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The local paper for Chelsea

WEEK OF OCTOBER REMEMBER HENRY STERN NOW ◄ P.8

11-17 2018

FRESH VOICES RESPOND TO THE SHED’S OPEN CALL CREATIVITY The up-and-coming cultural institution aims to present arts and pop culture under one roof for all audiences. Can a generous commission program for emerging artists help? BY ALIZAH SALARIO

To butcher a Virginia Woolf quote, artists must have money and a large cultural institution of their own if

Open Call’s inaugural class. Photo: Scott Rudd

they are to create. