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Building a ZOO Yuliana Uleman Tracy Spurlock Tabby Cure Chelsea Tramel EDML 43500 Dr. Kimberly Ruebel

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Table of Contents Introduction.................................................................................................................................................................. 3 Description of Learners ................................................................................................................................................. 4 Web Model .................................................................................................................................................................. 5 Calendar Week 1 ........................................................................................................................................................... 6 Calendar Week 2 ........................................................................................................................................................... 7 Pre-Assessment ............................................................................................................................................................ 9 MATH ........................................................................................................................................................................ 10 TAKS Objectives ............................................................................................................................................. 11 Lesson Outline................................................................................................................................................ 12 TLAC Techniques ............................................................................................................................................ 42 Student Resources .......................................................................................................................................... 43 Science ..................................................................................................................................................................... 44 TAKS Objectives ............................................................................................................................................. 45 Lesson Outline................................................................................................................................................ 46 Teacher /Student Resources ............................................................................................................................ 68 English ...................................................................................................................................................................... 69 TAKS Objectives ............................................................................................................................................. 70 Lesson Outline................................................................................................................................................ 71 Teacher/Student Resources .......................................................................................................................... 105 Technology ............................................................................................................................................................. 106 TAKS Objectives ........................................................................................................................................... 107 Lesson Outline.............................................................................................................................................. 259 Teacher /Student Resources .......................................................................................................................... 260

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Introduction Our 7th grade unit requires our students to create their dream zoo through an engaging and creative curriculum. Out unit will begin with a field trip to the Fort Worth Zoo where students can take note on the layout of the zoo as well the animals that are in the zoo. This will give them an example to refer to when constructing their own zoo. The students will discuss the layout of the zoo and create a map of their own zoo. As the week progresses the students will be learning about the different types of animals and the biomes they live in in science. Math and English will expand on the information they learn in science through hands on activities as well as using material that pertain to the lessons in science. As the students create their dream zoo, the will be putting together a final presentation in Technology. Among other projects, they will be creating an advertisement flyer, dealing with the budget for the zoo and putting together a proposal for their zoo. On the last day, our students will present their zoo proposals to the four teachers and their classmates. We will be playing the roles of mayors from four different cities who are considering building the students zoo in our city.

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Description of Learners Our Team consists of four teachers and eighty students. Our students spend the first twenty minutes of their day in their homeroom class. They will have a short advisory period along with announcements. At 8:15 am, their content classes begin. Students rotate through all of their content classes each day along with electives. The learning abilities and styles of our students vary slightly. Most of our eighty students learning abilities are within their grade level. We have about 12% of ELL students and only two of these students are recent transfers with limited English. We have two students that are functioning autistic and three other special education students that have more severe disabilities that require a special aide. The rules will be clearly defined for all students but special emphasis will be given to the special education students so they are clear on what the expected of them. At the beginning of every six weeks, the team will discuss any IEP’s of student’s within our team and any accommodations needed for each classroom. The eighty students will be split up into four groups of twenty. In each class, there is a small portion of English Language Learners and students with disabilities. In our classes we have students that excel and can help others. We will make sure that these students are split amongst the groups so they can assist the other students if needed. We will not be grouping all students with same learning levels together so we can ensure success for everyone.

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Theme Map

Calendar 5


Week 1 English

Day 1

MATH

Technology

Science

-Trip to the Zoo

-Trip to the Zoo

-Trip to the Zoo

X

Field Trip

Day 2 Building the Zoo Day 3 Mamma ls

Classifying Angles

Introduction & Glogster

Biomes in the zoo and the world

Research Paper/Vocab for the week

Classifying Polygons and Triangles

Research

Mammals

Research for paper

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Day 4 Birds

Perimeter of Polygons

Research and Prezi

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Day 5 Reptiles

Parts of a Circle

Prezi and Budget

Traits of mammals What type of mammals were found in the zoo What biomes they live in

Birds What makes a bird a bird Diet Biomes

Reptiles -

Poetry for signs and advertisements on birds based on reptiles

Poetry for fliers, m

Characteristics Diet Biomes

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Week 2

English

Day 6 Amphibia ns Day 7 Rainforest

MATH

Technology

Circumference of the Circle

Budget and layout

Area of Triangles

Layout of Zoo in Sketch Up and ISSUU

Science Amphibians Characteristics Diet Biome

Prose-How to write an article

Rainforest What are the layers of the rainforest List unique qualities Food webs

Prose- writing about an animals of their choice

Proposal/Outline for research paper

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Temperate Deciduous Forest Layers of the forest Compare deciduous (leaves) and evergreen (needles) trees Food web

Work on research paper/ presentation

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Tundra/Polar Region Characteristics Climate Locations What is permafrost

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Day 8 Tundra

Area of Quadrilaterals

Layout of Zoo in Sketch Up and ISSUU

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Day 9 Forest

Area of All Shapes

ISSUU

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Day 10 Safari

Differentiate and Apply Area/Perimeter

Proposal Practice and Presentations -

Day 11

Grasslands/desert s Resources of the grasslands Where are they located location

Quiz over vocab/work on presentation/researc h paper

Presentation

Presentation

X X We used a simple questionnaire as a pre assessment of our students in order to see how much pervious knowledge the student had about the topic that we are about to cover. It is important to see how much our students know so that we can build our lessons to go off the knowledge they already have and figure out how to expand that knowledge.

Pre-Assessment 1. Have you ever been to the zoo?

2. What was your favorite part?

3. What animals do you remember seeing in the zoo?

4. Is there any questions that you have about the zoo or the animals in the zoo?

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MATH Yuliana Uleman

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TAKS Objectives Objective

TEKS

Classify and be able to identify angles.

(6) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The

student compares and classifies two- and threedimensional figures using geometric vocabulary and properties. The student is expected to: (A) use angle measurements to classify pairs of angles as complementary or supplementary; Identify different types of polygons based on their characteristics.

(6) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The

Identify different types of triangles and quadrilaterals based on their characteristics

(6) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The

Be able to find perimeter/area of different polygons

(9) Measurement. The student solves application problems involving estimation and measurement. The student is expected to: (A) estimate measurements and solve application problems involving length (including perimeter and circumference) and area of polygons and other shapes

Be able to identify and chose between the area/perimeter formula in the context of a work problem

(13) Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student applies Grade 7 mathematics to solve problems connected to everyday experiences, investigations in other disciplines, and activities in and outside of school. The student is expected to:

student compares and classifies two- and threedimensional figures using geometric vocabulary and properties. The student is expected to: (B) use properties to classify triangles and quadrilaterals;

student compares and classifies two- and threedimensional figures using geometric vocabulary and properties. The student is expected to: (B) use properties to classify triangles and quadrilaterals;

(A) Identify and apply mathematics to everyday experiences, to activities 10


in and outside of school, with other disciplines, and with other mathematical topics (8) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student uses geometry to model and describe the physical world. The student is expected to: (C) use geometric concepts and properties to solve problems in fields such as art and architecture

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DAY

2

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TLAC Technique

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“Cold Call” “Board=Paper”

“Break It Down”

“Check for Understanding”

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“Exit Ticket” “Pepper” “Board=Paper” “Circulate” “Name the Steps” “Do Now” “Check for Understanding”

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 “The Hook”  “Circulating”  “Exit Ticket”

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 “Everybody Writes”  “Break it Down”  “Circulating”

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 “Take a Stand”  “Everybody Writes”  “At Bats”

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 “Board=Paper”  “Wait Time”

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 “Do Now”  Exit Ticket”

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 “Props”  “SLANT”

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Resources Teacher’s Resources: 1. Angles . (2010). Retrieved from http://www.mathsisfun.com/angles.html 2. Angle word problems . (2011). Retrieved from http://www.education.com/study-help/article/angleword-problems_answer/ 3. Properties . (2009). Retrieved from http://teacherweb.com/ON/Mayfield/RBesworth/properties_of_quad.pdf 4. Perimeter worksheets. (2011). Retrieved from http://www.superteacherworksheets.com/perimeter.html

Student’s Resources: 1. Angles and angle terms . (2006). Retrieved from http://www.mathleague.com/help/geometry/angles.htm 2. Quadrilateral quest . (2008). Retrieved from http://teams.lacoe.edu/documentation/classrooms/amy/geometry/68/activities/quad_quest/quad_que st.html 3. Shape surveyor . (2010). Retrieved from http://www.funbrain.com/poly/index.html 4. Area and perimeter . (2010). Retrieved from http://www.mathplayground.com/area_perimeter.html 5. Finding the circumference of a circle . (2011). Retrieved from http://algebra4children.com/Games/Circumference/Circumference.html 6. Perimeter . (2011). Retrieved from http://www.coolmath.com/reference/perimeters.html

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Science Tracy Spurlock

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Objective: Science

Teks Chapter 112. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Science ยง112.23. Science, Grade 7.

(2) Scientific processes. The student uses scientific inquiry methods during field and laboratory investigations. The student is expected to: Students will take a trip to the Zoo and take notes about the animals and habitats they live in.

(B) collect data by observing and measuring; 10) Science concepts. The student knows that species can change through generations and that the instructions for traits are contained in the genetic material of the organisms. The student is expected to:

Students can describe the different traits of mammals, birds, amphibians, and reptiles.

Student will be able to describe the characteristics of the Rainforest, Temperate Forest, Tundra Polar Region, and Grasslands/Deserts.

(B) compare traits of organisms of different species that enhance their survival and reproduction; and (12) Science concepts. The student knows that there is a relationship between organisms and the environment. The student is expected to: (C) describe how different environments support different varieties of organisms;

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Day 2 Science: Discuss Trip to Zoo Stage 1 – Desired Results 45


Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to describe the differences between the habitats the animals live in at the Zoo and what their actual habitats should look like. (12) Science concepts. The student knows that there is a relationship between organisms and the environment. The student is expected to: (C) describe how different environments support different varieties of organisms; Essential Questions: What different biomes did you find at the Zoo? Where would you find these biomes in the world? What animals did you find in those biomes? Students will understand… The different biomes around the world What animals live in these biomes Students will know … How many different biomes there are? What makes the habitats in the Zoo and the actual habitats different? Students will be able to … Describe the differences between the habitats the animals live in at the Zoo and what their actual habitats should look like. Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence

Performance Tasks:  

Class work “ Mapping the Biomes of the world” worksheet Science Notebooks Stage 3 – Learning Plan What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results? Activity: Students will be given a map of the world. While we are discussing our trip to the Zoo and the biomes we found, the students will color in the countries where you can find a biome. The map will be glued into their

TLAC 16 TLAC 18 46


Science notebooks for reference. Homework: Students will take home a Biome organizer chart home and fill it out, with a description of the biome, and the animals that can be found within the biome.

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Day 3 Science: Mammals Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students will describe the characteristics that are specific to mammals. 10) Science concepts. The student knows that species can change through generations and that the instructions for traits are contained in the genetic material of the organisms. The student is expected to: (B) compare traits of organisms of different species that enhance their survival and reproduction; and Essential Questions: 1. How many ways do mammals reproduce? 2. Identify what biomes mammals live in. 3. Compare biomes in the zoo to actual biomes in wild. Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that … Students will know… 1. The difference between a manmade habitat and a natural habitat. Students will be able to… 1. List traits that are specific to mammals 2. List ways that mammals reproduce Student will understand 1. What a herbivore, a omnivore, and a carnivore are? Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks:  Activity: Mammals  Science Notebooks Description:

Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures TLAC Techniques:

What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results? Students will glue their Biome Organizer Chart into their Science notebook. Those that do not have their chart will have points deducted from their final grade. Activity: Students will be given a worksheet that they will complete in class. I will have the same worksheet on the overhead and will fill it out at the same time as the students. We will discuss the different traits of mammals and what types of biomes they live in.

TLAC 31

TLAC 16 TLAC 18

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We will also discuss the difference between manmade and natural habitats. The students will be asked to fill out the worksheet as we go along. Those that do not finish in class will have to finish outside of class.

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_____1. Animals that eat plants are called ______ . a. herbivores b. mammals c. carnivores d. omnivores _____ 2. A kangaroo is an example of a ______ . a. monotreme b. placental mammal c. marsupial d. primate _____ 3. The milk that female mammals feed to their young is produced in the ______ glands. a. scent b. placental c. mammary d. oil _____ 4. The ______ attaches the placenta to the embryo. a. umbilical cord b. mammary gland c. omnivore d. monotreme _____ 5. The specialized teeth that bite and cut are the ______ . a. molars b. incisors c. canine teeth d. premolars _____ 6. Whales and dolphins are examples of ______ a. primates b. cetaceans c. fish d. perissodactyls _____ 7. Animals that eat both plants and animals are called ______ . a. carnivores b. monotremes c. omnivores d. herbivores _____ 8. The time during which the embryo develops in the mammal uterus is called the ____ . a. lagomorph b. gestation period c. marsupial d. umbilical cord _____ 9. Mammals that lay eggs are known as ______ . a. marsupials b. carnivores c. monotremes d. placental mammals _____ 10. After birth, a kangaroo spends a few months in a ______ . a. pouch b. placenta c. mammary gland d. monotreme _____ 11. Animals that eat meat are called ______ . a. herbivores b. carnivores c. monotremes d. omnivores _____ 12. Mammals have a ______-chambered heart. a. two b. four c. six d. eight _____ 13. Mammals are endothermic animals that have ______ on their bodies. a. feathers b. scales c. hair d. shells

TASMANIAN DEVIL, A MARSUPIAL

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Day 4 Science: Birds Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to describe the characteristics of a bird. 10) Science concepts. The student knows that species can change through generations and that the instructions for traits are contained in the genetic material of the organisms. The student is expected to: (B) compare traits of organisms of different species that enhance their survival and reproduction; and Essential Questions: 1. List the types of feathers birds have 2. How does a bird fly 3. What type of skeleton does a bird have Students will know … 1. About the digestive system of a bird. Students will be able to … 1. List the different types of feathers. 2. List the different parts of the bird Students will understand that … 1. What makes a bird fly Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks: 1. Students will fill out a KWL Chart at the beginning of class. 2. Students will fill out the worksheet attached Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures Description: TLAC Techniques: What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results?  Students will turn in their worksheet on mammals from last class. Those TLAC 31 students that do not have their homework will be docked points. TLAC 16  We will discuss as a class what the characteristics of are, and what type of feathers they have. TLAC 18  We will talk about what makes a bird fly.  If the students do not finish the worksheets in class they will need to be finished at home. 52


Birds

Describe the four characteristics of birds. 1.____________________________________________________________ 2.____________________________________________________________ 3.____________________________________________________________ 4.____________________________________________________________

Write the name of the organ responsible for each step in the digestive process of a bird. ____________________ 5. where food is moistened and stored ____________________ 6. where food is partially digested

____________________ 7. where grain, seeds, and other foods are ground and crushed ____________________ 8 . where the rest of digestion occurs Answer the following questions.

9. How do the air sacs of birds help make the body lighter? ________________________________ 10. What is an amniotic egg?__________________________________________________________ 11. What is the purpose of preening? _____________________________________________________ 12. Compare and contrast contour feathers and down feathers. ___________________________________

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Day 5 Science: Reptiles Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to identify, describe, the different characteristics of reptiles. 10) Science concepts. The student knows that species can change through generations and that the instructions for traits are contained in the genetic material of the organisms. The student is expected to: (B) compare traits of organisms of different species that enhance their survival and reproduction; and Essential Questions: 1. What are the four major groups of reptiles? 2. List the characteristics of reptiles 3. Make a list of reptiles Students will know … Where the legs on a reptile are located Students will be able to … Tell the difference between an amphibian and a reptile. Students will understand that … Some reptiles use mimicry to survive.

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks:  Students will complete a concept map as we discuss the characteristics of the reptile.  Students will complete the worksheet. Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results? TLAC 31  Students will need to turn in the worksheet from last class.  Students will be handed a blank concept map to use for taking notes. TLAC 16 They will also be given a worksheet to complete during class.  We will discuss the characteristics of certain reptiles that are called TLAC 18 mimicry. Meaning they look like something that is poisonous but they are not this is also called camouflage. 56




The milksnake, kingsnake, and coralsnake have similar coloration. The harmless kingsnake and milksnake appear to be mimicking the patterns and colors of the poisonous coralsnakes. Read m ore onTeacherVision:http://www.teachervision.fen.com/reptiles/lessonplan/8696.html#ixzz1foeIkaK8

http://www.uen.org/Lessonplan/preview.cgi?LPid=10325

Radical Reptiles Questions 1. The four major groups of reptiles are _________, tuataras, __________ and snakes, and __________ and alligators. 2. True or False. Reptiles are able to lay their amniotic eggs on land in dry conditions. 3. Reptiles are waterproofed by their scales which contain ____________. 4. Reptiles are __________, which means they do not generate much of their own heat. 5. In Triassic times, _________ roamed the Earth and _________ were in the skies. 6. The extinction of the dinosaurs occurred around ______ million years ago. a. 100 b. 2 57


c. 65 d. 85 7. What could have caused the extinction of the dinosaurs? 8. Which type of reptile is carnivorous and may have adaptations like heat-sensing organs or poison to catch prey with? a. lizards b. snakes c. turtles d. alligators 9. Loose jaws for swallowing large prey items are found in__________. 10. ____________ and ____________ are among the largest living reptiles. http://www.lessonsnips.com/

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Day 6 Science: Amphibians Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to identify, describe, the different characteristics of amphibians. 10) Science concepts. The student knows that species can change through generations and that the instructions for traits are contained in the genetic material of the organisms. The student is expected to: (B) compare traits of organisms of different species that enhance their survival and reproduction; and Essential Questions: 1. What type of eggs do amphibians lay? 2. List the characteristics of Amphibians 3. List the differences between Amphibians and Reptiles. Students will know … Where the legs on a reptile are located Students will be able to … Make a list of amphibians and where they live Students will understand that … Understand the difference between an amphibian and a reptile

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks:  Students will complete a Frayer diagram as we discuss the characteristics of the amphibians.  Students will complete the worksheet. Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results?  Students will need to turn in the worksheet from last class. TLAC 31  Students will be given a Frayer diagram to use for taking TLAC 16 notes. They will also be given a worksheet to complete during class. TLAC 18  We will discuss the different locations amphibians can be found.  We will discuss the characteristics of amphibians. 59


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Day 7 Science: Rainforest Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to identify, describe, and locate where Rainforests are located.

12) Science concepts. The student knows that there is a relationship between organisms and the environment. The student is expected to: (C) describe how different environments support different varieties of organisms; Essential Questions: 1. What are the layers of the rainforest? 2. List the unique qualities of the rainforest. 3. What makes the rainforest different than the deciduous forest. Students will know … The names of the layers of the rainforest. Students will be able to … List animals that live in the rainforest. Students will understand that … The difference between the deciduous forest and the rain forest.

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks:  Students will be given a worksheet to complete during our discussion. Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results?  Students will need to turn in the worksheet from last class. TLAC 31  The students will be given a worksheet to complete during TLAC 16 TLAC 18 class.  We will discuss the different the different layers of the rainforest and their purpose.  We will discuss the difference between a deciduous forest and a rainforest.

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1. What is a rainforest? 2. How is the rainforest different from other types of forests?

3. How much land area is occupied by the rainforest? 4. How many animal species are in the rainforest?

5. How many plant species are in the rainforest? 6. List several benefits we get from the rainforest.

7. What are some ways people are trying to save the rainforest?

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Day 8 Science: Temperate Deciduous Forest Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to identify, describe, and locate where Rainforests are located.

12) Science concepts. The student knows that there is a relationship between organisms and the environment. The student is expected to: (C) describe how different environments support different varieties of organisms; Essential Questions: 1. List the layers of the forest 2. Compare the deciduous (leaves) and Evergreen (needles) trees 3. Name animals that live in the deciduous forest Students will know … The names of the layers of the Deciduous Forest Students will be able to … List animals that live in the Deciduous Forest Students will understand that … The difference between deciduous (leaves) and Evergreen (needles) trees

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks:  Students will be given a blank concept map to use during our discussion. Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results?  Students will need to turn in the worksheet from last class. TLAC 31  The students will be given a blank concept map to take notes TLAC 16 on. TLAC 18  We will discuss the different the different layers of the forest and their purpose.

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Day 9 Science: Tundra/Polar Region Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to identify, describe, and locate where Rainforests are located.

12) Science concepts. The student knows that there is a relationship between organisms and the environment. The student is expected to: (C) describe how different environments support different varieties of organisms; Essential Questions: 1. Describe the climate of this Biome 2. List the animals that can live here 3. Where is this biome located. Students will know … Where the biome is located Students will be able to … List animals that live in this region Students will understand that … The climate that is required to consider this a Tundra biome

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks:  Students will be given a blank concept map to use during our discussion. Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results?  The students will be given a blank concept map to take notes on.  We will discuss what the climate is in the Tundra Biome.  We will discuss the animals that can live and survive in this type of climate.  We will discuss the different places this biome is located.

TLAC 16 TLAC 18

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Day 10 Science: Grasslands/Desert Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to identify, describe, and locate where Rainforests are located.

12) Science concepts. The student knows that there is a relationship between organisms and the environment. The student is expected to: (C) describe how different environments support different varieties of organisms; Essential Questions: 1. Describe the climate of this Biome 2. List the animals that can live here 3. Where is this biome located. Students will know … Where the biome is located Students will be able to … List animals that live in this region Students will understand that … The climate that is required to consider this a desert or grassland biome

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks:  Students will be given a blank concept map to use during our discussion and to be used in their other classes that our team is working with. Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results?  The students will be given a blank concept map to take notes on. TLAC 16  We will discuss what the climate is in the Grassland and Desert TLAC 18 Biomes  We will discuss the animals that can live in the Grassland and Desert Biomes  We will discuss the different places this biome is located.

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Teacher Resource Lesson Planet. (n.d.). Retrieved October 10, 2011, from Lesson Planet: http://www.lessonplanet.com/

Student Resources: Kid Friendly Search - http://www.kidfriendlysearch.com/ Biomes of the World - http://www.mbgnet.net/ Switcheroo Zoo - http://www.switchzoo.com/ Fact Monster - http://www.factmonster.com/homewor k/ Homework Help Yahoo - http://kids.yahoo.com/learn DOGOnews - http://www.dogonews.com/

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English Tabby Cure

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Objectives & TEKS Unit Objective

TEKS th

Learn new vocabulary for this unit using dictionaries, glossaries, and other sources.

Read and comprehend Literary Text and Poetry

Know the techniques and be able to write a poem

Know the techniques and be able to write a short story

Know how to spell specified words

Know the techniques and be able to write a short story

Know how to choose a research topic and being researching

Know how to gather sources and format them in MLA format.

Know how to Utilize the research and narrow the field down.

Know how to organize the research.

7 Grade English (6)(C) Reading/word identification. The student uses a variety of word recognition strategies. The student is expected to: locate the meanings, pronunciations, and derivations of unfamiliar words using dictionaries, glossaries, and other sources (4-8). th 7 Grade English (4) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to analyze the importance of graphical elements (e.g., capital letters, line length, word position) on the meaning of a poem. th 7 Grade English (15)(B)(i,ii,iii) Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to: Write a poem using: poetic techniques(e.g., rhyme scheme, meter); figurative language (e.g., personification, idioms, hyperbole); and graphic elements (e.g., word position.) th 7 Grade English (15)(A)(i,ii,iii,iv,v) Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to: write an imaginative story that: sustains readers interest; includes well-paced action and an engaging story line; creates a specific, believable setting through the use of sensory details; develops interesting characters; and uses a range of literary strategies and devices to enhance the style and tone th 7 Grade English (21) Oral and written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to spell correctly, including using various resources to determine and check correct spellings. th 7 Grade English (17)(A)(i,ii,iii,iv,v) Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to: write a multi-paragraph essay to convey information about a topic that: presents effective introductions and concluding paragraphs; contains a clearly stated purpose or controlling idea; is logically organized with appropriate facts and details and includes no extraneous information or inconsistencies; accurately synthesizes ideas from several sources; and uses a variety of sentence structures, rhetorical devices, and transitions to link paragraphs. th 7 Grade English (22)(A)(B) Research/Gathering Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to: brainstorm, consult with others, decide upon a topic, and formulate a major research question to address the major research topic; and apply steps for obtaining and evaluating information from a wide variety of sources and create a written plan after preliminary research in reference works and additional text searches. th 7 Grade English (23)(A)(B)(C)(D) Research/ Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to: follow the research plan to gather information from a range of relevant print and electronic sources using advanced search strategies; categorize information thematically in order to see the larger constructs inherent in the information; record bibliographic information (e.g., author, title, page number) for all notes and sources according to a standard format; and differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources. th 7 Grade English (24)(A)(B) Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to: narrow or broaden the major research question, if necessary, based on further research and investigation; and utilize elements that demonstrate the reliability and validity of the sources used (e.g., publication date, coverage, language, point of view) and explain why one source is more useful than another. th 7 Grade English (25)(A)(B)(C)(D) Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the research into a written or an oral presentation that: draws conclusions and summarizes or paraphrases the findings in a systematic way; marshals evidence to explain the topic and gives relevant reasons for conclusions; presents the findings in a meaningful format; and follows accepted formats for integrating quotations and citations into the written text to maintain a flow of ideas.

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DAY 2

Candidate Name: Tabby Cure

Content/Grade: English 7 th Grade

Lesson Topic: Vocabulary and Research

CT:

Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes:  7th Grade English (6)(C) Reading/word identification. The student uses a variety of word recognition strategies. The student is expected to: locate the meanings, pronunciations, and derivations of unfamiliar words using dictionaries, glossaries, and other sources (4-8). 

7 th Grade English (22) Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to: (A) brainstorm, consult with others, decide upon a topic, and formulate a major research question to address the major research topic; and (B) apply steps for obtaining and evaluating information from a wide variety of sources and create a written plan after preliminary research in reference works and additional text searches.

7 th Grade English (23) Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to: (A) follow the research plan to gather information from a range of relevant print and electronic sources using advanced search strategies; (B) categorize information thematically in order to see the larger constructs inherent in the information; (C) record bibliographic information (e.g., author, title, page number) for all notes and sources according to a standard format; and (D) differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources. Essential Questions:  Why is it necessary to learn vocabulary words and their definitions?  When researching, where should you start? List of questions to foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning. Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that …  How to use a dictionary to find the definition of their vocabulary words.  How to begin researching for a presentation.  How to create a multimedia presentation. Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks: 

Students will write the definitions of the vocabulary words. o Graded by their peers  Students will be able to begin researching for their presentation. *All materials, task/lab descriptions, student work/problems, assessments, rubrics, etc., must be attached. Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures Description: Warm-up(15 minutes): The students will come in to find a list of words projected on the board. On their desks they will find their Spelling and Vocabulary notebook. They will know from previous experience that they are to write down the words listed and begin looking up the vocabulary words. If the students finish early, they will read one of their books. After the warm-up, the students pass their papers to a classmate and they will check the definitions. The students will be asked to share the definitions they came up with for the vocabulary words. If any are incorrect they will be given the correct definitions.

TLAC Techniques: 16: Break it Down (“We” Technique) 18:Ratio (“We” Technique) 22: Cold Call 23: Call and Response 26: Everybody Writes 28: Entry Routine 29: Do Now

After the Vocabulary and spelling has been taken care of, students will be given a rubric explaining in detail what will be expected of them for the research paper and presentation they will be working on throughout the rest of the unit. Each student will pick an animal of their choosing and present what they have learned about the animal in a presentation at the end of the unit. The Technology class will be helping the students with their research. Extensions: I would have the more advanced students help the other students find the definitions for their vocabulary. Modifications: For students with special needs, I will monitor closely their progress with the vocabulary and spelling as well as the research and help when they require it. Based on my judgments of how well they are comprehending the information given, and how far they get in their research, I will determine if they need to go to the content mastery lab for further assistance.

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Day 3 Content/Grade: English 7 th Grade CT:

Candidate Name: Tabby Cure Lesson Topic: Research Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: 

7 th Grade English (22) Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to: (A) brainstorm, consult with others, decide upon a topic, and formulate a major research question to address the major research topic; and (B) apply steps for obtaining and evaluating information from a wide variety of sources and create a written plan after preliminary research in reference works and additional text searches.

7 th Grade English (23) Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to: (A) follow the research plan to gather information from a range of relevant print and electronic sources using advanced search strategies; (B) categorize information thematically in order to see the larger constructs inherent in the information; (C) record bibliographic information (e.g., author, title, page number) for all notes and sources according to a standard format; and (D) differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.

7 th Grade English (24) Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to: (A) narrow or broaden the major research question, if necessary, based on further research and investigation; and (B) utilize elements that demonstrate the reliability and validity of the sources used (e.g., publication date, coverage, language, point of view) and explain why one source is more useful than another.

