on In beginning, herthe overall balance attracted metures to her. Shepens had a cows beautiful beautiful steel designed for udder, Calf-tel hutches. help. Four diesel-powered lights were set up so making sure have enough space. front end and beautiful feet and legs. that When she was can get Fourteen bestudies secured intosay a 96-foot that they could work through the night. “I was “I pens havewill read you offered me,with it one-third ownership and I hadDairy Elizabeth Olson, 2012 Student Recognition widetoslab ofwas concrete. then each has an butShrine never billed by anyone,” said Boyd. by overcrowding upNational topen 20 percent, I to care for her. When I saw her for the first time at anchordon’t that locks in the that,” hutch fromBrent. the top. Boyd took pride in setting every post while agree with said Award winner, has a ofpassion fortothe communications, sales and marketing World Dairy Expo, it took me all three seconds hutches All can be so a skid steer can easily building the dairy. Now seeing the destruction of moved the heifers, lactating cows and dry decide I would rather owncan part of her than look up that she hopes dairy clean bedding off are the cement. Boyd welded the the the tornado caused to the farm was more than cow pens deep help bedded with farmers. sand. at her in the show ring the rest of my life. first jighead-to-head of the pens, then it toina local he could bear. Even more devastating was seefreegave stalls theirwelder high group to make the are rest. the complete facility will feaing many cows injured by the 18 shades that barn 16 feet long curb-to-curb, by Chelsey Johnson What unique aspects do you appreciate about allowing 16for rows of 14 hutches and 32 weaned pens. the tornado ripped apart. extra lunge space. theture Guernsey breed? Boyd’s son Ryan willa manage all of and the heifers. “Beverly came and got me and said I was Also, their newer barns have wider headI milked few Holsteins I found SHrEddEd by tHE tOrNAdO, the pieces and shards of At one time, this calf facility iscows done, the dairy to eat needed up at the house,” recalled Boyd. “She locks toare assure that will choose Guernseys more docile when compar18 shades injured many cows. After seeing the damage, that “When complete,” smiled “this is heat a leaving simjust knew I needed to get away from there. Boyd was hesitant to put shades up again but decided ingwill the be two breeds. Guernseys are also more next to each otherBoyd. rather than an ost people don’t get thrill they were a necessity. ple dairy but it has been a profitable one.” Seeing the damage tore me up so bad.” tolerant. They are probably more energy efficient open headlock. the walkway to athe parlor and teammates over the years. By the time I of discussing milk and because even thoughout some of the Holsteins milked is sprinkled with sand in critical areas that competed at Expo, our whole team was a reaReprinted by permission from the September 10, 2012, issue of Hoard’s Dairyman. September 10, 2012 569 more, I also had to clean-up an awful lot then behind machine, and that was a cool feeling.” grain markets, but again, become slippery to ensure that cows can walk sons WArm WAter frOm tHe plAte COOler is available Copyright 2012 by W.D. Hoard & Sons Company, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin. them andcomfortably they ate more. The from bottom line was we olson to her 4-Hwater dairy Elizabeth olson has always to and the parlor. to cows remembered right after milking.back The Wilsons believe is probably made more money with the Guernseys. a key factor cow comfort. daystowhen coach Barry Visser trained done things different way. pen is another area judging the aparlor holding

Engineering a profitable dairy

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Giving her heart and soul for dairy farmers

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on March 26, 2011. The hundreds of plaques and banners decorating the shed easily confirmed why this die-hard crowd was so willing to stand the cold that sale day. over the years, Four Winds’ owners, Clark and Joy Vilter, have gained a sterling reputation for breeding awe-inspiring Guernseys.

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oT even a blizzard could keep the trailers away from the aptly named Four Winds Farm in Hartland, Wis.,

to look forward to giving reasons This past summer I hadher theteam opportunity to write several articles for Hoard’s Dairyman Magazine. I We need to improve the feet and legs overall practice schedule and quality coaching at of storiestheranging FarmofStories in the breed, and wewrote also needatovariety give the breed U of M. Asfrom the youngest four children, more overall strength so they can more efficiently JOHNSON olson also enjoyed the luxury of her older sibtoa stories for the make milk. If you have narrow front-ended cow,Young Dairyman page. In addiThe author is the 2012 Hoard’s lings’ coaching. chances are she’s going toDairyman be narrow in the rearand is Editorial Intern “Whenever I went to I couldall ask any gained with editing asa Ishow, edited end. And I have yettion, to see aI cow make in a experience lot of a junior majoring agricultural of my siblings to talk about a class with me,” milk out of a narrow udder. communications at South Dakota materials that were routed during the summer. State University. recalled olson. “I remember participating in “I got the lucky hand of being the youngest,”

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What do you 25, think needs to be improved Used by permission from the dreading October 25,the 2012, issue ofroom. Hoard’s 2012 682 Octoberolson, olson rather than reasons AsDairyman. explained who tohas twoherolder sisters within the Guernsey cow make viable Copyright 2012 by W.D. Hoard & Sons Company, fort Atkinson, Wisconsin. under t she grew older, she benefited from a rigourous and a brother. “I see bits and pieces of my siblong-term in our industry?

The Vilters are nothing less than an icon when it comes to breeding accomplishments in any breed, having earned 281 All-American nominations with a remarkable 149 being homebred. Members of the Four Winds herd have been selected as National Grand Champion 17 times, 11 times being homebred. A household name in dairy circles, Westlynn Tom Dee, the farm’s first national Grand Champion, is celebrated among all breeds as one of only a few cows to win four or more Grand Champion titles at World Dairy Expo. That’s not all. Led by Four Winds Magicman, a five-time Premier Sire at World Dairy Expo, the Four Winds prefix ranks fourth all-time among Guernsey sires for All-American nominees. In 1998, Clark was chosen as the 57th winner of the Klussendorf award, the nation’s highest show-

leave the industry, the Vilters’ impact on the Guernsey breed and showing community has set a standard of excellence for years to come. What were the keys to your herd’s success during the 28-year run since your first AllAmerican nomination in 1983?

First of all, having an understanding and very helpful wife. Without Joy, I could not have accomplished any of this. My three children, Tim, Tina and Jim, were also always a big help. The support of my family was key to my success. The second ingredient would be a little bit of luck. Once in awhile success comes from what you have accomplished, but other times it comes from luck. Sometimes I was just in the right place at the right time with the right animal. Our breeding program probably helped us quite

Four Winds Farm has received much recognition over the years, what achievement do you think has been the highlight?

It is hard to select just one highlight. The two at parents in me. the youngest thelings top ofand my list are when the But Klussendorf Asso- has ciation elected me of todoing be part of that group andway.” the mentality things their own receiving the Master Cattle Breeder olson’s “way” Dairy led her to join an Award elite group from the American Guernsey Association. of dairy graduates as the 2012 National Dairy The Klussendorf Award is for what I accomshrine student Recognition scholarship winplished in the show ring, while the Master Breeder As a nominee from the years University of Minis ner. for accomplishments over the breeding

the Harrisburg contest when I was only 15. I called my sister sarah for advice on reasons, and she gave me a list of tips to remember. I continued to use that list throughout my whole judging career.”

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OVER 300 MEDIA INTERVIEWS as Princess Kay of the Milky Way helped Elizabeth Olson refine her communication skills. Serving as Princess Kay led her to discover an interest in marketing.

“I learned and grew so much from being Princess Kay and realized what it feels like to love and believe in something,” Olson expressed. Olson noted that spending her year promoting dairy products helped her discover a new passion. She began to realize an interest in dairy marketing and a desire to understand consumers. “Being Princess Kay really made me start thinking about why people buy our products and who is buying them,” explained Olson. “I wanted to understand what goes through their mind. “Dairy farmers are salt to the earth and I want to help them. It’s all about connecting our passion to the public. By understanding milk marketing, I can help dairy farmers do that.”

Double major sees past the farm

Giving her heart and soul for dairy farmers Elizabeth Olson, 2012 National Dairy Shrine Student Recognition Award winner, has a passion for communications, sales and marketing that she hopes can help dairy farmers. by Chelsey Johnson

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ost people don’t get a thrill out of discussing milk and grain markets, but then again, Elizabeth Olson has always done things a different way. “I got the lucky hand of being the youngest,” explained Olson, who has two older sisters and a brother. “I see bits and pieces of my sib-

JOHNSON The author is the 2012 Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern and is a junior majoring in agricultural communications at South Dakota State University.

lings and parents in me. But the youngest has the mentality of doing things their own way.” Olson’s “way” led her to join an elite group of dairy graduates as the 2012 National Dairy Shrine Student Recognition Scholarship winner. As a nominee from the University of Minnesota (U of M), Olson’s many leadership roles throughout her youth and college career and genuine passion for the dairy industry helped her earn this top honor. Her passion stems from growing up on a 50-cow registered Holstein farm near Hutchinson, Minn.

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Olson’s dairy judging résumé is decorated with numerous individual and team honors, but most impressively, during Olson’s time on the U of M judging team, she took first place in individual reasons at two national contests and was a member of the first-place team in reasons at three national contests. The U of M team also took second-place in reasons at World Dairy Expo in 2011. “I reached a point where I felt excitement instead of nerves before I gave reasons,” explained Olson. She humbly added, “My success in reasons is due to many great coaches September 10, 2012

and teammates over the years. By the time I competed at Expo, our whole team was a reasons machine, and that was a cool feeling.” Olson remembered back to her 4-H dairy judging days when coach Barry Visser trained her team to look forward to giving reasons rather than dreading the reasons room. As she grew older, she benefited from a rigourous practice schedule and quality coaching at the U of M. As the youngest of four children, Olson also enjoyed the luxury of her older siblings’ coaching. “Whenever I went to a show, I could ask any of my siblings to talk about a class with me,” recalled Olson. “I remember participating in the Harrisburg contest when I was only 15. I called my sister Sarah for advice on reasons, and she gave me a list of tips to remember. I continued to use that list throughout my whole judging career.”

Princess Kay sparks a passion Olson’s passion for the dairy industry as well as the public speaking finesse she gained from dairy judging helped her excel in a different judging room. Olson talked her way to the front of a class of 12 finalists for Minnesota’s highest dairy princess honor, Princess Kay of the Milky Way. “Growing up, I looked up to Princess Kay, but as I grew older, I started to understand what Princess Kay does,” explained Olson. “I knew it would be an opportunity to help dairy farmers, and I knew that was something I would love doing.” After being crowned Princess Kay, Olson spent her year traveling to over 50 elementary schools promoting the Fuel Up to Play 60 campaign, as well as writing articles, using social media and participating in over 300 media interviews.

Olson maintained a heavy load of extracurricular activities while at the U of M. The leadership role she takes most pride in was serving as the president of the Gopher Dairy Club. She also served as president of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Natural Resource Sciences Student Board, and the Midwest Region Student Affiliate Division of the American Dairy Science Association. Olson played an active role in many other student organizations, as well. These organizations kept Olson busy with many responsibilities, but she also took on a heavy class load as she pursued a double major in animal science with an industry emphasis and applied economics. “I started out pre-vet, but I began to recognize my interest in looking at the industry side, so I switched to the industry emphasis,” explained Olson. “Then, after serving as Princess Kay, I recognized my interest in marketing and added the applied economics major.” To dig deeper into her marketing interest, Olson participated in an independent study under the supervision of dairy economist Marin Bozic, exploring dairy policy and marketing on both a domestic and international scale. “I am so thankful for my double major, it allows me to see past the farm and see the real world,” said Olson.

A career helping farmers Olson stands out among recent college graduates with a wide range of professional experiences. She worked part-time with Midwest Dairy in St. Paul, Minn., as a communications consultant. She also worked part-time with Bellmont Partners and Columbia Grain. Last summer, she was a marketing intern with CRV-USA, and in 2009, she was a sales and marketing intern with Form-A-Feed/ TechMix in Stewart, Minn. While her experiences span between a wide range of companies, in each company she worked in roles that utilized her passion for marketing, sales and communications. “Discussing dairy marketing with others is something that really makes me tick,” said Olson. “I get excited when I find someone who I can discuss milk and grain markets with.” Now she is continuing this pattern as a sales representative with the Mycogen Seeds division of Dow AgroSciences. She is already on a fast track toward success as she was selected to move out of her traineeship class after four weeks into a sales representative position with her own sales territory in Alexandria, Minn. “I am really excited to work as a sales rep because I will have the chance to work outside and visit with farmers,” said Olson. “Like anything I do, I plan to put my heart and soul into it to help farmers.”

Reprinted by permission from the September 10, 2012, issue of Hoard’s Dairyman. Copyright 2012 by W.D. Hoard & Sons Company, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin.


Overstocking is not an option at Wilson Centennial Dairy. Extra lunge space, wide stalls, wide headlocks and large fans combine to provide comfort for cows.

For 14 years, rBST was a management tool at Wilson Centennial Dairy. However, today all milk cooperatives in Michigan have an rBST-free policy. This change greatly shifted the focus of their reproductive program.

A shift in focus

Each management decision is made with the well-being of cows in mind at Wilson Centennial Dairy. Through a team effort, the 160-year-old Michigan farm strives to maintain comfortable cows. by Chelsey Johnson

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fter working with cows his whole life, Brent Wilson feels the aches and pains from hours of standing on cement each day. He and his son Tyler strive to assure their cows don’t experience the same discomfort. “I feel the wear and tear in my knees and hips, and I don’t spend every hour of my day on

JOHNSON The author is the 2012 Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern and is a junior majoring in agricultural communications at South Dakota State University.

concrete,” explained Brent. “A cow never gets off concrete from the hutches onward. We put rubber mats down to try to remove 20 hours out of the day that cows have to stand on concrete.” At Wilson Centennial Dairy, near Carson City, Mich., rubber mats cover the free stall barn, holding area and milking parlor floors. This mentality of comparing how standing on concrete affects cows is a key management tool for Brent and Tyler at their 600-cow dairy. “Cow comfort is absolutely a focus for us,” said Brent.

where the Wilsons have taken extra measures to assure that cows are comfortable. Large fans run constantly while two zones of six sprinkler heads douse cows for increments of a minute and a half on, and eight minutes off. “We are intense about managing cow comfort in the heat,” said Tyler. “We know that if the temperatures are uncomfortable enough for us to have trouble sleeping that our cows are uncomfortable, too.” Sprinkler heads are also installed on the feed mangers in the free stall barns and large fans are hung every 24 feet. In addition, water is available to cows every 50 feet. A large water tank is located a few yards away from where the cows exit the parlor and warm water from the plate cooler flows into it. “The cows like the warm water, and the tank can hardly keep up with as much as the cows drink,” said Tyler. The Wilsons also noted that the climate in Michigan contributes to the comfort of cows on their dairy. “We have found the climate to be great,” said Brent. “We average only about five days above 90°F and five days below zero.”

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Overcrowding is not an option at this dairy. The Wilsons place tremendous emphasis on making sure cows have enough space. “I have read studies that say you can get by with overcrowding up to 20 percent, but I don’t agree with that,” said Brent. All of the heifers, lactating cows and dry cow pens are deep bedded with sand. The head-to-head free stalls in their high group barn are 16 feet long curb-to-curb, allowing for extra lunge space. Also, their newer barns have wider headlocks to assure that cows will choose to eat next to each other rather than leaving an open headlock. The walkway to the parlor is sprinkled with sand in critical areas that become slippery to ensure that cows can walk comfortably to and from the parlor. The parlor holding pen is another area October 25, 2012

Warm water from the plate cooler is available to cows right after milking. The Wilsons believe water is a key factor to cow comfort.

“We weren’t anxious to get cows bred because we didn’t have to,” added Brent. “As a result, we didn’t have enough heifers for our herd to grow or to cull our low producers.” Now, reproductive efficiency is a key focus at Wilson Centennial. Brent, Tyler and a hired employee do all of the A.I. breeding. The herd is on an ovsynch and G6G program. Their first-service conception rate is close to 50 percent with 2.2 services per conception overall. “We do a herd health check every week,” explained Tyler. “We figure we need 11 to 12 pregnancies per week to keep our days in milk at about 170 and our calving interval below 14 months.” With their higher percentage of conceptions at first breeding, they are able to actually grow their herd while eliminating inefficient cows. Even though the reproductive program has become a crucial piece of the operation, it does not interfere with the central focus of cow comfort. In fact, the Wilsons believe reproductive management is a key component to ensuring cow comfort. “We have been using A.I. breeding for over 60 years because we don’t want a jumper bull hurting the cows, and we use an ovsynch and G6G program so that we don’t have to wait for a cow to come into heat,” explained Brent. “We don’t like having the cows banging around and getting hurt.”

Continuing to improve Even though there is plenty of room for expansion, Tyler noted that the next project isn’t going to be building more barns. “Our barns are so spread out already,” explained Tyler. “The cows in the high barn have a long walk to the parlor, and our walkway is only one lane.” Currently, the cows walk down a fenced walkway to the parlor. When one barn is done, the milking employees shut down the parlor and chase any stragglers back to that barn. Then they have to chase cows from the next barn to the parlor. “We could milk cows a lot faster if we didn’t have the down time between barns,” said Tyler. “Our next project will be extending our walkway to have two lanes like a highway so cows can come and go.” Tyler and Brent also rely on the help of family members to ensure continued success. Ben, Brent’s younger son, has a business management degree and he currently works as an agronomist. But he is also involved with selecting all of the crops planted on their 3,000 acres. “Part of our transition plan for the farm is that our boys have to work somewhere else before they consider coming back to the farm,” explained Brent. “Those value-added experiences are important. Tyler worked in the nutrition field for seven years.” When Brent shares some of their building plans for the future, he jokingly tells his wife, Nancy, to cover her ears. Tyler and Brent are good at proposing ideas to improve the dairy, but Nancy, the chief financial manager, keeps their ideas in check. “When we get ideas for expansion, Nancy will say why do you want to do that. Then she will ask where do you draw the line, don’t you have enough work already?” smiled Brent.