Essential Questions:  Why is it important to use many different sources for your research?  Why do we go to the library to do our research?  What types of online sources should you use to conduct research? List of questions to foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning. Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that …  How to continue researching for a presentation.  Be able to utilize online resources to research.  Be able to complete tasks using online collaboration. Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks:  Students will use their many resources to continue their research.  Students will write their resources down.  Students will write their data gathered down.  Students will require a computer, books based on their subject from the library, a notebook, and a pencil. *All materials, task/lab descriptions, student work/problems, assessments, rubrics, etc., must be attached. Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results? Provide a brief description of the learning plan/procedures. Clearly identify key points in which you plan to/realize that you may need to incorporate Teach Like a Champion techniques as you describe the lesson. Description: TLAC Techniques: The students will go to the library to get books to help them with their research, picking out books based on the animal they chose. They will have help gathering books by both the librarians and the teacher. Once they return from the library, they will continue their research writing down the data they gather into a googledoc. This will enable them to use their research in both their English class and their Technology class. 10 minutes before class lets out, I would have the kids play thumbs-up 7-up as a fun relaxer from the hard work they’ve done. The Technology class will be helping the students with their research. Extensions: To extend this lesson, I would have the advanced students help the other students with their research. They can help them to find books, and help them to write their information down. Modifications: In order to accommodate the students with special needs, I will monitor their progress closely and make sure they stay on the right track. If I feel it to be necessary, I will send the students to the content mastery lab for further assistance.

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Day 4 Candidate Name: Tabby Cure Lesson Topic: Poetry “The Raven”

Content/Grade: English 7 th Grade CT:

Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes:  7 th Grade English (15)(B) Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to: write a poem using: (i) poetic techniques (e.g., rhyme scheme, meter); (ii) figurative language (e.g., personification, idioms, hyperbole); and (iii) graphic elements (e.g., word position). Essential Questions:  How can poetry be defined?  What are poetic devices and how are they used to engage readers?  Why is imagery and symbolism as a poetic/literary device important to the understanding/appreciation of poetry?  How can one utilize life experiences as a foundation for creative and expressive thinking? List of questions to foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning. Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that … •That poetry is a form of literary art where language is used as a substitute to direct meanings. •Students develop an appreciation for reading and understanding a variety of materials. •How to analyze the line length and word position of a poem. •Students develop an appreciation for applying thinking skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks:  Students will be given a copy of the poem.  The students would be asked to underline the words that highlight the same thoughts given at the beginning of class. *All materials, task/lab descriptions, student work/problems, assessments, rubrics, etc., must be attached. Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results? Provide a brief description of the learning plan/procedures. Clearly identify key points in which you plan to/realize that you may need to incorporate Teach Like a Champion techniques as you describe the lesson. Description: TLAC Techniques: Warm-up: Students will come into class where they find a list of words projected on the smart board. They will 22: Cold Call be asked to describe the feelings that come to mind when they read the projected words. They will then be 23: Call and Response told that the words are from a famous poem. Students will be asked to make some guesses about the setting 26: Everybody Writes and atmosphere of the poem such as: What time of day is it? What time of year? What is the author feeling? Is 28: Entry Routine he alone or with other people? 29: Do Now After discussing the questions asked, the students will be given a copy of The Raven to read. The teacher will allow them to read the poem to themselves first, then play a video of either Vincent Price or Christopher Walken reading the poem. Vincent Price: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VPmpDD3MGas . Christopher Walken: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ilu-OznMktA . While they are listening, they will be asked to identify some of the additional words in the poem that highlight the thoughts of bleakness and hopelessness and told to underline them. After the video, the students will discuss what Poe wanted the reader to consider has taken place to the author of the poem before the night that is the setting for the poem. The teacher will then ask students why they think Poe chose to use a Raven instead of a different bird as the major symbol of this work. The teacher would make an observation that the widespread appeal of the poem comes from its expression of the feeling of loneliness we are all subject to at some time in our lives due to separation from friends and/or family. Emphasize that these feelings, although at the time they may feel as inescapable as the hopelessness that seems to envelop the author, will pass and be replaced again by happiness and hope. The students will continue their research any time they have free time. http://www.lessonplanspage.com/latheravenatmospheresymbolismin-halloween612-htm Extensions: The teacher would ask the students to describe the “chamber” suggested by Poe’s poem. They will be asked to compose a written description of the room. Modifications: In asking the students to describe the “chamber” suggested by Poe’s poem. They will be asked to draw a picture of the room as they envision it.

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Day 5 Candidate Name: Tabby Cure Lesson Topic: Poetry

Content/Grade: English 7 th Grade CT:

Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes:  7th Grade English (15)(B) Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to: write a poem using: (i) poetic techniques (e.g., rhyme scheme, meter); (ii) figurative language (e.g., personification, idioms, hyperbole); and (iii) graphic elements (e.g., word position). Essential Questions:  How can poetry be defined?  What is the difference between an acrostic, alliteration, and Shape poem?  What makes a poem unique from prose?  What are poetic devices and how are they used to engage readers?  Why is imagery and symbolism as a poetic/literary device important to the understanding/appreciation of poetry?  How can one utilize life experiences as a foundation for creative and expressive thinking? List of questions to foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning. Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that …  Determine the difference between an acrostic, alliteration, and shape poem.  That poetry is a form of literary art where language is used as a substitute to direct meanings.  Students develop an appreciation for reading and understanding a variety of materials.  How to analyze the line length and word position of a poem.  Students develop an appreciation for applying thinking skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks:  Students will write a poem in one of three ways.  Students will need a notebook and a pencil.  Students will be given some marbles, paint, a box and a cut out of a frog. *All materials, task/lab descriptions, student work/problems, assessments, rubrics, etc., must be attached. Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results? Provide a brief description of the learning plan/procedures. Clearly identify key points in which you plan to/realize that you may need to incorporate Teach Like a Champion techniques as you describe the lesson. Description: TLAC Techniques: Warm-up: The students will come in to find a picture of a reptile sitting on their desk. They will write down 22: Cold Call words that describe the picture they have. If they finish the list of words early, they will read one of their 23: Call and Response books for their research. 26: Everybody Writes 28: Entry Routine After the warm-up, the students will be told the differences between an acrostic, alliteration, and shape poem. 29: Do Now They will learn that an acrostic poem is a vertical poem that uses the first letters of the words as the beginning of the poem. (example: SUN, Shiny, Unique, Neat) An alliteration is the repetition of a particular sound in the first syllables (example: dragging the dirty dingy dog down). And a shape poem is one that uses the words to create the shape that they are describing. (apple in the shape of an apple). The students will then write 2 poems of their choosing; alliteration, acrostic, or shape; based off the reptile picture they have in front of them. If they have extra time, they can write a third poem. Once students have finished their poems, They will get to choose a frog picture. They will take the frog picture, place it inside the provided box, take a marble, place it in the paint of their choosing, and then slide the marble around the box across the frog picture. The students will continue their research whenever they have extra time. The students will take their poems to the Technology class for the flyers.

Extensions: To extend the lesson, I would have the students help the other students with their poems. Modifications: In order to accommodate the students with special needs, I will monitor their progress closely and make sure they stay on the right track. If I feel it to be necessary, I will send the students to the content mastery lab for further assistance.

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Day 6 Candidate Name: Tabby Cure Lesson Topic: Prose (articles for the Technology Issuu) and a comic.

Content/Grade: English 7 th Grade CT:

Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes:  7 th Grade English (17) Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to: (A) write a multi-paragraph essay to convey information about a topic that: (i) presents effective introductions and concluding paragraphs; (ii) contains a clearly stated purpose or controlling idea; (iii) is logically organized with appropriate facts and details and includes no extraneous information or inconsistencies; (iv) accurately synthesizes ideas from several sources; and (v) uses a variety of sentence structures, rhetorical devices, and transitions to link paragraphs  

(C) write responses to literary or expository texts that demonstrate the writing skills for multi-paragraph essays and provide sustained evidence from the text using quotations when appropriate; and (D) produce a multimedia presentation involving text and graphics using available technology.

Essential Questions:  What is Prose?  What makes prose different from poetry?  Why might we use a comic as a form of Prose? List of questions to foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning. Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that …  Be able to utilize online resources to research  Use collaborative software and productivity tools Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks: 

Students will use online sources to pick pictures to create a comic that will be used in the Technology Class. o Using Comic Life, they will make a comic.

*All materials, task/lab descriptions, student work/problems, assessments, rubrics, etc., must be attached. Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results? Provide a brief description of the learning plan/procedures. Clearly identify key points in which you plan to/realize that you may need to incorporate Teach Like a Champion techniques as you describe the lesson. Description: TLAC Techniques: Warm-up: As the students walk in, they will find a group of pictures posted on the smart board. They will be pictures of Amphibians. The students will pick a picture and write down describing words. If the students finish early, they will read one of their books. After the warm-up, the students will be asked to share some of the description words they came up with. The students will then write a 2 page comic for the Technology class’s Issuu. They will find pictures online using google images of Amphibians and then they will take those images and use them with the program Comic Life. http://plasq.com/products/comiclife/win . They will pick a layout and add the pictures they would like to include. They will then use the chat bubbles included in the program to comicify their pictures. The chat bubbles will have their description words. (example: I am a slimy frog).

Extensions: Students who finish early will be allowed to create a third page. They will then continue their research. Modifications: In order to accommodate the students with special needs, I will monitor their progress closely and make sure they stay on the right track. If I feel it to be necessary, I will send the students to the content mastery lab for further assistance.

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Day 7 Candidate Name: Tabby Cure Lesson Topic: Continuation of Prose

Content/Grade: English 7 th Grade CT:

Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes:  7 th Grade English (17) Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to: (A) write a multi-paragraph essay to convey information about a topic that: (i) presents effective introductions and concluding paragraphs; (ii) contains a clearly stated purpose or controlling idea; (iii) is logically organized with appropriate facts and details and includes no extraneous information or inconsistencies; (iv) accurately synthesizes ideas from several sources; and (v) uses a variety of sentence structures, rhetorical devices, and transitions to link paragraphs 

(C) write responses to literary or expository texts that demonstrate the writing skills for multi-paragraph essays and provide sustained evidence from the text using quotations when appropriate; and  (D) produce a multimedia presentation involving text and graphics using available technology. Essential Questions:  What is an article?  What is the difference between an article and a story? List of questions to foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning. Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that …  Be able to utilize online resources to research  Use collaborative software and productivity tools  Be able to complete tasks using online collaboration. (googledocs) Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks:  Students will write an article for the Technology Class’s Issuu. *All materials, task/lab descriptions, student work/problems, assessments, rubrics, etc., must be attached. Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results? Provide a brief description of the learning plan/procedures. Clearly identify key points in which you plan to/realize that you may need to incorporate Teach Like a Champion techniques as you describe the lesson. Description: TLAC Techniques: When students arrive they will find a selection of short articles sitting on their desks. They will be asked to read them so they can get a clear understanding of what the difference is between an article and a story is. Using a couple of methods they will be taught that articles are typically nonfiction and are composed of a Headline, Byline, Lead, Body, and Conclusion. Students will then write an article based on the research they have been doing on the animal of their choosing. They will use Googledocs to create the article so they can continue working on it in Technology. Any extra time they have after they write their article will be spent working on their research.

Extensions: Students will work on their research and presentation. Modifications: In order to accommodate the students with special needs, I will monitor their progress closely and make sure they stay on the right track. If I feel it to be necessary, I will send the students to the content mastery lab for further assistance.

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Day 8 Candidate Name: Tabby Cure Lesson Topic: Proposal and Outline for Research paper and Presentation (rough draft)

Content/Grade: English 7 th Grade CT:

Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes:  7 th Grade English (22) Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to: (A) brainstorm, consult with others, decide upon a topic, and formulate a major research question to address the major research topic; and (B) apply steps for obtaining and evaluating information from a wide variety of sources and create a written plan after preliminary research in reference works and additional text searches.  7 th Grade English (23) Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to: (A) follow the research plan to gather information from a range of relevant print and electronic sources using advanced search strategies; (B) categorize information thematically in order to see the larger constructs inherent in the information; (C) record bibliographic information (e.g., author, title, page number) for all notes and sources according to a standard format; and (D) differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.  7 th Grade English (24) Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to: (A) narrow or broaden the major research question, if necessary, based on further research and investigation; and (B) utilize elements that demonstrate the reliability and validity of the sources used (e.g., publication date, coverage, language, point of view) and explain why one source is more useful than another.  7 th Grade English (25) Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the research into a written or an oral presentation that: (A) draws conclusions and summarizes or paraphrases the findings in a systematic way; (B) marshals evidence to explain the topic and gives relevant reasons for conclusions; (C) presents the findings in a meaningful format; and (D) follows accepted formats for integrating quotations and citations into the written text to maintain a flow of ideas. Essential Questions:  Why is it essential to organize our data before we present it?  What is the purpose of an Outline?  Why do we peer review our works? List of questions to foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning. Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that …  Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks:   

Students will use this time to outline their research paper o And presentation Students will write their rough draft Students will peer review the rough draft.

*All materials, task/lab descriptions, student work/problems, assessments, rubrics, etc., must be attached. Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results? Provide a brief description of the learning plan/procedures. Clearly identify key points in which you plan to/realize that you may need to incorporate Teach Like a Champion techniques as you describe the lesson. Description: TLAC Techniques: As the students come into the classroom, they will be informed they should begin working on an outline of their research paper. After they have finished their outline, they will begin writing their rough draft of the research paper. If the students finish their rough draft, they will be permitted to trade the draft with a classmate and peer review their paper. Extensions: Students will not have any extra time, but if they should find they do, they can read a book of their choosing. Modifications: In order to accommodate the students with special needs, I will monitor their progress closely and make sure they stay on the right track. If I feel it to be necessary, I will send the students to the content mastery lab for further assistance.

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Day 9 Candidate Name: Tabby Cure Lesson Topic: Vocabulary Quiz and finish working on presentation

Content/Grade: English 7 th Grade CT:

Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes:  (21) Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to spell correctly, including using various resources to determine and check correct spellings.  (22) Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to: (A) brainstorm, consult with others, decide upon a topic, and formulate a major research question to address the major research topic; and (B) apply steps for obtaining and evaluating information from a wide variety of sources and create a written plan after preliminary research in reference works and additional text searches.  (23) Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to: (A) follow the research plan to gather information from a range of relevant print and electronic sources using advanced search strategies; (B) categorize information thematically in order to see the larger constructs inherent in the information; (C) record bibliographic information (e.g., author, title, page number) for all notes and sources according to a standard format; and (D) differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.  (24) Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to: (A) narrow or broaden the major research question, if necessary, based on further research and investigation; and (B) utilize elements that demonstrate the reliability and validity of the sources used (e.g., publication date, coverage, language, point of view) and explain why one source is more useful than another. 

(25) Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the research into a written or an oral presentation that: (A) draws conclusions and summarizes or paraphrases the findings in a systematic way; (B) marshals evidence to explain the topic and gives relevant reasons for conclusions; (C) presents the findings in a meaningful format; and (D) follows accepted formats for integrating quotations and citations into the written text to maintain a flow of ideas.

Essential Questions:  Why is it necessary to learn vocabulary words and their definitions?  When researching, where should you end? List of questions to foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning. Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that …  Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks:  Students will take a vocabulary quiz.  Students will peer review the rough drafts of their fellow classmates.  Students will continue working on their presentation and paper. *All materials, task/lab descriptions, student work/problems, assessments, rubrics, etc., must be attached. Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results? Provide a brief description of the learning plan/procedures. Clearly identify key points in which you plan to/realize that you may need to incorporate Teach Like a Champion techniques as you describe the lesson. Description: TLAC Techniques: The students will come into class and find the vocabulary words projected on the board. They will be asked to pull out a blank sheet of paper and write down the word and its meaning. After everyone has completed the vocabulary words, the students will then hand their rough drafts to a classmate and begin peer reviewing their classmate’s paper. Once all papers have been peer reviewed, they will return to their owners and the students will start creating their final draft. This should take the rest of the class period. Extensions: Students will not have any extra time, but if they should find they do, they can read a book of their choosing. Modifications: In order to accommodate the students with special needs, I will monitor their progress closely and make sure they stay on the right track. If I feel it to be necessary, I will send the students to the content mastery lab for further assistance.

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Day 10 Candidate Name: Tabby Cure Lesson Topic: Spelling Test and finish working on presentation

Content/Grade: English 7 th Grade CT:

Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes:  (21) Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to spell correctly, including using various resources to determine and check correct spellings.  (22) Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to: (A) brainstorm, consult with others, decide upon a topic, and formulate a major research question to address the major research topic; and (B) apply steps for obtaining and evaluating information from a wide variety of sources and create a written plan after preliminary research in reference works and additional text searches.  (23) Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to: (A) follow the research plan to gather information from a range of relevant print and electronic sources using advanced search strategies; (B) categorize information thematically in order to see the larger constructs inherent in the information; (C) record bibliographic information (e.g., author, title, page number) for all notes and sources according to a standard format; and (D) differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.  (24) Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to: (A) narrow or broaden the major research question, if necessary, based on further research and investigation; and (B) utilize elements that demonstrate the reliability and validity of the sources used (e.g., publication date, coverage, language, point of view) and explain why one source is more useful than another.  (25) Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the research into a written or an oral presentation that: (A) draws conclusions and summarizes or paraphrases the findings in a systematic way; (B) marshals evidence to explain the topic and gives relevant reasons for conclusions; (C) presents the findings in a meaningful format; and (D) follows accepted formats for integrating quotations and citations into the written text to maintain a flow of ideas. Essential Questions:  Why is it necessary to know how to spell properly?  Where does research stop and finding documentation begin? List of questions to foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning. Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that …  How to properly spell the spelling words they were given at the beginning of the unit. Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks:  Students will take a spelling test.  Students will continue working on project or paper *All materials, task/lab descriptions, student work/problems, assessments, rubrics, etc., must be attached. Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results? Provide a brief description of the learning plan/procedures. Clearly identify key points in which you plan to/realize that you may need to incorporate Teach Like a Champion techniques as you describe the lesson. Description: TLAC Techniques: As the students come into class, they will be informed to either study the spelling words or sit quietly reading until everyone has arrived. Once the class is present in the classroom, the teacher will hand out a sheet of paper. The students will write down the spelling word as the teacher calls it out. Once the spelling test is done, students will continue quietly working on either their presentation or paper. If all students finish earlier than anticipated, we shall play a game of thumbs-up 7-up to reward them for their hard work. Extensions: Students will not have any extra time, but if they should find they do, they can read a book of their choosing Modifications: In order to accommodate the students with special needs, I will monitor their progress closely and make sure they stay on the right track. If I feel it to be necessary, I will send the students to the content mastery lab for further assistance.

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Day 11 Content/Grade: English 7 th Grade CT:

Candidate Name: Tabby Cure Lesson Topic: Presentations! Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes:

Essential Questions: List of questions to foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning.

Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that …  Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks:  Students will stand before their peers and present their findings.

*All materials, task/lab descriptions, student work/problems, assessments, rubrics, etc., must be attached.

Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results? Provide a brief description of the learning plan/procedures. Clearly identify key points in which you plan to/realize that you may need to incorporate Teach Like a Champion techniques as you describe the lesson. Description:  

TLAC Techniques:

Presentation Day! Homework:

Extensions:

Modifications: I will have students with special needs sit by the teachers. Also, I will have an assistant from the content mastery lab be at the presentations as well.

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Name: Date:

Spelling Test 1.

11.

2.

12.

3.

13.

4.

14.

5.

15.

6.

16.

7.

17.

8.

18.

9. _

19.

10.

20.

81


Name: Period: Date: Research Project

Has a Title Page

Excellent!

Good

Satisfactory

Needs Work

Not Done

1 point 1 point 2 points There is a 2 points There is a 0 points There is a Title There is a Title clear concise Title clear concise Title There is no Page but it is not Page but it is not Page Page title page properly organized organized

16 points The 14 points The 12 points The 11 points The Neatly written or paper is neat and paper is neat, and paper is neat, but paper is not neat typed very well organized not organized. or organized. organized.

0 points The paper is not organized or neat.

14 points The 18 points The 16 points The 12 points The Paper is atleast 2 paper is less than paper is more paper is atleast 2 paper is atleast a pages long. 2 pages but atleast than 3 pages long. pages long. page. a page.

0 points The paper is less than a page

Rough Draft is Present

14 points There is 16 Points The a complete rough complete and draft, but it is not organized rough a organized draft is included.

Peer Edited

10 points The paper has been peer edited

Spelling and Grammar is correct

16 points The 14 points The paper is well paper is well written and has no written but has a spelling or few spelling or grammatical grammatical errors errors.

9 points The paper has been partially peer edited

12 points There is a rough draft but it is not complete

10 points There is an outline but 0 points not a completed There is no or organized rough draft rough draft

7 points The paper has not been fully peer edited.

5 points 0 points The paper has There is no barely been peer peer editing edited shown

12 points The paper has several spelling or grammatical errors

10 points The paper has significant spelling and grammatical errors.

0 points There is several spelling and grammatical errors

82


Animal Theme is followed

4 points The 6 points The 5 points The paper relates to paper relates to paper relates to the topic but the overall topic. the topic tends to go off track

Resources Included

14 points There is 16 points There is a MLA formated a MLA formatted Works cited page, works cited page but with a few errors.

TOTAL:

100

12 points MLA formated works cited page is included, but there are several errors.

88

2 points The overall theme is there, but barely

0 points The animal theme was not followed

10 points There is a works 0 points cited but it is not No resources formated in MLA are included formatting.

74

61

0

Presentation is insightful

10 points 25 points 20 points The 15 points The The presentation 0 points The presentation presentation is presentation is not is not at all There is no is entertaining and entertaining and insightful entertaining or presentation insightful insightful insightful

Presentation is well organized

25 points The presentation is well organized and follows a logical format.

10 points 20 points The The presentation presentation is 15 points The 0 points is not organized well organized and presentation is not There is no nor does it follows a logical well organized presentation follow a logical format. format

TOTAL:

50

40

30

20

0

83


84


85


86


87


88


89


90


91


92


Name: 93


Spelling Word List: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

Habitat Amphibians Invertebrates Vertebrates Primates Carnivore Herbivore Omnivore Kangaroo Elephants Giraffe Chameleon Porcupine Orangutan Komodo Dragon Tarantula Penguin

18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34.

Exotic Gorilla Chameleon Rain forest Migratory Chimpanzee Gazelle Monsoon Jaguar Tundra Iceberg Hurricane Volcano Lagoon Caribou Bayou Wildebeest

94


Vocabulary Word List: Mammals extinct endangered hibernation marsupial

Birds Flock Migration Incubation Instinct bipedal ornithologists alula

Reptiles coldblooded neurotoxin hemotoxin antitoxins carapace plastron

“The Raven� Lesson Plan List of words projected on the smart board. Bleak Darkness Dirges Dreary Ghost Grave Lost Melancholy Sorry Stern Stillness Terrors

101


The Raven Edgar Allan Poe Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore, While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of someone gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door. `'Tis some visitor,' I muttered, `tapping at my chamber door Only this, and nothing more.' Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December, And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor. Eagerly I wished the morrow; - vainly I had sought to borrow From my books surcease of sorrow - sorrow for the lost Lenore For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels named Lenore Nameless here for evermore. And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain Thrilled me - filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before; So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating `'Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door; This it is, and nothing more,' Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer, `Sir,' said I, `or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore; But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping, And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door, That I scarce was sure I heard you' - here I opened wide the door; Darkness there, and nothing more. Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing, Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before; But the silence was unbroken, and the darkness gave no token, And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, `Lenore!'

102


This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, `Lenore!' Merely this and nothing more. Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning, Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before. `Surely,' said I, `surely that is something at my window lattice; Let me see then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore; 'Tis the wind and nothing more!' Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter, In there stepped a stately raven of the saintly days of yore. Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he; But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door Perched, and sat, and nothing more. Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling, By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore, `Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou,' I said, `art sure no craven. Ghastly grim and ancient raven wandering from the nightly shore Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night's Plutonian shore!' Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.' Much I marvelled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly, Though its answer little meaning - little relevancy bore; For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being Ever yet was blessed with seeing bird above his chamber door -

103


Bird or beast above the sculptured bust above his chamber door, With such name as `Nevermore.' But the raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only, That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour. Nothing further then he uttered - not a feather then he fluttered Till I scarcely more than muttered `Other friends have flown before On the morrow he will leave me, as my hopes have flown before.' Then the bird said, `Nevermore.' Startled at the stillness broken by reply so aptly spoken, `Doubtless,' said I, `what it utters is its only stock and store, Caught from some unhappy master whom unmerciful disaster Followed fast and followed faster till his songs one burden bore Till the dirges of his hope that melancholy burden bore Of "Never-nevermore."' But the raven still beguiling all my sad soul into smiling, Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird and bust and door; Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt, and ominous bird of yore Meant in croaking `Nevermore.' This I sat engaged in guessing, but no syllable expressing To the fowl whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosom's core; This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease reclining On the cushion's velvet lining that the lamp-light gloated o'er, But whose velvet violet lining with the lamp-light gloating o'er, She shall press, ah, nevermore! Then, methought, the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen censer Swung by Seraphim whose foot-falls tinkled on the tufted floor. `Wretch,' I cried, `thy God hath lent thee - by these angels he has sent thee Respite - respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore! Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe, and forget this lost Lenore!' Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.' `Prophet!' said I, `thing of evil! - prophet still, if bird or devil! Whether tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore, Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted On this home by horror haunted - tell me truly, I implore Is there - is there balm in Gilead? - tell me - tell me, I implore!' Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.' `Prophet!' said I, `thing of evil! - prophet still, if bird or devil! By that Heaven that bends above us - by that God we both adore Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn, It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels named Lenore Clasp a rare and radiant maiden, whom the angels named Lenore?' Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.' `Be that word our sign of parting, bird or fiend!' I shrieked upstarting `Get thee back into the tempest and the Night's Plutonian shore! Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken! Leave my loneliness unbroken! - quit the bust above my door! Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!' Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.' And the raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door; And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming, And the lamp-light o'er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor; And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor Shall be lifted - nevermore!

104


Sources Animal Reptile Armor . (2011). Retrieved 5 2011, 12, from freepik.com: http://www.freepik.com/freephoto/animal-reptile-armor_152247.htm Frog 18 Coloring Page. (2009, January 21). Retrieved 12 1, 2011, from Paint the world: Super Coloring: http://www.supercoloring.com/pages/frog-18/ Frog coloring Pages. (2007-2011). Retrieved 12 7, 2011, from Animal-coloring-pages.com: http://www.animal-coloring-pages.com/frog-coloring-pages.html Frog coloring pages for kids. (2007-2010). Retrieved 12 1, 2011, from Freecoloring.org: www.freecoloring.org/animals/frog-coloring-pages.htm Frog is a Prince coloring page. (2009, April 29). Retrieved 12 1, 2011, from Supercoloring.com: http://www.supercoloring.com/pages/frog-is-a-prince/ Frog Printable Coloring Pages. (2011). Retrieved 12 1, 2011, from The Coloring Barn: www.thecoloringbarn.com/printable-coloring-pages/frog-coloring-pages.html Green With Envy. (2011). Retrieved 5 12, 2011, from freepik.com: http://www.freepik.com/freephoto/green-with-envy_22807.htm Massachusetts State Animal. (2007). Retrieved 12 5, 2011, from State Symbols USA: http://www.statesymbolsusa.org/Massachusetts/reptile_gartersnake.html Reptile - Wikipedia. (2011, 12 5). Retrieved 12 5, 2011, from wikipedia.org: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reptile Rhyne, M. (1996-2011). Atmosphere and Symbolism in "the Raven". Retrieved 11 26, 2011, from Lessonplanspage.com: http://www.lessonplanspage.com/latheravenatmospheresymbolisminhalloween612-htm

105


Objectives ยง126.11. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Applications, Middle School. Source: The provisions of this ยง126.11 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5203 (c) Knowledge and skills. (1) Foundations. The student demonstrates knowledge and appropriate use of hardware components, software programs, and their connections. The student is expected to: !(D) delineate and make necessary adjustments regarding compatibility issues including, but not limited t!o, digital file formats and cross platform connectivity; (5) Information acquisition. The student acquires electronic information in a variety of formats, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to: !(C) use on-line help and other documentation. (7) Solving problems. The student uses appropriate computer-based productivity tools to create and modify solutions to problems. The student is expected to: !(A) plan, create, and edit documents created with a word processor using readable fonts, alignment, p ! age setup, tabs, and ruler settings; !(B) create and edit spreadsheet documents using all data types, formulas and functions, and chart !information; !(C) plan, create, and edit databases by defining fields, entering data, and designing layouts appropriate !for reporting; !(D) demonstrate proficiency in the use of multimedia authoring programs by creating linear or n ! on-!linear projects incorporating text, audio, video, and graphics; !(F) differentiate between and demonstrate the appropriate use of a variety of graphic tools found in !draw and paint applications; !(G) integrate two or more productivity tools into a document including, but not limited to, tables, charts a ! nd graphs, graphics from paint or draw programs, and mail merge; (I) use technical writing strategies to create products such as a technical instruction guide; and! (J) use foundation and enrichment curricula in the creation of products. (8) !Solving problems. The student uses research skills and electronic communication, with appropriate supervision, to create new ! knowledge. The student is expected to: ! (A) participate with electronic communities as a learner, initiator, contributor, and teacher/!mentor; ! (B) complete tasks using technological collaboration such as sharing information through on-line ! communications; ! (C) use groupware, collaborative software, and productivity tools to create products; ! (E) integrate acquired technology applications skills, strategies, and use of the word processor, database, spreadsheet, ! telecommunications, draw, paint, and utility programs into the foundation and enrichment curricula. (10)!!!!!!! Communication. The student formats digital information for appropriate and effective communication. The student is !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!expected !to: !!!!!!!!! (A) use productivity tools to create effective document files for defined audiences such as slide s! hows, p ! osters, multimedia !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!presentations, newsletters, brochures, or reports; !!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (B) demonstrate the use of a variety of layouts in a database to communicate information appropriately i!ncluding horizontal!!!!and !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!vertical layouts; !!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (11) Communication. The student delivers the product electronically in a variety of media, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to: (A) publish information in a variety of ways including, but not limited to, printed copy, monitor display, Internet documents, and video; (12) Communication. The student uses technology applications to facilitate evaluation of communication, both process and product. The student is expected to: (B) determine and employ technology specifications to evaluate projects for design, content delivery, purpose, and audience; and


Day One Candidate Name: Chelsea Tramel

Content/Grade: 7th Technology

Lesson Topic: Introduction & Research

CT:

Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students will demonstrate knowledge of glogster. They will email the glogster to themselves and group members. They will also copy and paste glogster into a word document, and then save it as a pdf. TEKS: 7(I)(J) 10(A) Essential Questions: • What tools are essential to know, when designing a flyer for glogster, • What technical writing strategies will you use to promote your zoo in glogster? Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that … • To use enrichment curriculum in creating a flyer • How to organize project information • How to create multimedia presentations and posters • To copy and paste glogster into a word document on google docs and save it on their desktop as a pdf in the appropriate folder.