Used by permission from the October 25, 2012, issue of Hoard’s Dairyman. Copyright 2012 by W.D. Hoard & Sons Company, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin.


A new calf facility is one of many projects Boyd designed for Plymell Dairy. His son Ryan will take over managing the calves.

After a tornado ripped through Plymell Dairy, Boyd Sigafoose was devastated. But, it would take more than a tornado to keep him from rebuilding and improving his dairy. by Chelsey Johnson

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t 7:40 p.m. on April 29, 2009, Boyd Sigafoose, manager and part owner of Plymell Dairy near Garden City, Kan., was talking on the phone with his friend Kyle Averhoff, manager of a nearby operation. Suddenly it got dark and he lost reception.

JOHNSON The author is the 2012 Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern and is a junior majoring in agricultural communications at South Dakota State University.

“All I could see was hail, and about the time I lost him, a scoop shovel lifted off the ground and started to spin,” recalled Boyd. “I drove up to a stand of sweet bran in the commodity shed with my pickup. I called my wife who was up at the milking parlor and told her to get in the hallway.” Just as Boyd had done years ago during hurricanes in Florida, he rode out the tornado that shredded through his farm. His wife, Beverly, and the milking employees were safe, but many of the structures and the cattle on their 1,800-cow drylot dairy weren’t as lucky. Shortly after the tornado ripped through the farm, hundreds of neighbors arrived to help. Four diesel-powered lights were set up so that they could work through the night. “I was never billed by anyone,” said Boyd. Boyd took pride in setting every post while building the dairy. Now seeing the destruction the tornado caused to the farm was more than he could bear. Even more devastating was seeing many cows injured by the 18 shades that the tornado ripped apart. “Beverly came and got me and said I was needed up at the house,” recalled Boyd. “She just knew I needed to get away from there. Seeing the damage tore me up so bad.”

A triage system was set up to treat and sort as many cows as possible. More than 100 cows were put down that evening and more than 300 total were eventually lost. By morning, the debris was cleaned up and Boyd had to move forward. “There was never a question in my mind about rebuilding,” said Boyd. “The only thing we questioned was putting shades back up because they were what hurt the cows in the tornado. But shades are necessary to keep cows comfortable, so we decided to rebuild them.”

An 80-cow mentality Boyd approaches all decisions on his dairy with the same mentality he used when deciding to put shades back up for his cows. “The cows are my number one priority,” explained Boyd. “Our second priority is our employees, then profitability.” Boyd has surveillance cameras throughout the dairy and can watch each camera live from a large screen mounted on the wall in his office. If an issue arises, he can watch the tapes to see if any management problems occurred. “My employees know that the cows come first, and they know that if I see anyone mistreating the cows, they won’t be working here anymore,” explained Boyd. This cow-first mentality stems from growing up on an 80-cow tie stall dairy north of Pensacola, Fla. Boyd’s father is still farming

Shredded by the tornado, the pieces and shards of 18 shades injured many cows. After seeing the damage, Boyd was hesitant to put shades up again but decided they were a necessity.

Always building and engineering The office at Plymell dairy is furnished with two hand-painted desks that Boyd built himself. Unique contraptions can be found across the dairy including a steel conveyer calf bottle washer and a portable lift for down cows. A custom-made steel blade pushes up feed. In the milking parlor, steel frames hold the prepping equipment and towel hampers. “We always need special things for the dairy,” explained Boyd. “I can build a lot of things from a thousand dollars worth of steel.” Boyd has a knack for building, but he also has a vision for designing dairy facilities. Each Sunday morning he spends hours at his computer using TurboCAD to design elaborate dairy facilities. He designs the farms with a region in mind and calculates the cost to build it. Then he uses Google Earth to see how the designs will work based on the lay of the land. He has even designed facilities for regions in Brazil and Argentina. One facility he has spent hours engineering is a $47 million dairy with twin rotary parlors. “The designs probably won’t be used by anyone but I enjoy it,” explained Boyd. “I know how to design facilities based on how cows move.” One of Boyd’s design projects is currently breaking ground at Plymell Dairy. He drew up a design for a calf facility that will bring all of the calves back to the farm. The facility features steel pens designed for Calf-Tel hutches. Fourteen pens will be secured into a 96-foot wide slab of concrete. Then each pen has an anchor that locks in the hutch from the top. The hutches can be moved so a skid steer can easily clean bedding off the cement. Boyd welded the first jig of the pens, then gave it to a local welder to make the rest. The complete facility will feature 16 rows of 14 hutches and 32 weaned pens. Boyd’s son Ryan will manage all of the heifers. “When this calf facility is done, the dairy will be complete,” smiled Boyd. “This is a simple dairy but it has been a profitable one.”

Reprinted by permission from the September 10, 2012, issue of Hoard’s Dairyman. Copyright 2012 by W.D. Hoard & Sons Company, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin.

September 10, 2012

HOARD’S DAIRYMAN

Engineering a profitable dairy

at this dairy, but the operation wasn’t large enough to support another family member. After spending 18 years away from the farm and working as an equipment manager for John Deere in Garden City, Kan., Boyd started thinking about how he could become connected to the dairy industry again. “I worked with many farmers while at John Deere. I found the right crop farmers interested in diversifying their operations,” explained Boyd. The first week of December 2002, Boyd proposed a business plan and design to area farmers Dick Strandmark and Dean Kleystuber. Between Christmas and New Year’s, they met to flesh out the idea further. “After discussing for a long time, one of them had a pencil in his hand and said, ‘Ah, let’s build it,’” recalled Boyd. They purchased a dry land wheat field near Strandmark and Kleystuber’s land, and in March 2003, they ran a disc through the field. “We called that our groundbreaking,” smiled Boyd. Now, nearly 10 years later and after rebuilding from the tornado, the site is almost complete. Cows are milked in a double-24 parallel parlor, and all lactating and dry cows are housed on dry lots with shades. When weather allows, heifers are let out to graze on a pasture beside the dairy. A heifer grower currently raises most of the calves. “My business partners raise the crops, but for the most part, I take care of the dairy,” said Boyd. “I manage our 1,800 cows with an 80-cow mentality.”

569


Setting a standard

of

excellence by Chelsey Johnson

Hard work and honesty are the two things Clark Vilter says young dair ymen need for a successful career. These attributes were key to Clark and his family’s showing success over the years.

with dairy character. We weren’t necessarily out to set a national class-leading record but the cow had to be profitable. Of Four Winds’ 17 National Grand Champion titles, which one was most memorable?

Probably the first time that Westlynn Tom Dee was Grand Champion at a national show. She was a oncein-a-lifetime cow. Tom Dee was the first animal that we ever showed that was a national champion. We didn’t breed her. We purchased her as a 2-year-old. Tom Dee put us on the map, so to speak. She was 4 years old the first time she won. She won four times in Madison at 4, 5, 6 and 7 years of age. I know the last year that I showed her my daughter, Tina, said I was nuts to take her out and risk it. That conversation firmly rings in my mind. What made Tom Dee so impressive as a cow and so successful as a transmitter?

N

ot even a blizzard could keep the trailers away from the aptly named Four Winds Farm in Hartland, Wis., on March 26, 2011. The hundreds of plaques and banners decorating the shed easily confirmed why this die-hard crowd was so willing to stand the cold that sale day. Over the years, Four Winds’ owners, Clark and Joy Vilter, have gained a sterling reputation for breeding awe-inspiring Guernseys.

She transmitted like no other Guernsey cow had. There have been cows of other breeds that surpassed her. But she transmitted the most reliably of any Guernsey cow that I am aware of. In the beginning, her overall balance attracted me to her. She had a beautiful udder, beautiful front end and beautiful feet and legs. When she was offered to me, it was one-third ownership and I had to care for her. When I saw her for the first time at World Dairy Expo, it took me all of three seconds to decide I would rather own part of her than look up at her in the show ring the rest of my life. What unique aspects do you appreciate about the Guernsey breed?

At one time, I milked a few Holsteins and I found that Guernseys are more docile when comparing the two breeds. Guernseys are also more heat tolerant. They are probably more energy efficient because even though some of the Holsteins milked more, I also had to clean-up an awful lot behind them and they ate more. The bottom line was we probably made more money with the Guernseys. What do you think needs to be improved within the Guernsey cow to make her viable long-term in our industry?

The author is the 2012 Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern and is a junior majoring in agricultural communications at South Dakota State University.

leave the industry, the Vilters’ impact on the Guernsey breed and showing community has set a standard of excellence for years to come. What were the keys to your herd’s success during the 28-year run since your first AllAmerican nomination in 1983?

First of all, having an understanding and very helpful wife. Without Joy, I could not have accomplished any of this. My three children, Tim, Tina and Jim, were also always a big help. The support of my family was key to my success. The second ingredient would be a little bit of luck. Once in awhile success comes from what you have accomplished, but other times it comes from luck. Sometimes I was just in the right place at the right time with the right animal. Our breeding program probably helped us quite a bit, too. We bred for type and we fed and managed for production. Explain why your herd transmitted so well for other breeders.

We are firm believers in cow families. Having said that, it comes down to using the right bull on the right cow. We never did subscribe to the theory of going the index route. We bred more for animals that suited us, and I guess we got lucky in that respect. I wanted a cow that would last for a number of years. They had to have good udders, good feet and legs, and have some strength along

We need to improve the feet and legs overall in the breed, and we also need to give the breed more overall strength so they can more efficiently make milk. If you have a narrow front-ended cow, chances are she’s going to be narrow in the rear end. And I have yet to see a cow make a lot of milk out of a narrow udder. Four Winds Farm has received much recognition over the years, what achievement do you think has been the highlight?

It is hard to select just one highlight. The two at the top of my list are when the Klussendorf Association elected me to be part of that group and receiving the Master Dairy Cattle Breeder Award from the American Guernsey Association. The Klussendorf Award is for what I accomplished in the show ring, while the Master Breeder is for accomplishments over the years breeding cows. The Master Breeder Award was given to me and my wife, Joy, because without the help of Joy and my kids, it wouldn’t have happened. Did some of the previous Klussendorf winners serve as your role models?

Yes. When I look at that list of winners I think, “How in the world did I get there?” As a kid, I would read the list of winners and was just in awe of the names. Some of the people I knew and some of them I didn’t. Of the ones I knew, I thought, (Continued on page EXPO 54)

HOARD’S DAIRYMAN

The Vilters are nothing less than an icon when it comes to breeding accomplishments in any breed, having earned 281 All-American nominations with a remarkable 149 being homebred. Members of the Four Winds herd have been selected as National Grand Champion 17 times, 11 times being homebred. A household name in dairy circles, Westlynn Tom Dee, the farm’s first national Grand Champion, is celebrated among all breeds as one of only a few cows to win four or more Grand Champion titles at World Dairy Expo. That’s not all. Led by Four Winds Magicman, a five-time Premier Sire at World Dairy Expo, the Four Winds prefix ranks fourth all-time among Guernsey sires for All-American nominees. In 1998, Clark was chosen as the 57th winner of the Klussendorf award, the nation’s highest showing honor. He also served as a leader to his peers as the president of the American Guernsey Breeders’ Association and Klussendorf Association. In addition, Clark and Joy have tirelessly supported youth and gave many young showmen their start by showing Four Winds cattle. It was a difficult decision for Clark to hang up the milkers and sell out his herd in 2011, but he knew his health wouldn’t allow him to continue milking much longer. Despite their decision to

September 10, 2012 EXPO 7


Circle No. 23 on Reader Response Card (Continued from page EXPO 7)

man, that’s the upper echelon. When they put my name on there, I think it came down a bit. When I was a boy, I remember going with my dad to Olaf Kjome’s (1937 winner) farm. He drove us around out in the field with a pick-up truck to look at his cows. I also looked up to Lew Porter (1969 winner). Another Guernsey breeder, Myron Lancaster (1983 winner) is someone I looked up to. It’s so hard to single anybody out because I admire the names on that list. I admired previous Klussendorf winners for being able to show cattle with great ability and having great sportsmanship. If they won, they were a gracious winner; if they lost, they were a gracious loser.

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Through your leadership roles over the years, what things have you learned?

First of all, I found that I needed to be a good listener. Secondly, I needed to approach issues impartially until I knew all the facts and figures and the ramifications of a decision. If my peers elected me to a leadership role, I tried to do the best job I possibly could. When the American Guernsey Association decided to reestablish a sale at World Dairy Expo, you put a first choice of Tom Dee in the sale and Forhar Magic Show that you owned in a three-way syndicate. What caused you to make that kind of commitment to that sale?

We are strong believers in the Guernsey breed, and we wanted to showcase it. There isn’t a better place than World Dairy Expo to do it. Why have you been such a strong supporter of youth?

There is no future in the dairy industry without our youth. I am not the future, I’m at the tail end. I have always believed that the youth are the future of the dairy industry and we need to give them support and guidance. What advice would you have for a young person entering a career in our industry?

HOARD’S DAIRYMAN

If they work hard at it and are honest, they’ll have a very rewarding career. I’m glad I made my career in the dairy industry.

See us at World Dairy Expo – Booth EH 3007-3309

EXPO 54 September 10, 2012

Circle No. 46 on Reader Response Card

What caused you to hang up the milkers?

Although I did have really good help the last couple years that I did farm, I had some health issues. I wore a knee brace for the last two years I milked. A couple months ago, I had a total shoulder replacement in my right shoulder. Everything that I had to do above my head I had to do lefthanded, and as a right-handed person this made milking very difficult. Joy convinced me it was the right choice to sell. I didn’t want to, but some days age catches up with you and you have to face the facts. You had an outstanding sale and cattle went to many states. Talk a little bit about that day.

We couldn’t have planned a worse weather day for the sale. We had a blizzard and it was cold and windy. We were told we had 700 people here for the sale and that still blows my mind. I was also told that in the trailer parking lot there were 32 trailers and cattle went into 16 different states. I didn’t realize that many people would come. I was just blown away by the amount of people. For that I say a big thank you. Your Guernsey cow Charity was proclaimed “Cow of the Year” by the Wisconsin governor. What can you recall from that day?

Governor Thompson gave a long speech since it was an election year. Charity got a bit impatient during the long talk, so she swung her head around and hit the governor! He didn’t go down but he moved. The crowd laughed. Governor Thompson quickly wound up his speech. It was 10 to 15 minutes too long and he was holding the show up. It was right before her class. We didn’t plan it but it kind of wrapped things up for him. Rumor has it some junior members encouraged you to ride a roller coaster during a Guernsey convention. What prompted you to hop on?

I’m still trying to figure that one out. What possessed me on that day I have no idea. Thinking back, I’m glad I did because those young ladies have gone on to become very prominent youth in the dairy industry. I don’t think a roller coaster ride convinced them to do that, but I’m glad to know and associate with them. And don’t ever look for me to do it again!

A household name in the dairy community, Westlynn Tom Dee was Vilter’s first National Grand Champion. From the moment he saw her, Clark knew he wanted to be the one leading her into the ring.

Circle No. 58 on Reader Response Card

Reprinted by permission from the September 10, 2012, issue of Hoard’s Dairyman. Copyright 2012 by W.D. Hoard & Sons Company, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin.


NBF-0612-031 cow pillow Hoards:Layout 1 8/10/1

Circle No. 45 on Reader Response Card

Near the top of its class by Chelsey Johnson

Numbers propel rank So what are the statistics that landed WDE so much attention among national trade shows? First of all, the record number of 68,000 attendees from 90 countries who attended WDE last year is enough to earn recognition. Add that to another record-setting total of 810 exhibitors from 28 different countries and the magnitude of WDE’s reach expands even further. Even more impressive is despite the fact WDE is sold-out every year for commercial exhibitors, it still ranks among the fastest-growing trade shows. How can there be room for growth? “The trade show industry saw a decline in booth space with the economic downturn of recent years, while Expo’s trade show continued to make small gains through expansion of our Outdoor Trade Mall and International Lounge,” explained John Rozum, WDE sales manager. Of the events that take place in the Madison area throughout the year, no event can compare to the direct tourism spending that is generated in the city during WDE. The 2011 The author is the 2012 Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern and is a junior majoring in agricultural communications at South Dakota State University.

Epic (a Madison software creator) Annual Users Group Meeting, held in late September last year, hosted 7,000 attendees and generated a $4.2 million direct spending impact. Ford Ironman Wisconsin 2011 held in early September hosted 30,000 attendees and generated a $2.3 million direct spending impact. WDE blows these events out of the water with a $17.7 million direct spending impact to the Madison area.

Everyone benefits from growth While this growth caught the attention of those outside of the dairy industry, the real benefit is to the attendees of the event. The growing number of exhibitors makes WDE an event valuable to producers and professionals because of the networking opportunities provided. “We’re fortunate that World Dairy Expo continues to have such high demand for booth space,” commented Rozum. “That high demand helps us ensure that dairy producers will be able to see the best of the industry.” WDE rises above other trade shows in its use of innovative strategies, new media and other original ways of showcasing exhibitors. “World Dairy Expo has taken great strides to ensure the show is not just the same show each year,” said David Andrews, communication and strategy manager for DeLaval, who has exhibited since the first WDE in 1967. Last year, DeLaval used World Dairy Expo as a chance to debut the Automatic Milking Rotary (AMR), the world’s first unmanned milking rotary. The full-size version was too large to display but they presented a working section that allowed customers to view the key operation of robotic arms while an adjacent video allowed for easy discussion. DeLaval also added touch-screen displays that were used to quiz booth visitors on their knowledge of milk quality and animal issues. WDE also excels at pro-

moting the event with social media. WDE’s Facebook page, with a continually growing 9,000 users, keeps fans updated year round about the upcoming event. Additionally, WDE utilizes Twitter to reach out to fans and promote the event. “I can’t think of any event we participate in that even compares when it comes to showcasing its exhibitors and making use of social media to generate interest in the show,” said Melanie Diaz, director of advertising and public relations at World Wide Sires, which has exhibited at WDE for more than 35 years.