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks: • Create folders on desktop • Issuu folder on desktop: Within Issuu folder: folders for Sketch Up, Google Docs (budget, powerpoints, etc.), Prezi • Glogster • Email glogster to self and other group members • Copy and paste glogster into a google doc (document) and save it as a pdf in the appropriate folder. • Save glogster to Issuu folder

Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures Description: •

TLAC

(30-40 min) Go over project (prezi) & extra money assignments Format Matters • http://prezi.com/lhauvdutthdv/zoolapalooza/ Binder Control -• Groups will post the prezi and the ISSUU on the teachers blog. Folder Control • Blog: http://chelseatramel.blogspot.com 4 Mʼs • Weebly Website For Parents & Class: This site takes you directly to the class blog. • http://tramelchelsea.weebly.com • Groups will also use todaysmeet.com (classroom chat room), to ask questions • http://todaysmeet.com/ZooCreation • Teacher will email students a page with links they will be using for the project, and a project calendar that they will fill out. • Google docs, Research Links Page, Glogster, Prezi, Wallwisher, Todaysmeet, Issuu, Class Blog • (10 min) Students write down what animals they would like to have in their zoo. • (10 min) Each student will begin to make folders on their computers • Teacher will go through and tell the group to make an ISSUU folder on their desktop of their computer. • ISSUU folder on desktop, within the ISSUU folder, make a folder for Sketch Up, Google docs (budget, powerpoints, documents), Prezi, • Group leaders will be in charge of creating each group members documents in google docs, because when putting together the issue, and combining documents, the leader needs to be able to merge documents together. • (30 min) Glogster • Students previously have used glogster • Students will create a flyer to get people to come to the town meeting. • Students will email glogster to themselves and group members, and then the group leader will create documents for each persons flyer, copy and paste into the document, save as a pdf, and put it into the Issuu folder on desktop. Extensions: Students can choose from the list of activities to do for extra money. Modifications: For students with special needs, I will be monitoring their progress with the concept closely, and will help when it is needed; giving the students individual attention necessary for them to master the concept. Based on my judgements of how well they are grasping the outcomes given for the day, I will determine whether or not they need to go to the content mastery lab for further assistance.


PBL Essential Elements Checklist Whatever form a project takes, it must have these Essential Elements to meet BIE’s definition of PBL.

?

Does the Project . . .? FOCUS ON SIGNIFICANT CONTENT At its core, the project is focused on teaching students important knowledge and skills, derived from standards and key concepts at the heart of academic subjects. DEVELOP 21st CENTURY SKILLS Students build skills valuable for today’s world, such as critical thinking/ problem solving, collaboration, and communication, which are taught and assessed. ENGAGE STUDENTS IN IN-DEPTH INQUIRY Students are engaged in a rigorous, extended process of asking questions, using resources, and developing answers.

ORGANIZE TASKS AROUND A DRIVING QUESTION Project work is focused by an open-ended question that students explore or that captures the task they are completing.

ESTABLISH A NEED TO KNOW Students see the need to gain knowledge, understand concepts, and apply skills in order to answer the Driving Question and create project products, beginning with an Entry Event that generates interest and curiosity. ENCOURAGE VOICE AND CHOICE Students are allowed to make some choices about the products to be created, how they work, and how they use their time, guided by the teacher and depending on age level and PBL experience. INCORPORATE REVISION AND REFLECTION The project includes processes for students to use feedback to consider additions and changes that lead to high-quality products, and think about what and how they are learning. INCLUDE A PUBLIC AUDIENCE Students present their work to other people, beyond their classmates and teacher.

70 /more RES O U R C visit E S /bie.org PBL 101 For FreeBIEs

©2011 BUCK INSTITUTE FOR EDUC ATION


©2011 BUCK INSTITUTE FOR EDUC ATION

P B L 1 0 1 / R E S O U R C E S / 77

For more FreeBIEs visit bie.org

Notes

Notes

MONDAY

Project: TU E S DAY

P R O J E C T

P R O J E C T

W E E K

W E E K

T W O

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F R IDAY

page 1

©2011 BUCK INSTITUTE FOR EDUC ATION

T H UR SDAY

Time Frame:

C A L E N D A R

W E DN E S DAY

P R O J E C T


Things Left To Do • Do Lesson Plan o TEKS o Research & proposal portion for english • How to for Sketch Up o Example for SKETCH UP • How to load ppt into Prezi o example for PREZI • Syllabus for folders • How to for ISSUU o Example for ISSUU

Zoolapalooza Introduction to the project

Introduction • The purpose of this project is to create a magazine (ISSUU) proposal to present at the town hall meeting. Your fellow peers will be the towns people, and the mayor will be your teacher. Your groups will be creating different aspects of the zoo in o Glogster: Flyer & Advertisement o Prezi: Animal Research o Googledocs: Homework Chats, File Sharing ! PPT for research of animals ! Excel for budget (Expenses and Income) ! Word for proposal / outline o Google Sketch Up: Layout / Map of Zoo o ISSUU: for final presentation

Glogster Flyer for announcement of town meeting & Advertisements


Glogster • Students would have previous knowledge on how to make a glogster. • Do a quick example, and students have 20 minutes to complete. • These will be done individually, and each group members flyer will be put into the ISSUU o if they do not complete it then, it becomes homework

Title Page:

Mammals, Birds, Amphibians, Reptiles, etc.

Research Of Animals Making Powerpoints & a Prezi Animals: habitats, food, behavior, fun facts

• List of the animals that fall into this category.


Animal Name

Prezi

• Mammal, Bird, Amphibian, etc. • Habitat: o list what type of habitat the animal lives in • Food: o Carnivore, herbivore, omnivore o Types of things it eats • Behaviors of animals o if you can find them - do they stay in packs or do they like to be alone • Fun Facts About Animal o at least 3-4

• Upload powerpoints into the prezi, and start formatting them how you want them. • Save prezi as pdf so that you can put it into the ISSUU • Also, put the link in for the prezi • ** MAKE SURE: to save it single slides, so that you can truly arrange them how you desire.

Budget

Budget Expenses & Income

• You need to decide whether or not you are going to have a small, medium, or large zoo. • You need to make your own expense sheet o Create an EXCEL document that calculates the budget ! In the EXCEL document you need to make sure you label what you are describe what the price is ! subtracts from your budget for expenses ! adds to your profit for income o At the end, you will write a paragraph in your reflection paper over your budget. Explain if your budget made sense and worked, and talk about any changes you would make if you made the budget again.


Zoo Layout

Zoo Layout Google Sketch Up

• Students will go into the 3D pictures, and find enclosures that have already been made by other members of sketch up. o One good person to look at is zooenterprises • They will create their zoo map out of these enclosures, they may also add trees and what not. • Also, teach students how to make basic models. • Can save the Sketch Up as a pdf to put into the ISSUU

ISSUU Creating a magazine for the presentation


ISSUU • The ISSUU will be posted in the class blog so it needs to be done neatly and correctly. • *** IT IS IMPORTANT THAT YOU PAY ATTENTION WHEN WE GO OVER WHAT TO DO IN ISSUU • ISSUU example: • http://issuu.com/chelseat1818/docs/ ppt_for_prezi_to_students? mode=window&backgroundColor=%23222222

Proposals / Outline Outline of what your group is going to say during their presentation

Proposals/Outline • This is going to be an outline of your "speech" to the towns people and the mayor during your presentation. • Each person must speak, and be prepared to answer questions as they are asked about their presentation.

Presentations Last Day Of Project **** NO LATE ASSIGNMENTS ACCEPTED


Example of Glogster


Project Links

Other Research Links http://www.scottspindler.com/zoo/

Class Website

http://tramelchelsea.weebly.com

Class Blog

http://chelseatramel.blogspot.com

Todaysmeet

http://todaysmeet.com/ZooCreation

Prezi

www.prezi.com http://prezi.com/lhauvdutthdv/zoolapalooza/

Google docs

www.google.com

Glogster

http://chelseatramel.edu.glogster.com/glog-6267/

ZOOS USA WEBSITE:

Issuu

http://www.issuu.com/home

http://www.officialusa.com/stateguides/zoos/index.html

Wallwisher

http://www.wallwisher.com/wall/thankyou1818

Wooland Park Zoo (Washington, Seattle):

The Electronic Zoo: http://netvet.wustl.edu/e-zoo.htm

Zoo Links

http://www.zoo.org/

Other Research Links Blog of websites from larry: http://larryferlazzo.edublogs.org/2010/03/07/the-best-sites-for-learning-about-animals/ Wooland Park Zoo (Washington, Seattle): http://www.zoo.org/ Sedgwick Zoo: http://www.scz.org/animal_exhibits-exhibit_areas_animals.php Smithsonian: National Zoological Park http://nationalzoo.si.edu/Animals/default.cfm University of Michigan Museum of Zoology: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/index.html Who Pooped? http://www.whopooped.org/ ArKive (also includes endangered species): http://www.arkive.org/ * PLANNING A ZOO:

Sedgwick Zoo: http://www.scz.org/animal_exhibits-exhibit_areas_animals.php Oregon Zoo: http://www.oregonzoo.org/Cards/ Sacramento Zoo: http://www.saczoo.org/Page.aspx?pid=318 Pittsburgh Zoo: http://zoo.pgh.pa.us/AnimalsandExhibits * San Diego Zoo: http://www.sandiegozoo.org/animalbytes/index.html Chicago Zoological Society: http://www.czs.org/czs/Brookfield/Zoo-Home.aspx Buffalo Zoo: http://www.buffalozoo.org/mammals.html Detroit Zoo: http://www.detroitzoo.org/Animals/Animals/Detroit_Zoo_Animals_and_Habitats


Zoo Links Tampa始s Lowry Zoo Park: http://www.lowryparkzoo.com/animals_and_habitat_areas.php Philadelphia Zoo: http://www.philadelphiazoo.org/zoo/Zoo-Habitats.htm Dublin Zoo: http://www.dublinzoo.ie/4/Animals-amp-Habitats.aspx Fort Worth Zoo: http://www.fortworthzoo.org/ WAZA ZOOS OF THE WORLD: http://www.waza.org/en/site/zoos-aquariums London Zoo: http://www.zsl.org/education/

Biomes Web Links Biomes: http://www.blueplanetbiomes.org/world_biomes.htm Berkley Biome: http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/gloss5/biome/ Enchanted Learning Biome: http://www.enchantedlearning.com/biomes/ Radford EDU Biome: http://www.radford.edu/swoodwar/CLASSES/GEOG235/biomes/intro.html * NASA Biome: http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Experiments/Biome/


** Extra Money Assignment Sheet ** $

$

$

$

$ ! $! Itʼs All About The Benjamin's! $

$

$

$

$

Send the class blog link to 5 people (not in your technology class). They can be friends or family. Ask them to comment on one of the post. Make sure they put your name down so that you can get credit.

From previous unit: How do you cite webpages? Books? Journal Articles? Newspapers? Magazines? Blogs? Now how do you cite these things if you find them online?

Research Web 2.0. What are the different types of technology that you could use to help you in school? Which site or program would you like to learn more about, and try to use in school?

Research how smart look works in an Issuu. Explain what it is, how it works, and then explain the steps. Try and use it with the class webpage. http://tramelchelsea.weebly.com

$

$

$

$

$

$ ! $! Itʼs All About The Benjamin's! $

$

$

$

$

Create your own animal (not an existing animal) in Sketch Up. Do a research slide over the animal.

Explain the methods of how to create a prezi ( up load powerpoints or create it from scratch). Explain how to upload it into a blog, and share it with other people so that multiple people can edit it.

Explain how google docs works. What types of things can you do with google? Go to www.google.com and under “MORE” find “SITES”. Explain what this is, how it works, and try to create one.

Create 2 advertisements using a glogster. Explain why you decided to advertise whatever product you chose, and what the product does. Explain different tools used in the glogster and what they were used for. Also, explain how to email it, and save it into a word document.

$


Day Two Candidate Name: Chelsea Tramel

Content/Grade: 7th Technology

Lesson Topic: Research

CT:

Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students will perform research online using web links given to them. They will conduct research over individual animals that will be in their zoo. Students will use online collaboration resources to work together on this task. TEKS: 5(c) 8(a)(b)(c) Essential Questions: • What types of online sources should you use to conduct research? • How are electronic communities useful when researching online? Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that … • Be able to utilize online resources to research • Identify an animals habitats, food, behaviors, and number of said specific animal in groups zoo. • Be able to participate in electronic communities effectively • Be able to complete tasks using online collaboration (powerpoints) • Use groupware, collaborative software, and productivity tools (google docs) Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks: • Create a powerpoint using google docs • Powerpoints to include: Animals name, number of animals going to have in zoo, habitat, food, and animal behaviors • Group leader creates powerpoint folders for each member in the group; each members powerpoints page will be saved as a pdf and be put into the Issuu. (establishes individual effort on project) • Use online resources for research and group collaboration • Google docs, web links for zoos, powerpoints • Use google chat and email with circle group in google docs to communicate with group members Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures Description: •

TLAC

(15 min) Teacher goes over research On Your Mark • Demonstrate examples of the power points Sweat The Details • (20 min) Groups decide what their “kingdom” names are going to be, and what animals are going to Break It Down be going into those said kingdoms. • Groups will assign individual members slides to do over research • Make sure slides are not boring, make them interesting to look at • The group leader will create a “presentation” document in google docs for each group member to do their research in. • Each group member will create their own power point in google docs for their assigned animals. • * Make sure your “sharing” your document • Each group memberʼs power point will be put into the ISSUU separately, so teachers can grade individual research, and participation of students. • At the end of the research portion, the leader will combine powerpoints into one document, and the group leader will save it under the “presentations” (under google docs) portion of their desktop folders. • (60 min) Groups start research • Powerpoint slides include: • Animal name & number of that animal going to be in the zoo • Habitat : where it is from, and what type of environment it lives in • Food: what type of food it eats • Animal behaviors: does it travel in a pack or individually, are they sociable Extensions: Students will not finish early, and if they are able to finish all their research in one day, then they need to go back to their power point and add video, sounds, and graphics to them. Modifications: For students with special needs, I will be monitoring their progress with the concept closely, and will help when it is needed; giving the students individual attention necessary for them to master the concept. Based on my judgements of how well they are grasping the outcomes given for the day, I will determine whether or not they need to go to the content mastery lab for further assistance.


Day Three Candidate Name: Chelsea Tramel

Content/Grade: 7th Technology

Lesson Topic: Research & Prezi

CT:

Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students will continue to work in online collaboration resources, and finish powerpoints individually. Students will upload the powerpoints into a prezi, and as a group modify the prezi for the blog presentation to the parents. TEKS: 5(c) 8(a)(b)(c) Essential Questions: • How is it useful to know how to upload a powerpoint into a prezi? • In what ways could a prezi be used? In what ways is it beneficial? Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that … • Be able to utilize online resources to research • Identify an animalʼs habitat, food, and behaviors • Be able to participate in electronic communities effectively • Be able to complete tasks using online collaboration (power points) • Use groupware, collaborative software, and productivity tools (google docs) • Understand how to create a prezi, how to copy the embedded details, and paste it into the class blog. • Will know how to upload a youtube video into prezi

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks: • Students will upload their groups power points into a prezi, and then create “polish” prezi presentation (make it look neat, organized, and professional as it will be displayed for parents to see on classroom blog) • Students will upload the final prezi presentation into the classroom blog. • Use google chat and email with circle group in google docs to communicate with group members

Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures Description:

TLAC

(45 min) Groups continue research Circulate (5 min) Teacher goes over how to upload the powerpoint document and a you tube video into a Do It Again prezi. • Due to some inappropriate content on youtube, the teacher will just demonstrate how upload it into prezi. • (40 min) Prezi • http://prezi.com/lhauvdutthdv/zoolapalooza/ • Once groups have uploaded everyoneʼs document into the prezi, the group leader will email everyone the link , so they may all edit it. • The prezi should have some order to it, and should not skip around from one kingdom to another, it should stay in one kingdom, and then move on to another kingdom. • When done with it, the group will post it into the classroom blog. • All students will have the username and password to the blog, this way they take part in keeping parents informed. Extensions: Teacher will make sure students power points have color and are engaging, neat, organized, and look professional. If in prezi presentation, slides do not look engaging, students will need to go back to their power points and add to them, and then re-upload into the prezi. If all is done correctly, then groups will communicate via google chat circle (no talking allowed), and begin brainstorming on what types of things they will want to have in their zoo. Students will open budget and see the types of things they can have in zoo. Modifications: For students with special needs, I will be monitoring their progress with the concept closely, and will help when it is needed; giving the students individual attention necessary for them to master the concept. Based on my judgements of how well they are grasping the outcomes given for the day, I will determine whether or not they need to go to the content mastery lab for further assistance. • •


Day Four Candidate Name: Chelsea Tramel

Content/Grade: 7th Technology

Lesson Topic: Prezi & Budget

CT:

Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students will learn about expenses and incomes in the budget. Each student will write down ten things they would like to have in their zoo; two ideas from each student must be put into the group budget. Students will use appropriate document (excel) in google docs for budget, and it will be organized, labeled correctly, and have correct formulas. TEKS: 7(b)(c) Essential Questions: • In what ways/how would you use a budget in your personal life right now? In jobs? As an adult? • How can a spreadsheet be used to evaluate and analyze data? Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that … • Will understand the different formulas to use in making a simple budget • Understand how to label, organize, and know how to input formulas on a spreadsheet • Know how to plan, create, and edit databases by defining fields, entering data, and designing the appropriate layout for reporting said information. • Be able to collaborate with group members through google, todaysmeet, and email.

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks: • Each student writes down their 10 ideas for the zoo • Group leader creates excel document in google docs • Group plans, creates, and edits database they have created • Group defines the fields, enters data correctly, and designs a professional and organized layout. • Students create a pie chart of their expenses and incomes. • Group collaboratively decides “fields” they would like to put in their zoo, including two ideas from each group member. • Groups collaborate through google, email, and todaysmeet (class questions and communication)

Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures Description: TLAC • (20 min) Groups finish Prezi presentations Format Matters • (10 min) Go over budget Check For Understanding • List of animals • https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc? key=0Agd0zN3C7lHedFpmU1pVRE11QnZoYm02WjNGaUt4bHc&hl=en_US#gid=0 • Expenses & Income Budget • https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc? key=0Agd0zN3C7lHedFZoWUlHQzhiWHcwdFRELTRjMmZjeVE&hl=en_US#gid=0 • (10 min) Each individual student will write down what things they would like to have in their zoo, and then the group will collaborate about what will actually be put into the zoo. • The group must use at least 2 ideas from each student in the group. • (50 min) Groups start budget • Group leader should create the excel document in google docs. • ** Groups need to make sure they update their budget if they do assignments for more money, and decide to purchase something for their zoo. • The document should be labeled correctly, organized, and have the formulas for automatically adding subtracting from the budget. • Students would have learned how to do this in the previous unit. • Give an example of what it should look like. Teacher will share the template with the group circles on google docs • When budget is complete, groups will create a pie chart of expenses. Extensions: Students can choose from extra money assignment page to do an assignment for more money. Modifications: For students with special needs, I will be monitoring their progress with the concept closely, and will help when it is needed; giving the students individual attention necessary for them to master the concept. Based on my judgements of how well they are grasping the outcomes given for the day, I will determine whether or not they need to go to the content mastery lab for further assistance.


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Budget Expenses • How much money is spent on... • All animals • Habitats • Food • Employees / Vets • Restaurants / Side Stands • Others Budget Income • How much money comes in... • Ticket Sales • Restaurants / Side Stands • Donations • Events


Day Five Candidate Name: Chelsea Tramel

Content/Grade: 7th Technology

Lesson Topic: Budget & Layout of Zoo in Sketch Up

CT:

Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students will continue to demonstrate knowledge on budget content covered from the previous day. Students will learn about Google Sketch Up, and be able to create a three dimensional zoo layout. Students will learn how to use tools (painting, drawing, and modification tools) draw three dimensional houses, and make landscapes. TEKS: 7(b)(c)(d)(f) Essential Questions: • In what ways/when could you use Sketch Up in your life right now? College? Future jobs? • What are the different tools/graphic tools that you can use in Sketch Up, and what is their purpose (how do you use them)? Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that … • Know how to plan, create, and edit databases by defining fields, entering data, and designing the appropriate layout for reporting said information. • Students will understand the different ways Sketch Up can be used • Will know how to create a 3D building in Sketch Up • Will know how to use the file menu, edit menu, tools menu, drawing menu, window menu, google menu • File Menu: new, open, save, save as, save a copy as, revert, export, import, print set up, print preview, print, recently opened, exit • Edit Menu: undo, redo, cut, copy, paste, erase, select all, deselect all, hide, unhide, construction geometry, lock, unlock, make component, make group, close group/component, intersect with model, entity commands sub-menu • View Menu: toolbars, hidden geometry, section planes, section cuts, axes, shadows, component edit, page tabs, tour guide, • Camera Menu: previous, standard, perspective, field of view, orbit, pan, zoom, zoom window, zoom extents, position camera, walk, look around • Drawing Menu: line, arc, freehand, rectangle, circle, polygon, • Tools Menu: select, eraser, paint bucket, move, rotate, scale, push/pull, follow me, offset, tape measure, protractor, axes, dimensions, text, section plane, utilities • Window Menu: model info, entity info, materials browser, material editor, components, layers, pages, display settings, shadow settings, soften edges, outliner, instructor, preferences, hide/show dialogs, ruby console • Google Menu: get current view, toggle terrain, place model, get models, share models

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks: • Students will go to the class blog, and open the Sketch Up guide • Students will listen as I give the lesson over Sketch Up. • Students will practice when instructed to do certain tasks by me during the lesson. • Students create enclosures and building in Sketch Up

Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures Description: • •

TLAC

(20 min) Students will continue to work on their budget Shortest Path (50 min) Teacher will begin to go over Sketch Up Format Matters • Students will practice concepts when I allow time during the lesson Break It Down • The teacher will post the pdf to the Sketch Up Guide on the class blog. Tight Transitions • Students will use this as a reference after lecture • (20 min) Students get to play on Sketch Up Extensions: Students will continue to play in Sketch Up to “get a feel” for the program. They will create different structures, and continue to do so until the end of class. Any structures done, must be saved under the Sketch Up portion of their desktop folder, and saved in the pdf format. Modifications: For students with special needs, I will be monitoring their progress with the concept closely, and will help when it is needed; giving the students individual attention necessary for them to master the concept. Based on my judgements of how well they are grasping the outcomes given for the day, I will determine whether or not they need to go to the content mastery lab for further assistance.


***For Teacher Use During Lesson*** How To Sketch Up For Kids • • •

Watch intro video over sketch up. Tell students about the index page about the buttons Demonstrate how to draw a building, and then how to draw a roof, and make it 3D. • Draw a rectangle, and draw another rectangle inside it. • Pull up the rectangle on the inside • This only works on flat surfaces, demonstrate how they can pull the sides of buildings out tops, etc. • Get the pencil, and draw a line from one midpoint to another of the rectangle (program will tell you once you hit the midpoint) • Grab the 4 way arrow and click on the line you just drew and pull up on it to create a roof. Demonstrate how to Draw the outline of the landscape • You can draw rectangle, circles, hexagons, on top of each other • Take the eraser and erase the lines inside of the figure. • To erase something simply click on the line or text that you want to erase. You can also hold down your mouse and scroll over and highlight multiple lines to erase. • This gives you the outline layout of your landscape • Draw figures inside, and push and pull them out, • Use the paint feature to paint the land layout the color you want *** Show 3D downloader • Click on the box in the right corner with the yellow arrow. • Type in the figure that you want, zoo, elephant, tiger, etc. • This will bring up animals and sometimes enclosures. You may use these enclosures in your layout of your zoo, as well as the animals. • You may also get trees and plants from this place as well. I want you to be creative, but this can get time consuming, so I want you to utilize your time wisely. • I only want you to create one enclosure of your zoo, I do not care if you use other enclosures that other people made, just make sure you cite them, and give them credit for their work. (state the username, and name of layout) Use the ABC button to create signs for enclosures and restaurants • Click ABC button • Click on place that you want sign, type in name, and click enter. • This labels things. • I want at least the names of the sections in the zoo, not necessarily the animals • I only want 5 animals labeled, and if you have animals in the building, I want to know what type of animals are in the building. • Example: insects building, this is all I’m looking for.

• Below is what I will be demonstrating to the kids


EXAMPLE OF ZOO LAYOUT


Push/Pull (P)

Follow Me

Offset (F)

Move (M)

Rotate (Q)

Scale (S)

Solid Tools

Freehand

Polygon

L

L

Split (Pro)

R

Subtract (Pro)

Union (Pro)

Trim (Pro)

Intersect (Pro)

Section Plane

Walk

Outer Shell

Look Around

Position Camera

R

Zoom Window

Zoom (Z)

Previous

Pan (H)

Orbit (O)

Zoom Extents

3D Text

Text

Axes

Protractor

Dimensions

Arc (A)

Circle (C)

Tape Measure (T)

Line (L)

Eraser (E)

Make Component

Rectangle (R)

Paint Bucket (B)

Select (Spacebar)

Large Tool Set

Right Mouse Button

Middle Button (Wheel)

Scroll Click-Drag Shift+Click-Drag Double-Click Click

Zoom Orbit Pan re-center view show context menu

To add other tools, right-click the toolbar (at the top of your document window) and choose “Customize Toobar...”

Back

Right

Left

Share Model… Share Component…

Front

Get Models…

Top

Preview Model in Google Earth

Standard Views

Monochrome

Shaded with Textures

Shaded

Hidden Line

Wireframe

Back Ege

X-Ray

Iso

Google

Style

Component Attributes

Component Options

Interact

Dynamic Components

Photo Textures

Add New Building…

Toggle Terrain

Add Location…

Flip Edge

Add Detail

Drape

Stamp

Smoove

From Scratch

From Contours

Sandbox (Terrain)

SketchUp 8 Quick Reference Card

Zoom (Z)

Tape Measure (T)

Select (Spacebar)

Scale (S)

Rectangle (R) Rotate (Q)

Push/Pull (P)

Paint Bucket (B)

Orbit (O)

Offset (F)

Look Around Move (M)

Line (L)

Follow Me

Eraser (E)

Circle (C)

Tool Arc (A)

Operation Bulge Radius Segments Shift Radius Segments Option Shift Option+Shift Command Better Way Shift Arrows Length Eye Height Option Shift Command Arrows Distance External Array Internal Array Double-Click Distance Option Shift Option Shift Option+Shift Command Option Double-Click Distance Dimensions Option Angle Slope Option Shift Amount Length Option Shift Option+Shift Option Arrows Resize Shift

© 2010 Google Inc.

Instructions specify bulge amount by typing a number and Enter specify radius by typing a number, the R key, and Enter specify number of segments by typing a number, the S key, and Enter lock in current plane specify radius by typing a number and Enter specify number of segments by typing a number, the S key, and Enter soften/smooth (use on edges to make adjacent faces appear curved) hide unsoften/unsmooth use face perimeter as extrusion path first Select path, then choose the Follow Me tool, then click on the face to extrude lock in current inference direction up or down arrow to lock in blue direction; right to lock in red; left to lock in green specify length by typing a number and Enter specify eye height by typing a number and Enter move a copy hold down to lock in current inference direction auto-fold (allow move even if it means adding extra edges and faces) up or down arrow to lock in blue direction; right to lock in red; left to lock in green specify move distance by typing a number and Enter n copies in a row: move first copy, type a number, the X key, and Enter n copies in between: move first copy, type a number, the / key, and Enter apply last offset amount to this face specify an offset distance by typing a number and Enter hold down to disable “gravity-weighted” orbiting hold down to activate Pan tool paint all matching adjacent faces paint all matching faces in the model paint all matching faces on the same object hold down to sample material push/pull a copy of the face (leaving the original face in place) apply last push/pull amount to this face specify a push/pull amount by typing a number and Enter specify dimensions by typing length, width and Enter ie. 20,40 rotate a copy specify an angle by typing a number and Enter specify an angle as a slope by typing a rise, a colon (:), a run, and Enter ie. 3:12 hold down to scale about center hold down to scale uniformly (don’t distort) specify a scale factor by typing a number and Enter ie. 1.5 = 150% specify a scale length by typing a number, a unit type, and Enter ie. 10m add to selection add/subtract from selection subtract from selection create a new Guide up or down arrow to lock in blue direction; right to lock in red; left to lock in green resize model: measure a distance, type intended size, and Enter hold down and click-drag mouse to change Field of View

Mac OS X


Please thank our partners for enhancing your Zoo experience.

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ublin Zoo is a registered arity that exists to nserve rare and dangered species rough an acclaimed nservation, education d breeding programme. ur adoption boxes and packs make ry special gifts and help with care d conservation too. ow much you care by adopting one 12 animals in Dublin Zoo. Adopt a matran tiger, Asian elephant or umboldt penguin in a special box ith a cuddly toy, certificate, print and dge or choose from nine animal option packs. more details go to: ww.dublinzoo.ie

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r more details contact e Events Team l: +353 (0)1 474 8900 ail:events@dublinzoo.ie

e historic Haughton House provides perfect setting for weddings, rties, conferences and all types special events and functions.

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27 African spurred tortoise

27 African spurred tortoise

26 Abyssinian ground-hornbill

African hunting dog 26 Abyssinian25ground-hornbill

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33 Chilean flamingo

34 Waldrapp ibis & white egret 35 Farm 35 Farm 36 Mara

14 Snowy owl 15 Humboldt penguin

16 Hippopotamus 15 Humboldt penguin

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40 Roberts House 42 Meerkat (viewed inside restaurant)

19 Zebra

42 Meerkat (viewed inside restaurant)

21 Southern white rhinoceros

Paper from responsible sources

41 South American House

20 Giraffe

21 Southern white rhinoceros

39 Spider monkey 41 South American House

19 Zebra

40 Roberts House

39 Spider monkey

38 Rhea

37 Brazilian tapir

18 Scimitar-horned oryx

18 Scimitar-horned oryx 20 Giraffe

17 Ostrich

16 Hippopotamus

38 Rhea

17 Ostrich

37 Brazilian tapir

36 Mara

33 Chilean flamingo 34 Waldrapp ibis & white egret

12 Amur tiger 13 California sealion 13 California sealion 14 Snowy owl

32 Red panda

32 Red panda

11 Asian small-clawed otter 12 Amur tiger

31 Asian and blackbuck 31 Asian elephant andelephant blackbuck

30 Eastern bongo 30 Eastern bongo

11 Asian small-clawed otter

10 Arctic fox

9

28 Red river hog Western lowland gorilla lemur 7 Ring-tailed 28 Red river hog (temporary habitat) 29 habitat) African lion29 African lion 8 Western lowland gorilla (temporary

10 Arctic fox

9

8

Ring-tailed lemur 6 Red-ruffed lemur

Bornean orang-utan

5

7

Siamang gibbon

4

Red-ruffed lemur

6

5

4

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22 Future home of the western lowland gorilla

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100 Metres

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23 Chimpanzee Snow leopard 1 Sulawesi crested macaque 22 Future home of the western lowland gorilla 24 White-crowned mangabey 2 Sumatran tiger 23 Chimpanzee Siamang gibbon 3 Snow leopard 24 White-crowned mangabey 25 African hunting dog Bornean orang-utan

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Information Pointsand animals subject to change

any member of the Zoo team

Information Points

require assistance please Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Play Areas

Picnic Areas

Elephant House Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Play Areas

Heritage Site

Heritage Site

Gift Shops Learning and Discovery Centres

First Aid and LostLearning Childrenand Discovery Centres

First Aid and Lost Children

Baby Feeding Rooms

Baby Feeding Rooms

Baby Changing Facilities

Displays and animals subject to change

3

W

Baby Changing Facilities

Accessible ToiletsAccessible Toilets

Toilets

If you require assistance please ask any member of the Zoo team

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Refreshment Points Refreshment Points

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www.dublinzoo.ie

CELEBRATING 180 YEARS

Sumatran Tiger Orang-utans Reptiles Elephant Encounter African Hunting Do (African Plains) Sealion Splash Penguins Giraffes Rhinos 2:15 2:30 2:45 3:00 Schedule: March to September: Daily October to February: Weekend

11:15 11:45 12:00 12:30 12:45

Listen and learn...

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Parent & Toddler: Spring Farm Tour

National Tree Week Discover more about the importance of plants in attracting and sustaining wildlife. Download your free tree trail guide.

h – 12th

Meet the Farmer...as Gaeilge Get a tour of Family Farm with Pat O’Flahearta from TG4’s ‘Feirm Factor’ series and learn about modern Irish farming methods.

h, 13th & 17th

Seachtain na Gaeilge Celebrate the Irish language through a range of fun and educational events, see website for more details.

h – 17th

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Valentine’s Day Celebrating famous couples and breeding animals plus face painting and arts and crafts.

th

Spring on the Farm Bring your infant or toddler to enjoy the sights, sounds and experience of spring.

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Single day camps and teen camps Interactive programmes to find out more about the animal world.

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ck our website for more rmation and updates on events. w.dublinzoo.ie Pre-booking is essential. bookings: Education Dept 3 (0)1 474 8932. ducation@dublinzoo.ie chers: Educational workshops visits available.

lcome to the wonderful world Dublin Zoo where you can wild’ and enjoy fun and ucational events all year round!



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Fun educational camps suitable for children 6-12 years. Make your own

Spring Day Camps

27th & 28th

Easter Weekend Discover more about Dublin Zoo’s egglaying birds, take part in the Easter trail and enjoy music at the Easter Bunny Disco (disco Sunday only).

24th & 25th

Meet the Farmer Join the farmer on Family Farm and learn more about the new piglets.

24th

Bird-Watching Morning for Beginners Children can develop bird watching and identification skills with our expert guide.

17th

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New! Junior Readers Club Join this reading club for a fun way to learn and make new friends! Bestselling author Dolores Keaveney reads from her book ‘Jenny the Little Brown Hen’. Suitable for children 7-9 years.

9th

Parent and Toddler: Spring Farm Tour Bring your infant or toddler for a tour of the farm & help prepare lunch for the rabbits!

6th

Mother's Day A special day for mums and families alike with lots of mum-related keeper talks, facepainting, arts & crafts and a special menu in the Meerkat Restaurant.

3rd

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McVitie’s Penguin Family Weekend Family event packed with music, face painters, magicians, clowns, stilt walkers, cartoonist, special penguin talks plus much more!

26th & 27th

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Practical course for teachers that will support the implementation of the science curriculum, focusing on the Zoo’s living collection and biofacts.

Teachers In-Service Course – Living Things

4th – 8th

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Farm & Countryside Safety Week Join the detective challenge in Family Farm to help solve the case, also learn how to be safe while visiting farms in the countryside, with fun trail. See www.dublinzoo.ie for more.

20th – 26th

Father’s Day Celebrate Father’s day with facepainting, arts & crafts, special keeper talks about well-known fathers in the Zoo including Harry the silverback gorilla plus more…

19th

Dublin Zoo 180th Anniversary Celebration Come and celebrate 180 years with Dublin Zoo, there will be historical trails and talks plus lots of fun for all the family, see www.dublinzoo.ie for full details.

11th & 12th

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Native Species Learn about Ireland’s rich and natural heritage, through a variety of wildlife organisations and the Dublin Zoo educational and conservation team. There will be interactive activities, educational talks, a mini-aquarium, children’s games, bird walks plus more. Suitable for adults and children alike!

28th & 29th

Family Farm 1st Birthday Join us for a Family Farm fun day with various activities for all the family including face-painting, meet the keeper and farm talks plus much more!

22nd

Bird-Watching Morning for Beginners Children can develop bird watching and identification skills with our expert guide.

15th

17th

St Patrick's Day Enjoy the lively sounds of an Irish trad band, arts & crafts, keeper talks and animal enrichment demonstrations.

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Plus a special monthly Saturday Club for Zoo Annual Pass Holders which launches this month.

New Gorilla Rainforest opening this month!

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Harvest Festival The annual celebration will take place in Family Farm, enjoy practical demonstrations in age-old crafts such as butter churning, spinning, weaving, felt-making, story-telling plus more!

25th

Autumn Lecture Series A series of talks about ‘Conservation & Wildlife’ hosted by a range of specialist speakers, suitable for adults and teenagers. For more details see website.

7th, 14th, 21st & 28th

Craigie Art Competition ‘Endangered Animals and Dublin Zoo’ is the theme of this year’s art competition; submit your entry to be in with a chance of winning a prize! Closing date is 1st December 2011. For all the details see www.dublinzoo.ie

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Buy your pass from our Annual Pass office in the Zoo, online at www.dublinzoo.ie

Come back as often as you like with the annual pass. You’ll get the inside track on what’s going on at the Zoo as well as receiving the special magazine, exclusive discounts and know you’re helping with the ongoing conservation work.

$118$/3$66

Dublin Zoo Saturday Club A monthly Saturday Club for Zoo Annual Pass Holders will launch in September, see www.dublinzoo.ie for all the details.

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McVitie’s Penguin Family Weekend Family event packed with music, face painters, magicians, clowns, stilt walkers, cartoonist, special penguin talks plus much more!

27th & 28th

Heritage Week As part of National Heritage Week, visit the Zoo and discover more about old farming traditions from days gone by!

20th – 28th

Young Zoologist Day Come and have fun as we explore the weird and wonderful world of wildlife at the Zoo, learn new skills while making new friends!

17th & 18th

Summer Camps See details above.

W/C 8th

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A week of fun and interactive learning about wildlife and animals. Explore animal and environmental topics through hands on investigations, animal encounters and behind the scenes tour while making new friends! (Booking opens 23rd May)

W/C 11th, W/C 18th, W/C 25th

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19th & 20th

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30th

Suitable for children 6 - 12 years.

Interactive workshops where you about Halloween related animals make your own witch's broom!

26th & 27th

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World Animal Week A week of free talks educatin about the importance of anim welfare, talk details can be fo www.dublinzoo.ie

4th – 11th

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(see reverse for details)

3

6 4

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s

2 Gator Falls

G

B

A

3

Tiger

8

1 Jungle Carousel

T 1

FEEDING TIME WILD GIFTS Feed your inner beast with a wide selection of food and beverage choices throughout the Zoo.

SAFARI AFRICA A

Safari Lodge Food Court Pasta, Rotisserie Chicken & Ice-Cream with Custom “Mix-Ins”

B

Reilly’s Reserve Seated Family Dining with Views of Elephants & Other Animals!

C

D

The Zoo offers unique souvenirs from wild animal clothing to books, toys, sundries and décor.

1

2

F

G

H

Adventure Outfitters Stroller & wheelchair rentals, sunscreen, film, sundries & more.

Tamani’s Oasis Cold Beverages, Funnel Cakes & Kettle Corn Stand (Select Hours)

3

Congo Trading Company Cold Beverages & Snack Stand

4

Stingray Bay Stingray food sold here. Aquatic animal gifts & more.

5

Manatee Cove All things manatee! Apparel toys, décor & more. (Select Hours)

(Select Hours)

E

Nature’s Kingdom Unique wildlife décor, toys, books, apparel, film, sundries & more.

The Garden Grille Main Entrance - Burgers, Fries, Hot Dogs, Salads & Chicken - Breakfast served until 11am Grub & Grog Restaurant Wallaroo Station - Pizza, BBQ & Cold Beverages Sweet Shoppe Jungle Carousel Gourmet Cupcakes, Cookies, Caramel Apples, Ice Cream & Sweet Treats Rango Snack Stand Primate World - Starbucks Coffee, Cold Beverages & Pastries The Zoo is proud to feature Edy’s Ice Cream. Alcoholic beverages are available Thursday - Sunday from 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. The Zoo uses no lids or straws for the safety of our animals.

Gator Falls Photoshop Gator Falls splashdown photos & unique gifts featuring Florida’s species.

7

Treetop Koala Shop Aussie-themed gifts, water-play gear, sunscreen, towels & more.

8

Giraffe Feeding Station Lettuce for giraffe feeding sold here. African-themed gifts & cold beverages.

Feed & Interact with Animals Stingray Bay Bushland Budgies Giraffe Feeding Wallaroo Petting Zoo Lorikeet Landing Pony Trek Camel Safari Rhino Feeding Collectable Mold-A-Rama and pressed penny machines are located throughout the Zoo.

At lower attendance levels, some food and gift locations may be closed. The Garden Grille, Sweet Shoppe and Nature’s Kingdom will remain open until the Zoo closes every day.

3

5

H

7

Tiger Coaster

4 Camel Safari

C

Safari Ride

6

1

3 2 1 4

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E

Lorikeet Landing Lorikeet feeding nectar sold here. Asian animal & bird-themed gifts.

6

D

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Pony Trek

5 1

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7 Overland Express

6 4

FREE ZOO RIDES* Carousel 1 Jungle Kids under 36” must ride with an adult.

F

Falls Flume Ride 2 Gator 42” to ride. Kids under 6 years old must ride with an adult.

8

Boomer’s Flyin’ Bananas

Tiger Family Coaster 5 Tasmanian Must be 36”, 3 years old & able to hold onto lap bar. Kids under 48” must ride with an adult.

Ride NEW SPECIES! 6 Safari Kids under 54” must ride with a responsible adult. Express Train 7 Overland Must be 4 years old to ride alone. Kids under 4 must ride with an adult.

Flyin’ Bananas 8 Boomer’s Kids must be 3 years old and under 100 lbs. to ride.

The following animal rides are not a part of the free ride offer. Token machines can be found near these two locations. Unlimited animal ride wristbands are available at the front gate ticket windows and in the Zoo Pass booth.

GUEST SERVICES First Aid - Located at the Main Entrance. Ask any Zoo employee.

Restrooms - All restrooms are wheelchair accessible excluding Primate World.

Trek 3 Pony 4 Tokens - Must be at least 2 years old. Weight

1

Water Fountain

2

Stroller & Wheelchair Rental

3

Designated Smoking Area See “Zoo Manners” on back

4

ATM Machine

5

Zoo Pass / Member Services

6

Security / Lost & Found

Interactive Exhibits

Baby Animal

Mommy Stop

A special place designed for Mommy & baby.

These species are nocturnal and are therefore more active in the late afternoon.

restrictions apply.

4 Camel Safari

4 Tokens - Kids under 36” tall must ride with an adult.

T Ride Token Machines *Rides may close due to inclement weather or other circumstances. Ticket refunds are not issued due to ride closures.

LowryParkZoo.com

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Had a good time today? Post or tweet about the Zoo!

1


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Information Designated Smoking Area Restroom Drinking Fountain Hand Washing Station First Aid, Lost & Found Gift Shop ATM Membership/Guest Services Birthday Room Cook House (Catering Support Facility) Pavilion Main Stage Memorial Wall Event Field POET Gazebo Stroller Rental Telephone Picnic Area Playground Tram Stop Tram Route Boat Dock Open Seasonally Giraffe Feeding Station

Food & Beverage Plaza Beastro Soda, Hamburgers, Hot Dogs, Salad, Fruit

Big Bear Watering Hole (Open Seasonally) Ice Cream, Pizza, Snacks

Nganda CafĂŠ (Open Seasonally) Sno-cones, Hot Dogs, Nachos



.RRNDEXUUD&DQWHHQ (Open Seasonally) Bottled Drinks, Hot Dogs, Pretzels, Sno-cones

Zoo Hours Winter Hours begin November 1 10:00 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00 p.m. Summer Hours begin March 1 8:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00 p.m. Sedgwick County Zoo is open every day except for Saturday, September 10, 2011, for Zoobilee. Visit www.scz.org for more details.

Please Note Â&#x2021;&KLOGUHQXQGHUPXVWEH accompanied by an adult. Â&#x2021;1RDOFRKROEDOORRQVRUSHWV Â&#x2021;1RELNHVVNDWHVVNDWHVKRHV scooters, skateboards, or Segways. Â&#x2021;'RQRWGLVWXUEWKHDQLPDOVSODQWV or other visitors. Â&#x2021;'RQRWIHHGWKHDQLPDOV any â&#x20AC;&#x153;people food.â&#x20AC;? Â&#x2021;1RVPRNLQJH[FHSWLQ designated smoking areas during regular business hours. Â&#x2021;6RPHDQLPDOVPD\JRRIIH[KLELW 45 minutes before closing time. Â&#x2021;6RPHDQLPDOVPD\EHRIIH[KLELW due to weather.


WOODLAND PARK ZOO

US BIKE, B LK OR WA OO! EZ TO TH ated at

NORTH 59TH STREET Steller’s Sea Eagle

Arctic Fox

s loc e. k c a r e k Bi tranc n e y r e ev

NORTH PARKING LOT Stalls 601– 795

59TH Street Public Park

Brown Bear

Mountain Goat

River Otter Taiga Viewing Shelter

Tundra Center

N

NORTHERN TRAIL Snowy Owl Elk Wolf

Picnic Shelter

G

Administrative Offices

INNER NORTH PARKING LOT Stalls 810 – 910

WEST ENTRANCE

Wallaby F

Historic Carousel

Emu

WILLAWONG STATION

Orangutan

ZooStore

Pacific Blue Chowder House

Snow Leopard D E

I

Tickets

Guest Services

J

Penguin

Butterfly Forest

Tiger

Adaptations

Fruit Bat

Tapir Komodo Dragon

Day Exhibit Sun Bear

Food Pavilion

Flamingo

in for e

Giraffe

Colobus Monkey

Patas Monkey

Ra

Rai

Pool

Tropical Rain Forest Building

TROPICAL RAIN FOREST

L

Elephant

B

Lion

st lo op

Rain forest loo p

Lemur

Wild Dog

West group Gorilla East group

Jaguar

Thai Village

C

Sloth Bear

Zoomazium’s Backyard

Elephant Barn

Python

Siamang

Meerkat

Membership

K

Metro bus to downtown

TROPICAL ASIA TRAIL OF VINES

Bank of America Commons Bike shelter

Raptor Programs

North Meadow

ARC/ Offices

#5

AUSTRALASIA

n forest loop

O

TROPICAL ASIA

AFRICAN SAVANNA

ELEPHANT FOREST Hippo

N

TEMPERATE FOREST Wetlands

Zebra

Beech Grove Bug World

A

Gazelle

Backyard Habitat

African Village

M

Waterfowl

Family Farm Hornbill

Asian Crane

Conservation Aviary

SOUTHWEST PARKING LOT Stalls 301– 444

PHINNEY AVENUE NORTH

Red Panda

Savanna Aviary

Habitat Discovery Loop

presented by Smith Brothers Farms Membership

Contact Area

The zo smoke-f o is ree!

Education Center

Guest Services

Auditorium ZooStore

SOUTH PARKING LOT Stalls 1– 271

War Garden Public Park

NORTH 50TH STREET Rainy Day Building Hop

Food

Gifts

Telephone

Guest Services First Aid

Restroom

Cash Machine

Picnic Area

Drinking Fountain

Bike Rack

A

Rose Garden

SOUTH ENTRANCE Map Locator (Look for these map locators on signs and match the letter with the one on the map to help guide you!)

Guest Services/Emergency: 206.548.2604 / TTY: 206.548.2599

Find fun today at gifts the

ZooSt

ores!

AURORA AVENUE NORTH

WEST PARKING LOT Stalls 505 – 566

PHINNEY AVENUE NORTH

H


Table Of Contents Welcome to SketchUp (Microsoft Windows).................................................................................... 1 Using the Online User's Guide................................................................................................. 2 Technical Support..................................................................................................................... 6 Learning SketchUp................................................................................................................... 7 Concepts ............................................................................................................................................. 9 Designing in SketchUp........................................................................................................... 10 Drawing Quickly...................................................................................................................... 15 Viewing Models in 3 Dimensions........................................................................................... 22 Adding Detail to Your Models ................................................................................................ 25 Presenting Your Models......................................................................................................... 32 Modeling Terrain and Organic Shapes ................................................................................. 35 The SketchUp User Interface .......................................................................................................... 39 Introduction to the SketchUp Interface.................................................................................. 40 File Menu................................................................................................................................. 44 Edit Menu ................................................................................................................................ 48 View Menu............................................................................................................................... 51 Camera Menu ......................................................................................................................... 53 Draw Menu.............................................................................................................................. 55 Tools Menu.............................................................................................................................. 56 Window Menu ......................................................................................................................... 59 Google Menu .......................................................................................................................... 61 Help Menu............................................................................................................................... 62 Toolbars................................................................................................................................... 65 Context Menus........................................................................................................................ 68 Dialog Boxes........................................................................................................................... 69 Drawing Axes.......................................................................................................................... 71 Inference.................................................................................................................................. 73 Principal Tools .................................................................................................................................. 77 Select Tool............................................................................................................................... 78 Eraser Tool.............................................................................................................................. 82 Paint Bucket Tool.................................................................................................................... 83 Drawing Tools................................................................................................................................... 87 Line Tool.................................................................................................................................. 88 Arc Tool ................................................................................................................................... 92 Freehand Tool......................................................................................................................... 94

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SketchUp User's Guide Rectangle Tool........................................................................................................................ 96 Circle Tool ............................................................................................................................... 98 Polygon Tool ......................................................................................................................... 100 Modification Tools........................................................................................................................... 103 Move Tool.............................................................................................................................. 104 Rotate Tool............................................................................................................................ 110 Scale Tool.............................................................................................................................. 115 Push/Pull Tool....................................................................................................................... 119 Follow Me Tool...................................................................................................................... 123 Offset Tool............................................................................................................................. 127 Intersect With Model Tool.....................................................................................................130 Position Texture Tool............................................................................................................ 132 Construction Tools.......................................................................................................................... 139 Tape Measure Tool ..............................................................................................................140 Protractor Tool ...................................................................................................................... 143 Axes Tool............................................................................................................................... 147 Dimensions Tool ................................................................................................................... 148 Text Tool................................................................................................................................ 150 Section Plane Tool................................................................................................................ 153 Camera Tools ................................................................................................................................. 155 Previous................................................................................................................................. 156 Standard Views..................................................................................................................... 157 Orbit Tool............................................................................................................................... 158 Pan Tool ................................................................................................................................ 159 Zoom Tool ............................................................................................................................. 160 Zoom Window Tool ..............................................................................................................161 Zoom Extents Tool................................................................................................................ 162 Walkthrough Tools ......................................................................................................................... 163 Position Camera Tool...........................................................................................................164 Walk Tool............................................................................................................................... 166 Look Around Tool ................................................................................................................. 167 Sandbox Tools................................................................................................................................ 169 Sandbox From Contours Tool .............................................................................................170 Sandbox From Scratch Tool................................................................................................171 Smoove Tool......................................................................................................................... 173 Stamp Tool............................................................................................................................ 175 Toggle Terrain Tool .............................................................................................................. 176

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Table Of Contents Add Detail Tool...................................................................................................................... 178 Flip Edge Tool....................................................................................................................... 181 Google Toolbar............................................................................................................................... 183 Get Current View Button ......................................................................................................185 Toggle Terrain Button........................................................................................................... 186 Place Model Button .............................................................................................................. 187 Share Model Button.............................................................................................................. 188 Get Models Button................................................................................................................ 189 Model Settings and Managers....................................................................................................... 191 Model Info Dialog Box ..........................................................................................................192 Entity Info Dialog Box ........................................................................................................... 202 Material Browser................................................................................................................... 203 Material Editor ....................................................................................................................... 207 Component Browser.............................................................................................................210 Layer Manager...................................................................................................................... 213 Page Manager ...................................................................................................................... 215 Display Settings Dialog Box................................................................................................. 218 Shadow Settings Dialog Box ...............................................................................................225 Soften Edges Dialog Box .....................................................................................................227 Outliner .................................................................................................................................. 229 Instructor................................................................................................................................ 233 Application Preferences Dialog Box....................................................................................234 Entities.............................................................................................................................................241 Arc Entities ............................................................................................................................ 242 Circle Entities......................................................................................................................... 244 Component Entities .............................................................................................................. 246 Construction Lines Entities...................................................................................................255 Construction Point Entities ...................................................................................................256 Curve Entities........................................................................................................................ 257 Dimension Entities ................................................................................................................ 258 Face Entities.......................................................................................................................... 259 3D Polyline Entities............................................................................................................... 260 Group Entities ....................................................................................................................... 261 Image Entities ....................................................................................................................... 264 Line Entities........................................................................................................................... 265 Polygon Entities .................................................................................................................... 266 Section Plane Entities........................................................................................................... 268

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SketchUp User's Guide Surface Entities..................................................................................................................... 269 Text Entities........................................................................................................................... 272 Context Menu Items .............................................................................................................273 Entity Info............................................................................................................................... 279 Input and Output............................................................................................................................. 283 2D Graphic Export ................................................................................................................ 284 2D Graphic (DWG/DXF) Export ..........................................................................................285 2D Graphic (PDF/EPS) Export ............................................................................................288 2D Graphic (Epix) Export .....................................................................................................291 3D Model (DWG/DXF) Export .............................................................................................293 3D Model (3DS) Export ........................................................................................................294 3D Model (VRML) Export.....................................................................................................298 3D Model (OBJ) Export ........................................................................................................300 3D Model (FBX) Export ........................................................................................................302 3D Model (XSI) Export .........................................................................................................303 3D Model (KMZ) Export .......................................................................................................304 Section Slice Export.............................................................................................................. 305 Animation Export................................................................................................................... 307 2D Graphic Import ................................................................................................................ 310 3D Model (DWG/DXF) Import..............................................................................................311 3D Model (3DS) Import ........................................................................................................313 3D Model (DEM) Import .......................................................................................................314 3D Model (KMZ/KML) Import...............................................................................................316 3D Model (SHP) Import........................................................................................................317 Pages and TourGuide™................................................................................................................ 319 Printing ............................................................................................................................................320 Technical Info.................................................................................................................................. 325 Raster File Formats .............................................................................................................. 326 2D Vector File Formats ........................................................................................................328 SketchUp and OpenGL........................................................................................................330 Codec Lists............................................................................................................................ 332 Bug Splat............................................................................................................................... 333 SketchUp Ruby API and Console .......................................................................................334 Color Pickers......................................................................................................................... 335 Uninstalling SketchUp ..........................................................................................................337 Common Tasks .............................................................................................................................. 339 Activating the Sandbox Tools ..............................................................................................340

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Table Of Contents Adding a Background to Your Model ..................................................................................341 Copying Geometry................................................................................................................ 342 Creating Models to Scale.....................................................................................................343 Creating and Using Keyboard Shortcuts ............................................................................344 Drawing Accurate Angled Lines .......................................................................................... 345 Flipping or Mirroring Geometry ............................................................................................346 Reorienting Materials............................................................................................................ 349 Using SketchUp With Google Earth....................................................................................350 Glossary ..........................................................................................................................................351 Index ................................................................................................................................................357

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Welcome to SketchUp (Microsoft Windows) Developed for the conceptual stages of design, SketchUp is powerful yet easy-to-learn 3D software. We think of it as the pencil of digital design. This award-winning software combines a simple, yet robust tool-set that streamlines and simplifies 3D design inside your computer. SketchUp is being used by anyone with the desire to Dream, Design and Communicate in 3D! From the entire SketchUp team, thank you for trying SketchUp, and welcome to the SketchUp user community.

SketchUp Versions SketchUp is available in personal and professional versions. Google SketchUp (free) is a 3D design tool for personal use and is available for free on sketchup.google.com. SketchUp Pro 5 is approved for commercial use and is available to purchase on sketchup.google.com. You need SketchUp Pro 5 if you want to: x

Export models in 3DS, DWG, DXF, OBJ, XSI, VRML, and FBX file formats

x

Export animations and walkthroughs as MOV or AVI files

x

Access the organic modeling (Sandbox) tools

x

Print and export raster images at higher-than-screen resolution

x

Receive free email technical support for two years after purchase

x

Use the software for commercial purposes (the free version is approved for personal use only)

Google SketchUp (free) and SketchUp Pro 5 Documentation This documentation represents all of the functionality in both Google SketchUp (free) and SketchUp Pro 5. Functionality that is specific to SketchUp Pro 5 is identified with the pro icon (

) in this documentation.

Using this Guide Familiarity with computer basics is all you need to use SketchUp. Continue with the Learning SketchUp section of this guide for assistance with learning SketchUp. Or, read the What's New in This Release section of this guide to become familiar with SketchUp's new features.

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SketchUp User's Guide

Using the Online User's Guide The SketchUp Online User's Guide is a Web-based help system designed to introduce you to the SketchUp concepts and features. Refer to this user's guide to find explanations of each SketchUp feature or to learn how to perform common tasks using SketchUp tools. Select the SketchUp Help menu item from SketchUp's Help menu to access SketchUp Online User's Guide. The online user's guide contains a toolbar on top, navigation panel (below the toolbar on the left), and content panel containing the actual user's guide content (below the toolbar on the right).