We have a soft spot for cows.

It excels internationally While most of the recent recognition World Dairy Expo received is at the national level, WDE’s trade show stands out internationally, as well. “World Dairy Expo is definitely the largest trade show, with the most diverse group of attendees of any show, World Wide Sires participates in,” said Diaz. World Wide Sires works in more than 70 countries so they exhibit at several trade shows around the world each year. “Most other shows we participate in are limited to national or regional audiences,” said Diaz. “World Dairy Expo is definitely the most global.” DeLaval is also among the exhibitors that participate in other international trade shows. Andrews noted that several of the international trade shows where they exhibit exceed 50,000 attendees. However, many of these larger events are agri-focused rather than specializing in dairy. WDE offers an opportunity for exhibitors to focus on a specialized audience. “World Dairy Expo is an important platform for interacting with dairy producers, advisors, veterinarians, nutritionists and consumers,” said Andrews. “By participating at this event, we can be confident that our message is communicated to a very relevant audience.”

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HOARD’S DAIRYMAN

e

ach year, thousands of dairy enthusiasts and exhibitors from around the world migrate to Madison, as World Dairy Expo has fittingly received the tagline, “Where the dairy industry meets.” But WDE is beginning to catch the attenJohnson tion of others outside the dairy industry. In fact, the impact of this event spans much further than the Alliant Energy Center grounds. Recently, WDE climbed the national trade show rankings. On January 4, EXPO magazine listed WDE as one of the top 25 fastestgrowing trade shows of 2011. Additionally, Trade Show News Network (TSNN) listed WDE as number 30 in the 2010 TSSN Top 250 U.S. Trade Show List. They later honored WDE at the 2011 TSNN Event Excellence awards as one of the 20 fastest-growing trade shows by net square footage in the United States from 2008 to 2010. WDE also caught the attention of another publication, Trade Show Executive ( TSE ). During a yearlong process of gathering data, TSE compiled a list called the Gold 100 Ranking of the largest shows of 2011. WDE earned a spot on this list among 100 other trade shows around the country. It was released in alphabetical order, but the actual rankings and winners will be announced at TSE’s Gold 100 Awards and Summit in Washington D.C., October 3 to 5.

September 10, 2012 EXPO 27

Reprinted by permission from the September 10, 2012, issue of Hoard’s Dairyman. Copyright 2012 by W.D. Hoard & Sons Company, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin.


Five tips to help pay for your education by Chelsey Johnson

students with a background in agriculture

shouldn’t feel intimidated by the rising costs of higher education. Today, many options exist to help finance an education, and as a student with a background or interest in agriculture, the list of scholarships available to you is long.   Fill out your FAFSA. You may be eligible for a number of grants and loans based on your family and personal tax information. By providing this information on the Federal Application for Student Aid (FAFSA), it will determine the amount of money you are eligible to receive in grants and loans. For details visit www.fafsa.ed.gov. Grants are a form of aid available based on financial need and don’t need to be paid back. Loans must be repaid, but student loans typically

have a very low interest rate and they usually don’t need to be repaid until after college. Find scholarships. You could be eligible for aid based on accomplishments, interests and involvement. Begin searching for scholarships that you are eligible for. Your guidance counselor will likely have a list of scholarships available in your local area. Luckily, many scholarships are awarded to students with an agriculture background each year. Plan ahead. Filling out scholarship applications is definitely worth your while but each application takes time to complete. Many scholarships require extra material such as transcripts, letters of recommendation and essays. Review

The author is the 2012 Hoard’s Dair yman Editorial Intern and is a junior majoring in agricultural communications at South Dakota State University.

ACCELERATED GENETICS Scholarships: 4-$500 Application: www.accelgen.com Questions: 800-451-9275 Due: February 15 For high school seniors and college students planning to major in agriculture who are or have a family member who is a customer of Accelerated Genetics. AGSTAR FINANCIAL SERVICES FUND FOR RURAL AMERICA Scholarships: 20-$1,000 Application: www.agstar.com Questions: 952-997-1255 Due: April 1 For students in AgStar’s territory. AMERICAN AGRICULTURAL EDITORS ASSOCIATION Scholarships: 4-$1,000 Application: www.ageditors.com Questions: 641-744-2114 Due: Late March For members of the National ACT Organization. AMERICAN GUERNSEY ASSOCIATION Scholarships: 2-$500, 2-$750 Application: www.usguernsey.com Questions: 614-339-5392 Due: March 31 For AGA junior members. AMERICAN JERSEY CATTLE ASSOCIATION Scholarships: 9 awards totaling $18,000 Application: www.usjersey.com Questions: 614-322-4456 Due: July 1 For students who have experience with Jersey cattle. AMERICAN SOYBEAN ASSOCIATION Scholarships: 1-$5,000 Application: www.soygrowers.com Questions: 314-576-1770 Due: Mid-November For immediate family of a current ASA member who plans to study agriculture.

HOARD’S DAIRYMAN

CHS FOUNDATION Scholarships: 225-$1,000 Application: www.chsfoundation.org Questions: 800-814-0506 Due: April 1 For high school and college students pursuing an agriculture-related field.

552

DAIRY CALF AND HEIFER ASSOCIATION Scholarships: 1-$1,000 Application: www.calfandheifer.org Questions: 877-434-3377 Due: February For a member or family member of DCHA pursuing an agriculture-related field. August 25, 2012

each application and allow enough time to gather all materials needed. Mark your calendar. Don’t put yourself through the stress of mailing your application at the last minute or the disappointment of missing a deadline. Plan to have all extra materials and a completed application ready before the deadline. Don’t forget to write a thank-you note to those who take time to write a letter of recommendation for you. Mark your calendar with deadlines and consider tearing out our scholarship list and posting it somewhere easily visible. Consider a part-time job. Once you begin classes, evaluate whether your schedule will allow for a part-time job. Work-study aid may be available to you through FAFSA and work-study jobs often work around your class schedule. If you don’t qualify for work-study, other part-time, onor off-campus jobs are often available.

DAIRY FARMERS OF AMERICA Scholarships: multiple $1,500 Application: www.dfamilk.com Questions: 816-801-6502 Due: Mid-January For students pursuing a degree in any aspect of the dairy industry.

NATIONAL BROWN SWISS ASSOCIATION Scholarships: 1-$1,000 Application: www.brownswissusa.com Questions: 608-365-4474 Due: March 15 For youth members majoring in agriculture and who are a National Brown Swiss member.

DAUGHTERS OF AMERICAN AGRICULTURE Scholarships: 2-$1,000 Application: www.americanagriwomen.org Questions: 406-652-9678 Due: June 1 For young women with agriculture work experience and financial need.

NATIONAL CORN GROWERS AND BASF Scholarships: 5-$1,000 Application: www.ncga.com Questions: 636-733-9004 ext. 137 Due: Early December For students pursuing a degree in an agriculture-related field and who are immediate family of a National Corn Growers member.

FAMILY DAIRIES USA Scholarships: several $500 Application: www.fdusa.org Questions: 608-244-3373 Due: April 1 For members or family members of Family Dairies USA. FARM KIDS FOR COLLEGE Scholarships: 3-$1,000 Application: www.nfo.org Questions: 515-598-4670 Due: March 7 For high school seniors planning to major in an agriculture-related field. INSTITUTE OF FOOD TECHNOLOGISTS FOUNDATION Scholarships: 32-$1,000 Application: www.ift.org Questions: 312-782-8424 Due: Mid-March For food science/technology majors. LEO BRIGGS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP Scholarships: 1-$500 Application: email mosgood@adadc.com Questions: 315-472-9143 Due: November 16 For a student from New York, northeastern Pennsylvania or northern New Jersey with an interest in agriculture or dairy product nutrition. MIDWEST DAIRY ASSOCIATION Scholarships: Varies Application: www.midwestdairycheckoff.com Questions: 800-642-3895 Due: Varies Awards are available in specific regions of the Midwest. NATIONAL AYRSHIRE YOUTH COMMITTEE Scholarships: 1-$500 Application: www.usayrshire.com Questions: 614-335-0020 Due: March 1 For junior Ayrshire members.

NATIONAL DAIRY PROMOTION AND RESEARCH BOARD Scholarships: 19-$1,500, 1-$2,500 Application: www.dairycheckoff.com Questions: (847)-627-3320 Due: April 15 For college students with majors that emphasize dairy. NATIONAL DHIA SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM Scholarships: 20-$750 Application: www.dhia.org Questions: 608-848-6455, ext. 112 Due: October 15 For immediate family members of a herd on DHIA test or employees of DHIA. NATIONAL FARMERS UNION FOUNDATION Scholarships: 1-$2,000, 6-$500 Application: www.nfu.org Questions: 800-347-1961 Due: February to April For high school seniors planning to major in an agricultural field. NATIONAL HOLSTEIN WOMEN’S SCHOLARSHIP ORGANIZATION, INC. Scholarships: Varies Application: www.nhwso.com Questions: 802-236-3570 Due: May For national junior Holstein members who have a dairy farm background. NATIONAL MILK PRODUCER’S FEDERATION Scholarships: Varies Application: www.nmpf.org Questions: 703-243-6111 Due: Late April or early May For majors that emphasize dairy. RED & WHITE DAIRY CATTLE ASSOCIATION Scholarships: 3-$1,000 Application: www.redandwhitecattle.com Questions: 608-676-4909 Due: June 1 For students who are members of RWDCA.

Reprinted by permission from the August 25, 2012, issue of Hoard’s Dairyman. Copyright 2012 by W.D. Hoard & Sons Company, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin.

SELECT SIRE POWER Scholarships: 1-$2,500, several $750 Application: www.selectsirepower.com Questions: 540-483-5123 Due: January 31 For a college student majoring in agriculture who is or has a family member who is a customer of Select Sire Power. UPPER MIDWEST DAIRY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION Scholarships: 3-$1,000 Application: http://umdia.org Questions: email Elaine.santi@state.mn.us Due: January 31 For students in UMDIA region pursuing a degree related to the dairy industry. SULLIVAN SHOW SUPPLY Scholarships: 20-$1,000 Application: www.sullivansupply.com Due: May 1 For students with a passion for the livestock show industry and/or raising livestock.

Check out these opportunities The National Dairy Shrine offers $45,000 annually in scholarships. Each one has its own criteria, but they are generally awarded to students looking to enter the dairy industry upon graduation. A listing of these scholarships and criteria along with applications can be found at www.dairyshrine.org. Also, more than 1,000 scholarships are available through the National FFA organization by filling out just one application. You need not be an FFA member to fill out the application. Visit www.ffa. org to fill out a 2013 application.

For a more complete listing of scholarships that is continually updated, visit www.hoards. com/youth/collegescholarships. If you would like your scholarship added to our online listing, please email us at hoards@hoards.com.


Top 50 cooperatives boost production despite having fewer member farms

L

by Chelsey Johnson

The author is the 2012 Hoard’s Dair yman Editorial Intern and is a junior majoring in agricultural communications at South Dakota State University.

Rank 1

Dairy cooperative

the top 50 list rose 1.9 billion pounds. This 1.2 percent rise is a slightly smaller climb than the 1.7 percent change in the national total of milk marketed in 2011. The top five held their positions from last year, while a number of cooperatives in the top 25 traded places. At No. 6, Family Dairies USA overtook Associated Milk Producers, Inc. More trade offs occurred further down the list as Agri-Mark, Inc., moved ahead of Milwaukee Cooperative Milk Producers to No. 16, and Continental Dairy Products, Inc., edged Prairie Farms Dairy, Inc., out of the No. 19 spot. Security Milk Producers, Inc., upped production enough to surpass Swiss Valley Farms at No. 21. Making a debut appearance in the upper

Member milk volume (bil. lbs.)

Member farms

Rank

39.000

8,697

26

Woodstock Progressive Milk Producers, Assn. Woodstock, Ill.

0.916

375

16.818

495

27

Magic Valley Quality Milk Producers, Inc. Jerome, Idaho

0.899

35

0.857

15

0.738

684

0.724

70

3 Dairy Farmers of America, Inc. Kansas City, Mo.

2

half of the list, Organic Valley/CROPP rounded out the top 25. For the second straight year, White Eagle Cooperative was the biggest mover, rising from No. 42 to No. 38. Just missing this year’s top 50 was Preble Milk Cooperative Assn., Preble, N.Y. Select Milk Producers, Inc., topped this list for milk per dairy with 70.2 million pounds per member dairy. Hoard’s Dairyman gathers information for the top 50 cooperatives list every summer. Each cooperative is contacted and asked to provide information on the previous year’s production. Because cooperatives have different ending dates for their fiscal year, milk volume and member farms may not necessarily represent the 2011 calendar year.

California Dairies, Inc. Visalia, Calif.

Dairy cooperative

3

3 Land O’Lakes, Inc. St. Paul, Minn.

13.010

2,586

28

4

3 Northwest Dairy Association Seattle, Wash.

7.880

547

29

5

3 Dairylea Cooperative, Inc. Syracuse, N.Y.

6.300

2,225

30

5.910

2,310

31

Bongards’ Creameries Bongards, Minn.

0.711

300

6

Family Dairies USA Madison, Wis.

3 Zia Milk Producers, Inc. Roswell, N.M.

Member milk Member volume (bil. lbs.) farms

Lanco-Pennland Quality Milk Producers Hagerstown, Md. 3 Farmers Cooperative Creamery McMinnville, Ore.

7

3 Associated Milk Producers, Inc. New Ulm, Minn.

5.800

2,800

32

Mount Joy Farmers Cooperative Mount Joy, Pa.

0.696

316

8

3 Foremost Farms USA Baraboo, Wis.

5.741

1,945

33

High Desert Milk, Inc. Burley, Idaho

0.654

14

9

3 Manitowoc Milk Producers Cooperative Manitowoc, Wis.

5.100

2,663

34

3 Ellsworth Cooperative Creamery Ellsworth, Wis.

0.650

460

10

3 Select Milk Producers, Inc. Artesia, N.M.

4.211

60

35

3 Tillamook County Creamery Association Tillamook, Ore.

0.546

105

11

3 Michigan Milk Producers Association Novi, Mich.

3.900

1,364

36

Plainview Milk Products Cooperative Plainview, Minn.

0.482

220

12

3 United Dairymen of Arizona Tempe, Ariz.

3.712

70

37

Cobblestone Milk Cooperative, Inc. Chatham, Va.

0.394

19

13

3 Maryland and Virginia Milk Prod. Co-op Assn. Reston, Va.

3.000

1,524

38

White Eagle Cooperative Association South Bend, Ind.

0.364

12

14

3 Lone Star Milk Producers Windthorst, Texas

2.910

209

39

Scenic Central Milk Producers Co-op Assn. Yuba, Wis.

0.360

253

15

3 Southeast Milk, Inc. Belleview, Fla.

2.700

251

40

Central Equity Milk Cooperative, Inc. Billings, Mo.

0.337

109

16

3 Agri-Mark, Inc. Lawrence, Mass.

2.630

1,270

41

Burnett Dairy Cooperative Grantsburg, Wis.

0.336

212

2.090

495

42

Lowville Producers Dairy Cooperative, Inc. Lowville, N.Y.

0.314

177

17

Milwaukee Cooperative Milk Producers Brookfield, Wis.

18

3 Upstate Niagara Cooperative, Inc. Buffalo, N.Y.

1.717

400

43

3 Mid-West Dairymen’s Company Rockford, Ill.

0.298

164

19

3 Continental Dairy Products, Inc. Artesia, N.M.

1.706

29

44

3 Cooperative Milk Producers Association Blackstone, Va.

0.240

98

20

3 Prairie Farms Dairy, Inc. Carlinville, Ill.

1.700

818

45

Cortland Bulk Milk Producers Co-op, Inc. Cortland, N.Y.

0.222

92

1.492

43

46

Hastings Cooperative Creamery Company Hastings, Minn.

0.211

104

21

Security Milk Producers Association Chino, Calif.

22

3 Swiss Valley Farms Company Davenport, Iowa

1.433

684

47

Sunrise Ag Cooperative Buckman, Minn.

0.207

160

23

3 First District Association Litchfield, Minn.

1.278

661

48

Calhoun Cooperative Creamery Company Lansing, Iowa

0.199

72

24

3 St. Albans Cooperative Creamery, Inc. St. Albans, Vt.

1.257

449

49

Northwest Independent Milk Producers Assn. East Olympia, Wash.

0.182

18

1.221

1,687

50

Rolling Hills Dairy Producers Co-op Browntown, Wis.

0.176

96

154.228

38,462

25

3

Organic Valley/CROPP La Farge, Wis.

Member of National Milk Producers Federation

Total

Used by permission from the October 10, 2012, issue of Hoard’s Dairyman. Copyright 2012 by W.D. Hoard & Sons Company, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin.

October 10, 2012

HOARD’S DAIRYMAN

ast year, the top 50 cooperatives accounted for 79 percent of the 195.2 billion pounds of milk marketed in the U.S. The top five cooperatives handled 54 percent of the milk marketed by the top 50 and they handled 43 percent of the entire nation’s milk. The top 50 had 38,462 member farms which represented a 5.1 percent drop from a year ago. This was a greater decline than the drop in overall number of licensed U.S. dairies in 2011 which went from 53,132 farms to 51,481. Despite this fall in farm numbers, total milk production from

643


Hoard’s Dairyman Farm Flashes Farm Flashes enhanced milk replacer can accelerate calf growth More producers are feeding enhanced milk replacer or starter to accelerate growth and lower age at first calving. But do the changes meet their goals? The University of Illinois Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee compared an enhanced early nutrition program to a conventional program. The results were published in the June 2012 Journal of Dairy Science. title Eighty-nine Holstein calves were divided into three groups. The first group received a conventional milk replacer containing 20 percent crude protein (CP) and 20 percent fat with a conventional starter containing 19.6 percent CP. The second group received an enhanced milk replacer containing 28.5 percent CP and 15 percent fat with the conventional starter. The last group received the enhanced milk replacer with the enhanced starter (25 percent CP). The treatments began at three days of age. For calves fed enhanced milk replacer, starter

Farm Flashes group size didn’t affect calves that had adequate space Group housing is becoming more common for calves. A study conducted by Grober Nutrition, Ontario, Canada, found that if calves were given the same amount of space, (24 square feet) group size didn’t affect feed intake, growth or health. The results of the study were reported in the July 2011 Journal of Animal Science E-Supplement. Sixty-five calves were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: individuals housed in a solitary pen, paired calves housed in the space equivalent of two solitary pens, a small group consisting of six calves housed in a group pen and a large group of 11 calves housed in a group pen. The two group pens had access to an automatic feeder. Calves received milk replacer, grain and hay for eight weeks and then grain and hay only for two weeks. All milk refusals were recorded and calf birth weight and height was measured weekly. Health

was evaluated daily using an adapted version of the University of Wisconsin calf-scoring sheet. The study revealed that the number of calves in a group with the same space per calf (24 square feet) did not affect growth. The number of health events also did not rise with the number of calves.

Farm Flashes

two new apps can help manage nitrogen Smartphone apps bring tools for some management decisions right to your fingertips. The University of Wisconsin released two new apps, the N (nitrogen) Price Calculator and Corn N Fertilizer Rate Calculator to assist farmers with managing nitrogen. The N price calculator compares the price of nitrogen fertilizer products and converts the price of each fertilizer product from price per ton to price per pound of N. This app can be found

Farm Flashes

for Apple devices at http://on.hoards.com/N-icalculator and for Android at http://on.hoards. com/N-And-calculatorNY1abD. The Corn N Fertilizer Rate Calculator uses Maximum Return to N (MRTN) guidelines to assist in selecting an N rate that improves profitability. The app can be found for iPhone or iPad at http://on.hoards.com/corn-i-calculator or for Android at http://on.hoards.com/ corn-And-calculator.

OverstOcking free stalls can reduce lying time

Consider the pros and cons before overstocking a free stall barn. In fact, overstocking free stall barns can impact the amount of time cows spend elevating hutches lying down. To determine the effects of overstocking on Poor airflow in plastic calf hutches heat, lying behavior and cleanliness of causes cows housed humidity and carbon dioxide accumulate. in free stalls, researchers fromtothe William H. Research conducted at Washington State UniMiner Agricultural Research Institute observed versity placing an 8-inch 8-inchof three suggests different that stocking methods. Thebyresults bythe 16-inch block under eachof study concrete were reported in the the Mayback 2012ofissue hutch can improve internal temperature and venthe Journal of Dairy Science . tilation. So much so that respiratory rate was Ninety-two cows and calf 44 first-calf heifers were reduced 44 breaths per minute dividedfrom into 58 fourtopens. The control pen hadina eleratio vated hutches. These published in of one stall and one findings headlockwere per cow. The other the Julypens 2012had Journal of Dairy Science . headlocks three a ratio of 0.7 stalls and Overcow. a 48-hour per One penperiod, denied data some loggers access tomeasured headlocks internal and to external dioxide, and stalls reach carbon stocking ratios.wind The speed second and calf respiratory rate in 15 straw-bedded pen denied some access to headlocks and stalls hutches. The calves were 5 to 16 days old. Hutches and reduced feed alley space. The last pen raised the group size from 34 to 48 cows.

improves airflow were 6.5 feet by 4 feet and arranged in a single row about 6 feet apart. The external temperatures were between the mid-60s and mid-100s. The hutches were evaluated three times daily for internal and external carbon dioxide, wind speed and calf respiratory rate. Differences were calculated for hutches with and without elevation. The data revealed that the internal temperature of elevated hutches tended to be cooler than the external temperature, whereas unelevated hutches recorded a lying warmer internal The study found time fell by temperatwo hours ture. Hutch elevation improved wind speed A and per day when free stalls were overstocked. sigair movement inside the hutches and lowered theof nificant difference was not found in cleanliness concentration of carbon dioxide. cows in overstocked free stalls compared to the control group.

w C c m m a a i l

intake was greater when fed enhanced starter. Over the 10-week study, average daily gain was greater for calves fed enhanced milk replacer with either starter. Regardless of milk replacer, calves should consume 2.2 pounds of starter daily before weaning to ensure continued growth.

adjust transition diets to improve embryonic survival Because high-producing cows often have reduced fertility, researchers from the University of Florida stress the importance of diets when setting goals for reproductive management plans. The scientists compared 17 trials in an effort to improve embryonic survival. Their research was published in the December 2011 journal Theriogenology. They found raising the number of days feeding a transition diet with a negative cation-anion dif-

c s

ference, combined with adequate energy, protein, amino acids and minerals, improves pregnancy rate. Also, supplementing selenium during the transition period and lactation enhanced immunity, uterine health and reproductive performance. The results also showed feeding glucogenic diets postpartum boosted ovarian activity and feeding a glucogenic followed by lipogenic diet improved the proportion of pregnancies by 120 days of lactation.

p s h J p v K i

l p

don’t forget about comfort in tie stalls A 2007 USDA National Animal Monitorcanola meal Health can substitute as a protein source ing System survey indicated that a tie stall barn served the primary housing 49.2 percent They found that CM can be substituted for DG Canolaasmeal (CM) and dried on distillers grainsof farms. Jeffrey Bewley the of Ken- as a source of protein in high-producing dairy (DG) serve a similar roleof in theUniversity diet of lactating dairy producers are tucky Department of Animal Science highlighted cows’ diets without significantly affecting dry matcows. Since canola balance of amino beef producers, toomeal has the three tie stall tips inresearchers the July KensOybean meal Prices ter intake, milk production or milk composition. acids needed formanagement milk keeP production, at tucky Dairy Notes . South State University if it mOving at aDakota dizzying Pace Since dairy cattle supply a significant por-evaluated Provide sufficient bedding. Uncomfortable be substituted dried distillers grains. canola and distillers compared tion of the could beef marketed incompromise theforU.S., understall surfaces lying times. Enough TheQuality study Assurance involved 16 lactating Holsteins The protein portion of the ration is still rations standing Beef (BQA) is traction. bedding is needed for cushion and divided groups. group received a item 15cm 15dg 17cm 17dg very closely tied thefour soybean mealEach market. important for dairytointo producers. In fact, accordDon’t use mattresses past useful life. Hock with either 15summary percent CM, 15 percent DG, 17 This has been moving at a rapid, and DMI lbs./d 54.01 54.23 56.0 58.2 ing to market the diet 2011 executive of the injuries areor commonly observed when cows are Milk maylbs./d appear to73.41 be the most option 76.72 cost-effective 80.25 80.03 percent CM 17 percent DG as the main protein mostly upward, pace, with prices moving well National Beef Quality 9.9 percent of is used past its Fat forced to lieAudit, on a mattress that 2.95 but the 3.00additional 3.16 investment 3.13 for%a stall surface, source. Feed intake and milk production were over $100 per ton since January 2012. carcasses were from dairy animals. However, Protein % 3.09 3.07 3.12 3.11 useful lifeshifts and the cushion isduring no longer in water beds provides more cushion while helpdaily and samples wereflexible. collected Additional wide are likely fewer than measured half (44.4 percent) of milk dairy Total solid % 11.80 11.87 feet12.05 Invest in the best stallproducsurface. ing production and improving and leg 12.08 health. forthe composition analysis. the rest of with about Rubber mats ers had attended asummer program thatconcern taught Beef heat and moisture issues. In addition, global Quality Assurance principles. demand have caused prices tostanmove To learn concerns about these quality assurance dards and training sessions, visit BQA.org. BQA also provides trainingmeal withfutures videos price via its Yousoybean limited feeding area favors dominant cows Tube$440 channel, www.youtube.com/nationalbqa.

design a heifer free stall facility to fit your herd

$420

a s

o w b l t h h t n s 1

c o

HOARD’S DAIRYMAN

HOARD’S DAIRYMAN

ing the training, researchers observed dominant Since dairy cattle have a hierarchical social the group can eat at the same time. On the other Free stall systems can work well for heifers, but i $400 and subordinate cows. As part of the study, cows structure, low-ranking cows may not consume hand, the three-row option is more economiyou should analyze your replacement herd size a $380 were escorted down an alley that ended in a “Y” enough quality feed in a fence line feeding syscal. However, the three-row design doesn’t allow and make-up when determining the design of a p with both the HPF and LPF bins visible. tem. Researchers from the Scottish Agricultural $360 more no-till evenly enough space for the entire group to access the facility. In the April 2012 Penn State Extension I During the test, dominant cows were standing College and St. Mary’s College, University of St. $340 distributes snow fence line at the same time. Dairy Digest , Dan McFarland, an agricultural at the HPL bin at four different space allowances Andrews in the United Kingdom proved this theFree stall dimensions should be determined engineering educator, discussed the importance t $320 (about 1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 feet). With the dominant ory. The study published in the July 2012 issue A study conducted at the Washington Statethat will allow based on heifer weight rather than age. Addiof designing a free stall facility t $300 cow at the 1 and 1.5 foot distances, lower-rankof the Journal of Dairy Science measured how a University Cook Agronomy Farm (CAF) and exit the stall tionally, stalls should be sized for the larger to recline, rest, rise5/22/12 f 1/3/12heifers 1/31/12 2/28/12 4/24/12 ing cows chose to feed alone on LPF significantly dominant cow’s3/27/12 location affects on a low-ranking a neighboring farm near Pullman, Wash., heifers in the group rather than smaller heifers with ease. t Observe envirOnment tOwinter recOgnize heat stress more than they chose to eat HPF. For the two cow’s willingness to feed. boost feed supply with small grains measured how crop residues could affect since smaller heifers can more easily use larger five suggested free s as much as He $20explained to $25 perthat ton there in justare a couple larger space allowances, researchers found no Thirty Holstein cows were split into two groups snow accumulation andgrowing soilof water levels stalls. It is recommended to consult farm records stall for heifers from t of days. In thesizes last six days April, the soy-approximately significant difference between the number of and conditioned to associate a black bin and highto heat stress is temperature-humidity index In thesmall summer heat stress some- starter fertilizer in amost cases. They also noted Winter grainsmonths, such as winter wheat,iscereal across no-till field. The theAdditionally, study when determining total stall numbers and sizes. 300 pounds to results precalving. the most H bean ameal price jumped nearlyof$35 per ton, choices for feeding alone or with a dominant cow. palatability food (HPF) and a white bin and low(THI) chart. The temperature and humidity of thing all dairy farmers battle. The University that harvesting at flag leaf stage supports high rye or winter triticale harvested for forage in the were in the 2012 issue of two-row tailMore information about free stall shelters and common freeAugust stall layouts include t and published similar losses were seen through the earThey concluded that feed bunks should have at palatability food (LPF). The other half of the herd the cows’ housing is needed to use this chart. The of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service milk production with strong yields. spring can rebuild your forage inventory. In 2011, USDA’s Agricultural Research magazine. suggested free stall layouts can be found at to-tail, two-row head-to-head three row. The a lier parts of the months. Similar price and shifts least 2 feet per cow. were trained with the opposite combination. DurTHI is found by following the line horizontally reminds dairy producers that an important tool researchers at Cornell University compared these For two years, snow depths, density and soilis all heifers in www.abe.psu.edu/extension/ip/ipindex.html. benefit of the two-row versions f are likely during the next three months right from the temperature and vertically down in minimizing heat stress is simply observing three species at the Valatie Research Farm in eastwater were ameasured at whichstorage could create significantmanually shift in overthreethe winter forage crops produce similar yields from humidity until they meet. At a THI of the environment. ern New York. Their findings as well as planting, hundreds points across a conventional and all dairyof operation feed costs. 68, cows begin to experience spring heatabove stress. This Since cows a thickadvice leather coat, temperaground fertilization andwear harvesting were discussed a no-till field. Residue height atDairy data Analyst collec—Rick Kment, DTN species n at greenup biomass chart can be found in the April 25, 2011, issue of tures as low as 68°F can cause heat stress. A refReprinted by permission from the July 2012 issue of Hoard’s Dair in the August 2012 Cornell Pro-Dairy e-leader. July 2012 tion points also measured. The standing 448 was erence tool to recognize an that environment favorable Hoard’s Dairyman on page 281. tons dm/acre Copyright 2012 by W.D. Hoard & Sons Company, Fort Atkinson, W The comparison suggests earlier planting wheat residue on the no-till soil improved the Rye No N 3.72 not all colostrum does its job produces significantly higher biomass in the fall uniformity of snow cover across the field. Snow Rye 40-0-0-4S 3.90 Wheat No N 2.63 followed by high forage yields in the spring. The depths on the no-till field ranged from 4 to 39 new discOvery has POtential Refrigerated samples had a greater TPC than Research conducted at ranged Iowa State University Wheat 40-0-0-4S 3.36 authors advised that for optimum yield the crop inches while the conventional-till field Triticale No N 3.05 frozen samples. Only 39.4 percent of samples met suggests that 60 cOsts percent of maternal colostrum is tO 0cut insecticide should have some nitrogen available, but fields from to 56 inches. carefully balance when feeding grains Triticaledried distillers 40-0-0-4S 3.77 industry standards for both TPC and IgG levels. not good enough to transfer necessary immunity. with a coat of manure applied will not need any Viruses transmitted aphids hurt involved yields in the study The farms by from 12 states how storage affects colostrum quality both corn and corn oil recorded the lowest (2.73). As a result of the growing ethanol industry, and reduce the quality Spraying between June of andcrops. October 2010 were grouped storage method Thefrom results suggest that DDGS withoutDairyman. quality feedstuffs such as driedReprinted distillersby grains insecticides can prevent into four regions:aphid-transmitted Northeast, Southeast, Midwest permission the September 10,feeding 2012, issue of Hoard’s 568 September 10, 2012 fresh refrigerated frozen and starches canCompany, boost milkfat. are available as by-product feeds.Copyright Dried distillviruses, but not all aphidsSamples transmitwere viruses. and Southwest. collected for analy2012 byfats W.D. Hoard & Sons Fort However, Atkinson,high Wisconsin. IgG (mg/ml) 69.0 74.6 66.3 levels of fat and starch represent risk factors for ers grains (DDGS) are good protein and energy A new discovery is expected to (IgG) lead composition to the sis of immunoglobulin and total Fat, % 4.9 5.4 5.6 milkfat depression when fed with DDGS. sources, but some nutritionists believe diets development of count a test to identify diseaseplate (TPC) and classified based on storage Protein, % 10.9 14.1 12.56 with high levels of DDGS induce milkfat deprescausing aphids. prior to feeding: fresh, refrigerated or frozen. Lactose, % 3.2 2.8 2.9 sion. University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers AgricultureSamples Research scientists, fromService the Midwest held greater IgG Other solids, % 4.6 4.3 4.4 milk fat % sought to test that theory. Michelle Cilia and Stewartwhile Gray,samples found a from way the Southeast 3.5 concentrations, Total solids, % 21.2 24.2 22.3 Twenty Holsteins housed in a tie stall barn SCC 5.8 5.5 5.6 to identify and virus-spreading aphids. By examSouthwest had the lowest. In this study, 29.4 3.0 Coliform 1.1 1.6 1.3 were divided into four groups that received difining disease-carrying aphids,had they percent of colostrom IgG found levels less than the

During my summer as the Hoard’s Dairyman editorial intern I was responsible for managing the Farm Flash page. This involved reading and condensing Journal of Dairy Science Articles and other publications. In addition, planned the page layout and selected the pictures and graphs to go on the page.

TPC

4.0

5.0


Farm Flashes Overstocking free stalls can reduce lying time Consider the pros and cons before overstocking a free stall barn. In fact, overstocking free stall barns can impact the amount of time cows spend lying down. To determine the effects of overstocking on lying behavior and cleanliness of cows housed in free stalls, researchers from the William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute observed three different stocking methods. The results of the study were reported in the May 2012 issue of the Journal of Dairy Science. Ninety-two cows and 44 first-calf heifers were divided into four pens. The control pen had a ratio of one stall and one headlock per cow. The other three pens had a ratio of 0.7 stalls and headlocks per cow. One pen denied some access to headlocks and stalls to reach stocking ratios. The second pen denied some access to headlocks and stalls and reduced feed alley space. The last pen raised the group size from 34 to 48 cows.

Soybean Meal Prices keep Moving at a Dizzying Pace The protein portion of the ration is still very closely tied to the soybean meal market. This market has been moving at a rapid, and mostly upward, pace, with prices moving well over $100 per ton since January 2012. Additional wide shifts are likely during the rest of the summer with concern about heat and moisture issues. In addition, global demand concerns have caused prices to move

Soybean meal futures price $440

The study found lying time fell by two hours per day when free stalls were overstocked. A significant difference was not found in cleanliness of cows in overstocked free stalls compared to the control group.

$420 $400 $380 $360 $340 $320 $300 1/3/12

observe environment to recognize heat stress In the summer months, heat stress is something all dairy farmers battle. The University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service reminds dairy producers that an important tool in minimizing heat stress is simply observing the environment. Since cows wear a thick leather coat, temperatures as low as 68°F can cause heat stress. A reference tool to recognize an environment favorable

to heat stress is a temperature-humidity index (THI) chart. The temperature and humidity of the cows’ housing is needed to use this chart. The THI is found by following the line horizontally right from the temperature and vertically down from the humidity until they meet. At a THI of 68, cows begin to experience heat stress. This chart can be found in the April 25, 2011, issue of Hoard’s Dairyman on page 281.

both corn and corn oil recorded the lowest (2.73). The results suggest that feeding DDGS without fats and starches can boost milkfat. However, high levels of fat and starch represent risk factors for milkfat depression when fed with DDGS.