The Online User's Guide Toolbar The SketchUp Online User's Guide's toolbar contains four options for finding the information. These options are: The Contents button, the Index button, the Search button, and the Search field.

The Contents Button The Online User's Guide is organized into topics. Topics can be combined with related topics within chapters or can exist outside of a chapter. Additionally, topics can have subtopics. Click on the Contents button in the Online User's Guide Toolbar to view all of the chapters in the user's guide. Click on the chapter icon (a small book) to view topics within that chapter. The following image shows all of the chapters in the SketchUp Online User's Guide. This image also shows all of the topics in the Principal Tools chapter.

Click on a topic to see the user's guide entry for that topic. Topics can contain multiple subtopics. For example, the Eraser Tool topic contains the Erasing Entities, Hiding Edges, and

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Welcome to SketchUp Soften Edges subtopics. The following image shows the Erasing Entities subtopic within the Eraser Tool topic.

The Index Button Click on the Index button to display a keywords search field and index entries in the online user's guide. Click on an index entry in the index list to navigate to that topic or subtopic.

An index entry can be used for more than one topic or subtopics. A sublist is displayed when an index entry is linked to more than one topics or subtopic. Select an item from this sublist to jump

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SketchUp User's Guide to a topic or subtopic. The following image shows that the Copy index entry contains related subtopics in the Edit Menu topic and in the Move Tool topic.

The Search Button Click on the Search button at the top of the online SketchUp Users Guide to search the entire user's guide for keywords and return the topics where those keywords exist. The following image shows the topics resulting from looking up the word "Copy." Notice that only topics are returned, not subtopics.

Tip - Use the Search button or Search only when you want to find all occurrences of a specific word or phrase throughout the entire user's guide. Use the Index button to find specific index entries and their associated topics.

Conventions The user's guide uses these special symbols and conventions: Note - The Note icon is used to indicate additional detail for a feature of SketchUp. Video - The projector icon is used to identify a Video Tutorial that compliments the text by explaining how to use a feature of SketchUp.

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Welcome to SketchUp

Caution - The Caution icon is used to identify issues that might cause you problems. Tip - The Tip icon is used to identify a tip to help you optimize the way you use SketchUp. Menu > Menu Item - Used to identify a location for a specific menu item. italics - Used to identify a term that is defined in the glossary. <a_value> - Used to identify a value you must supply.

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SketchUp User's Guide

Technical Support Google SketchUp (Free) and SketchUp Pro users have different levels of technical support. Review the following technical support explanation for the your product.

SketchUp Free SketchUp Free is a self-supporting product. There are several options available to find answers to SketchUp your issues: x

Use the online user's guide index to find a topic.

x

Search the knowledge base to find a topic.

x

Post a question in our user forum.

Visit the SketchUp Help Center by clicking on the Help Center menu item in the Help Menu (Help > Help Center...). You must be connected to the Internet to access the user forums.

SketchUp Pro In addition to the self-supporting options for SketchUp Free, SketchUp Pro users can request installation and configuration help using email through the SketchUp Help Center (your serial number will be required). Please include the following with your email: x

A copy of the SketchUp file you are creating

x

A list of your computer system's resources (CPU type, RAM, video card details, and the exact release of your operating system, such as Windows XP Professional with Service Pack 2)

x

A detailed description of your question or issue

ŠGoogle Inc. 2006

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Welcome to SketchUp

Learning SketchUp As with any software tool, there is a minimum level of learning you must do to attain proficiency with SketchUp. The following information can help you learn how to use SketchUp.

Video Tutorials Google has created several video tutorials to facilitate learning of the SketchUp tools and drawing procedures. View these tutorials through the View Tutorials menu item in the Help Menu (Help > View Tutorials). You must be connected to the Internet to access these tutorials. These video tutorials will also play directly from the CD-ROM if you have a SketchUp CD-ROM inserted into your drive. If the CD-ROM is not in your drive, your computer will attempt to access streaming versions of the tutorials from the SketchUp web site. You can also download the online tutorials from the Web site to your hard drive to ensure they play smoothly.

Self-Paced Tutorials Google has also created several self-paced tutorials to help you learn SketchUp. Access these tutorials through the Self-Paced Tutorials menu item in the Help Menu (Help > Self-Paced Tutorials). You must be connected to the Internet to access these tutorials.

Online User's Guide This online user's guide contains a Concepts section for users who are new to working in three dimensions or new to SketchUp. This section is meant to be read sequentially before using SketchUp for the first time. You must be connected to the Internet to access this guide.

Menus Most SketchUp commands are accessible using both tool buttons and drop-down menus. Examine SketchUp's menus to become familiar with the breadth of features.

Quick Reference Card The SketchUp Quick Reference Card, available in the SketchUp Help Menu and on the sketchup.google.com, contains a list of all of toolbar tools and their modifier keys. Examine the

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SketchUp User's Guide SketchUp Quick Reference card to become familiar with using SketchUp's tools. View the quick reference card the Quick Reference menu item in the Help Menu (Help > Quick Reference).

The Status Bar The Status Bar, located at the bottom of the SketchUp Drawing Area, displays tips for the active tool, including special functions accessible using keyboard shortcuts. Watch the status bar while you are working in SketchUp to discover advanced capabilities of each of the SketchUp tools.

User Forum The SketchUp forums are a great way to contact others in the SketchUp user community. These forums provide a unique environment for you to obtain help, suggest new features, offer advice, and share your models. Visit the SketchUp user forums by clicking on the SketchUp Community... menu item in the Help Menu (Help > SketchUp Community...). You must be connected to the Internet to access the user forums.

SketchUp Training Google provides training courses for users who want extra assistance with SketchUp from the experts at Google. Visit http://www.sketchup.com/training to see a list of training courses available in your area.

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Concepts This section of the user's guide covers the numerous 3D design and SketchUp concepts found within the product and in the user community. This section was primarily written for users who are new to 3D modeling or SketchUp. Note - This section does not cover how to do something in SketchUp, but covers important concepts necessary to model in 3D.

This section is organized into the following topics: x

Designing in Sketchup - Introduces you to the basic concepts behind drawing accurately in SketchUp.

x

Drawing Quickly - Introduces you to SketchUp tools and concepts necessary to draw quickly.

x

Viewing Models in 3D - Presents the concept of the camera and manipulation of a model in 3D space.

x

Adding Detail to Your Models - Introduces you to mechanisms to quickly add realism to your SketchUp models.

x

Presenting Your Models - Presents concepts related to the presentation of your models to clients.

x

Modeling Terrain and Organic Shapes - Presents concepts related to working with mesh tools to create both terrain and organic shapes.

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Designing in SketchUp SketchUp models are fundamentally created by joining lines as the edges of the model. Faces are automatically created when any three or more lines or edges are in the same plane (an infinite flat 2D space), or coplanar, and form a closed loop. These edge and face combinations are combined to create 3D models. The following image shows three unconnected coplanar lines. These lines were drawn with the Line Tool (this tool looks like a pencil).

The following image shows four connected coplanar lines and the subsequently created flat, 2 dimensional, face.

Note - Everything you draw in SketchUp is generically referred to as geometry. To create a 3D model, simply draw up or down in the blue direction (parallel to the blue axes). The coordinate system (axes) is covered later in this section. The following image shows the first line created in 3D space.

As you continue to draw lines, following the colored axes, faces are created. The following image shows three faces created simply by drawing lines parallel to the three axes directions (red, green, and blue). ŠGoogle Inc. 2006

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There is one line left to draw to finish a 3 dimensional box. Notice that when this one line is drawn in, two faces are created (the top and front faces).

You can do a lot in SketchUp simply by drawing lines to form faces using the Line Tool. And, you can draw lines starting anywhere (on another line, on a face, at a point, and so on). Can you recognize the previous 3D box within the model of the following house?

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Look around the room you are in. Notice how everything you look at has faces. Some faces might be rounded, some might be flat. Additionally, everything has edges that bound the face, such as the edge of a shelf in a bookshelf. Note - SketchUp is not the same as Computer Assisted Design or CAD. CAD applications are designed specifically for representing concrete information, while SketchUp is for exploration and design of concepts and ideas (though you are not prohibited from designing models that are as concrete or accurate as those designed in CAD). SketchUp files can be imported into several different CAD applications for further processing and several different CAD files can be imported into SketchUp to quickly create 3D models.

Introduction to Entities As mentioned previously, lines are combined to create faces in SketchUp. Lines (also called edges) and faces, are just two of the many building blocks (called entities) used for creating models in SketchUp. A full list of SketchUp entities follows. Name

Notes

Line

Lines in SketchUp are straight. Lines, also referred to as edges, are the most basic building block for all SketchUp models.

Face

Faces are created automatically when three or more coplanar edges form a closed loop. Faces have a front side and a back side. SketchUp attempts to put the front side of all faces on the outside (facing out) of all of your models, though sometime you might have to tell SketchUp the direction for your faces.

Circle

Circle, arcs, and curves are comprised of several lines or edges.

Arc Polygon Curve 3D Polyline Group

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Group entities are used to combine two or more entities in your

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Concepts

model for quick operations such as a copy. Component

Component entities are like groups but can be reused in all of your SketchUp models. Components are just SketchUp models used within other SketchUp models.

Construction Line

A Construction Line entity is a temporary line used as a drawing guide.

Dimension

A notation indicating length of an edge or a radius.

Surface

Surface entities are the result of combining a number of faces to give the impression of smoothness.

Section Plane Image

An imported raster, or pixel-based, image.

Text

Text can be unattached (floating) or attached to a specific entity using a leader line.

The SketchUp Coordinate Systems SketchUp uses a 3D coordinate system whereby points in space are identified by position along three drawing axes: plus or minus X, Y, and Z (above ground/below ground) values. In SketchUp, plus or minus X is represented by solid red and dotted red lines respectively; plus or minus Y are represented by a solid green and dotted green axis lines respectively; plus or minus Z (above and below the ground plane) are represented by solid blue and dotted blue lines respectively. The plane where the red and green axes lines lie is called the ground plane. Finally, the term origin, is used to define the place where all of axes lines start or originate. The following image shows the drawing axes in SketchUp (the lines have been thickened to make the axes easier to read). The black circle represents the origin.

Understanding SketchUp’s coordinate system is important because SketchUp’s inference engine (explained next) provides you help with drawing accurately.

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Following the Inference Engine SketchUp has an invisible inference engine to help you draw accurate and realistic models. The inference engine locates or infers points from other points in your model, such as the center of a circle, the midpoint of a line, a line that is perpendicular to the ground plane, a point on a face, a point on an edge, and so on. SketchUp notifies you of these points by using both color indicators and tool tips, which are onscreen messages indicating the location of the cursor as you draw an entity. For example, SketchUp displays the string â&#x20AC;&#x153;On Face" when the cursor is touching a face. The following image contains five common inference tool tips.

Additional information on the inference engine, including inference types, is in the User Interface section of this guide. The first step to drawing in SketchUp is to learn how to draw accurately by following the cues of the inference engine. Simply select the Line Tool (it looks like a pencil in the toolbar) and start drawing. Pay attention to the on-screen tool tips from the inference engine as you draw. Most everything you will create in SketchUp can be created by inference using the Line Tool. You can move on to learning how to draw quickly after you master using the inference engine. = Functionality only available in SketchUp Pro

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Drawing Quickly As mentioned in the Design in SketchUp topic, you can use the Line Tool and the inference engine, to draw just about anything in SketchUp. It is recommended that you use the Line Tool and inference engine to create your initial models. Tip - Learn to draw accurately before you learn to draw quickly and you will master SketchUp in a shorter amount of time. SketchUp implements several concepts which you will use to help you draw quickly. These are dividing and healing, pushing and pulling, sticky geometry, autofold, and intersections.

Dividing and Healing Geometry Some tools speed up design dramatically by allowing you to perform modifications on existing geometry. For example, the Line Tool allows you to split faces and edges to create additional independent faces and edges. Simply divide the face or edge with another edge. This concept is similar to cutting a piece of paper in half and having two separate remaining pieces. The following image shows how two faces are created when dividing the face with a line. Notice the image on the left has one solid top face, while the image on the right has two independent faces when split with a line. Note that the dividing line does not cut through the model from top to bottom, but just cuts the top face in half.

The following image shows how the edges at each end of the face have been split to create additional edges. Note four edges bounding the face in the left image, while four edges bounding each of two faces in the image on the right (the middle edge being common to both top faces).

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If you remove the line that shared by the two faces in the image on the right, the two faces will be glued back together or healed back into one face. It is common in SketchUp to perform these dividing and healing operations to your model.

Pushing and Pulling The Push/Pull Tool allows you to take any non-curved face in SketchUp and push it away or pull it toward a starting point (these operations are also referred to as extrusions). Pushing is the process of reshaping a portion of your model by shrinking the portion away from its starting point and along a single axis. The following image shows the right-most face of the split face (shown earlier) pushed down toward the ground plane.

In the previous image, there are eight faces that can be pushed, can you find them (some are hidden out of view)? Pulling is the process of expanding a portion of your model away from the starting point along a single axis. The following image shows the same face having been pulled up toward the sky. Any face in SketchUp can be pushed and pulled (with some minor limitations).

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In both of the images, the left side of the cube remained the same size, while the right side was pushed and pulled (shrunk and expanded) independently. The Push/Pull Tool is one of the most commonly used tools in SketchUp to add the sense of volume to your model.

Manipulating Connected Faces Geometry in SketchUp is sticky meaning that it can be manipulated (skewed, distorted, or folded) by selecting an edge or face and moving the edge or face with the Move Tool (causing all entities attached or "stuck" to the edge or face to move too). Following are three examples of sticky geometry in SketchUp: 1. The following image shows a line dividing the top face of a box being moved up with a Move Tool. The faces that were connected to the middle line followed the line as it was moved to create a roof-like effect.

2. The following image shows the left-most top face being moved down in the blue direction. This action causes the left-most top face to angle to create a slant on one side.

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3. Finally, the following image shows the left-most top-edge being moved to the left. The model is skewed into a trapazoid-like shape.

Be sure to use the Move Tool to grab and move edges and faces while you begin to experiment with modeling in SketchUp. Tip - Experimentation and play is highly important in learning how to draw in SketchUp! Learn how to draw accurately first, then learn how to draw quickly using the concepts in this portion of the user's guide.

Autofold Faces must remain planar at all times in SketchUp. Therefore, SketchUp will Autofold, or score, faces as necessary to accommodate any operation that will result in warped faces.

In the left-most image above, a six-sided polygon volume's top face (created with the Polygon Tool followed by the Push/Pull Tool) was rotated using Rotate Tool. Because of SketchUp's sticky nature, the sides of the shape, which share common edges with the top face, twisted and folded with the rotate operation (right-most image).

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Concepts What you are not seeing is that SketchUp has created hidden geometry when performing this Autofold operation. The following image shows the 3 dimensional shape with the hidden geometry shown (dotted lines). Notice that each twisted faces are actually comprised of two triangular faces.

Intersections (Boolean Operations) SketchUp allows you to easily create complex geometry by intersecting two geometrical forms, such as a box and a tube, creating new edges where the elements intersect, merging the geometry, and subtracting parts of the combined geometry.

In the left-most image above, a cylinder shape was moved into a cube shape. Notice, that no lines appear where the two shapes intersect, indicating that the shapes have not truly merged. A special tool, called the Intersect with Model Tool, is used to create intersection lines (the middle image), merging the two shapes together to form one new shape. Finally, the cylinder shape is deleted (using the eraser tool on the cylinder's edges) and because the intersection lines were created, the resulting curved face is left within the cube creating a new complex geometrical shape (right image).

SketchUp Tools Most entities in SketchUp, including arcs and circles, are actually just a combination of small lines or edges. Thankfully, you do not have to use only the Line Tool to sketch your models. ŠGoogle Inc. 2006

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SketchUp User's Guide Instead, SketchUp provides many other tools to help you draw quickly. Some of these tools are for creating common entities such as a circle, arc, polygon, or freehand line. Other tools allow you to quickly draw complex models by modifying your models (splitting, skewing, and even merging geometry together). Tools in SketchUp are divided into five categories: principal tools (tools that are used a lot to select and modify geometry), drawing tools (tools used to create geometry), modification tools (tools used to modify existing geometry), construction tools (tools used to create construction lines or points, and document your model), camera tools (tools used to view geometry; discussed later), and walkthrough tools (tools to explore your model). The following table lists all of the Drawing and Modification tools: Tool

Type

Notes

Line

Drawing

Can be used to create, intersect, or divide a face or other line (edge)

Arc

Drawing

Can be used to create, intersect, or divide a face or other line (edge)

Freehand

Drawing

Can be used to create, intersect, or divide a face or other line (edge)

Rectangle

Drawing

Can be used to create, intersect, or divide a face or other line (edge)

Circle

Drawing

Can be used to create, intersect, or divide a face or other line (edge)

Polygon

Drawing

Can be used to create, intersect, or divide a face or other line (edge)

Select

Principal

Used to select entities

Eraser

Principal

Used to delete geometry and heal faces

Paint Bucket

Principal

Used to apply materials (combinations of color and texture)

Position Texture*

Modification

Used to manipulate materials painted on a surface.

Move

Modification

Used to move, distort (autofold), and copy entities

Rotate

Modification

Scale

Modification

Push/Pull

Modification

Used to expand and shrink geometry

Follow Me

Modification

Used to duplicate a profile along a path

Intersect With Model*

Modification

Used to create complex geometry by piecing together separate geometry

Offset

Modification

Tape Measure

Construction

Used to get a measurement and create construction line entities

Protractor

Construction

Used to set angles

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Axes

Construction

Dimensions

Construction

Text

Construction

Section Plane

Construction

Used to calculate and display a dimension

Used to create section cut effects

*These menu items are available in menus, not from the toolbar, and are discussed in the tools sections of this user's guide. Each of these tools is discussed further in this guide. As a recommendation, however, learn the Line Tool and Eraser Tool first, followed by the Orbit Tool (discussed in the next section), Push/Pull, and Move Tools. Note - Most drawing tools can perform modifications as well, such as the Line Tool being used to draw a line to divide a face.

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Viewing Models in 3 Dimensions SketchUp implements the concept of a camera to represent your point of view of the model. Simply, you (the user) are treated as though you were a camera looking at your model as you work. This concept is particularly important when your model is something that you want to tour, such as a house, as though you were walking through it in the real world. In this case, SketchUp allows you to change your point of view to a specific height and angle to the model and walk through the model as though it were real.

Manipulating the Camera SketchUp starts at a camera angle (the angle at which you view your model) that is facing directly down at the ground as though you were looking directly down the blue axis from the sky at the ground plane. This camera angle is the default because the majority of SketchUp models, houses and landscapes for example, begin on the ground or red/green plane. Notice you only see the ground plane in the following figure. This figure suggests you are looking down at the image as though looking down the Blue axes (you, the camera, are hanging in the sky and looking right down at the ground).

However, you will not get the sense of modeling in a 3D space until you orbit the camera using the Orbit Tool after opening SketchUp and drawing a starting form. Following is the same model after having been orbited.

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Camera Tools There are other ways to manipulate the camera (your point of view) in SketchUp, including zooming in and out and panning. The following table lists all of the camera tools in SketchUp: Tool

Type

Orbit

Camera

Pan

Camera

Zoom

Camera

Zoom Window

Camera

Zoom Extents

Camera

Position Camera

Walkthrough

Walk

Walkthrough

Look Around

Walkthrough

Perspective and Paraline Projections In addition to your point of view, you can view items in SketchUp in a paraline (also called axonometric) projection or in a perspective projection. Axonometric means “measurable from the axes” and an axonometric projection is a view of a model in which lines appear parallel in both 3 dimensional and 2 dimensional space. Also, lines have a length that is to some scale in an axonometric projection when printed (for example 4' in SketchUp = 1" on paper). The following image shows a axonometric or paraline projection, notice how the roof, and wall lines appear parallel.

Perspective, however, distorts the view such that it represents the model as though the lines were vanishing to a horizon (certain items appear closer while other items appear to be far away; entities are not to scale). The following image shows a perspective projection.

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SketchUp defaults to a perspective view, but can be toggled into a paraline view for those who prefer a point of view that is similar to what you would see when drawing 3D objects in a 2D space (such as when drawing a cube on flat paper). Note - The iso camera view in SketchUp is not the same as an isometric projection in which anything along the x, y or z axis are in proportion. This view simply shows you ! of your model and is a standard camera angle for viewing models in a 3D space.

Layers SketchUp layers are used to control the visibility of geometry within large models. A SketchUp layer is an attribute with a name, such as "Layer0," "Layer9," or "Chairs." Elements can be assigned different layers. For example, all Component entities that are chairs can be assigned to the "Chairs" layer. This layer can be then be hidden temporarily to hide everything on the layer from view. Note - Geometry on one layer is not separated from geometry on another layer. For example, faces sharing a common edge will both be affected by a modification to that edge regardless of what layer the faces are on. Default "Layer0" There is one Layer, Layer0, in SketchUp, by default. All entities are automatically placed on this layer unless you create another layer, designate the new layer as the active layer, and create entities on the new layer.

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Adding Detail to Your Models You will likely want to create progressively more detailed models as you become more proficient with SketchUp. SketchUp contains several features allowing you to quickly create detailed or life-like models. These features include components, materials, and shadows.

Materials SketchUp allows you to paint materials on faces to add detail and realism to your models. Materials are essentially paints that have a color and optional texture (defined within a image file). For example, a siding material with the color of grey and a appearance or texture simulating to real overlapped composite siding. Following is a building painted with grey composite siding and grey shingle roofing materials. A grass material is also used to the ground.

As with components, SketchUp comes with a library of materials. You can paint these materials on your models using the Paint Bucket Tool. Additionally, you can create your own materials within SketchUp (using the color wheel), or by importing texture-like images (such as the image of a wood flooring). In fact, you can import an entire image of a real-world object (such as a picture of a car), and manipulate it over your 3D model to give your model a truly realistic appearance. Default Material Geometry in SketchUp is assigned a default material as it is created. The default material can be changed by painting the geometry with a material. Material Transparency Materials also have a opacity property (a number between 0 and 100%) allowing you to create materials that behave like glass. Paint these materials on faces to create windows.

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Faces have two sides. SketchUp materials are normally applied to a single side of a face at a time. Painting a default colored side with transparent material will result in both sides of that face being treated as transparent allowing the surface to be transparent when viewed from both sides. If the back side of a face has already been painted with some non-transparent material, applying a transparent material to the front side will not cause the back side to also display as transparent. Likewise, if you paint the back side of a face with a different transparent material, it will not effect the front side. Thus, by specifically applying a material to both sides, it is possible to have transparent faces that can have different colors and levels of transparency on each side.

Groups and Components Groups and components are entities that can hold other entities. Groups are commonly used to combine several entities into a single entity for the purposes of performing a quick operation on the group (such as a copy or move). For example, you might draw a model, group the entities that compose model and move the entire model. The characteristics of groups are: x

Quick selection. When you select a Group, all elements within that group are selected as well.

x

Isolation of geometry. Entities within groups are protected from the rest of the model. Geometry outside of the group does not affect the geometry within the group

x

Model organization. Groups can be nested within other groups resulting in hierarchical collection of subgroups.

x

Group material. The group as a whole can be assigned a material of its own, which is separate from the materials painted on individual entities within the group. See the Materials section within this topic for further information.

x

Drawing Axes. Groups maintain their own internal drawing axes.

x

Alignment and Hole Cutting. Groups have a special behavior that allows them to properly align themselves and stick to faces on which they are placed (as well as cut holes in those faces).

Components are just a group with special behaviors, namely behaviors allowing them to be inserted in other models. For example, you might create a model of a car that you want to bring into other SketchUp models, such as the model of a house. Any models you create can be a component.

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Components have the following characteristics, in addition to the characteristics of groups: x

Instancing Behavior. Each copy of a component that you insert into a model is considered an instance of a component definition. The component definition is the blueprint that defines the appearance and behavior of all component instances (created when you insert the component in the model). Editing a component instance edits the definition and all instances accordingly. However, some actions, such as scaling an instance, only affects the instance itself.

x

Improved Performance. Components allow SketchUp to more efficiently use your computerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resources because the information necessary to describe a component is only stored once, in the component definition, and then referenced for every component instance.

x

Drawing Axes. Components display their own internal drawing axes when you are editing the component.

x

Alignment and Hole Cutting. You can define alignment and hole cutting behavior when creating components (it is automatically defined for groups). Note - You can define the characteristics of the component during component creation.

Group and Component Context Entities within a group or component are said to exist within the group or component's scope or context. You can modify a group or component as a whole (affecting all of the entities within the group or component) or edit the group or component's individual entities (within the group or component's context). Additionally, you can nest components within other components, groups within components, components within groups and so on. The following image shows a shelf component has been selected (as indicated by the yellow selection color) using the Select Tool. This shelf is composed of several subcomponents, such as slats.

The following image shows the shelf component being edited. Notice that it has a dashed bounding box to indicate you are in the component's context. In this case, a subcomponent, one of the slats in the shelf, has been selected. That slat is within the context of the shelf. Also notice that the component's axes are displayed in the lower left-hand corner. ŠGoogle Inc. 2006

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Finally, the following image shows the slate component being edited. Notice now that there is a dashed bounding box around the component, and around the slat being edited. The entities, such as the lines and face, that compose that individual slat are said to be in the context of the slat.

Component Libraries Component libraries have been created and included with SketchUp to allow you to easily add detail to your models. These components range from standard architectural components (doors, windows, and so on) to people, cars, trees, and geometric shapes. You can also create your own libraries of components from pre-existing components or components you create yourself.

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Note - Additional industry-specific content libraries are available on the SketchUp web site under the download section (www.sketchup.com). Component Axes Components have their own axes which, by default, are aligned to the global axes in the drawing area. These axes can be moved affecting component placement in the model. Cutting and Gluing Behavior Components, such as doors and windows, can be designed such that they can be placed on specifically-oriented surfaces such as vertical wall surfaces. This behavior is referred to as the gluing behavior of a component. Additionally, components can be designed to automatically cut holes in surfaces, such as in the case of a window component being able to cut a hole in a wall. This behavior is referred to as the cutting behavior of a component. Layers, Groups and Components Layers are a mechanism for controlling the visibility of entities within a model. Entities can be assigned to different layers in a model and those layers, and their contents, can be displayed independently. Groups and Components are used to isolate geometry as sub-models within an overall model, such as a component of a chair within a model of a room. Note - Entities within a group or component can be on several different layers.

Shadows SketchUp allows you to cast shadows on your model as though the model were in a real-world environment. These shadows can be cast based on time of day and virtual location of the model in the real-world. For example, you can set shadows to see exactly what a model of a house would look like at 10:20 am, December 10, in Boulder, Colorado, which is the default location. Finally, SketchUp's shadows are designed to provide dynamic feedback as you change geometry and your camera viewpoint. The shadow casting feature in SketchUp is a great way to give your models a better sense of depth and realism.

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Note - While SketchUp's projected shadow angles are accurate, the rendering effect is not intended to be photo-realisitc. Fortunately, SketchUp can export models to other many other applications that excel at photo-realistic renderings. Ground Shadows Ground shadows use the faces in your model to create a flattened set of faces on the ground plane. These faces are colored and positioned based on the background color and the angle of the sun. Although faster than face shadows, the illusion that ground shadows provide only works on the ground plane. The following figure shows a model whose geometry all lies on or above the ground plane.

Note - Ground shadows create unexpected geometry, called artifacts, when your model contains geometry beneath the ground plane. Ground shadows works well for models with solid color backgrounds and in which all geometry is above the ground plane.

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Concepts Face Shadows Face shadows use the sun angle to project shadows based on the location of faces relative to other faces. For example, a shadow is cast on the stairs in the following figure, based on the face of the vertical 3d rectangle. The calculation used to create face shadows is processorintensive, however, and will slow down performance with large models.

Note - Faces with less than 70 percent opacity are considered transparent, and do not cast shadows. Faces with 70 percent opacity or greater cast shadows. Transparent faces cannot receive shadows. The following image shows a transparent (less than 70% opacity) rectangle that does not cast a shadow (left) and a opaque (70% or greater opacity) rectangle that does cast a shadow (right).

The two shadow systems are designed to be complimentary, and you may often wish to have both types enabled simultaneously.

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Presenting Your Models There are several things you can do after you create a model. For example: x

You can add dimensions, section cut effects, and other entities to your model for use in documenting the actual physical item.

x

You can present the model within SketchUp as a TourGuide Tour (a animated tour of your model)

x

You can print your model

x

You can export all or portions (such as a section slice) of the model for post processing in another application

Section Cut Effects SketchUp allows you to create section cut effects which are the result of slicing through your model to see and work inside its interior. The following image shows a model of a building with a section cut affect active allowing the designer to work inside the model or present interior detail to a client.

The following model shows the section cut effect resulting from slicing through the model of a cup.

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Concepts

Section Planes Section cut effects are created by section planes which are special entities used to control the selection, placement, orientation, direction, of the section slice. Section planes are generated using the Section Plane Tool.