Milk fat %

3.5

Milk fat %

3.0 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0

Cont

Oil

Starch

as much as $20 to $25 per ton in just a couple of days. In the last six days of April, the soybean meal price jumped nearly $35 per ton, and similar losses were seen through the earlier parts of the months. Similar price shifts are likely during the next three months which could create a significant shift in overall dairy operation feed costs. —Rick Kment, DTN Dairy Analyst

new discovery has potential to cut insecticide costs

carefully balance when feeding dried distillers grains As a result of the growing ethanol industry, quality feedstuffs such as dried distillers grains are available as by-product feeds. Dried distillers grains (DDGS) are good protein and energy sources, but some nutritionists believe diets with high levels of DDGS induce milkfat depression. University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers sought to test that theory. Twenty Holsteins housed in a tie stall barn were divided into four groups that received different dietary treatments. The control group was fed a balanced ration with 20 percent DDGS. Soy hulls were added to the second ration at 7.6 percent and corn oil at 1 percent. The third group received a ration with 8.7 percent added ground corn. The last group received 7.8 percent ground corn and 1 percent corn oil. The control treatment recorded the highest (3.34) milkfat percentage and the group that received

1/31/12 2/28/12 3/27/12 4/24/12 5/22/12

Viruses transmitted by aphids hurt yields and reduce the quality of crops. Spraying insecticides can prevent aphid-transmitted viruses, but not all aphids transmit viruses. A new discovery is expected to lead to the development of a test to identify diseasecausing aphids. Agriculture Research Service scientists, Michelle Cilia and Stewart Gray, found a way to identify virus-spreading aphids. By examining disease-carrying aphids, they found the greenbug aphid’s ability to transmit yellow dwarf viruses is linked to the presence or absence of nine biomarker proteins found in insect cells. An aphid does not need all nine proteins to spread a virus but specific proteins are necessary.

Comb

CALF STARTER FORM CAN REDUCE ACIDOSIS INCIDENCE

HOARD’S DAIRYMAN

vitamin d could serve as natural mastitis remedy

396

Mastitis is the most costly and common disease in the U.S. and costs the economy $2 billion each year. Since the disease reduces milk production, quality and income, effective treatment methods are crucial. Antibiotics are often used to treat mastitis, but new research may have found a natural remedy. Scientists at the ARS National Animal Disease Center in Ames, Iowa discovered that vitamin D delays and lessens the severity of mastitis infection. They used a natural form of vitamin D, prehormone 25-hydroxyvitamin D, that is found in

June 2012

blood. One group of cows received vitamin D by infusion directly into the infected quarter and another group received no treatment. The results showed that, in the early phase of treatment, cows treated with vitamin D had a significant reduction in bacterial counts and fewer clinical signs of severe infection than untreated cows. Additionally, milk production was greater in the treated cows. The research also suggests that vitamin D could potentially reduce other bacterial and viral diseases such as respiratory tract infections.

How do you know if your calves have slightly acidotic rumens? It is not simply how much starter they are eating. Consider when they begin ruminating (about three to four weeks), what percentage of time they are ruminating (about 20 percent), if they chew wood within reach, and if you observe shallow panting (an effort to reduce ruminal acidosis), notes Al Kertz, with ANDHIL, LLC, a St. Louis-based consulting firm. All of these factors indicate possible marginal rumen acidosis from feeding a pelleted calf starter or from an improperly “texturized” calf starter. For more on starters and hay inclusion in calf diets, see page 397.

Reprinted by permission from the June 2012 issue of Hoard’s Dairyman. Copyright 2012 by W.D. Hoard & Sons Company, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin.


Farm Flashes enhanced milk replacer can accelerate calf growth More producers are feeding enhanced milk replacer or starter to accelerate growth and lower age at first calving. But do the changes meet their goals? The University of Illinois Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee compared an enhanced early nutrition program to a conventional program. The results were published in the June 2012 Journal of Dairy Science. Eighty-nine Holstein calves were divided into three groups. The first group received a conventional milk replacer containing 20 percent crude protein (CP) and 20 percent fat with a conventional starter containing 19.6 percent CP. The second group received an enhanced milk replacer containing 28.5 percent CP and 15 percent fat with the conventional starter. The last group received the enhanced milk replacer with the enhanced starter (25 percent CP). The treatments began at three days of age. For calves fed enhanced milk replacer, starter

CASH CORN BASIS CONTINUED TO STRENGTHEN IN LATE JUNE Mid-June the national average basis levels were 29 cents over the July corn futures price. Corn basis price is the difference between cash and futures prices. Through the last two months, the national average basis level has moved from the normal negative basis level to a positive basis level. Although the basis levels are extremely strong now, there has been little improvement in selling activity, which could loosen the overall available corn supplies. DTN national cash corn index

intake was greater when fed enhanced starter. Over the 10-week study, average daily gain was greater for calves fed enhanced milk replacer with either starter. Regardless of milk replacer, calves should consume 2.2 pounds of starter daily before weaning to ensure continued growth.

adjust transition diets to improve embryonic survival Because high-producing cows often have reduced fertility, researchers from the University of Florida stress the importance of diets when setting goals for reproductive management plans. The scientists compared 17 trials in an effort to improve embryonic survival. Their research was published in the December 2011 journal Theriogenology. They found raising the number of days feeding a transition diet with a negative cation-anion dif-

ference, combined with adequate energy, protein, amino acids and minerals, improves pregnancy rate. Also, supplementing selenium during the transition period and lactation enhanced immunity, uterine health and reproductive performance. The results also showed feeding glucogenic diets postpartum boosted ovarian activity and feeding a glucogenic followed by lipogenic diet improved the proportion of pregnancies by 120 days of lactation.

Corn futures DTN national cash corn index

Many are concerned about new-crop corn production, and there is an unwillingness to sell extra corn in the event of low production or higher prices, hence a stronger basis level. The July corn contract continues to carry a strong premium to the September futures, which is viewed as a new-crop corn contract this year. Keep current and average price and basis levels in mind when forward-contracting corn needs. —Rick Kment, DTN Dairy Analyst

late-summer oat seedings produce a quality forage canola meal can substitute as a protein source Canola meal (CM) and dried distillers grains (DG) serve a similar role in the diet of lactating cows. Since canola meal has the balance of amino acids needed for milk production, researchers at South Dakota State University evaluated if it could be substituted for dried distillers grains. The study involved 16 lactating Holsteins divided into four groups. Each group received a diet with either 15 percent CM, 15 percent DG, 17 percent CM or 17 percent DG as the main protein source. Feed intake and milk production were measured daily and milk samples were collected for composition analysis.

They found that CM can be substituted for DG as a source of protein in high-producing dairy cows’ diets without significantly affecting dry matter intake, milk production or milk composition. Canola and distillers compared Rations Item

15CM

15DG

17CM

17DG

DMI lbs./d Milk lbs./d Fat % Protein % Total solid %

54.01 73.41 2.95 3.09 11.80

54.23 76.72 3.00 3.07 11.87

56.0 80.25 3.16 3.12 12.05

58.2 80.03 3.13 3.11 12.08

HOARD’S DAIRYMAN

design a heifer free stall facility to fit your herd

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Free stall systems can work well for heifers, but you should analyze your replacement herd size and make-up when determining the design of a facility. In the April 2012 Penn State Extension Dairy Digest, Dan McFarland, an agricultural engineering educator, discussed the importance of designing a free stall facility that will allow heifers to recline, rest, rise and exit the stall with ease. He explained that there are five suggested free stall sizes for growing heifers from approximately 300 pounds to precalving. Additionally, the most common free stall layouts include two-row tailto-tail, two-row head-to-head and three row. The benefit of the two-row versions is all heifers in

July 2012

the group can eat at the same time. On the other hand, the three-row option is more economical. However, the three-row design doesn’t allow enough space for the entire group to access the fence line at the same time. Free stall dimensions should be determined based on heifer weight rather than age. Additionally, stalls should be sized for the larger heifers in the group rather than smaller heifers since smaller heifers can more easily use larger stalls. It is recommended to consult farm records when determining total stall numbers and sizes. More information about free stall shelters and suggested free stall layouts can be found at www.abe.psu.edu/extension/ip/ipindex.html.

Recent research by University of Wisconsin agronomists found that oats seeded in late summer produce a high-quality forage. Three cultivars of oats planted in mid-April or early August and harvested 77 days later were compared. Concentrations of water-soluble carbohydrates were 61 percent greater in leaf tissue and 330 percent greater in stem tissue following an August planting date. The higher concentration of sugar resulted in a higher TDN. Furthermore, cooler temperatures in late summer reduced content of lignin, an indigestible fiber. Oats planted in late summer should be harvested around October 15 for good yields.

corn farmers are not overapplying nitrogen Nitrogen fertilizer is often criticized for having a negative environmental impact, but according to Better Crops with Plant Food, published by the International Plant Nutrition Institute, U.S. farmers are not overapplying N. They compared N amounts prescribed by the Corn Nitrogen Rate Calculator (CNRC) to USDA survey data on N rates applied by farmers in 2000, 2005 and 2010 in seven top corn producing states. The comparison showed that N was applied at rates lower than the amounts prescribed by the CNRC. However, farmers should always emphasize the 4Rs of nutrient stewardship: right source at the right rate, right time and right place for more sustainable production.

Reprinted by permission from the July 2012 issue of Hoard’s Dairyman. Copyright 2012 by W.D. Hoard & Sons Company, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin.


Farm Flashes don’t forget about comfort in tie stalls A 2007 USDA National Animal Health Monitoring System survey indicated that a tie stall barn served as the primary housing on 49.2 percent of farms. Jeffrey Bewley of the University of Kentucky Department of Animal Science highlighted three tie stall management tips in the July Kentucky Dairy Notes. Provide sufficient bedding. Uncomfortable stall surfaces compromise lying times. Enough bedding is needed for cushion and traction. Don’t use mattresses past useful life. Hock injuries are commonly observed when cows are forced to lie on a mattress that is used past its useful life and the cushion is no longer flexible. Invest in the best stall surface. Rubber mats

MILK-FEED PRICE RATIO CONTINUES TO remain depressed As the year progresses, milk margins over feed costs continue to erode. With corn hovering near $8 per bushel and soybean meal above $500 per ton, even the moderate gains in milk prices have not been enough to maintain margins. The July Milk-Feed

Milk-to-feed price ratio may appear to be the most cost-effective option for a stall surface, but the additional investment in water beds provides more cushion while helping production and improving feet and leg health.

limited feeding area favors dominant cows Since dairy cattle have a hierarchical social structure, low-ranking cows may not consume enough quality feed in a fence line feeding system. Researchers from the Scottish Agricultural College and St. Mary’s College, University of St. Andrews in the United Kingdom proved this theory. The study published in the July 2012 issue of the Journal of Dairy Science measured how a dominant cow’s location affects on a low-ranking cow’s willingness to feed. Thirty Holstein cows were split into two groups and conditioned to associate a black bin and highpalatability food (HPF) and a white bin and lowpalatability food (LPF). The other half of the herd were trained with the opposite combination. Dur-

ing the training, researchers observed dominant and subordinate cows. As part of the study, cows were escorted down an alley that ended in a “Y” with both the HPF and LPF bins visible. During the test, dominant cows were standing at the HPL bin at four different space allowances (about 1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 feet). With the dominant cow at the 1 and 1.5 foot distances, lower-ranking cows chose to feed alone on LPF significantly more than they chose to eat HPF. For the two larger space allowances, researchers found no significant difference between the number of choices for feeding alone or with a dominant cow. They concluded that feed bunks should have at least 2 feet per cow.

Price Ratio has dropped to just 1.29. This is compared to a level of 1.92 a year ago. The large buildup in production seen through the first six months of the year is likely to keep any significant milk price surge months away. In this time of high feed prices, producers are encouraged to take advantage of the volatility of the market and be mindful that these price swings have not lasted long. Expect that, even if milk prices improve, Milk-Feed Price Ratios will likely remain depressed because of the strong demand for feed products, including forage. —Rick Kment, DTN Dairy Analyst

new method kills pathogens without antibiotics Not all colostrum does its job Research conducted at Iowa State University suggests that 60 percent of maternal colostrum is not good enough to transfer necessary immunity. The farms from 12 states involved in the study between June and October 2010 were grouped into four regions: Northeast, Southeast, Midwest and Southwest. Samples were collected for analysis of immunoglobulin (IgG) composition and total plate count (TPC) and classified based on storage prior to feeding: fresh, refrigerated or frozen. Samples from the Midwest held greater IgG concentrations, while samples from the Southeast and Southwest had the lowest. In this study, 29.4 percent of colostrom had IgG levels less than the industry recommended standard of 50 mg/ml.

Refrigerated samples had a greater TPC than frozen samples. Only 39.4 percent of samples met industry standards for both TPC and IgG levels. How storage affects colostrum quality IgG (mg/ml) Fat, % Protein, % Lactose, % Other solids, % Total solids, % SCC Coliform TPC

Fresh

Storage method Refrigerated

Frozen

69.0 4.9 10.9 3.2 4.6 21.2 5.8 1.1 4.0

74.6 5.4 14.1 2.8 4.3 24.2 5.5 1.6 5.0

66.3 5.6 12.56 2.9 4.4 22.3 5.6 1.3 4.5

HOARD’S DAIRYMAN

Add shredlage to your dairy vocabulary

536

In recent months, the term shredlage entered dairy vocabulary. Corn shredlage describes a silage produced from whole-plant corn harvested with a self-propelled forage harvester fitted with aftermarket cross-grooved crop processing rolls. The forage harvester is set for a longer cut length than commonly used. Compared to kernel-processed corn silage, shredlage has a greater proportion of course stover particles due to the 30 mm theoretical length of cut. The University of Wisconsin Agriculture Research Station harvested both shredlage and conventional

August 25, 2012

corn silage in September 2011. Then, 14 eight-cow pens were randomly assigned either a shredlage or conventional corn silage ration. Cows that received shredlage recorded 1.4 pounds per day more dry matter intake than the cows fed conventional corn silage. No significant difference was found between milk yield and feed efficiency. Mike Hutjens of the University of Illinois discussed using shredlage in dairy rations in the Hoard’s Dairyman July webinar. To view this webinar, “New corn silage utilization for dairy rations,” visit www.hoards.com/webinars.

Another alternative to antibiotics has been discovered by the Agriculture Research Service. ARS molecular biologist David Donovan recently patented a method of designing pathogen-targeted antimicrobials. The strategy uses enzymes produced by viruses that infect bacterica, called bacteriophages, to kill pathogens. These enzymes have been effective at killing pathogens like streptococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The enzymes can be manipulated to target and kill only specific pathogens, thus reducing the chance that nontargeted bacteria will develop resistance.

use guidelines to see where your heifers measure up When used in conjunction with health records and visual observation, monitoring a heifer’s average daily gain (ADG) and feed efficiency can help determine productivity and profitability. The Dairy Calf and Heifer Association recently offered three benchmarks to follow. 1. A reasonable ADG for the first 70 days of age should be 1.7 to 2 pounds per day. 2. By six months, heifers should have an ADG of 2 pounds per day. 3. Depending on breed and individual herd dynamics, heifers should be about 51 inches at the hip (for Holsteins) and 55 percent of their dam’s mature body weight at first breeding.

Reprinted by permission from the August 25, 2012, issue of Hoard’s Dairyman. Copyright 2012 by W.D. Hoard & Sons Company, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin.


Farm Flashes group size didn’t affect calves That had adequate space Group housing is becoming more common for calves. A study conducted by Grober Nutrition, Ontario, Canada, found that if calves were given the same amount of space, (24 square feet) group size didn’t affect feed intake, growth or health. The results of the study were reported in the July 2011 Journal of Animal Science E-Supplement. Sixty-five calves were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: individuals housed in a solitary pen, paired calves housed in the space equivalent of two solitary pens, a small group consisting of six calves housed in a group pen and a large group of 11 calves housed in a group pen. The two group pens had access to an automatic feeder. Calves received milk replacer, grain and hay for eight weeks and then grain and hay only for two weeks. All milk refusals were recorded and calf birth weight and height was measured weekly. Health

Title

was evaluated daily using an adapted version of the University of Wisconsin calf-scoring sheet. The study revealed that the number of calves in a group with the same space per calf (24 square feet) did not affect growth. The number of health events also did not rise with the number of calves.

two new apps can help manage nitrogen Smartphone apps bring tools for some management decisions right to your fingertips. The University of Wisconsin released two new apps, the N (nitrogen) Price Calculator and Corn N Fertilizer Rate Calculator to assist farmers with managing nitrogen. The N price calculator compares the price of nitrogen fertilizer products and converts the price of each fertilizer product from price per ton to price per pound of N. This app can be found

for Apple devices at http://on.hoards.com/N-icalculator and for Android at http://on.hoards. com/N-And-calculatorNY1abD. The Corn N Fertilizer Rate Calculator uses Maximum Return to N (MRTN) guidelines to assist in selecting an N rate that improves profitability. The app can be found for iPhone or iPad at http://on.hoards.com/corn-i-calculator or for Android at http://on.hoards.com/ corn-And-calculator.

elevating hutches improves airflow Poor airflow in plastic calf hutches causes heat, humidity and carbon dioxide to accumulate. Research conducted at Washington State University suggests that placing an 8-inch by 8-inch by 16-inch concrete block under the back of each hutch can improve internal temperature and ventilation. So much so that calf respiratory rate was reduced from 58 to 44 breaths per minute in elevated hutches. These findings were published in the July 2012 Journal of Dairy Science. Over a 48-hour period, data loggers measured internal and external carbon dioxide, wind speed and calf respiratory rate in 15 straw-bedded hutches. The calves were 5 to 16 days old. Hutches

were 6.5 feet by 4 feet and arranged in a single row about 6 feet apart. The external temperatures were between the mid-60s and mid-100s. The hutches were evaluated three times daily for internal and external carbon dioxide, wind speed and calf respiratory rate. Differences were calculated for hutches with and without elevation. The data revealed that the internal temperature of elevated hutches tended to be cooler than the external temperature, whereas unelevated hutches recorded a warmer internal temperature. Hutch elevation improved wind speed and air movement inside the hutches and lowered the concentration of carbon dioxide.