The previous image shows a section plane entity intersecting the cup and creating a section slice through the cup. Section Slices The term section slice refers to the edges that are highlighted after intersecting geometry with a section plane. The following image shows a section slice in red.

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These edges act as dynamic virtual edges in that they continually change as you move the section plane through your model with the Move Tool. You can create a group from these edges, such as when slicing horizontally through a house, to create a wire frame of the model (such the outline of a floor plan). Then, export this section slice for use in a CAD program to add additional detail (such as wall construction detail).

TourGuide Tours SketchUp allows you to create different pages, similar to slides in traditional presentation software, each containing different settings for your model (point of view, section cut effects, and so on). These pages can be combined and executed sequentially as a TourGuide Tour. The TourGuide engine can be set to gradually transition between effects on different pages for a truly dynamic presentation.

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Modeling Terrain and Organic Shapes SketchUp implements the concept of a sandbox which refers to a surface that can be generated and manipulated using sandbox tools. A sandbox in SketchUp (and in other 3D modeling tools) is commonly referred to as a triangulated irregular network or TIN in terrain modeling terminology. The following image shows a TIN (sandbox) in SketchUp.

Note - This documentation uses the term TIN, sandbox, and terrain interchangeably. A TIN is like a sandbox because it has a boundary and contains a sculpted surface (sand). Sandbox tools are those tools that are included in SketchUp for creating and manipulating TINs. The following image shows a TIN in SketchUp with hidden geometry displayed (so you can see the triangles that are the foundation of the TIN).

There is nothing special about a TIN, it is simply several connected triangular faces that, when smoothed, appear like one continuos smooth surface. Note that you are not limited to creating terrain with the sandbox tools, you can create other organic shapes (shapes that appear to be crafted by hand) using these tools. For example, you might create a person's face, a bowl, or a swimming pool using the sandbox tools. Another type of TIN-like surface, which the sandbox tools can work with, is called a polygon mesh. A polygon mesh is similar to a TIN, but contains faces with more than three vertices. Note - SketchUp's Sandbox From Scratch Tool and Sandbox From Contours Tool only create TINs, but you can import a polygon mesh or create a polygon mesh (manually) using other SketchUp tools.

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Triangulation Triangles in a TIN can be oriented in different directions. The orientation of triangles is referred to as triangulation. Notice in the previous image that some triangles are oriented vertically while others are oriented horizontally. This concept is important because some sandbox tools allow you to change the direction of the triangles as a way to further smooth TINs.

Creating a TIN There are several ways to obtain a starting TIN as the foundation of your model. These are: x

Create or import contour lines and use the Sandbox From Contours Tool to create a TIN.

x

Import an image of a site plan or contour map and trace its contours with the Freehand Tool. Then, adjust the contours to their proper elevation and use the Sandbox From Contours Tool to create a TIN.

x

Import a TIN using the SketchUp ArcGIS Plug-in available at www.http://www.sketchup.com/markets/gis.php. ArcGIS is an industry standard application suite or Geographic Information System for working with geographical information such as the location of buildings within a world-wide global coordinate system.

x

Import a digital terrain model (DTM) file.

x

Create sandbox (TIN) using the Sandbox From Scratch Tool.

Modifying a TIN SketchUp contains several tools for modifying TINs. The following table lists all of the sandbox tools in SketchUp. Tool

Type

Notes

Sandbox From Scratch

Create TIN

Creates a flat, rectangular shaped, TIN or sandbox that can be modified by other sandbox tools.

Sandbox From Contour s

Create TIN

Creates TIN or a sandbox from contour lines at various elevations.

Smoove

Large Modifi cation s

Allows you sculpt or make large modifications to a TIN by moving groupings of vertices to create hills, berms, or other features.

Stamp

Large Modifi cation s

Allows you to sculpt or make large modifications to a TIN by stamping footprints into the TIN, such as the footprint of a building.

Drape

Large Modifi cation s

Allows you to drape the outlines of roads, paths and buildings, drawn on a flat plane, onto a TIN.

Add Detail

Small, Detail ed, Modifi cation

Allows you to sculpt or make small, detailed, modifications to the a TIN by adding additional triangles to a TIN.

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s Small, Detail ed, Modifi cation s

Flip Edge

Allows you to sculpt or make small, detailed, modifications to the TIN by adjusting the triangulation of a TIN.

Note - The sandbox tools can also be used to create organic geometry or geometry that appears to be hand-crafted.

Functional Terrain The term functional terrain is used to describe terrain that has no portion bending back upon itself creating overhangs, underhangs, or caves. If you draw a vertical line through your terrain at any point and the line only touches the terrain at one point, your terrain is functional. This concept is important because certain tools, such as the Smoove Tool, can create unexpected results when working on nonfunctional terrain (the neighboring points included in the sculpting operation by the Smoove Tool are often undesirable).

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The SketchUp User Interface This section of the user's guide covers the SketchUp user interface, including menus, toolbars, dialog boxes, and the drawing area.

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Introduction to the SketchUp Interface The SketchUp user interface is designed to be simple and easy to use. The main parts of the SketchUp user interface are the title bar, menus, toolbars, drawing area, status bar, and the value control box.

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Note - The previous image contains a screenshot of the SketchUp Plus application. The SketchUp Mini application has fewer tools and, therefore, fewer icons in the toolbars.

Title Bar The title bar (at the top of SketchUp) contains the standard Microsoft Windows controls (close, minimize, and maximize) on the right, and the name of the currently opened file. A blank drawing area appears when you start SketchUp and the name of the currently opened file is "Untitled" in the title bar, indicating that you have not yet saved your work.

Menus Menus appear below the title bar. The majority of SketchUp tools, commands, and settings are available within these menus. The menus that appear by default are: , File, Edit, View, Camera, Draw, Tools, Window, Earth, Help.

Toolbars The Toolbars, appearing below the menus and along the left side of the application contain a user-defined set of tools and controls. Toolbar visibility is toggled under the View > Toolbars menu item.

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Drawing Area The drawing area is where you create your model. The 3D space of the drawing area is identified visually by the drawing axes.

Status Bar The status bar is the long gray rectangular area at the bottom of the drawing area.

The left side of the status bar displays tips for the currently used drawing tools, including special functions accessible using keyboard shortcuts. Watch the status bar to discover advanced capabilities of each of the SketchUp tools. Note - Use the resize handle to make the drawing area larger so you can see the entire message in the status bar. Value Control Box (VCB) The value control box (VCB) is located on the right side of the status bar. The VCB displays dimensional information while you draw. You can also enter values into the VCB to manipulate currently selected entities, such as creating elements of a specific dimension. Other behaviors of the VCB are as follows: x

You can type a value in the VCB before or after an operation is complete as long as the value is entered prior to the start of a new operation. Detailed information on the VCB values accepted for each tool appears in the Drawing Tools and Modification Tools sections of this user's guide.

x

You must press the Enter or Return key to accept a typed value.

x

You can change the value of the geometry as many times as you like before you start a new operation.

x

The VCB cannot be used again to enter values for a tool once you have exited the tool.

x

SketchUp will display a tilde (~) before the number to indicate that a number is not precise (not within precision settings as set in the Units panel of the Model Info Dialog Box).

x

It is not necessary to click in the VCB before typing. The VCB is always awaiting input from your keyboard.

x

You can type values in the VCB using an alternate measuring system than the default system. SketchUp will convert the value to the default system. For example, you can type in 3' 6" even if you are using metric system as your default. Units are set within the Units panel of the Model Info dialog box.

Window Resize Handle To the right of the VCB is the window resize handle which is used to change the size of the drawing area.

Page Tabs Click on a page tab to switch between the pages in your file. Page Tabs are created for each page as each page is created using the Page Manager.

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Page Tab Context Menu Items Page Tabs contain their own context menus. Context-click on a page tab to access its context menu. Move Left/Move Right The Move Left and Move Right menu items are used to reposition a page in the series of pages. Add The Add menu item is used to add a new page to the current file. Update The Update menu item is used to update a page if you have made changes to the page. Delete The Delete menu item is used to delete the currently selected page. Slideshow The Slideshow menu item starts a TourGuide slideshow. See the Pages and TourGuide topic for further information. Page Manager The Page Manager menu item invokes the Page Manager dialog box.

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File Menu The File menu contains items that relate to SketchUp model files, including commands to create, open, save, print, import, and export model files.

New The New menu item is used to close the current document and create a blank drawing area to begin a new SketchUp model. You will be prompted to save your changes if you have not saved changes to the current model before selecting the New menu item. Sketchup will use the settings in the template file to define the initial model state if you have selected a template file in the template panel under Window > Preferences. Keyboard Shortcut: Ctrl+N Tip - Open another instance of SketchUp if you want multiple drawing areas open simultaneously.

Open... Use the Open menu item to launch the Open dialog box, allowing you to open a previously saved SketchUp file. You will be prompted to save your changes if an unsaved model is already open because only one file can be open at a time. Keyboard Shortcut: Ctrl+O Problem Detection Minor problems can occur with your model given the infinite flexibility that SketchUp provides when designing in 3D. You likely will not notice anything different in your model, except that it will perform better, after these problems are fixed. SketchUp checks all files for problems when they are opened and saved if the Automatically check models for problems check box is checked in the General Panel of the Application Preferences. SketchUp displays a dialog box allowing you to fix problems if they are found. This dialog box has three options: Always fix my models, Fix it now, and Fix it later. Google recommends you click on the Always fix my models button in this dialog box to fix the problem. This button also checks the Automatically fix problems when they are found checkbox in the General Panel of the Application Preferences. This preferences option causes SketchUp to automatically fix problems without user intervention. Refer to the Automatically fix problems when they are found option for further information. SketchUp will check your model for unrecoverable errors during the open, preventing the overwriting of a good auto-save file. Sketchup will display a dialog box in the rare case that unrecoverable errors are found in your model. This dialog box contain the option to quit SketchUp and send a report. Google recommends you click on the quit SketchUp and send report button to terminate SketchUp and preserve your previously valid auto-save file. This report contains valuable information regarding the unrecoverable errors.

Save Use the Save menu item to save the currently active SketchUp model to your file system. When you close an unsaved document, or attempt to quit SketchUp with unsaved open documents, SketchUp will prompt you to save your work before continuing. Keyboard Shortcut: Ctrl+S

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Tip - If Create Backup is enabled within the General panel of the preferences dialog box, the existing file will be converted to a backup file (.skb), and the new drawing will be saved in place of that currently existing file (.skp). The Create Backup option can help preserve your data in the event of an accidental removal of a .skp file. Tip - It is good to save often. You can have SketchUp automatically save for you at a specific time increment by enabling the Auto-save option within the General panel of the Preferences dialog box. Problem Detection Minor problems can occur with your model given the infinite flexibility that SketchUp provides when designing in 3D. You likely will not notice anything different in your model, except that it will perform better, after these problems are fixed. SketchUp checks all files for problems when they are opened and saved if the Automatically check models for problems check box is checked in the General Panel of the Application Preferences. SketchUp displays a dialog box allowing you to fix problems if they are found. This dialog box has three options: Always fix my models, Fix it now, and Fix it later. Google recommends you click on the Always fix my models button in this dialog box to fix the problem. This button also checks the Automatically fix problems when they are found checkbox in the General Panel of the Application Preferences. This preferences option causes SketchUp to automatically fix problems without user intervention. Refer to the Automatically fix problems when they are found option for further information. SketchUp will check your model for unrecoverable errors during the save, preventing the overwriting of a good auto-save file. Sketchup will display a dialog box in the rare case that unrecoverable errors are found in your model. This dialog box contain the option to quit SketchUp and send a report. Google recommends you click on the quit SketchUp and send report button to terminate SketchUp and preserve your previously valid auto-save file. This report contains valuable information regarding the unrecoverable errors.

Save As... Use the Save As... menu item to open the Save As dialog box which defaults to the current document's folder. You can use this dialog box to save the current drawing as a new document. This file can be assigned a new name, a new location, and a previous version of SketchUp. The new file will becomes the current file in the drawing window. Problem Detection Minor problems can occur with your model given the infinite flexibility that SketchUp provides when designing in 3D. You likely will not notice anything different in your model, except that it will perform better, after these problems are fixed. SketchUp checks all files for problems when they are opened and saved if the Automatically check models for problems check box is checked in the General Panel of the Application Preferences. SketchUp displays a dialog box allowing you to fix problems if they are found. This dialog box has three options: Always fix my models, Fix it now, and Fix it later. Google recommends you click on the Always fix my models button in this dialog box to fix the problem. This button also checks the Automatically fix problems when they are found checkbox in the General Panel of the Application Preferences. This preferences option causes SketchUp to automatically fix problems without user intervention. Refer to the Automatically fix problems when they are found option for further information. SketchUp will check your model for unrecoverable errors during the save as, preventing the overwriting of a good auto-save file. Sketchup will display a dialog box in the rare case that unrecoverable errors are found in your model. This dialog box contain the option to quit ŠGoogle Inc. 2006

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SketchUp User's Guide SketchUp and send a report. Google recommends you click on the quit SketchUp and send report button to terminate SketchUp and preserve your previously valid auto-save file. This report contains valuable information regarding the unrecoverable errors.

Save A Copy As... Use the Save A Copy As... menu item to save a new file based on your current model. This menu item does not overwrite or close the current file and is useful for saving incremental copies or tentative schemes of your work. Problem Detection Minor problems can occur with your model given the infinite flexibility that SketchUp provides when designing in 3D. You likely will not notice anything different in your model, except that it will perform better, after these problems are fixed. SketchUp checks all files for problems when they are opened and saved if the Automatically check models for problems check box is checked in the General Panel of the Application Preferences. SketchUp displays a dialog box allowing you to fix problems if they are found. This dialog box has three options: Always fix my models, Fix it now, and Fix it later. Google recommends you click on the Always fix my models button in this dialog box to fix the problem. This button also checks the Automatically fix problems when they are found checkbox in the General Panel of the Application Preferences. This preferences option causes SketchUp to automatically fix problems without user intervention. Refer to the Automatically fix problems when they are found option for further information. SketchUp will check your model for unrecoverable errors during the save a copy as, preventing the overwriting of a good auto-save file. Sketchup will display a dialog box in the rare case that unrecoverable errors are found in your model. This dialog box contain the option to quit SketchUp and send a report. Google recommends you click on the quit SketchUp and send report button to terminate SketchUp and preserve your previously valid auto-save file. This report contains valuable information regarding the unrecoverable errors.

Revert Use the Revert menu item to revert your current document to its last saved state.

Export Use the Export submenu to access SketchUp's export functionality, which is useful for sharing your work with other people or exporting your drawings for use in other applications. You can export your SketchUp model as a 3D model, a 2D graphic, section slice, or animation. Google Earth... Use the Google Earth... menu item to export your SketchUp model as a KMZ file for use in Google Earth. Refer to the 3D Model (KMZ) Export topic for additional information on this menu item. 3D Model... Use the 3D Model... menu item to export you SketchUp file to 3D formats, including the AutoCAD 2000 DXF/DWG and AutoCAD R14 DXF/DWG CAD formats. 2D Graphic... Use the 2D Graphic... menu item to export 2D bitmap and dimensionally accurate, resolution independent, 2D vector drawings. Pixel-based images can be exported in JPEG, PNG, Epix, BMP, TGA, and TIFF file formats.

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Vector images can be exported in PDF, EPS, DWG, and DXF file formats. This option makes it easy to send your SketchUp files to a plotter, quickly integrate them into construction documentation, or further modify your models using vector-based illustration software. Note that vector output formats may not support certain display options, such as shadows, transparency, and textures. Section Slice... Use the Export 2D Section Slice menu item to output dimensionally accurate 2D section slices in standard vector formats. Animation... Use the Animation... menu item to export a pre-rendered animation file containing the page sequence you have created. This option makes it easy archive your TourGuide tours to CD or DVD and to create smooth animations of complex models.

Import Use the Import menu to import information from other files into your SketchUp drawings.

Print Setup... Use the Print Setup... menu item to access to the print setup dialog box. This dialog box is used to select and configure printer and page properties for printing.

Print Preview... Use the Print Preview... menu item to preview your model as it will appear on paper (using the print setup settings).

Print... The Print... menu item opens the standard Print dialog box. This dialog box enables you to print the current model in SketchUp's drawing area to the currently selected printer. Keyboard Shortcut: Ctrl+P

(Recently Opened File List) The (Recently Opened File List) menu item lists recently opened SketchUp files. Select a file from this list to open the file.

Exit The Exit menu item closes the current file and the SketchUp application window. SketchUp will notify you to save your file if it has not been saved since the last change. = Functionality only available in SketchUp Pro 5

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Edit Menu The Edit menu contains items allowing you to perform editing functions on SketchUp geometry. These menu items include those for creating and editing groups and components, visibility operations, and standard cut, copy, paste commands.

Undo Use the Undo menu item to undo the last drawing or editing commands performed. SketchUp allows you to undo all operations you have performed, one at a time, to the state at which you saved your file. The number of possible sequential Undo commands is limited to 100 steps. Keyboard Shortcut: Alt+Backspace or Ctrl+Z Note - Undo will undo any operation that creates or modifies geometry, but it does not undo changes to your point of view. Use the Previous menu item under the Camera menu to undo a point of view change.

Redo The Redo menu item returns the last undo to its previous state. Keyboard Shortcut: Ctrl+Y

Cut The Cut menu item removes the selected elements from your model and places them in the clipboard. The contents of the clipboard can then be inserted back into any open SketchUp document by using the Paste menu item. Contents of the clipboard will remain on the clipboard until replaced with other content using an additional Cut or a Copy command. Keyboard Shortcut: Shift+Delete or Ctrl+X

Copy The Copy menu item copies the selected items to the clipboard without deleting the items from the model. The contents of the clipboard can then be inserted back into any open SketchUp document by using the Paste menu item. Contents of the clipboard will remain on the clipboard until replaced with other content using an additional Cut or a Copy operation. Keyboard Shortcut: Ctrl+C or Ctrl+Insert

Paste The Paste menu item copies the contents of the clipboard into the current SketchUp document. The pasted objects will be attached to and placed by the point of the cursor, allowing you to position the new geometry when it is pasted. Click to set the pasted objects in place. Contents of the clipboard will remain on the clipboard until replaced with other content using an additional Cut or a Copy operation. Keyboard Shortcut: Ctrl+V or Shift+Insert

Erase Use the Erase menu item to remove the currently selected entities from your model. Keyboard Shortcut: Delete ŠGoogle Inc. 2006

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Select All Use the Select All menu item to select all selectable entities in the model. Hidden entities, any items on a hidden layer, or geometry that is clipped away using a section plane cannot be selected with the Select All menu item. Keyboard Shortcut: Ctrl+A

Deselect All The Deselect All menu item clears the selection set, deselecting any currently selected items in the model. Keyboard Shortcut: Ctrl+T

Hide Use the Hide menu item to hide any selected object. Hiding geometry can help simplify your current view, or enable viewing and working inside tight areas.

Unhide Selected The Unhide menu item unhides any selected hidden object. Ensure Show Hidden Geometry is enabled under the View Menu to view and select hidden geometry. Last The Last menu item unhides the last entities hidden with the Hide command. All The All menu item unhides all hidden entities in your current document.

Construction Geometry Hide All The Hide All menu item hides all construction line entities in the drawing area. Unhide All The Unhide All menu item unhides all construction line entities in the drawing area. Erase All The Erase All menu item deletes all construction line entities from the drawing area.

Lock The Lock menu item is used to lock any component or group that you do not wanted to be able to be moved or edited.

Unlock The Unlock submenu contains options for unlocking components and groups. Selected Use the Selected menu item to unlock all components and groups in a selection set.

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SketchUp User's Guide All Use the All menu item to unlock all components and groups in your drawing area.

Make Component Use the Make Component menu item to create a component entity from the selected entities. Keyboard Shortcut: Ctrl+C

Make Group The Make Group menu item creates a group entity from the selected entities. Keyboard Shortcut: G

Close Group/Component Use the Close Group/Component menu item to exit from a group or component's context or editing session.

Intersect With Model Complex geometry in SketchUp can be easily created using the Intersect With Model menu item (also called the Intersector). This menu item allows you intersect two elements, such as a box and a tube, and automatically create edges where the elements intersect. The face within the new edges can be deleted, pushed, pulled or manipulated in other ways. Keyboard Shortcut: I

Entity Commands Sub-Menu The Entity Commands sub-menu contains all of the commands available to manipulate the currently selected entity (which are the same as the commands found in the entity's context menu). The sub-menu's name and contents will change depending on the entity that you have selected.

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View Menu The View menu contains menu items that alter the display of entities within your model. Note - Items in the View menu alter the display of entities. Items in the Camera menu alter your point of view.

Toolbars The Toolbars submenu contains all of the toolbars. These toolbars are: Camera, Construction, Drawing, Display Style, Earth, Modification, Layers, Principal, Sections, Shadows, Standard, and Views., and Walkthrough. The Large Buttons menu item toggles large toolbar buttons on and off. This option can enhance usability on tablets or low-resolution displays.

Hidden Geometry Use the Hidden Geometry menu item to display hidden geometry or entities that have been hidden using the Hide menu item or context command. The Hidden Geometry menu item displays hidden faces with a light cross-hatch pattern (edges are displayed dashed), enabling you to select the geometry. Once selected, hidden geometry can be made visible with the Unhide and Unhide All menu items.

Section Planes The Section Planes menu item toggles the display section plane entities.

Section Cuts The Section Cuts menu item toggles the display of any section cut effects.

Axes The Axes menu item toggles the display of the drawing axes.

Shadows The Shadows menu item activates shadows.

X-ray The X-ray menu item activates X-ray mode.

Rendering The Rendering submenu contains options to activate face and edge rendering styles. The face rendering styles are Wireframe, Hidden Line, Shaded, Shaded with Textures, and Monochrome. The edge rendering styles are Profile Edges, Depth Cued Edges, Extended Edges, Endpoints, and Jitter Edges. See the Display Settings topic for further information. Use the Edges menu item to toggle the visibility of edges.

Component Edit The Component Edit submenu contains commands to alter the display of other entities when editing components.

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SketchUp User's Guide Hide Rest of Model Use the Hide Rest of Model menu item to toggle the display of the model when editing a component. Hide Similar Components Use the Hide Similar Components menu item to toggle the display of similar components when editing a component.

Page Tabs The Page Tabs command toggles the display of page tabs. See the Page Manager topic for further information.

TourGuide The Tourguide submenu contains several menu items related to pages and TourGuide. See the Pages and TourGuide topic for further information. Add Page Use the Add Page menu item to add a new page to the current file. Update Page Use the Update Page menu item to update a page if you have made changes to the page. Delete Page Use the Delete Page menu item to delete a page from the current model. Previous Page Use the Previous Page menu item to transition to the previous page. Next Page The Next Page menu item is used to transition to the next page. Play Slideshow The Play Slideshow menu item starts a TourGuide slideshow. See the Pages and TourGuide topic for further information.

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Camera Menu The Camera menu contains items for altering your point of view of the model.

Previous Use the Previous menu item to undo the last performed camera command.

Standard The Standard submenu provides access to standard views: Top, Bottom, Front, Right, Back, Left, and Isometric. Selecting any of these model views will immediately set your active drawing window to that view.

Perspective Use the Perspective menu item to toggle between perspective and paraline projections. You are in a perspective projection when this item has a checkmark. Note - SketchUp must be in paraline mode to print to scale. Be aware that faces and edges that are parallel to the view plane will be measurable.

Field of View Use the Field of View menu item to invoke the Zoom Tool in Field of View mode allowing you to widen or narrow your field of view.

Orbit The Orbit menu item invokes the Orbit Tool. Keyboard Shortcut: O

Pan The Pan menu item invokes the Pan Tool. Keyboard Shortcut: H

Zoom The Zoom menu item launches the Zoom Tool. Keyboard Shortcut: Z

Zoom Window The Zoom Extents menu item launches the Zoom Window Tool. Note - The Zoom Window Tool is not in the SketchUp Mini toolbar, but is available to use from the Camera menu.

Zoom Extents The Zoom Window menu item launches the Zoom Extents Tool. Keyboard Shortcut: Shift+Z

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Position Camera The Position Camera menu item launches the Position Camera Tool allowing you to investigate fixed views of your model (such the an eye-level view of a house). This option is often used with the Walk Tool to take an eye-level tour of a structure.

Walk The Walk menu item invokes the Walk Tool for maneuvering through your SketchUp model as though you taking a virtual tour of the model.

Look Around The Look Around menu item invokes the Look Around Tool which pivots the camera around a stationary point at the point of view.

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Draw Menu The Draw menu contains all of the SketchUp drawing tools and provides an alternative to using the Toolbars or keyboard shortcuts.

Line The Line menu item invokes a Line Tool used to draw line entities, or edges, within the drawing area. Keyboard Shortcut: L

Arc The Arc menu item invokes a Arc Tool used to draw Arc entities, comprised of multiple connected straight line segments (editable as a single curve). Keyboard Shortcut: A

Freehand Use the Freehand menu item to invoke a Freehand Tool used to draw irregular, coplanar connected lines in the form of Curve entities.

Rectangle The Rectangle menu item invokes a Rectangle Tool used to draw four coplanar intersecting edges and a subsequent Face entity. Keyboard Shortcut: R

Circle The Circle menu item invokes a Circle Tool used to draw Circle entities. Keyboard Shortcut: C

Polygon The Polygon menu item invokes a Polygon Tool used to draw regular Polygon entities, inscribed within a circle, consisting of 3 to 100 sides.

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Tools Menu The Tools menu provides access to all of the modification tools in Sketchup. This menu represents one of three mechanisms for accessing these tools (additional mechanisms are the Toolbars and keyboard shortcuts).

Select The Select menu item invokes a Select Tool allowing you to select one or more entities to modify. Keyboard Shortcut: Spacebar

Eraser Use the Eraser menu item to invoke the Eraser Tool allowing you to erase entities from the drawing area. This tool also allows you to hide and soften edges. Keyboard Shortcut: E

Paint Bucket The Paint Bucket menu item invokes the Paint Bucket Tool used to assign materials to entities in your model. Use the Paint Bucket tool to paint individual elements, fill a number of connected faces, or replace a material in your model. Keyboard Shortcut: B

Move The Move menu item invokes the Move Tool allowing you to move, manipulate, and copy geometry. This tool can also be used to rotate Component entities. Keyboard Shortcut: M

Rotate Use the Rotate menu item to invoke the Rotate Tool used to rotate drawing elements and single or multiple objects within a single rotation plane. The Rotate Tool can also be used to stretch and distort geometry by selecting only a portion of a model. Keyboard Shortcut: Q

Scale The Scale menu item invokes the Scale Tool allowing you to resize and stretch selected geometry relative to other elements in your SketchUp model. Keyboard Shortcut: S

Push/Pull The Push/Pull menu item invokes the Push/Pull Tool used to manipulate faces of your model. This tool can be used to displace, extrude, re-attach, or subtract faces, depending on the context of selected geometry. Keyboard Shortcut: P

Follow Me Use the Follow Me menu item to invoke the Follow Me Tool used to extrude faces along a path such as an edge or line drawn with the Freehand Tool. This tool is useful when adding details to

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Application UI a model because it allows you to draw the detail at one end of a path on the model and then repeat that detail along the path.

Offset The Offset menu item invokes the Offset Tool used to create copies of co-planar lines and faces that are a uniform distance from original lines and faces. Lines and faces can be offset either inside or outside the original face. Offsetting a face will always create a new face. Keyboard Shortcut: F

Tape Measure Use the Tape Measure menu item to invoke the Tape Measure Tool used to perform a number of dimension-related operations. These operations include measuring the distance between two points, creating Construction Line entities, and re-scaling an entire model to an exact dimension. Keyboard Shortcut: T

Protractor The Protractor menu item invokes the Protractor Tool allowing you to measure angles and create Construction Line entities (usually at some angle).

Axes The Axes menu item invokes the Axes Tool allowing you to move the drawing axes. This tool is often used when constructing rectangular objects that are skewed relative to one another, or to allow for more accurate scaling of entities that are not oriented along the default coordinate planes. Note - The Axes Tool is not in the SketchUp Mini toolbar, but is available to use from the Camera menu.

Dimensions Use the Dimensions menu item to invoke a Dimension Tool used to place Dimension entities in your model.

Text The Text menu item launches a Text Tool used to insert Text entities into your model.

Section Plane The Section Plane menu item invokes a Section plane Tool used to make section cuts in your model.

Sandbox The Sandbox submenu contains options for modifying terrain. This menu item only appears after enabling the terrain modeling tools using the Extensions panel of the Preferences dialog box. See the Sandbox Tools topic for further information.

Utilities The Utilities submenu contains various utilities and macros created using the Sketchup Ruby API. This menu item only appears after enabling the utilities tools using the Extensions panel of the Preferences dialog box. ŠGoogle Inc. 2006

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Note - Ruby scripts are contained in the Plugins directory under the installation directory. Create Face The Create Face menu item invokes the Create Face utility allowing you to troubleshoot face creation and, in most cases, create a face for three or more intersecting edges. Specifically, the Create Face utility is useful when: x

A model has two edges that have a common end point geometrically (the coordinates of the end point are the same), but the edges are not connected topologically. In this case, the Create Face utility will properly connect edges and create a face.

x

A face cannot be created because edges are not exactly planer, or appear to be connected when there is actually a small gap between the ends of the edges. In these instances, Create Face will not create a face, but displays a message indicating why SketchUp cannot create a face. This message can be used to troubleshoot face creation.