HOARD’S DAIRYMAN

boost feed supply with winter small grains

568

Winter small grains such as winter wheat, cereal rye or winter triticale harvested for forage in the spring can rebuild your forage inventory. In 2011, researchers at Cornell University compared these three species at the Valatie Research Farm in eastern New York. Their findings as well as planting, fertilization and harvesting advice were discussed in the August 2012 Cornell Pro-Dairy e-leader. The comparison suggests that earlier planting produces significantly higher biomass in the fall followed by high forage yields in the spring. The authors advised that for optimum yield the crop should have some nitrogen available, but fields with a coat of manure applied will not need any

September 10, 2012

starter fertilizer in most cases. They also noted that harvesting at flag leaf stage supports high milk production with strong yields. Three winter forage crops produce similar yields Species

N at greenup

Spring above ground biomass Tons DM/acre

Rye Rye Wheat Wheat Triticale Triticale

No N 40-0-0-4S No N 40-0-0-4S No N 40-0-0-4S

3.72 3.90 2.63 3.36 3.05 3.77

dairy producers are beef producers, too Since dairy cattle supply a significant portion of the beef marketed in the U.S., understanding Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) is important for dairy producers. In fact, according to the 2011 executive summary of the National Beef Quality Audit, 9.9 percent of carcasses were from dairy animals. However, fewer than half (44.4 percent) of dairy producers had attended a program that taught Beef Quality Assurance principles. To learn about these quality assurance standards and training sessions, visit BQA.org. BQA also provides training with videos via its YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/nationalbqa.

no-till more evenly distributes snow A study conducted at the Washington State University Cook Agronomy Farm (CAF) and a neighboring farm near Pullman, Wash., measured how crop residues could affect snow accumulation and soil water levels across a no-till field. The results of the study were published in the August 2012 issue of USDA’s Agricultural Research magazine. For two years, snow depths, density and soil water storage were measured manually at hundreds of points across a conventional and a no-till field. Residue height at data collection points was also measured. The standing wheat residue on the no-till soil improved the uniformity of snow cover across the field. Snow depths on the no-till field ranged from 4 to 39 inches while the conventional-till field ranged from 0 to 56 inches.

Reprinted by permission from the September 10, 2012, issue of Hoard’s Dairyman. Copyright 2012 by W.D. Hoard & Sons Company, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin.


Hoard’s Dairyman Blogs Hoard's Dairyman:

Best Freebies at Expo Date: Fri, 10/05/2012

When you visit Expo, take a few of our hints and mark your maps for the best freebie stops. by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard's Dairyman Editorial Intern

While the trade show is an opportunity for networking and finding out about new innovations and shopping for useful products, one can’t help but also take advantage of the many freebies handed out at each booth. I went from booth to booth, seeking out the plethora of product handouts, notepads and writing utensils. Check out a few of these booths for their unique giveaways. A trend from booth to booth is cloth bags. These bags come in handy to carry the merchandise you acquire, but they can also make great reusable grocery bags when you return from expo. While many booths offered bags of similar quality, the bags at the Semex booth (EH 26082709) were the deepest and had the greatest holding capacity for freebies. One of my best finds of the day was a hard shell first aid kit from Boehringer Ingelheim (EH 2806-2909). Also you can satisfy your hunger by picking up a box of popcorn, in a Lifeline colostrum replacer box at APC (EH 3617-3718). If you are looking for a new baseball cap, there are several booths that can meet that need. Semex, Big Ass Fans (EH 1408-1509), and Mycogen (AR 477-78) were among booths that were handing out hats. In the arena, a stocking hat could be found at the Lely (AR 461-483) booth. Find out the word of the day from the Genex Cooperative Facebook page then stop at the Genex (AL 218 to 225) booth to receive a free Toystory t-shirt or hat. The Cottonseed booth (EH 4107) offered several quality freebies including a stainless steal water bottle, ice scraper, and fly swatter. Then, Family Dairies (EH3507) handed out a pizza cutter. If you are looking for a new yardstick, Tracy Seeds (TC 915) has an abundance. You can’t come home from expo without a stress cow which can be found at the Novus (EH 1211-1212) booth. In addition, Allflex (EH 4512-4513) is personalizing ear tag key chains. Don’t forget to download the official Hoard’s Dairyman World Dairy Expo app. If you stop by our booth and show us that you downloaded the app, you can receive a free stylus. Share your Dairy Wellness story by liking our sponsor,

Each Monday throughout the summer I was asked to write a blog for the Hoard’s Dairyman notebook blog. I was responsible for thinking of my own topic. I wrote about a variety of topics and expanded my knowledge of current events in the dairy industry. I also returned to write for the Hoard’s @Expo blog during World Dairy Expo in October.


Hoard's Dairyman:

Minnesota event encourages young women to advocate for dairy farming Date: Wed, 05/23/2012

Miss Oklahoma kicks off event by encouraging young women to share their story. by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard's Dairyman Editorial Intern Betty Thompson felt like she had the odds stacked against her when she ran for Miss America. “I was the little farm girl with a milk dud platform that wasn’t tall enough to win,” she said. But, this Oklahoma farm girl sorted her way to 1st Runner Up in the 2012 Miss America pageant. Now, she travels the U.S. promoting her platform: “Milk, it really does a body good.” This weekend, she made a trip to the Minnesota Dairy Princess Promotion event in St. Joseph, Minn., to remind young women that while their story may seem small, they shouldn’t be afraid of sharing it. On Friday evening, Thompson stood before a crowd of nearly 100 young women from across Minnesota as well as princesses from Iowa, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota. Her speech kicked off a weekend full of engaging presentations and sessions meant to equip young women with the tools needed to advocate for the dairy industry. During the weekend, Minnesota princesses had the option to compete for one of 12 finalist spots for Princess Kay of the Milky Way, the official goodwill ambassador for the Minnesota dairy industry. During a banquet on Sunday afternoon 12 young women found out they would join the nearly 450 prior princesses who have sat in a rotating cooler while Linda Christiansen, a butter sculpting extraordinaire, creates their likeness in a 90-pound block of butter. The tradition of sculpting princesses in butter at the Minnesota State Fair has been around since 1965. Not only is it a source of pride for Minnesota dairy farmers, it also engages the thousands of fair visitors who pass through the dairy building. While Minnesota dairy producers love finding out who will sit for the 12 signature butter sculptures, greater benefit for the dairy industry after this event is that nearly 100 young women went home ready to promote agriculture in a changing society. Like

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Hoard's Dairyman:

Consistency is key to completing many dairy farm tasks Date: Mon, 05/28/2012

Consider writing a standard operating procedure to ensure tasks are completed uniformly on your operation. by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard's Dairyman Editorial Intern The workforce on a modern dairy farm is both multigenerational and multicultural. Without training, each employee will likely perform each task differently; therefore, you need to provide clear instructions. In order to ensure that tasks are done with uniformity, consider writing a standard operating procedure (SOP) for tasks that require consistency. An SOP is a documentation of the specific steps necessary to complete a task. If taken seriously, an SOP can help your farm improve uniformity and reach measurable goals. Consider these steps when writing an SOP: 1. Have a goal in mind. You must identify the reason why an SOP is needed. For example, a milking procedure SOP could be written to maintain a low somatic cell count or reduce the occurrence of mastitis. Consider your goals when designing your SOP. 2. Choose a format. Decide on a format that works best for your operation such as a simple list of steps or a graphic organizer. If language is a barrier, consider using pictures to make each step clearer and facilitate communication. 3. Discuss the first draft. Remember, in order to receive results from an SOP, your employees must take ownership in improving the consistency of a procedure. Show your employees the first draft and ask for input on areas that might be confusing or changes they think need to be made. Also, ask for an opinion from someone outside of your farm, such as a field service expert. 4. Try out the procedure. Once you feel you have designed a practical plan for a procedure, observe it in action. If you created a milking SOP, observe each step while your employees are in the parlor. Then you can visually see if adjustments need to be incorporated. 5. Make your final draft available. Once you have created a final draft, provide a copy to each employee who is involved with the task. If possible, hang the SOP in an area where it can serve as a continual reminder of the procedure. 6. Train, maintain and audit. In order to see results from your efforts, you must train your employees to follow the SOP. Make sure your employees understand the importance of consistency with the specific task, and audit the procedure on a regular basis to make sure the steps are being followed and original goals are met. SOPs are used in many types of businesses and organizations. To find a more in-depth description and a sample SOP, visit the following links: http://www.ehow.com/how_4455615_write-standard-operating-procedures.html (http://www.ehow.com/how_4455615_write-standard-operating-procedures.html)

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Hoard's Dairyman:

Social media can help build trust during dairy month Date: Mon, 06/04/2012

Use pictures to catch the eye and use your words to catch the mind Chelsey Johnson, Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern

To build trust, farmers know they must become a familiar face to their customers. From coffee shops to hay sales, farmers have used these traditional venues to build relationships with neighbors and customers. While making yourself a familiar face at locations in your local community isn’t a bad place to start, in today’s society a dairy farmer can reach even more people without even leaving the farm. We’ve all heard the chatter about the growing presence of social media, but have you created an engaging exchange of information about agriculture online? Social media gives farmers the ability to build relationships and reach consumers in a similar fashion to how their grandfathers did at the local coffee counter. Regardless of the social network you prefer, find a way to grab the attention of your followers. An effective strategy could be using pictures to catch their eye, and using your words to catch their mind. For example, a picture of a calf could be a great way to draw in your audience. Once you have caught their attention, include a key dairy message to catch their mind. For example, with a calf picture you could post a caption like, “This morning I bottle fed each calf to make sure they each received adequate nutrition.” A list of consumer-tested key messages can be found at www.dairycheckoff.com (http://www.dairycheckoff.com) . Another great way to catch their attention is to post a video. Today, creating videos is simple and inexpensive. The key is to be genuine because your audience can tell when they are being fed a scripted line. Don’t worry about the production quality of your video, simply video taping as you do chores in the morning can be a great way to let consumers see what you do on a dayto-day basis. Then call your followers to action. Effective use of social media should involve two-way communication between you and your audience. Encourage conversation by asking questions or hosting contests. Something as simple as asking your audience to help think of a name for a new calf can help build relationships. Once you have built that trust, they will come to you when they have more serious concerns or questions about the production of their food. Like Tweet

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Hoard's Dairyman:

New Zealand’s dairy industry is still growing Date: Mon, 06/11/2012

Recent size and landscape changes of New Zealand’s dairy industry are worth noting. by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern Even though New Zealand currently produces less than 5 percent of the global milk supply, recent changes in size and landscape of the dairy industry “down under” are worth noting. In fact, according to a report released by Statistics New Zealand in May 2012, New Zealand’s dairy herd increased 259,000 head in the past year, adding up to 6.17 million cows. What fueled this increase? One factor is the recent decline in sheep population. Traditionally, the majority of New Zealand’s dairy industry was located in the North Island and sheep farms were more prevalent in the South Island. However, due to heavy snow and storms in the southern regions of Southland and Otago during the 2010 spring lambing season the once dominant sheep industry began to plummet in numbers. As of June 2011, Southland had 484,000 fewer sheep than the year before, and Otago sheep numbers shrank by 121,000 head. The combined factors of inclement weather and culling of older ewes added up to a 7.3 percent fall in total breeding ewes. The shrinking sheep population has urged the conversion of many sheep farms into dairy operations. In fact, as of June 2011, the total of dairy cattle in the South Island exceeded 2.2 million. South Island dairy cattle now represent 36 percent of the national total. From a production standpoint, the strong milk prices and milk solid payouts from June through May, will fuel an expected 10 percent gain in milk production in the 2011/12 milk season. This expansion will raise New Zealand’s production 1.7 billion pounds above California’s 2011 annual milk production. Despite an expected 15 percent decline in milk prices, New Zealand is still expected to see a 5 percent climb in milk production for the 2012/13 season. New Zealand is already the world’s largest exporter of dairy products despite its limited contribution to the total global milk supply. Now as we see numbers and production continuing to expand, we might see New Zealand developing a greater presence in the global dairy industry. Like Tweet

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With proper management, recycled manure solids are quality bedding Date: Mon, 06/25/2012

Researchers at the University of Minnesota conducted a study to better understand recycled manure solids. by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern You may be facing challenges with the availability and expense of common bedding sources such as sawdust or the management of sand bedding. In recent years recycled manure solids have become a more prevalent bedding source on dairy farms. With the growing demand for producers to seek more sustainable practices, it seems like bedding with recycled manure solids could be a win-win situation. If only it could be that easy. Although sustainability, availability and cost are major factors when selecting bedding sources, cow comfort and cleanliness should receive equal if not more consideration. Likewise, some producers are hesitant to use recycled manure solids until they see evidence that this option is working for other herds. Marcia Endres and Adam Husfeldt of the University of Minnesota recently conducted a study to help skeptical producers and professionals weigh the pros and cons of this bedding option. Endres presented their findings at the Four State Dairy Nutrition and Management Conference on June 13. They conducted an observational study involving 38 dairy farms in Wisconsin, Minnesota, South Dakota and Iowa that were using recycled manure solids for bedding free stalls. They aimed to find out if recycled manure solids influence SCC and animal welfare. The study observed herds that used recycled manure solids in deep-bedded free stalls as well as herds that used it on top of mattresses. They found that herds with deep beds had a lower prevalence of lameness and hock lesions compared to herds with mattresses. After comparing these observations to studies with sand bedding, they learned that lameness prevalence was similar, hock lesion prevalence was slightly higher and cow hygiene was better in herds using recycled manure solids. “One of the major concerns expressed by producers considering the use of manure solids for bedding is the possibility of increased somatic cell count,” explained Endres. “But the cows in this study were on average cleaner than any other free stall study we have conducted.” She also noted that she preferred the odor of manure solids compared to sand. However, Endres noted that they recorded relatively high numbers for clinical mastitis. Therefore, like any other bedding source, you must pay close attention to detect clinical cases. Overall, they concluded that excellent cow preparation at milking time, sanitation of milking equipment, cow hygiene, adequate dry cow housing and bedding/stall management are critical to maintaining a low somatic cell count when using manure solids for bedding. So, rather than asking if recycled manure solids are a quality bedding option, the question should be, are you willing to take the management steps necessary to successfully bed with recycled manure solids? To view a more in depth analysis of the findings from the study, click here (http://www1.extension.umn.edu/dairy/manure/manure-solids-for-bedding-does-it-work/index.html) . Like Tweet

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Hoard's Dairyman:

What doesn’t kill a herd mate doesn’t make her stronger Date: Mon, 07/02/2012

Manage BVDV risk factors to prevent persistently infected animals from damaging your herd by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern You may have heard Kelly Clarkson sing, “What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.” However, Julia Ridpath, of the National Animal Disease Center/ARS/USDA staff, reminded dairy producers that in the case of animals exposed to BVD virus, this saying does not apply. Ridpath explained how to optimize management of BVDV risk factors at the first annual Vita Plus Calf Summit on June 20 in Green Bay, Wis. One challenge with managing BVDV risk factors in a herd is preventing persistently infected (PI) animals from entering the herd. PI animals silently do damage to a herd, as Ridpath explained, “You can’t walk out into a lot, sniff the air and say, ‘wow, BVD.’” PI animals are infected in utero and are often born from an uninfected dam. PI animals continually shed the virus into the environment without showing signs of infection. Therefore, herd mates are constantly trying to fight infection. As a result of this immune response, herd mates do not have as much energy to go toward milk production, growth or fighting other diseases. So in the case of a cow exposed to a PI animal, the exposure may not kill her but it certainly isn’t going to make her stronger. In order to prevent a PI animal from entering your herd, be sure to develop a BVDV-control program consisting of the following three components. Use surveillance Every PI animal must be identified and removed. A 90 percent detection accuracy that works with other diseases will not cut it with BVDV. Therefore, BVDV testing requires a high standard for accuracy. Talk to your veterinarian about BVDV testing options. The sooner a PI animal can be eliminated from a herd, the better. Build a biosecurity system The risk of BVDV is lowest when a herd is truly closed. This isn’t possible in many cases, especially since wildlife can expose cows to BVDV. Instead, producers should have a biosecurity plan in place. For example, all purchased animals should be kept separate until they are confirmed BVDV-free, and calves that are born from purchased bred animals should not be exposed to the rest of the herd until the calf is confirmed BVDV-free. Raise herd resistance by vaccination Vaccination cannot prevent all BVDV infections but it has been shown to be effective in reducing the number of infections. Both modified-live virus (MLV) and killed vaccines are available for control of BVDV infections. Killed vaccines are more stable and safe, but the duration and breadth of immunity may be less with killed vaccines. Choose a vaccination system that best fits your herd. Keep in mind, however, that vaccination cannot compensate for poor surveillance or biosecurity. Like Tweet

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Hoard's Dairyman:

Help nonfarming neighbors and they will help you Date: Mon, 07/09/2012

Farmers drop everything to help another farmer, but what about our nonfarming neighbors? by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard's Dairyman Editorial Intern I spent the past week at my family’s dairy farm in southwest Minnesota. One evening, while helping my dad with a few chores after milking, we felt a few drops of rain. We hoped the sprinkles would turn into the rainfall we needed. However, my dad quickly thought of a neighbor who planned to finish round baling a road ditch that evening. My dad called him offering to help before the rain. This isn’t uncommon for a farmer to stop what he or she is doing to help a neighboring farmer. I was reminded of this several times as we prepared for a countywide Breakfast on the Farm hosted at our dairy on Saturday, July 7th. Our nutritionist called offering to help any way he could to prepare for the event and several other neighbors offered to assist in various ways. When our main feeder-wagon tractor broke down on Friday morning, another neighbor offered to let us borrow his tractor. That’s just the way it works with farmers. When our cows get out, our dairy farming neighbors from across the road are the first ones to help get them back in, and my family does the same for them. With the number of farms in our country continually dwindling, farmers must work together more than ever, but what about our nonfarming neighbors? My family’s farm is located between many small communities in our county and over 300 people from the area stopped by Saturday morning to enjoy breakfast and experience a morning on a dairy farm. Many people commented, “I drive by here everyday, and I have always wondered what goes on here.” I am sure many children went home with memories of their first time petting a calf or seeing a cow milked. Many adults went home with a new appreciation for how their dairy products are produced.