Query Tool The Query Tool menu item invokes a Query Tool utility that displays the current mouse position in the VCB. Fix Non-planar Faces The Fix Non-planar Faces menu items invokes the Fix Non-planar Faces utility to find and fix non-planar faces. Fix Non-planer Faces looks at the Vertices of every face and checks to see if they are on the plane of the face. If not, Check Validity tries to break the face into triangle so that each triangular face will be planar. Fix Non-planar Faces can actually change the model, but does not move vertices or edges. Instead, Check Validity will split faces into triangular faces if they were not planar. Note - Non-planar faces can get created by a bug in the DWG importer.

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Window Menu The Window menu contains model settings and managers for your models. Model settings are dialog boxes with settings that affect the model, such as shadows, display settings, and model information. Managers are dialog boxes that manage certain aspects of your model such as pages, layers, materials, and components.

Model Info Use the Model Info menu item to display the Model Info dialog box used to set settings for your entire model.

Entity Info The Entity Info menu item displays the Entity Info dialog box used to view and set settings for the currently selected entity (or entities).

Materials Browser The Materials Browser menu item invokes Material Browser used for selecting and applying colors and materials to your models.

Material Editor The Material Editor menu item displays the Material Editor dialog box used for editing and mixing colors and materials.

Components The Components menu item displays used for managing your components.

Layers Use the Layers menu item to display the Layer Manager used to manage your SketchUp layers.

Pages The Pages menu item invokes the Page Manager used to manage pages for a TourGuide slideshow. The Page Manger will display with the current page highlighted.

Display Settings The Display Settings menu item invokes the Display Settings dialog box containing options to activate the face and edge rendering styles. The face rendering styles are wireframe, hidden line, shaded, shaded with textures, and Monochrome. The edge rendering styles are profile lines, jitter lines, and extended edges.

Shadow Settings The Shadow Settings menu item invokes Shadow Settings dialog box for manipulating shadows in your model.

Soften Edges The Soften Edges menu item invokes the Soften Edges dialog box used to soften and smooth edges in your model.

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Outliner The Outliner menu item invokes the Component Outliner used to display components and groups in a hierarchy.

Instructor The Instructor menu item invokes the Instructor used to display information about the currently activated tool.

Preferences The Preferences menu item invokes the Application Preferences dialog box where you can set various global settings for the program.

Hide/Show Dialogs Use the Hide/Show Dialog menu item to hide and show all currently active dialog boxes.

Ruby Console The Ruby Console menu item displays the Ruby Console where you can type Ruby script.

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Google Menu The Google menu contains items used to interact with other Google applications.

Get Current View Use the Get Current View menu item to capture 2D and 3D snapshot images of the current view in Google Earth.

Toggle Terrain Use the Toggle Terrain menu item to toggle the Google Earth snapshot image between a 2D and 3D image.

Place Model Use the Place Model menu item to place your SketchUp models in Google Earth.

Get Models... Use the Get Models menu item to download a model from the Google 3D Warehouse.

Share Models... Use the Share Models... menu item to post your SketchUp model file and corresponding KML file to the Google 3D Warehouse. The Google 3D Warehouse is a repository where models can be shared with other Google Earth or SketchUp users.

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Help Menu The Help menu contains items relating to receiving help with the product. These items include the SketchUp on-line user's guide, a quick reference card, and video tutorials.

Google SketchUp Help... The Google SketchUp Help... menu item opens SketchUp's online user's guide.

View Tutorials... The View Tutorials... menu item launches the Video Tutorials portion of the SketchUp web site. Select this command to open your default web browser and connect to the SketchUp online video tutorials.

Quick Reference... Use the Quick Reference... menu item to display SketchUp's Quick reference card in your default PDF viewer.

SketchUp Web Site The SketchUp Web Site menu item invokes your default web browser and connects you to the SketchUp web site. The web site contains SketchUp support forums, additional training information, and access to new software releases.

Tip of the Day The Tip of the Day menu item invokes the Tip of the Day dialog box containing useful information to help you learn SketchUp.

View Tutorials... The View Tutorials... menu item launches the Video Tutorials portion of the SketchUp web site. Select this command to open your default web browser and connect to the SketchUp online video tutorials.

Help Center... The Help Center... menu item launches the Google SketchUp Help Center in your default web browser. This web site contains a list of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) and a knowledge base of technical support issues and solutions.

Send a Suggestion... The Send a Suggestion... menu item launches the Google SketchUp Help Center in your default web browser. This web site will prompt you to fill out suggestion form to be submitted to Google. This form contains fields for your name, email, and a comment related to one of the following categories: bug report, feature request, comment, training question.

Google SketchUp Community... The Google SketchUp Community... menu item launches a the SketchUp user's forum in your default web browser.

Ruby Help The Ruby Help menu item opens Ruby Help online user's guide. The user's guide contains reference information for the SketchUp Ruby APIs and examples.

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License The License submenu includes several options allowing you to view and manage your SketchUp license. License Info The License Info menu item displays information about your SketchUp license, including the type of license and serial number. Authorize... Use the Authorize... menu item to authorize your SketchUp licence to extend the use of SketchUp beyond the 8 hour trial period. Click on this menu item to display the SketchUp Authorization Screen. Type in the authorization number, provided by Google when you buy SketchUp, to authorize SketchUp. Unauthorize... Use the UnAuthorize... menu item to unauthorize your SketchUp licence. This menu item is used primarily when switching from a single-user license to a multiuser network license. Caution - SketchUp will not run after you unauthorize your license. You must authorize a new single-user or network license to use SketchUp again.

Set Network License File... Use the Set Network License File menu item to relocate the network license file on the network. Unset Network License File Use the Unset Network License File menu item to delete the location of the network license file on the network. Lan License Monitor The Lan License Monitor menu item displays the LAN License Monitor dialog box. This dialog box displays single user licenses on the network.

Check Web for Update... The Check Web For Update... menu item checks to see if you have the most current version of SketchUp. You will be prompted to download the current version if your version is out-of-date. A Internet connection is required to use this feature.

Ruby Help The Ruby Help menu item opens Ruby Help online user's guide. The user's guide contains reference information for the SketchUp Ruby APIs and examples.

Self-Paced Tutorials The Self-Paced Tutorials submenu contains three self-paced tutorials allowing you to learn to use SketchUp.

About Google SketchUp... The About Google SketchUp... menu item activates the About Google SketchUp dialog box. This dialog box provides information about your SketchUp version and license.

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About Plugins The About Plugins sub-menu contains information about additional SketchUp plugins.

Check Web for Update... The Check Web For Update... menu item checks to see if you have the most current version of SketchUp. You will be prompted to download the current version if your version is out-of-date. A Internet connection is required to use this feature.

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Toolbars SketchUp's toolbars are similar to those in other Microsoft Windows applications in that each contains a related set of tools. These toolbars can be detached by clicking and dragging the move handle (thin line at the top) of the toolbar, resized by dragging the corners, and reattached or docked to the edge of the drawing area to suit your preferences. Toggle toolbar visibility using the View > Toolbars submenu. Note - Only the Getting Started and Google toolbars appear when you first run SketchUp. You can turn on other toolbars using the Toolbars submenu in the View menu.

Getting Started The Getting Started toolbar contains all of the tools and menu items necessary for a new user to become acquainted with SketchUp. These tools are the Select Tool, Make Component, Line Tool, Eraser Tool, Tape Measure Tool, Paint Bucket Tool, Rectangle Tool, Circle Tool, Arc Tool, Push/Pull Tool, Move Tool, Rotate Tool, Offset Tool, Orbit Tool, Pan Tool, Zoom Tool, and Zoom Extents Tool.

Standard Toolbar The Standard toolbar contains a variety of menu items which help with file and drawing management, as well as shortcuts to printing and help operations. These menu items are New, Open, Save, Make Component, Cut, Copy, Paste, Erase, Undo, Redo, Print, and Model Info.

Principal Toolbar The buttons on the Principal toolbar activate the Select Tool, Paint Bucket Tool, and Eraser Tool.

Drawing Toolbar The buttons on the Drawing toolbar activate the Rectangle Tool, Line Tool, Circle Tool, Arc Tool, Polygon Tool, and Freehand Tool.

Modification Toolbar The Modification toolbar contains geometry modification tools. The tools on this toolbar are the Move Tool, Push/Pull Tool, Rotate Tool, Follow Me Tool, Scale Tool, and Offset Tool.

Construction Toolbar The buttons on the Construction toolbar activate the Tape Measure Tool, Dimensions Tool, Protractor Tool, Text Tool, Axes Tool, and Section Tool.

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Camera Toolbar The buttons on the Camera toolbar activate the Orbit Tool, Pan Tool, Zoom Tool, Zoom Window Tool, Zoom Extents Tool, and the Previous camera tools.

Walkthrough Toolbar The buttons on the Walkthrough toolbar activate the Position Camera Tool, Walk Tool, and Look Around Tool.

Display Style Toolbar The buttons on the Display Style toolbar activate SketchUp's face rendering styles (x-ray transparency, wireframe, hidden line, shaded, and shaded with textures).

Views Toolbar The buttons on the Views toolbar activate SketchUp's standard views (iso, top, front, right, back, and left). The bottom view is not included, but is available from the Camera menu.

Shadows Toolbar The Shadows toolbar is used to control shadows. This toolbar contains buttons to launch the Shadow Settings dialog box (left-most icon) and enable/disable shadows (second icon). This toolbar also contains slider bars to control settings related to the time of year (left-most slider bar) and time of day (right-most slider bar).

Sections Toolbar The Sections toolbar allows you to conveniently execute common section operations. The controls on this toolbar include buttons for toggling the section cut effect and toggling the display of section planes.

Layers Toolbar The Layers toolbar provides quick access to several often used layer operations.

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Application UI Display the Current Layer When nothing is selected, the current layer name is displayed in the toolbar and has a check mark next to it. Any new entities you draw will be assigned to the current layer. Change the Current Layer Select a layer from the Layers toolbar, when nothing is selected, to change the current layer. View Entity's Layer Select an entity. The layer for the entity will be displayed, with a check mark, in the layers toolbar. Change the Layer Assignment of Entities Select an entity and then a layer from the layer toolbar to change the layer of an entity. Display the Layer Manager The button on the right hand side displays the Layers Manager allowing you to create new layers, control their visibility, and more.

Google Toolbar The buttons on the Google toolbar are used to collaborate between SketchUp and other Google products. The toolbar contains the Get Current View, Toggle Terrain, Place Model, Get Models, and Share Model buttons.

Large Buttons The toolbar can be displayed using large and small tool buttons. Check the Use Large Tool Buttons checkbox in the General panel of the Preferences dialog box to switch between large and small tool buttons.

Tool Help Tips Hover over a tool to display a help tag with the name of the tool. A longer help tag will appear in the Status Bar when you activate a tool.

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Context Menus Menu items also appear in special context menus which are menus whose contents vary depending on the context in which they are invoked (usually on one or more entities in the drawing area or within a user interface component, such as a dialog box). The following image shows a context menu for a Face entity.

Context-Clicking Context menus are invoked by selecting one or more entities and clicking the right mouse button. This operation is referred to as a context-click. Detailed information on the context menu for each entity appears in the Entities section of this user's guide. Other dialog boxes and user interface components have their own context menus, including drawing axes, the Material Browser, and so on.

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Dialog Boxes Most dialog boxes in SketchUp are modeless, meaning they do not limit your interaction with the rest of the application by requiring user input before continuing with your work. Instead, these dialog boxes can be displayed while you work allowing you to make dynamic settings changes to your model while you are sketching. Dialog boxes in SketchUp can be snapped to other user interface components on your screen, resized, and minimized (with some exceptions).

Snapping Dialog Boxes to Other User Interface Components Some dialog boxes, such as the Display Settings dialog box, automatically snap to the outside edges of the application window, the outer edge of the screen, with the top and bottom of other dialog boxes to create a dialog stack. To snap a dialog box to another user interface component: 1. Display a dialog box, such as the Window > Display Settings dialog box. 2. Click and hold on the dialog box's title bar. 3. Move the dialog box to the outside edge of the application window, outside edge of the screen, or top or bottom edge of another dialog box (such as the Shadow Settings dialog box). The dialog box will snap to and align with the edge. Note - Dialog boxes that have been snapped to the application window do not move when the application window is moved (they are not stuck to the window). Tip - Snap several dialog boxes together at their top and bottom edges to form a dialog box stack. Dialog boxes in a dialog box stack move with the stack when the top-most dialog box's title bar is moved.

Manipulating Dialog Boxes in a Dialog Box Stack A dialog box stack refers to a series of dialog boxes snapped together at their bottom and top edges such that they form a stack. The following image contains a dialog box stack with the Shadow Settings dialog box opened in the middle.

You can manipulate the dialog boxes in a dialog box stack in the following ways: x

Move the entire dialog box stack by clicking, holding, and moving the top-most dialog box's title bar.

x

Click on any dialog box's title bar to minimize or maximize a dialog box within the stack.

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Move a dialog box, residing in the middle of the stack, to the right or left to break it from the stack. Move a dialog box, residing at the bottom of the stack, down to break it from the stack.

x

Reinsert the dialog box at the beginning or end of the stack by snapping the dialog box to the bottom or top edge of the stack, respectively.

x

Reinsert the dialog box in the middle of the stack by moving sideways into a middle position.

x

Snap the entire dialog box stack to the application window or screen by moving it to the outer edge of the application window or screen.

Resizing Dialog Boxes Some SketchUp dialog boxes, such as the Component Browser dialog box, can be resized. Move the cursor around the dialog box's edges to display a resize cursor (two arrows). Click on the edge and move the edge to resize the dialog box.

Minimizing Dialog Boxes Click on any dialog box's title bar to minimize or maximize the dialog box (even those that can not be placed in a dialog box stack).

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Drawing Axes SketchUp's drawing axes consist of three colored lines, perpendicular to each other, displayed in the drawing area. These axes are helpful in providing a sense of direction in 3D space while you work.

Note - The Drawing Axes will be automatically hidden in any images exported from SketchUp.

Moving the Drawing Axes The drawing axes can be manipulated (moved, moved and rotated, and hidden) through their context menu. To move the drawing axes: 1. Context-click on the Drawing Axes and select Place from the context menu. The cursor changes to a collection of axes. 2. Move your cursor to the point in your model to be the new coordinate origin. You will see the axes snap to inferred alignments and points as you move around your model. 3. Click to accept the new coordinate origin. 4. Drag your cursor away from the origin to set an alignment for the red axis. Use the inference ToolTips to make sure you are aligned precisely. 5. Click to accept the alignment. 6. Move your cursor away from the origin to set an alignment for the green axis. Use inference ToolTips again to make sure you are aligned precisely. 7. Click again to accept the alignment.

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Moving and Rotating the Drawing Axes Relative to Current Position You can quickly and accurately move and rotate the drawing axes relative to their current position using the Move Sketching Context dialog box. To move and rotate the drawing axes: 1. Context-click on the drawing axes. The drawing axes context menu is displayed. 2. Select Move from the context menu. The Move Sketching Context dialog box is displayed.

3. Specify displacement and rotation values in the units specified under the Units panel of the Model Info dialog box. 4. Click OK.

Aligning the Point of View to the Current View You can align SketchUp's point of view to be perfectly aligned with the current view. To align the point of view to the current view: 5. Context-click on the drawing axes. The drawing axes context menu is displayed. 6. Select Align View from the context menu.

Hiding the Drawing Axes You can display or hide the drawing axes from the View menu. You can also hide the drawing axes from the drawing axes's context menu (when the drawing axes are visible).

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Inference SketchUp features a geometric analysis engine, called the inference engine, allowing you to work in 3D space using a 2D screen and input device. This engine helps you draw very accurately by inferring points from other points as you draw while also providing you with visual cues.

Inference Cues The inference engine uses ToolTip cues, appearing automatically while working on the model, to identify significant points or geometric conditions. These cues make complex inference combinations clear to you as you draw Additionally, the inference engine uses specific colors to indicate its type of inference (covered further in Inference Types).

Inference Types There are three main types of inferences: point, linear, and planar. SketchUp often combines inferences together to form a complex inference. Point Inference A point inference is based on an exact point of your cursor in your model.

Endpoint: The green Endpoint inference identifies the end of a Line entity or Arc entity. Midpoint: The cyan Midpoint inference indicates the middle point on a line or edge. Intersection: The black intersection inference indicates an exact point where a line intersects another line or face. On Face: The blue On Face inference identifies a point which lies on a Face Entity. On Edge: The red On Edge inference identifies a point that lies along an edge. Equi-Distant On Edge: The Equi-Distant On Edge inference indicates an equidistant point, or a chamfer, when a magenta line appears between two connected edges. Half Circle: The Half Circle inference appears when drawing an arc to indicate the point that creates an exact half circle.

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SketchUp User's Guide Linear Inference A linear inference snaps along a line or direction in space. In addition to a ToolTip, a linear inference sometimes displays a temporary dotted line while you draw.

On Axis: The On Axis inference indicates a linear alignment to one of the drawing axes. The solid line is drawn in the color associated with the corresponding axis (red, green, or blue). From Point: The From Point inference indicates a linear alignment from a point along the Drawing Axes directions. The dotted line is drawn in the color associated with the corresponding axis (red, green, or blue). Perpendicular: Tie Perpendicular magenta line indicates perpendicular alignment to an edge. Parallel: The Parallel magenta line indicates a parallel alignment to an edge. Tangent at Vertex: When drawing from the endpoint of an Arc entity using the Arc Tool. Tangent to Edge: Planar Inference A planar inference snaps to a plane in space. Drawing Planes: SketchUp will snap to the planes defined by the Drawing Axes and your view when it cannot snap to geometry in the drawing area. For example, SketchUp will draw on the ground plane when the point of view is that of the ground plane. On Face: A blue On Face inference identifies a point which lies on a face. Although initially a point inference, On Face can also serve as a planar alignment by using inference locking (described below).

Encouraging an Inference At times, the inference you need may not come up immediately or SketchUp might choose alignments with the wrong geometry. In these cases, you can increase the chances of a particular alignment by pausing your mouse cursor over the particular location that you want SketchUp to infer from. When the ToolTips appears, SketchUp will briefly prioritize that alignment as you continue drawing. For example, to encourage SketchUp to create a line to match another, parallel, line (such as when drawing the third line of a rectangle):

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Application UI 1. Create the first two edges of a rectangle with the first edge being parallel to the red axes. 2. Click on the start point of the third edge and move the line tool as though you were creating the third line parallel to first line. As you begin to move the line tool, the line should appear in red. 3. Mid-line creation, move the line tool over the start point of the start point of the first line you created for the rectangle. Your line will extend diagonally to this point. 4. Leave the tool over this point until the Endpoint ToolTip displays. 5. Move the line tool to the approximate location where the end of the third line should appear. A dotted line, with the color of the corresponding axes (green) will follow the line tool to indicate you are directly inline with the start point of the first line. 6. Click when the line you are drawing is indicated by an axes color (red) and is directly perpendicular to the green dotted line.

Component Inferences All normal geometry inferences can be obtained from geometry inside Component entities or Group entities. Group and Component inferences are all indicated by magenta dots.

Inference Locking At times, geometry might interfere with your ability to infer points from other points, making it difficult to draw accurately. Use an inference lock, which tells SketchUp not to waver from the direction it is currently inferring from, to solve this problem. To use the inference lock, hold down the Shift key when SketchUp infers the desired alignment (the inference line will bold). The alignment will remain locked, even as you move the mouse and/or pick a secondary inference point. The following image shows the inference locked in the blue direction to ensure that a new line is exactly perpendicular to the face.

Any of the inference conditions may be locked; along an axis direction, along an edge direction, on a face, from a point, parallel or perpendicular to an edge, and so on. Video - A video tutorial on this topic is available at http://www.sketchup.com/training/tutorials.php

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Principal Tools This section of the user's guide covers the principal tools within SketchUp. Principal tools are those tools that tend to be used most often in SketchUp. Tools in this section are covered in the order they appear within the Tools menu.

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Select Tool Use the Select Tool to specify the entities you will modify when using other tools or commands. The entities that are included in a selection are referred to as the selection set. Activate the Select Tool from the Principal toolbar or from the Tools menu. Keyboard Shortcut: Spacebar

Selecting a Single Entity SketchUp allows you to make both single-entity and multiple-entity selections. To select a single entity: 1. Select the Select Tool. The cursor changes to an arrow. 2. Click on an entity. The selected entity is highlighted in yellow.

Selecting Multiple Entities Multiple-entity selections are useful when you want to perform a single operation on several entities (the selection set). Multiple-entity selections use an expandable selection box to surround the entities you want in the selection set. To select multiple entities: 1. Select the Select Tool. The cursor will change to an arrow. 2. Click and hold the mouse button a short distance away from the entities you want to select to start a selection box. 3. Drag the mouse to expand the selection box over the elements you want to select. a. Clicking to the right-side and dragging to the left, called a crossing selection, selects any elements within the selection rectangle, including those that are only partially contained in the rectangle. The following images show a right-toleft selection selecting two components, though none are completely within the bounds of the selection box.

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b. Clicking to the left-side of the entities and dragging right, called a window selection, selects only those elements completely within the selection rectangle. The following image shows a left-to-right selection selecting one component because only one component (the left speaker) is completely within the bounds of the selection box.

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4. Release the mouse button when all of the elements are either partially included (left-to-right selection) or fully included (right-to-left selection) in the selection box.

Adding and Subtracting From a Selection Set The Select Tool can be used with one or more keyboard modifiers to add or remove entities from a selection set. Adding to the Selection Set (Ctrl) Press and hold the Ctrl key (the cursor will change to an arrow with a plus sign) while clicking on additional entities to add entities, one-by-one, to the selection set. Or, press and hold the Shift key (the cursor will change to an arrow with a plus and minus signs) while clicking on additional entities to add entities, one-by-one, to the selection set. Changing Selection Status for an Entity (Shift) Press and hold the Shift key (The cursor will change to an arrow with plus and minus signs) while clicking on entities to invert the selection status of the entity (currently selected entities will become unselected, unselected entities will be come selected). Subtracting from the Selection Set (Shift+Ctrl) Press and hold the Shift and Ctrl keys simultaneously (the cursor will change to an arrow with a minus sign) while clicking on currently selected entities to remove entities from the selection set.

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Principal Tools Or, press and hold the Shift key (the cursor will change to an plus sign and minus sign) while clicking on currently selected entities to remove the entities, one-by-one, from the selection set. Tip - Use the Group entity to group items within a selection set as a temporary way of quickly reselecting the same group of items. See the Group entity for additional information.

Expanding the Selection Set Using the Mouse You can automatically add to a selection set clicking the Select Tool multiple times in rapid succession. Click once on an entity to select that entity. Click rapidly twice (double-click) on an entity, namely an edge or face, to select corresponding faces or edges respectively. Click three times (triple-click) on an entity, namely an edge or face, to select he edge or face and all entities physically connected to that edge or face. The following image shows this click/selection sequence.

Tip - Use a context-click to invoke the context menu for an entity. Many context menus have a Select submenu allowing you to expand a selection using one of the following commands: Bounding Edges, Connected Faces, All Connected, All on same layer, and All with same material.

Selecting or Unselecting All Geometry Use either the Select All menu item in the Edit menu or press Ctrl+A on the keyboard to select all visible elements in your model. Use the Deselect All menu item in the Edit model, press Ctrl+T , or click on any empty space in the Drawing Area to de-select all currently selected entities.

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Eraser Tool Use the Eraser Tool to delete entities. The Eraser Tool can also be used to hide and soften edges. Activate the Eraser Tool from the Principal toolbar, or by selecting Eraser from the Tools menu. Keyboard Shortcut: E

Erasing Entities As mentioned previously, the Eraser Tool is used to erase entities in the drawing area. Note, the Eraser Tool does not allow you to erase faces (faces are erased after their bounding edges are erased). To erase entities: 1. Select the Eraser Tool. The cursor changes to an eraser with a small box. 2. Click on an entity to erase it. Alternatively, erase several entities at once by holding down the mouse button and dragging it over several entities to be erased. All selected geometry will be erased once you release the mouse button. If you accidentally select geometry you do not wish to delete, press the ESC key to cancel the erase operation before it deletes your selection. Tip - Try erasing entities slowly if you continuously skip over entities you want to erase. Tip - It is usually faster to erase a large number of entities by selecting the entities with the Select Tool and pressing the Delete key on your keyboard. You can also delete selected items by selecting Erase from the Edit menu.

Hiding Lines Press and hold the Shift key and use the Eraser Tool to hide lines (instead of erasing lines).

Softening/Unsoftening Edges Press and hold the Ctrl key to soften/smooth edges (instead of erasing entities). Press and hold the Shift and Ctrl keys simultaneously to unsoften/unsmooth edges.

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Principal Tools

Paint Bucket Tool Use the Paint Bucket Tool to assign materials and colors to entities in your model. You can use it to paint individual entities, fill a number of connected faces, or replace a material with another throughout your model. Activate the Paint Bucket Tool from the Principal toolbar, or by choosing Paint Bucket from the Tools menu. Keyboard Shortcut: B Video - Various video tutorials on this topic are available at http://www.sketchup.com/training/tutorials.php

Applying Materials Ensure you are using either the Shaded or Shaded with Textures display setting so that you can see materials as they are applied to your model (Window > Display Settings > Shaded or Shaded with Textures). To apply materials: 1. Select the Paint Bucket Tool. The cursor will change to a paint bucket and the Material Browser is activated. The Materials Browser contains libraries of materials you can paint on faces in your model. 2. Select a materials library using the drop down list in the Materials Browser. SketchUp contains several default materials libraries, including landscape, roofing, and transparent materials. 3. Select a material from the materials library. 4. Click on the faces to paint. The material is assigned to the face.

Face Painting Rules There are several face painting rules that apply when painting multiple faces or edges at the same time. These rules follow: x

The side of the faces that will be painted depends on the side initially painted when more than one face is selected. For example, if all faces are selected and you paint the front of one face, the front of all faces will be painted. Conversely, if all faces are selected and you paint the back of one face, all back faces will be painted.

x

All selected edges will be painted when you select a face and all edges and paint the front of the face. No edges are painted when you select a face and all edges and paint the back of one face. Ensure you have the Window > Display Settings > Edge color set to By Material to see the painted effect applied to edges.

Fill Options The Paint Bucket Tool can be used with one or more keyboard modifiers to perform various painting operations. Element Fill The Paint Bucket Tool normally operates by filling in faces as you click on them. As mentioned previously, entities selected with the Select Tool can be painted with a single click of the Paint Bucket Tool.

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SketchUp User's Guide Adjacent Fill Press and hold the Ctrl key while clicking on a face with the Paint Bucket Tool to fill that face and any adjacent (connected) face with the same material. The face you click on and the adjacent face must have the same material prior to performing this operation.

Note - Selecting a number of entities with the Select Tool and painting using the Ctrl modifier keys causes just the entities within the selection set to be painted. Replace Press and hold the Shift key prior to clicking on a face with the Paint Bucket Tool to apply a material to every face, with the same material in the current context, with the new material.

Note - Selecting a number of entities with the Select Tool and painting using the Shift modifier key causes just the entities within the selection set to be painted. Adjacent Replace Press and hold both the Shift and the Ctrl keys simultaneously while painting to only replace the material on the face within the confines of geometry that is physically connected to that face. Note - Selecting a number of entities with the Select Tool and painting using the Ctrl modifier keys causes just the entities within the selection set to be painted.

Sampling a Material Press and hold the Alt key to change from the Paint Bucket Tool to a Sample Tool for sampling materials within your model. The cursor will change to an eye dropper. Click on the face whose material you want to sample. Release the Alt key to return to the Paint Bucket Tool. Paint the sampled material on a face.

ŠGoogle Inc. 2006

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Principal Tools

Painting Groups and Components Materials can be painted on entire Group entities or Component entities or to the individual entities within the Group or Component. To assign materials to an entire Group or Component: 1. Select the Paint Bucket Tool. The cursor will change to a paint bucket and the Material Browser is activated. The Materials Browser contains libraries of materials you can paint on faces in your model. 2. Select a materials library using the drop down list box. SketchUp contains several default materials libraries, including landscape, roofing, and transparent materials. 3. Select a material from the library of materials. 4. Click on the Group or Component you want to paint. The faces will receive the material. 5. If you select multiple Groups or Components using the Select Tool, clicking on the selection with the Paint Tool will paint all of them with a single click. Note - If a face within a Group or Component is already painted with a material (other than the default material), before applying a material to the entire Group or Component, the face will not adopt the new material. For example, the windshields, bumpers, and tires in the following image were already painted before a material was applied to these components. Therefore, the windshields, bumpers, and tires maintained their original material.

Note - Exploding a Group or Component assigns the object materials to any elements assigned the default material, thus making the material override permanent.