Just as you may drop everything you are doing to help a neighboring farmer, try to make an extra effort to show appreciation to your nonfarming neighbors. Often without realizing, they are helping us everyday by buying and supporting our products. It is important to show appreciation and build a trusting relationship with everyone in our community. Even though our “town” neighbors may not be able to offer us a tractor when ours breaks down, keep in mind that they will remember the farmer who gave them a farm tour or the farmer who


answered a question at the county fair. If they have a positive experience, they will share what they learned with friends and stand up for you if others put you down. Like Tweet

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Hoard's Dairyman:

Don’t try to tackle your to-do list Date: Mon, 07/16/2012

Be realistic when managing your to-do list instead of being discouraged when you don’t complete it. by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern A broken piece of equipment, a visit from a neighbor, or simply losing track of time while completing a single task can wreak havoc on your to-do list. Some days we leave the barn with what seems like little to show for our efforts. However, we shouldn’t view a hard days work as a failure simply because we didn’t tackle our entire to-do list. I am guilty of setting overambitious goals that can’t fit into the time allotted to complete them. However, the best advice I’ve received is “Don’t focus on finishing your to-do list, focus on managing it.” So rather than creating unrealistic goals that could never fit into the few hours in a day, I’ve tried taking a different time management approach. Consider the following tips that can apply to managing your list. Plan each day. It is good to be ambitious, but take time to look at the tasks that need to be done on your dairy and decide what can realistically be completed for that day. Prioritize your tasks. We are often attracted to completing the easy but not urgent tasks first. When you plan each day make sure that the most important and urgent tasks are at the top of your list. Also, avoid extra nonessential tasks. Sometimes you must say no to additional tasks that prevent you from reaching bigger picture goals. Delegate as needed. Delegating can be a difficult task when it takes time to teach others how to complete a task. However, delegating a job to others can reduce your stress level and save time in the future. Do it right the first time. If you are solely focused on reaching the end of your to-do list, you may try to cut corners to complete a task. But sometimes taking shortcuts can actually waste time when you have to fix a sloppy job. Do a quality job the first time so you don’t need to make corrections. Don’t abandon the dreaded tasks. We all have those important but not urgent jobs we intentionally avoid. Consider breaking those daunting tasks such as cleaning up a cluttered area into small increments. Try spending just ten minutes everyday until the job is complete. Take breaks. Sometimes we think we can’t rest until a job is done. However, this can increase your stress level and actually lose time. Don’t be afraid to take short breaks as needed. A blog (www.mayoclinic.com/health/time-management/wl00048 (http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/time-management/wl00048) ) by staff at the Mayo clinic provides more tips on time and stress management. Facing a long list of tasks that need to be completed can be stressful before you start, but just remember, don’t focus on tackling your to-do list, focus on managing it. Like Tweet

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Hoard's Dairyman:

Cooling cows more often may be worth it Date: Mon, 07/23/2012

A study in Israel suggests that more frequent, intensive cooling sessions keeps milk production up by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern It’s hard to watch milk production drop during extended periods of high temperature. As you try to stay hydrated and cool while working outside during hot and humid temperatures, you must work even harder to keep your cows comfortable. However, there is some concern that extra cooling sessions with sprinklers and fans will elevate use of water, electricity and labor while limiting lying and rumination times. A study conducted at the Institute of Animal Science in Israel indicated that more frequent cooling sessions with fans and sprinklers boost intake, milk yield and rumination time. The findings of the study were published in the July 2012 Journal of Dairy Science. This study involved 42 Holsteins divided into two treatment groups and housed in an open barn. Each group was subjected to a different cooling schedule. The cows were moved to the holding area of the milking parlor for 45-minute cooling sessions that alternated between 30 seconds of showering and 4.5 minutes of ventilation without showering. One group received this cooling treatment five times per day, while the other group received treatment eight times per day. At the end of the four-week study, the results indicated that cooling cows more frequently improved comfort. As a result, cows spent more time lying down than those with fewer cooling sessions. In addition, the eight cooling session cows produced on average 7.7 pounds per day more milk than the five-cooling-session cows. Dry matter intake was 9.3 percent higher and milk yield was 9.6 percent higher for the cows that received eight-cooling-sessions. So, keep in mind during extreme hot and humid temperatures, it may be worth investing the time, labor and electricity to provide more frequent cooling sessions for your herd. Like Tweet

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Hoard's Dairyman:

Don’t rely on feeding time to detect calf illness Date: Mon, 07/30/2012

Sheila McGuirk, D.V.M. provides three steps for evaluating calf health by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern Raising healthy calves is critical to the future and profitability of a dairy, so evaluating calf health should not be taken lightly. Sheila McGuirk, D.V.M., who is a regular veterinary columnist for Hoard’s Dairyman, provided dairy producers with a three-step process for recognizing signs of disease at the Vita Plus Calf Summit in Green Bay, Wis. this past June. McGuirk pointed out that two of the most common diseases in young calves are scours and respiratory disease. She said that we often realize respiratory disease in calves as a postweaning problem. However, she believes this is because we don’t detect the first incidence, so the postweaning occurrence is actually the second incidence of the disease.

To ensure you don’t miss the signs that a calf is sick, do not simply rely on feeding time to recognize illness. Taking extra time during the day to screen the health of your calves can help detect illness on the first incidence. With proper screening, you can prevent the spread of respiratory disease and other illness before calves are exposed to a group setting. Follow this three-step process for screening calf health. 1. Select a time of day. McGuirk suggests that the best time of day for a calf health screening is 30 to 40 minutes after feeding when 90 percent of calves are asleep. The calves that remain standing are giving your first signal for concern because this may be a sign that they are uncomfortable. McGuirk noted that if calves are comfortable they should spend 75 to 80 percent of each day sleeping. 2. Observe from outside the pen. Start your observation by walking outside the pens or hutches and listening for coughing. Then check for ears that may be tilting or flipping uncomfortably. Check the eyes for any tearing or discharge. Also, check the nostrils for any colored discharge. 3. Inspect from inside the pen. Calves that may appear sick after walking outside the hutches or pens should receive a closer look. Do a final evaluation from inside the pen. First, the calf’s temperature should be checked. Then check for an abnormal cough. To check whether a calf has a cough, McGuirk uses a technique of firmly squeezing the windpipe and moving it back and forth. If the calf coughs as a result of this action, it has an abnormal cough.


If you observe two or more of these symptoms, proceed to treat a calf according to your farm’s protocol. This screening process should also take place directly before moving a calf to a group setting. The process of detecting illness in young calves is simple as long as you set aside time to do it. Like Tweet

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Hoard's Dairyman:

Show pride and interact with consumers at the fair Date: Mon, 08/06/2012

Youth at the Wisconsin State Fair share messages with fairgoers. by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern Showing livestock at the fair can be a hectic time filled with preparing for shows and interviews, as well as keeping up with chores at the fair and home. While it may seem you have no time to rest or stop to think, you should be prepared for the questions fairgoers may ask. I recently judged the educational displays and herdsmanship for junior dairy exhibitors at the Wisconsin State Fair. The youth exhibitors were quick to come and ask me if I had any questions as soon as they spotted my clipboard, knowing that they would receive points for interacting with the judge. We asked each youth the same question: “What message do you want to bring to fairgoers when they pass through the barn.” After talking to youth from several counties, I came up with a few tips to keep in mind as you prepare to interact with fairgoers. 1. Be prepared to respond to the negative. When asked what message he wants to bring to consumers, Cody Getschel of Polk County said, “There are a lot of negatives about our industry on the news. We want to make sure people see the positives.” With this point in mind, stay informed about negatives in the media, and be prepared to respond to these negatives with solid positive facts without becoming overly defensive.

2. Don’t assume people already know the basics. Ben Kosten of Manitowoc County said, “We live in America’s Dairyland, but people need to be reminded that we are excited to put food on the table.” Ben makes a good point, people are becoming further and further removed from agriculture, so the county or state fair may be the only time they see a dairy cow. Take each question seriously, even if it seems basic or humorous to you. 3. Show pride in your animals and industry. One of the best ways to maintain a positive image for the dairy industry at the fair is to keep your area in the barn clean. While you may be motivated to maintain a clean area because of a herdsmanship competition, displaying a positive image to fairgoers should provide extra incentive. Youth at the Wisconsin State Fair, like many other fairs, create educational displays near their animals. Make a point to provide current, accurate and engaging information with your display. Also, don’t be afraid to add a personal touch. Youth from Sheboygan County created a display about the cheese plants in their county. By personalizing the display, they were able to more easily connect with consumers.


Even though preparing to exhibit at a fair can be a busy and hectic time, you should make the extra effort to answer consumers’ questions and display your area with pride. To equip yourself to interact with consumers, use Dairy Management, Inc.’s Telling YOUR Story flip book, which contains consumer tested key messages. More information can be found at www.dairyfarmingtoday.org (http://www.dairyfarmingtoday.org) . You can also learn more about interacting with consumers at the fair from our Young Dairymen page in the April 25, 2012, issue of Hoard’s Dairyman.

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Hoard's Dairyman:

Dairy farming parody goes viral Date: Mon, 08/13/2012

Nine-year-old dairy farm boy, “Little Fred,” sings a “Call Me Maybe” parody while putting a cute face on dairy farming. by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard's Dairyman Editorial Intern Leave it to farm kids to come up with creative ideas. When gathered with family over the 4th of July, Clymer, N.Y. brothers, 18-year-old Justin and 9-year-old Fred White decided to respond to the recent YouTube video “I’m Farming and I Grow It” created by the Peterson Farm Brothers. However, this time the parody would be based on Carly Rae Jepsen’s hit, “Call Me Maybe,” and the star would be an animated, charismatic 9-year-old who sings about the life of growing up on a dairy farm. Creating the video was a team effort, as cousins Sam and Jacob worked on the lyrics and sister, Katie, helped during the filming. The actual filming process took about a week, and the boys used a small flip camera for the video and voice recording. But more than 700,000 views later, the farm kids’ creativity turned into more than a fun 4th of July activity. In fact, “Little Fred” — as Fred White is known on his YouTube channel — was asked to appear on “Fox and Friends” in New York City. So, the Whites left their 170-cow milking herd to make the eight-hour drive to the Big Apple. The dairy farming family received a tremendous amount of community support as they were sent off with fire trucks and a prayer service. During their appearance on the show, Justin, Fred and their family represented our industry well. They put a face to the product we produce and showed their pride in dairy farming. As Little Fred sang a few bars of the song, his brother Justin was grinning from ear-to-ear with pride for his younger brother. This isn’t Justin and Fred’s first YouTube video; in fact, the brothers have been filming humorous YouTube clips since 2008, but this video gained popularity the fastest. When asked what it was like to become such a star, Fred simply responded, “It is really awesome.” Just a little old-fashioned farm kid creativity made an impact on our industry’s promotion efforts. You don’t need fancy camera equipment to create a quality YouTube video like this and uploading YouTube videos takes only a few minutes. Videos like “Farm it Maybe” and “I’m Farming and I Grow it” show that a little bit of fun and creativity can go a long way. To view the brothers' interview on "Fox and Friends":

They were also interviewed on the "After the Show Show":


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Hoard's Dairyman:

It’s not too early to start thinking about next summer Date: Mon, 09/10/2012

The Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Internship program provides an opportunity to improve writing skills, network and gain knowledge of the dairy industry. by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern This summer, I had the honor and privilege of working as the 24th Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern. This opportunity not only gave me a chance to improve my writing and editing skills. It also offered me numerous chances to expand my knowledge of the dairy industry and grow professionally. I encourage hard working and ambitious college students with an interest in the dairy industry and writing to consider applying for this internship. Below are a few highlights from my summer. From Fort Atkinson to Arkansas. I spent a majority of my summer working at the Hoard’s Dairyman office in Fort Atkinson, Wis. However, I spent about three weeks throughout the summer traveling. During my travels, I attended two conferences and the American Milking Shorthorn Society Annual Convention in Rogers, Ark. I also visited 14 dairies throughout Kansas and Michigan to learn about their operations and write farm stories for the magazine. Helping busy farmers. One responsibility I had this summer was writing research summaries each issue for the Farm Flash page. I improved my understanding of the dairy industry and my technical writing skills. By condensing lengthy research studies and newsletters into a shorter summary, I could help busy farmers gain important information in less time. Preparing for World Dairy Expo. Each year Hoard’s Dairyman prints a World Dairy Expo supplement stitched into the September 10 issue of the magazine. I enjoyed the opportunity to work with the editorial team on planning layouts, writing articles and editing articles. I also look forward to returning to Wisconsin in October to work on the Hoard’s Dairyman team at World Dairy Expo. If you are interested in this internship opportunity, apply before October 19, 2012, for the following summer. Students can mail resumes, grade transcripts, cover letter and three written letters of recommendation from references to Corey Geiger, Internship Coordinator, 28 Milwaukee Ave. West, Fort Atkinson, WI 53538. Like Tweet

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Hoard's Dairyman:

No need to fear the cost of higher education Date: Mon, 08/27/2012

Check out Hoard’s Dairyman’s updated online scholarship listing. by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern As many college students return to class during the next few weeks, they will pay their fall semester tuition and fees. On top of that, more bills for books, housing and meal plans will need to be paid. As exciting as starting a fresh semester can be, the many expenses can be daunting. While you may have already paid your fall semester bill, now is the time to begin searching for scholarships that can make next semester’s bill less intimidating. Our August 25 Young Dairymen (http://www.hoards.com/sites/default/files/Five tips to help pay for your education.pdf) page provided five tips to help fund your college education. It also provided a list of scholarships available to students with an interest or background in agriculture. I encourage college students to use this advice and listing to actively take charge of financing your education. Here are three tips to keep in mind this fall as you begin your scholarship search. 1. Get involved: Many scholarships are awarded based on involvement. As you begin the fall semester, consider joining a club or organization and taking a leadership role. However, keep in mind that your academics are also important, be sure to maintain a balance between extracurricular activities and schoolwork. Your grade point average is often another criteria looked at by scholarship judges. 2. Gather materials early: Many scholarships require supplemental materials such as a resume, official transcript, letter of recommendation and a cover letter to go along with an application. Read each scholarship’s requirements carefully and make a checklist of the materials you need. Provide references plenty of notice to write a letter of recommendation for you. It is also a nice gesture to give them a thank-you note for taking time to write a letter for you. 3. Mark your calendar: As you fill your calendar with social events, extracurricular activities and schoolwork it is easy to let scholarship deadlines slip by. Our compiled list of scholarships (http://www.hoards.com/youth/collegescholarships) can help you begin to mark your calendar with scholarship deadlines. Also check with your academic adviser to find out about scholarships available in your major. High school students can often get a list of scholarships from the school guidance counselor. Like Tweet

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Hoard's Dairyman:

Exhibit celebrates 75 years of Klussendorf Award Date: Sun, 09/30/2012

Stop by the National Dairy Shrine Museum in Fort Atkinson to view an exhibit honoring past winners of the Klussendorf award. by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern As you visit Madison for World Dairy Expo, consider making a stop at the National Dairy Shrine and Hoard Historical Museum in Fort Atkinson, Wis. An exhibit in honor of the 75th Anniversary of the Klussendorf Trophy is on display with photos and memorabilia of past winners. In addition, the Klussendorf Trophy, made by Tiffany and Company is showcased at the museum. Since the idea was developed in 1936, the Klussendorf award has been considered the highest showmanship honor in the dairy show ring. The trophy is awarded to an individual who exemplifies the qualities that made Arthur Klussendorf so popular amongst his peers, sportsmanship, ability and endeavor. In 1937, Mrs. Klussendorf presented the trophy to the first winner, Olaf Kjome of Minnesota. See the introductory panels of the display to learn more about how the award began.

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Since Arthur Klussendorf, was one of the most popular and talented cowman of his time, three of his closest friends, Harry Strohmeyer, Earl Hopper, D.V.M. and Gordon Hall met after his funeral to discuss an award in his namesake. Through their efforts, they raised funds for the signature trophy created by Tiffany and Company of New York, N.Y. Today, several other awards recognize past Klussendorf Honorees. The Klussendorf-MacKenzie Award, Al Hay Award, A.C. “Whitie” Thomson Award, McKown Award and the Merle Howard Award were all created to recognize outstanding individuals that enjoy showing cattle. If you are unable to make it to the museum to see the display, you can look at our online version of the display.