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Drawing Tools This section of the user's guide covers the drawing tools within SketchUp. Drawing tools are those tools used to create new geometry. These tools include the Line Tool, Rectangle Tool, and Freehand Tool. Tools in this section are covered in the order they appear within the Draw menu.

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SketchUp User's Guide

Line Tool Use the Line Tool to draw edges or Line entities. Line entities can be joined to form a face. The Line Tool can also be used to divide faces or heal deleted faces. Activate the Line Tool from either the Drawing toolbar or the Draw menu. Keyboard Shortcut: L

Drawing a Line Lines can be placed on existing faces or separate from existing geometry. To draw a Line: 1. Select the Line Tool. The cursor changes to a pencil. 2. Click to set the starting point of your line. Note - Press the Esc key at any point during the operation to start over. 3. Move the cursor to the ending point of your line. As you draw a line, the length is displayed dynamically in the Value Control Box (VCB). 4. Click to draw your line. This ending point can also be the starting point of another line.

The line length can be specified precisely using the VCB either before clicking the second point or immediately after the line has been drawn. See Specifying Precise Line Values for further information on using the VCB with Line entities. Tip - Alternately, you can click and hold the mouse button to set the starting point of the line, and drag outward without releasing the button to set the length. Release the mouse button to complete the line. See the Drawing panel of the Preferences dialog box for further information on setting drawing behavior.

Creating a Face The Line Tool will remain at the ending point of every line you create. This end point is automatically treated as a starting point for another line. You can create another line by moving the cursor and clicking again from this new starting point. These two lines are said to be coplaner, intersecting lines (intersecting at starting and ending points). Three or more coplanar lines, intersecting at their ending and starting points (forming a loop), generate a Face entity. Ensure that the Endpoint inference ToolTip is visible whenever you close a Face entity to ensure that any lines you draw are continuous. The Line Tool is released but is still active after a face has been created.

ŠGoogle Inc. 2006

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Drawing Tools

Tip - Set the display settings (Window > Display Settings ) to the Shaded rendering style to clearly show new faces as they are created.

Splitting a Face Draw a line with starting and ending points on the face's edges to split a face. The following image shows a rectangle being split when a line is drawn from one edge of a face to another opposite edge.

Integrating Lines Occasionally, overlapping lines will not be split or integrate with a face. Any lines that are not part of a face perimeter will be displayed with a thicker line (left-most image below) . The Profile Edge rendering style must be enabled in the Display Settings dialog box to see this behavior. Use the Line Tool to trace along an existing line to attempt to split overlapping lines. SketchUp will re-analyze your geometry and attempt to reintegrate the line. The following images show a bold line that did not effectively split a face (left-most image). The line was traced (middleimage) and the line became thin indicating that the line was reintegrated.

Splitting a Line SketchUp automatically splits line segments when new lines are drawn perpendicular to a line. For example, draw a new line to the midpoint (identified by a cyan square) of another line to split a line in half. The following example shows one line being intersected at the midpoint, resulting in two lines.

Select the original line to verify that the line has been split into two equal segments.

ŠGoogle Inc. 2006

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SketchUp User's Guide

Dividing a Line into Equal Segments Line segments can be divided into any number of equal line segments. To divide a line into equal segments: 1. Context-click on a line. 2. Select Divide from the context menu. SketchUp will place points on the line to show where the line will be divided. 3. Move the cursor toward the center of the line to reduce the number of segments. Move cursor toward either end of the line to increase the number of segments. 4. Click on the line when the number of segments you would like is shown. The line will be divided into an equal number of joined line segments.

Specifying Precise Line Values The VCB displays the length of your line while you are drawing lines. You can also specify an line length value using the VCB. Entering a Length Value The VCB label indicates "Length" after you place the starting point of a line. The following image shows the length value in the VCB.

Type the length into the VCB, after placing the starting point of the line, and press the Enter or Return key. SketchUp will use the current document units setting if you only type in a numerical value. You can also specify either Imperial (1’6”) or Metric (3.652m) units at any time, regardless the model units setting. Note - The Line Tool will snap to any previously entered length within the VCB. Entering a 3D Coordinate The VCB can also be used to place the end of the line at an exact coordinate in space. Entering an Absolute Coordinate: Type in the coordinates of a point in 3D space enclosed by brackets, such as [x, y, z], to get absolute coordinates relative to the current axes.

Entering a Relative Coordinate: Type the coordinate points enclosed by angle brackets, in the format <x, y, z>, where x, y, and z values are relative distances from the starting point of your line.

Note - The exact format for VCB entries will vary depending on your computer's Regional Settings. For European users, the list separator symbol may be a semi-colon instead of a comma, so the format would be [x; y; z].

Drawing Lines by Inference The Line Tool uses SketchUp's sophisticated geometric inference engine to help you place your lines in 3D space. The inference decisions, made by the inference engine, are displayed in the drawing area as inference lines and inference points. These lines and points show precise

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Drawing Tools alignment between the line you are drawing and the geometry of your model. Refer to the inference engine topic for additional information. Locking a Line to the Current Inference Direction Press and hold the Shift key, while the line you are drawing is the specific color of an axis, to lock drawing operation to that axis. Locking a Line to a Specific Inference Direction Press and hold either the up arrow, left arrow, or right arrow keys, where the up arrow equals blue, left arrow equals green, right arrow equals red, while drawing a line to lock the line to a specific axis.

ŠGoogle Inc. 2006

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SketchUp User's Guide

Arc Tool Use the Arc Tool to draw Arc entities, comprised of multiple line segments (which can be edited as a single arc). Activate the Arc Tool from the Drawing toolbar or from the Draw menu. Keyboard Shortcut: A

Drawing an Arc Arc entities consist of three parts: the starting point, the ending point and the bulge distance. The distance between the starting point and the ending point is also known as the chord length. To draw an arc: 1. Select the Arc Tool. The cursor changes to a pencil with an arc. 2. Click to place the starting point of your arc. 3. Move the cursor to the ending point of your chord. 4. Click to place the ending point of your arc. A straight line is created. 5. Move your cursor perpendicular to the straight line to adjust the bulge distance. A straight line will extend perpendicular from the straight line.

Note - Press the Esc key at any point during the operation to start over. 6. Click to set the bulge distance. Chord length can be specified after you place the ending point of your arc. Bulge distance, radius, and number of segments can be specified using the VCB immediately after a arc is drawn. See Specifying Precise Arc Values for more information on manipulating arcs using the VCB.

Drawing a Half-Circle The arc temporarily snaps to a half-circle as you pull out a bulge distance. Watch for the HalfCircle inference ToolTip indicating when your arc is a half-circle.

ŠGoogle Inc. 2006

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Day Six Candidate Name: Chelsea Tramel

Content/Grade: 7th Technology

Lesson Topic: Layout of Zoo in Sketch Up

CT:

Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students will learn about Google Sketch Up, and be able to create a three dimensional zoo layout. They will learn how to use toolbars in Sketch Up. Students will demonstrate proficiency in Sketch Up. Students will also know how to appropriately use a variety of graphic tools in the program. TEKS: 7(d)(f) Essential Questions: • Why is it important to know how to use different tools in Sketch Up? • How could knowing how to use different tools in Sketch Up benefit you when using other computer programs or software? Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that … • Know how to use the toolbar in Sketch Up • Getting started, standard toolbar, principal toolbar, drawing toolbar, modification toolbar, construction toolbar, camera toolbar, walkthrough toolbar, display style toolbar, views toolbar, views toolbar, shadows toolbar, sections toolbar, layers toolbar, google toolbar, large buttons, tool help tips. • Will continue to demonstrate knowledge of Sketch Up; they will demonstrate they know how to use basic tools (drawing, painting, push/pull, etc.)

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks: • Each member in the group will draw their own enclosure. They will save it and share it in google 3D library. • Groups will collaboratively begin to put their layout together, and make sure to include each members enclosure.

Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures Description: •

TLAC

(15 min) Teacher will reiterate material from Sketch Up and answer any questions students may Shortest Path have, also teacher will go over the toolbars with students Break It Down • Getting started, standard toolbar, principal toolbar, drawing toolbar, modification toolbar, Check For Understanding construction toolbar, camera toolbar, walkthrough toolbar, display style toolbar, views toolbar, views toolbar, shadows toolbar, sections toolbar, layers toolbar, google toolbar, large buttons, tool help tips. • (75 min) Students begin their layout • (40-50 min) Students create their own enclosures • Each student must create an enclosure in the zoo, they can do this on their own computers, because Sketch Up allows them to publish their works. • When they are done creating it, they will name it, and publish it to the 3D library. • They will find their image under the name they published it under, or under the class username ( *** ) • On the group leaders computer, the group will find each persons enclosure in the 3D library, and upload it to the groupʼs layout. Under the title of the enclosure, the name of the person who created it needs to go under it. • In a word document, students need to remember to cite the images they used in the 3D library that were not their own. • Remind them to put the name of the author, title of image, and where they found it. • ( 25 min) Groups start to put together their layout as a whole Extensions: Students will continue to work on their layout (it is a big task to do the layout), so they will add details to their layout. Students may also have the choice of choosing an assignment to earn extra bucks. Modifications: For students with special needs, I will be monitoring their progress with the concept closely, and will help when it is needed; giving the students individual attention necessary for them to master the concept. Based on my judgements of how well they are grasping the outcomes given for the day, I will determine whether or not they need to go to the content mastery lab for further assistance.


Day Seven Candidate Name: Chelsea Tramel

Content/Grade: 7th Technology

Lesson Topic: Layout of Zoo in Sketch Up & Issuu

CT:

Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students continue to demonstrate their knowledge for the program Sketch Up, by Google. They will also learn what an Issuu is and how it works. Students will learn how to save multiple files as a pdf, and merge pdf files together to make one file. They will learn how to upload the pdf file into Issuu, and make a magazine for their final presentation. TEKS: 1(d) 7(d)(f) 7(g) 8(e) 10(b) 11 (a) Essential Questions: • In what ways would you use an Issuu in your everyday life? College? Jobs? • What are the benefits to choosing to publish Issuu to a more targeted audience versus a broader audience? Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that … • How to save multiple files in the pdf format. • How to merge pdf documents to form one pdf document • How to upload the pdf document into an Issuu

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks: • Save all documents as pdfs • Merge pdf documents into one pdf document, making sure it is in the order and the pages on the pdf look how students want them to. • Upload pdf document into an issuu.

Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures Description: • •

TLAC

(60 min) Groups continue to work on the layout of the zoo Shortest Path (30 min) ISSUU: teacher goes over ISSUU Tight Transitions • Each individual student creates at least 1 - 2 advertisements for the zoo • The advertisements can be from companies and local businesses. Explain to the students that it is a good way for the zoo to start making an money for the zoo. • If they have time, they will begin going back and making sure their documents are appealing ( in an way that they would see pages in a magazine). • * Donʼt forget to explain to students, if they want to do half pages in the magazine, then they need to save a document in the form of, two pages put into one page. • They can do this by going to print, setting the layout to 2, and setting the page orientation how they would want it. • Then going to print preview to make sure it looks the way they want it, then file, save as, etc. Extensions: Students will go through each of their files, and use drawing and organizational tools to make the pages going into the Issuu look like real magazine pages. Modifications: For students with special needs, I will be monitoring their progress with the concept closely, and will help when it is needed; giving the students individual attention necessary for them to master the concept. Based on my judgements of how well they are grasping the outcomes given for the day, I will determine whether or not they need to go to the content mastery lab for further assistance.


Example of ISSUU http://issuu.com/chelseat1818/docs/ppt_for_prezi_to_students? mode=window&backgroundColor=%23222222 To embed in blog: Embed code looks like this... <div><object classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" style="width:420px;height:272px" id="d9852300-8488-a705a1fd-acd603dd6bfd" ><param name="movie" value="http://static.issuu.com/webembed/viewers/style1/v2/IssuuReader.swf? mode=mini&amp;backgroundColor=%23222222&amp;documentId=111207174625-5064b4c802d048f0a7b074f94db7f698" /><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true"/><param name="menu" value="false"/><param name="wmode" value="transparent"/><embed src="http://static.issuu.com/webembed/viewers/style1/v2/IssuuReader.swf" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" menu="false" wmode="transparent" style="width:420px;height:272px" flashvars="mode=mini&amp;backgroundColor= %23222222&amp;documentId=111207174625-5064b4c802d048f0a7b074f94db7f698" /></object><div style="width:420px;textalign:left;"><a href="http://issuu.com/chelseat1818/docs/ppt_for_prezi_to_students?mode=window&amp;backgroundColor=%23222222" target="_blank">Open publication</a> - Free <a href="http://issuu.com" target="_blank">publishing</a> - <a href="http://issuu.com/ search?q=animals" target="_blank">More animals</a></div></div>


Day Eight Candidate Name: Chelsea Tramel

Content/Grade: 7th Technology

Lesson Topic: Issuu

CT:

Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students will learn what an Issuu is and how it works. Students will learn how to save multiple files as a pdf, and merge pdf files together to make one file. They will learn how to upload the pdf file into Issuu, and make a magazine for their final presentation. TEKS: 7(g) 8(e) 10(b) 11 (a) Essential Questions: • In what ways would you use an Issuu in your everyday life? College? Jobs? • What are the benefits to choosing to publish Issuu to a more targeted audience versus a broader audience? Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that … • How to save multiple files in the pdf format. • How to merge pdf documents to form one pdf document • How to upload the pdf document into an Issuu

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks: • Save all documents as pdfs • Merge pdf documents into one pdf document, making sure it is in the order and the pages on the pdf look how students want them to. • Upload pdf document into an issuu.

Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures Description: •

Teacher goes over how to convert all the documents in the ISSUU folder to pdf documents. • Google docs, glogster, sketch up, etc. • Issuu example Extensions: Student will begin to work on proposals for the presentation

TLAC Format Matters Props Explain Everything

Modifications: For students with special needs, I will be monitoring their progress with the concept closely, and will help when it is needed; giving the students individual attention necessary for them to master the concept. Based on my judgements of how well they are grasping the outcomes given for the day, I will determine whether or not they need to go to the content mastery lab for further assistance.


Day Nine Candidate Name: Chelsea Tramel

Content/Grade: 7th Technology

Lesson Topic: Proposals & Practice For Presentations

CT:

Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students will learn what is expected of them from the rubric, and will plan and create a proposal of their presentations. TEKS: 7(a) Essential Questions: • What is the purpose of writing an outline? • During a presentation, how can an outline be useful/beneficial? Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that … • Know how to write an outline • Develop a plan for the presentation • Be able to present with minimal usage of their outlines.

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks: • Make sure all aspects that should be in the Issuu are there. Also, that the Issuu and documents within it, are done correctly, neat, organized, and looks professional • Make sure all areas of the rubric are covered • Develop their proposal/outline • Practice, practice, practice proposals • Fill out presentation plan

Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures Description: • •

This will not go in the students ISSUU Teacher will go over the rubric for the presentations part of the project. Students will begin to prepare their proposals, and start practicing them. • Teacher reiterate the basics of an outline, and answer student questions of confusion. • Proposals should be typed in google docs. Once completed they should be posted in the class blog. • Teacher will send students the link for wallwisher, and each student will write a thank you note (sticky) to the mayor for listening to their presentation and giving them their time. • WALL LINK: http://www.wallwisher.com/wall/thankyou1818 • This will be used for a thank you note to the mayor • Students will be given a presentation plan to help them get started with their outline/proposal. Extensions: Students will practice their presentations until the end of the period.

TLAC Sweat The Details Emotional Constancy

Modifications: For students with special needs, I will be monitoring their progress with the concept closely, and will help when it is needed; giving the students individual attention necessary for them to master the concept. Based on my judgements of how well they are grasping the outcomes given for the day, I will determine whether or not they need to go to the content mastery lab for further assistance.


S●T● S●T● S●T● S●T● S●T● S●T● S●T● S●T● S●T● S●T●S

Presentation Plan What my presentation is about: _______________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ Who is my audience? _______________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ What do I want my audience to know, feel, or do? ________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ How will I begin my presentation?_____________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ What will be in the middle part of my presentation? ______________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ How will I end my presentation? ______________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ What will I show or do to make my presentation interesting? _______________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ S●T● S●T● S●T● S●T● S●T● S●T● S●T● S●T● S●T● S●T●S 140 © 2 0 1 1 B U C K I N S T I T U T E F O R E D U C A T I O N For more FreeBIEs visit bie.org ©2011 BUCK INSTITUTE FOR EDUC ATION


CATEGORY Focus on the Task and Participation

Dependability and Shared Responsibility

Listening, Questioning! and Discussing!

Research and InformationSharing

Exemplary

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Unsatisfactory

3 points

2 points

1 point

0 points

Consistently stays focused on the task and what needs to be done. Very self-directed.

Focuses on the task and what needs to be done most of the time. Other group members can count on this person.

Focuses on the task and what needs to be done some of the time. Other group members must sometimes remind this person to keep on task.

Rarely focuses on the task and what needs to be done. Lets others do the work. .

A true team A strong group member who member who tries contributes a lot of hard! effort, and encourages and supports the efforts of others in the group.

Sometimes a satisfactory group member who does what is required

Sometimes chooses not to participate and does not complete assigned tasks.

3 points

2 points

1 point

0 points

Consistently punctual for group meetings, turns in all work on time.

Usually punctual for group meetings, turns in most work on time.

Sometimes late for group meetings, frequently turns in work after the deadline.

Late for all or most group meetings, misses all deadlines for turning in work.

Follows through on assigned tasks and does not depend on others to do the work, responsibility for tasks is shared evenly.

Follows through on most assigned tasks.

Does not follow through on most assigned tasks and sometimes depends on others to do the work.

Seldom or never follows through on assigned tasks. Depends on others to do all of the work.

3 points

2 points

1 point

0 points

Respectfully listens, interacts, discusses and poses questions to all members of the team during discussions and helps direct the group in reaching consensus.

Respectfully listens, interacts, discusses and poses questions to others during discussions.

Has some difficulty respectfully listening and discussing, and tends to dominate discussions.

Has great difficulty listening, argues with teammates, and is unwilling to consider other opinions. Impedes group from reaching consensus.

3 points

2 points

1 point

0 points

POINTS

___/3

___/3


CATEGORY

Exemplary

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Unsatisfactory

Research and InformationSharing

Routinely gathers research and shares useful ideas when participating in the group discussion. Defends/ rethinks ideas relating to the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s project goals.

Usually provides useful research and ideas when participating in the group discussion.

Sometimes provides useful research and ideas when participating in the group discussion.

Rarely provides useful research or ideas when participating in the group discussion.

ProblemSolving

3 points

2 points

1 point

0 points

Actively looks for and suggests solutions to problems.

Refines solutions suggested by others.

Does not suggest or Does not try to solve refine solutions, but problems or help others is willing to try out solve problems. solutions suggested by others

3 points

2 points

1 point

0 points

Consistently makes necessary compromises to accomplish a common goal.

Usually makes necessary compromises to accomplish a common goal.

Occasionally makes compromises to accomplish a common goal, and sometimes helps keep the group working well together.

Rarely makes compromises to accomplish a common goal and has difficulty getting along with other group members.

Always has a positive attitude about the task(s) and the work of others.

Usually has a positive attitude about the task(s) and the work of others.

Occasionally is publicly critical of the task(s) or the work of other members of the group.

Is often negative and publicly critical of the task(s) or the work of other members of the group.

All team members contributed equally to the finished project.

Assisted group/ partner in the finished project.

Finished individual task but did not assist group/ partner during the project.

Contributed little to the group effort during the project.

Performed all duties of assigned team role and contributed knowledge, opinions, and skills to share with the team. Always did the assigned work.

Performed nearly all duties of assigned team role and contributed knowledge, opinions, and skills to share with the team. Completed most of the assigned work.

Performed a few duties of assigned team role and contributed a small amount of knowledge, opinions, and skills to share with the team. Completed some of the assigned work.

Did not perform any duties of assigned team role and did not contribute knowledge, opinions or skills to share with the team. Relied on others to do the work.

Group/Partner Teamwork

POINTS ___/3

___/3

___/3


Group Oral Presentation Rubric 4 All group members participate equally. Group members help each other as needed.

3 All group members participate. Group members help each other as needed.

2 Some group members participate. Some group members speak clearly and are easy to understand. All group members Most group members Some group speak clearly and are speak clearly and are members speak easy to understand. easy to understand. clearly, but are difficult to understand. All group members Most group members Group members speak to the entire speak to the entire speak to only part of audience. audience. the audience. Information is Information is Information may be presented in an presented in an only partially organized way. organized way. organized. Oral presentation Oral presentation Oral presentation includes many includes some includes few details. details. details. Presentation is Presentation is Presentation is visually organized organized and complete. and complete. complete.

!

1 Only 1 or 2 group members participate. Most group members are hard to understand. Only 1 or 2 group members speak and can be understood. Most group members speak only to part of the audience. Information is presented in a disorganized way. Oral presentation includes few or no details. Presentation is disorganized or incomplete.


Day Ten Candidate Name: Chelsea Tramel

Content/Grade: 7th Technology

Lesson Topic: Presentations

CT:

Stage 1 – Desired Results Goals/Learning Outcomes: Students will demonstrate they can create interdisciplinary presentations for defined audiences. They will also use technology applications to facilitate evaluation of communication, both process and product. TEKS: 12(b) Essential Questions: • How does technology enhance presentations? • What are the elements of a well developed presentation? • Why is it so important to be well organized when preparing/giving a presentation? Students will know … Students will be able to … Students will understand that … • How technology can enhance presentations • How to make a proposal for a product, and present it. • How to stay organized when creating presenations, and giving presentations

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks: • Students will grade other groups presentations • Fill out the audience feedback sheet • Students will present their zoos • Teachers will grade using the collaboration rubric, and group oral presentation rubric • Students will fill out the end of project self assessment

Stage 3 – Learning Plan/Procedures Description:

TLAC

• Presentation Day! Positive Framing • Student groups will present their final presentations in the auditorium. No Warnings • Students will have a rubric for each groups presentations and grade their own peers. • Students will fill out surveys on their group members regarding effort and collaboration. Extensions: Students will be doing presentations on this day, and grading their peers presentations Modifications: I will send content mastery students down to practice their presentation if needed prior to their class presentation. Also, I will have an assistant from the content mastery lab be at the presentations as well.


P R E S E N T A T I O N

D A Y

C H E C K L I S T

…

Schedule of presentations set

…

Guests/audience know when/where to attend

…

Guest/audience materials duplicated

…

Room arranged for presenters and audience

…

Equipment /student materials in place

…

Equipment tested (and tech support on stand-by)

…

Teacher’s materials in place

…

Audience role explained

…

Timekeeping device ready

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End Of Project Self Assessment Project:

Student:

I completed the following tasks during the project:

As a result, I learned the following: About the subject matter:

About working in a group:

About conducting research:

About presenting to the audience:

About using the different programs: I learned that my strengths are:

Date:


End Of Project Self Assessment I learned I need to work on:

If I were to do the project again, I would make the following changes:

My favorite part of the project was:


PROJECT PRESENTATION AUDIENCE FEEDBACK Student Team: Project Name:

Date:

Thank you for attending our project presentations and taking the time to write thoughtful answers to the following questions: 1. What did you learn from this presentation, or what did it make you think about?

2. What did you like about this presentation?

3. Do you have any questions about the topic or about how the project was done?

4. Any other comments about this presentation?

142 © 2 0 1 1 B U C K I N S T I T U T E F O R E D U C A T I O N For more FreeBIEs visit bie.org ©2011 BUCK INSTITUTE FOR EDUC ATION


Students Grading Students Each person will fill one of these for every person in their group. Teacher will take this score into consideration when giving out final grade. Criteria

! ! !

Weight

Unsatisfactory

Proficient

Advanced

Leadership & Initiative

25%

Group member played a passive role, generating few ideas; tended to do only what they were told to do by others or did not seek help when needed

Group member played an active role in generating new ideas, took initiative in getting tasks organized and completed, and sought help when needed.

In addition to proficient criteria: The group member provided leadership to the group by thoughtfully organizing and dividing the work, checking on progress, or providing focus and direction for the project

Facilitation & Support

25%

Group member seemed unable or unwilling to help others, made nonconstructive criticisms toward the project or other group members, or distracted other members

Group member demonstrated willingness to help other group members when asked, actively listened to the ideas of others, and helped create a positive work environment

In addition to proficient criteria: The group member actively checked with others to understand how each member was progressing and how he or she may be of help

Contributions & Work Ethic

50%

Group member was often off-task, did not complete assignments or duties, or had attendance problems that significantly impeded progress on project. May have worked hard, but on relatively unimportant parts of the project.

Group member was prepared to work each day, met due dates by completing assignments/ duties, and worked hard on the project most of the time. If absent, other group members knew the reason, and progress was not significantly impeded.

In addition to proficient criteria: The group member made up for work left undone by other group members and demonstrated willingness to spend significant time outside of class/school to complete the project.

Rate the group member from 0-5. Five is the highest amount (best) and 0 is the lowest amount. Explain why you gave them the score that you did.


Technology Bibliography Tramel, C. (2011, December 7). Zoolapalooza. Retrieved from http://prezi.com/lhauvdutthdv/zoolapalooza/ Tramel, C. (2011, December 7). [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://tramelchelsea1818.blogspot.com/ Tramel, C. (2011, December 7). Chelsea's webpage. Retrieved from http//www.tramelchelsea@weebly.com Tramel, C. (2011, December 7). Classroom chatroom. Retrieved from http://www.todaysmeet.com/ Tramel, C. (2011, December 7). Zoolapalooza. Retrieved from http://chelseatramel.edu.glogster.com/glog-6267/? voucher=2fc063ad9e5a1d46f3d120b9bad45dff Tramel, C. (2011, December 7). Googledocs. Retrieved from https://docs.google.com/?tab=Xo&authuser=0 Tramel, C. (2011, December 7). Example of issuu . Retrieved from http://issuu.com/chelseat1818/docs/ ppt_for_prezi_to_students Tramel, C. (2011, December 7). Thank you card. Retrieved from http://www.wallwisher.com/wall/chelseatramel Google sketchup teacher guide. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.3dvinci.net/teacherguide/Teacher_Guide.htm Sketchup user's guide. (2006, June 16). Retrieved from http://www.scribd.com/doc/13920654/Google-Sketch-UpUsers-Guide-WIN Google sketchup. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://sketchup.google.com/intl/en/product/gsu.html Quick reference card. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://support.google.com/sketchup/bin/answer.py? hl=en&answer=116693&ctx=cb&src=cb&cbid=1dlb1gdto5wkg&cbrank= Markham, T., Larmer, J., & Ravitz, J. (2003). Project based learning handbook. (2 ed.). Oakland, California: Buck Institute For Education. Chapter 126. texas essential knowledge and skills for technology applications . (n.d.). Retrieved from http:// ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/ch126toc.html Rubrics for assessment. (2011). Retrieved from http://www.uwstout.edu/soe/profdev/rubrics.cfm Rubrics for teachers. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.rubrics4teachers.com/ Rubrics. (2011). Retrieved from http://www.bie.org/tools/freebies/cat/planning_forms Ferlazzo, L. (2010, March 7). [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://larryferlazzo.edublogs.org/2010/03/07/thebest-sites-for-learning-about-animals/ Wooland park zoo. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.zoo.org/ Sedgwick zoo:. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.scz.org/animal_exhibits-exhibit_areas_animals.php Arkive. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.arkive.org/ Who pooped?. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.whopooped.org/ University of michigan museum of zoology:. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/ index.html Smithsonian: National zoological park. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://nationalzoo.si.edu/Animals/default.cfm


Planning a zoo. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.scottspindler.com/zoo/ The electronic zoo:. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://netvet.wustl.edu/e-zoo.htm Zoos usa website:. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.officialusa.com/stateguides/zoos/index.html San diego zoo:. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.sandiegozoo.org/animalbytes/index.html Pittsburgh zoo:. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://zoo.pgh.pa.us/AnimalsandExhibits Sacramento zoo:. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.saczoo.org/Page.aspx?pid=318 Oregon zoo:. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.oregonzoo.org/Cards/ Tampaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lowry zoo park:. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.lowryparkzoo.com/animals_and_habitat_areas.php Detroit zoo. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.detroitzoo.org/Animals/Animals/Detroit_Zoo_Animals_and_Habitats Buffalo zoo:. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.buffalozoo.org/mammals.html Chicago zoological society:. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.czs.org/czs/Brookfield/Zoo-Home.aspx Waza zoos of the world:. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.waza.org/en/site/zoos-aquariums Fort worth zoo:. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.fortworthzoo.org/ Dublin zoo. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.dublinzoo.ie/4/Animals-amp-Habitats.aspx Philadelphia zoo:. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.philadelphiazoo.org/zoo/Zoo-Habitats.htm London zoo:. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.zsl.org/education/ World biomes. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.blueplanetbiomes.org/world_biomes.htm The worlds biomes. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/gloss5/biome/ Biomes. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.enchantedlearning.com/biomes/ Woodward, S. (1998, September 16). Introduction to biomes. Retrieved from http://www.radford.edu/swoodwar/ CLASSES/GEOG235/biomes/intro.html Mission: Biomes. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Experiments/Biome/

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