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The Klussendorf exhibit follows other successful one-time exhibits, including 2010’s 125th Anniversary display of Hoard’s Dairyman magazine and last year’s Brown Swiss exhibit. A decision has been made to continue with special exhibits in the Historical Museum’s Mary Hoard Gallery each year during the time of World Dairy Expo to showcase the dairy industry. The National Dairy Shrine Museum and the Hoard Historical Museum are located at 401 Whitewater Avenue in Fort Atkinson. The museum is normally open Tuesday through Saturday between 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. However, during World Dairy Expo week, the museum will also be open Sunday, September 30th and Monday, October 1st. There is no admission fee; cash donations are gratefully accepted. For more information, call 920-563-7769 or email info@hoardmuseum.org (mailto:info@hoardmuseum.org) . Share your Dairy Wellness story by liking our sponsor,

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Hoard's Dairyman:

Experiences make dairy judging worth it Date: Mon, 10/01/2012

Judging teams will face off at Expo, but their coaches say experiences along the way are just as rewarding as the competition. by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern While many of us grow up competing as dairy cattle judges, a few get the chance to foster young people through the process. While youth were evaluating cattle at the Hoard's Dairyman Farm early Sunday morning, I took a moment to talk to some of the coaches. Between three classes of Guernsey cows, I visited with Dale Olver, Penn State; Bonnie Ayers, Ohio State; Katharine Knowlton, Virginia Tech; and Isidro Matamoros, Zamorano Pan-American Agricultural School. No matter their judging philosophy, each coach agreed that the most rewarding part of coaching is providing students with memorable learning experiences. Matamoros traveled here with six students from Honduras, one from Guatemala, and two from Ecuador. Traveling to World Dairy Expo allows his students to compare the similarities and differences of dairy farming between their home countries and the United States. Matamoros also noted that American judging contests are different from in Honduras because his students are typically asked to judge shows where class sizes vary, rather than the standard classes of four animals in American judging contests. “Many of the students on this team come from small towns,” explained Matamoros. “This trip gives them a chance to have a new experience. After we are done at Expo, our students will visit Chicago for sight-seeing.” Knowlton has instilled the focus and knowledge in Virginia Tech students needed for judging, but the one reminder she constantly gives her students is to take a step back to see the cows. “The best advice I can give the kids is to move back to see the cows better,” explained Knowlton. “But, the biggest thing they will remember is the people they meet and the farms they visit while practicing.” Olver preaches the scorecard to his Penn State judging team members. Even though the scorecard has transformed over the years, Olver believes the changes have been easy to teach to his students. “Our students are learning to select cows that best fit our industry. The scorecard provides them a guideline and terminology to do this,” explained Olver. “The farms they visit are the most valuable part. Twenty years down the road, they will still remember the places they went when they were judging.”

Ayers has many years of experience coaching both the 4-H and Collegiate teams from Ohio. The dual program has offered her students a unique learning community. “The kids learn from each other. The 4-H kids teach our college kids and vice versa,” she


explained. “From the traveling, to ringside judging, to clinics, they gain a balance of exemplary experiences.� Share your Dairy Wellness story by liking our sponsor,

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Hoard's Dairyman:

Penn State wins third title Date: Tue, 10/02/2012

All four Penn State team members earn All-American Honors. by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern

Dustin Gates, Rebecca Shaw, Ariel Taxdal, Isaac Haagen and coach Dale Olver The Penn State Dairy Cattle Judging team entered the National Collegiate Judging contest awards banquet earlier this morning without comparing placings or discussing how the classes went. Their surprise as members of the team were repeatedly called forward to receive awards, made victory even more exciting. The final announcement of the banquet honored Penn State as the first place team with 2,539 points. The Penn State team includes Dustin Gates, Isaac Haagen, and Rebecca Shaw and is coached by Dale Olver. The University of WisconsinMadison followed in second place with 2,526 points.

The top individuals in reasons included Hayden Hauschildt of University of Wisconsin-Madison in first place with a total score of 282 out of 300. Isaac Haagen of Penn State followed in second place. Finally Stephen Gould of Cornell, David Hansen of the University of Minnesota, and Jessica Sentelle of Virginia Tech took third, fourth, and fifth place respectively. Isaac Haagen of Penn State took first place individual overall with 859 points out of 900 possible. Following Haagen were Hayden Hauschildt of University of Wisconsin-Madison, Ariel Taxdal of Penn State, Jayne Esch of the University of Minnesota, Abbey Wethal of University of WisconsinMadison, Jacob Brey of University of Wisconsin-Madison, Katie Adams of Iowa State University, Chanse Huggins of University of Florida, and Rebecca Shaw of Penn State. Jessica Sentelle of Virginia Tech rounded out the top ten.


Hoard's Dairyman:

Ayrshire champion hails from Maine Date: Wed, 10/03/2012

After the first day of World Dairy Expo, the Ayrshire champions for 2012 have been named. by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern

Lynn Harbaugh, Marion, Wis., lead judge in the International Ayrshire show, assisted by Chad Ryan, Fond du lac, Wis., praised the contenders for Grand Champion as a “tremendous uddered group of cows.” He selected Sweet-Pepper Black Francesca owned by Beverly Donovan, Benton, Maine, as Grand Champion Ayrshire at World Dairy Expo yesterday afternoon. He praised her as a cow with “pure style and silk from end to end." She was the winning entry in the Six-Year-Old and Over Cow class. Last year, Sweet-Pepper Black Francesca was named the Reserve Champion of the show. This year, the Reserve Champion came from the Five-Year-Old Cow class, Sharwards Calimero Megan owned by Kurt Wolf, Epworth, Iowa. In the junior show, Four-Hills Tdent Snoopy 2634, owned by Britney and Bradley Hill, Bristol, Vt., was named Senior Champion Female of the Junior Show. Britney Hill’s Magic Meadows Bbbk Alexus, Bristol, Vt. was the Reserve Senior Champion. The Premier Breeder award will go home with Palmyra Farms of Hagerstown, Md. This is their ninth Premier Breeder award. Old Bankston of Epworth, Iowa, was named Premier Exhibitor. Share your Dairy Wellness story by liking our sponsor,

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Hoard's Dairyman:

Grand Champion Jersey hails from Connecticut Date: Wed, 10/03/2012

A pair of four-year-old cows win Grand Champion and Reserve in International Jersey Show at World Dairy Expo. by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard’s Dairyman Editorial Intern A competitive and quality class from top to bottom is how lead judge Mark Rueth, Oxford, Wis., described the group of Jersey females contending for Grand Champion of the International Jersey Show on Wednesday. With the help of Associate Judge Cathy Yeoman, Dover, Okla., the pair deemed Arethusa Response Vivid-ET, owned by Arethusa Farm, Litchfield, Conn. the Grand Champion of the show. Arethusa Response Vivid-ET was also the first place cow in the Four-Year-Old Cow class and Champion Senior Female.

(http://www.flickr.com/photos/hoardsdairyman/8053485216/)

Meanwhile, Random Luck Ray Helen followed the Grand Champion cow all day as she earned Reserve Grand Champion, Reserve Senior Champion Female and second place in the FourYear-Old Cow class. Hillacres Morrae Maryland, owned by Budjon Farms and Peter Vail, Lomira, Wis., was recognized as honorable mention. Winter Heifer Calf, M-Signature Tequila Clara Marie, owned by Gene Iager and Kevin Ehrhardt, Baldwin, Md., was named Junior Champion. The Intermediate Champion Female was Marynole Excite Rosey, owned by Nelson Farm, Stranshome and Joel Kietzman, Owatonna, Minn. In the junior show, Big Guns Jamaica Vanilla, exhibited by Madison Fisher and Josh McKay of Claysburg, Pa., earned Grand Champion. Winner of the Winter Yearling Heifer class, Partee at Budjon Licorice-ET, owned by Emma Olstad, Stoughton, Wis., was Junior Champion Female. Premier Breeder honors went home with Arethusa Farm and Premier Exhibitor was awarded to Ron and Christy Ratliff, Garnett, Kan. Share your Dairy Wellness story by liking our sponsor,

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Hoard's Dairyman:

Best Freebies at Expo Date: Fri, 10/05/2012

When you visit Expo, take a few of our hints and mark your maps for the best freebie stops. by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard's Dairyman Editorial Intern

While the trade show is an opportunity for networking and finding out about new innovations and shopping for useful products, one can’t help but also take advantage of the many freebies handed out at each booth. I went from booth to booth, seeking out the plethora of product handouts, notepads and writing utensils. Check out a few of these booths for their unique giveaways. A trend from booth to booth is cloth bags. These bags come in handy to carry the merchandise you acquire, but they can also make great reusable grocery bags when you return from expo. While many booths offered bags of similar quality, the bags at the Semex booth (EH 26082709) were the deepest and had the greatest holding capacity for freebies. One of my best finds of the day was a hard shell first aid kit from Boehringer Ingelheim (EH 2806-2909). Also you can satisfy your hunger by picking up a box of popcorn, in a Lifeline colostrum replacer box at APC (EH 3617-3718). If you are looking for a new baseball cap, there are several booths that can meet that need. Semex, Big Ass Fans (EH 1408-1509), and Mycogen (AR 477-78) were among booths that were handing out hats. In the arena, a stocking hat could be found at the Lely (AR 461-483) booth. Find out the word of the day from the Genex Cooperative Facebook page then stop at the Genex (AL 218 to 225) booth to receive a free Toystory t-shirt or hat. The Cottonseed booth (EH 4107) offered several quality freebies including a stainless steal water bottle, ice scraper, and fly swatter. Then, Family Dairies (EH3507) handed out a pizza cutter. If you are looking for a new yardstick, Tracy Seeds (TC 915) has an abundance. You can’t come home from expo without a stress cow which can be found at the Novus (EH 1211-1212) booth. In addition, Allflex (EH 4512-4513) is personalizing ear tag key chains. Don’t forget to download the official Hoard’s Dairyman World Dairy Expo app. If you stop by our booth and show us that you downloaded the app, you can receive a free stylus. Share your Dairy Wellness story by liking our sponsor,


Hoard's Dairyman:

Myers Named Fourth Robert "Whitey" McKown Master Breeder Award Winner Date: Sat, 10/06/2012

Jason and Donna Myers, Horace Backus and David Selner Jason and Donna Myers, New Windsor, Md., have been selected by the Klussendorf Association as the fourth Robert “Whitey” McKown Master Breeder Award winner. The honor was presented at the 46th World Dairy Expo. This award recognizes a well managed breeder herd who has been successful at showing and judging and emphasizes all qualities of the Klussendorf Award, including ability, character, endeavor and sportsmanship. Serving in a number of leadership roles and sporting many years of breeding success, the Myers fit every criteria of the McKown Master Breeder Award. Their two daughters, Kelly and Kristin, have been involved with the operation over the years, and Kelly is a full-time partner on the farm. Both Jason and Donna were born into a life of dairying. Jason’s family raised and milked Holsteins at Del-Myr Farm near Westminster, Md., and Donna’s family had Guernseys at Maple Spring Farm in Montgomery County, Md. After getting married in 1974, the couple partnered with Del-Myr Farm for 10 years. In 1984, they moved to their New Windsor farm and established Windsor Manor Holsteins. Highlighting the New Windsor prefix is the well-known Holstein “Zip” family as well as the stand out Red and White “Ruby” family. For their breeding efforts, the Myers have bred AllAmerican nominations in three breeds and have garnered All Americans in two breeds. They bred the breed’s former top productive life (PL) cow, Windsor-Manor Rud Zip, and a former No. 1 TPI bull, Windsor-Manor Machoman. Not to mention, the herd has recorded 107 excellents, 11 Gold Medal Dams and 16 Dam of Merits over the years. A number of milestones further emphasize the Myers dedication to the quality of the cattle they breed. In 1980, Jason and Donna earned the Maryland Holstein Junior Breeder Award, and in 2000, they were presented the Senior Breeder Award. In 2006, they were honored with the Maryland Holstein Distinguished Service Award, and in 2011, received the Dairy of Distinction Award. Last year, they were inducted into the Maryland Dairy Shrine. Last year, Donna was recognized as Dairy Woman of the Year at World Dairy Expo. The Robert “Whitey” McKown Memorial Breeder Award was made possible by the family and friends of the 1997 Honorary Klussendorf honoree. Whitey joined the Holstein World staff in 1956 and became widely respected as he traveled nationally and internationally, reporting on shows, sales, meetings and other Holstein events. The 1987 National Dairy Shrine president


also developed MooKown Holsteins in Belleville, N.Y. Whitey had great admiration for the farmer breeder. The Klussendorf Memorial Association, considered by many as the Hall of Fame for Dairy Cattle Exhibitors, began in 1937 in memory of Arthur B. Klussendorf, considered the outstanding dairy cattle showman of his time. Each year, the Klussendorf Association votes to add a new dairy cattle exhibitor to its roles with lifetime membership for their cumulative works including ability, character, endeavor and sportsmanship. Share your Dairy Wellness story by liking our sponsor,

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Hoard's Dairyman:

A gamble that rewards for years Date: Sat, 10/06/2012

While dairy judging seems like a gamble, with dedication and practice the experience offers many rewards. by Chelsey Johnson, Hoard's Dairyman Editorial Intern

Laurie Winkelman and Curtis Day For decades, youth have exercised critical thinking and decision-making skills through participating in dairy cattle judging. While hundreds of youth step onto the shavings and mark their cards, a few individuals have the luxury of saying they were a national champion. I took a moment during Expo to visit with a handful of these individuals. Curtis Day won the National 4-H Contest in 1960. After his 4-H career, he worked as a dairy farmer, a classifier and for the postal service. When asked how he felt before he heard the results on the day he won the National 4-H Contest he responded, “Dairy judging is like playing the tables in Vegas. If you are happy about how you did, all you can do is wait for the answers.” While sometimes a little bit of luck might be just the ingredient needed to win a contest, all of the contest winners I visited also put forth a great deal of hard work and dedication to improving. They all agreed that unlike gambling, dairy judging offers rewards regardless of the outcome of a contest. Luke Olson, now a district sales representative for Semex, won the National Collegiate Contest in 2006 while judging for the University of Minnesota. “Winning the national contest has given me credibility when discussing cows and in my career,” explained Olson. Today, Olson uses the knowledge he gained from dairy judging as a judge at several shows. Most notably, he has judged the Olmsted District Show, the Minnesota State 4-H Colored Breed Show and served as an official for the National 4-H Contest this year. His goal is to someday be a judge at World Dairy Expo. “Pay attention to good judges, watch shows, ask questions and learn from your elders,” advised Olson to youth looking to improve their judging. “I owe my eye for cattle to my father. Being competitive with my sisters over the years also helped me.” Laurie Winkelman is one of only four individuals who earned high individual honors in both the 4-H (2000) and Collegiate (2002) national contests. Today she works as a dairy nutritionist for VitaPlus. Winkelman noted that the ability to give oral reasons and defend information in a logical and organized way has helped her throughout life and her career. “Both years I won, I kept a list of terms and phrases for reasons. I would add phrases I wanted to try and make note of phases to avoid,” explained Winkelman. “I also set high goals for myself each year.” Brian Behnke won the contest while hes was a student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, in 1988. Today he is working as a sire analyst for Semex. He attributes his ability to stand up in front of people, defend a decision and think on his feet to the years he spent dairy judging. Behnke says the biggest advice he can provide students preparing for the national contest, is practice makes perfect. “Dairy judging involves a lot of team practices, but to get better, you must also work on things individually,” said Behnke. “We used to video tape our reasons. If you are honest with yourself and critique yourself, you can see many things to work on. I used to get tongue tied, so I did many exercises to control my voice during reasons.”


These individuals would all agree, that dairy judging opened many doors for them. After winning the 4-H contest, Curtis Day traveled to judge in Europe. He values the memory of shaking hands with Queen Elizabeth’s mother after winning the European contest. Even 52 years since Day won the National 4-H Contest, he is still using his dairy judging talents. On Thursday, he judged the International Brown Swiss Show at World Dairy Expo. Later this year, he will travel to Australia to judge. As you can see, practice has set these judges up for success. Share your Dairy Wellness story by liking our sponsor,

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Skyscraper Ads & Photography

While I have gained much experience with writing, I also have a desire to improve my design and photography skills. This summer I had a chance to design two skyscraper ads for the Hoard’s Dairyman website. Included in this portfolio are two drafts of the ads. In addition, I am constantly looking for opportunities to learn more about Adobe creative software and my Canon T3 Rebel camera. I am currently taking lessons via lynda.com on InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator. Included in my portfolio is a collection of some of my photography work.


Photo taken on my farm near Heron Lake, MN and enhanced using Adobe Photoshop


Photo taken of SDSU Dairy Club to appear in 2012 Dairy Digest


SDSU Dairy Digest

Manufacturing Connections

Producing Leaders

D D

airy igest 2012 South Dakota State University This year will be my third year working on the SDSU Dairy Digest. My first year I was an assistant editor and wrote articles. Last year I was the Co-Editor and designed the layout of a majority of the Dairy Digest. This was my first experience with designing and editing a publication. Now this year, I am the Editor and have made many improvements to the Dairy Digest. I look forward to presenting the finished product at the SDSU Dairy Science Banquet in April 2013. To view last year’s Dairy Digest follow this link: http://issuu.com/chelsey.johnson/docs/dairydigest2012?mode=window&viewMode=doublePage


Dairy Shrine Display

Another project I worked on while in Fort Atkinson for a summer was designing a 12 panel display for the 75th Anniversary of the Klessendorf award. The display was set up in the Dairy Shrine Museum for about a month in the weeks surrounding World Dairy Expo. To view the display follow these two links. http://issuu.com/hoardsdairyman/docs/klussendorf-history/3 and http://issuu.com/hoardsdairyman/docs/klussendorf_displays/3


Permanent Address 38392 County Road 13 Heron Lake, MN 56137

chelsey.johnson@jacks.sdstate.edu

507-221-4070

Current Address 2227 Nicole Lane Apt. 5 Brookings, SD 57006

Chelsey Johnson's 2012 Portfolio  

A collection of my writing, design, and photography work.

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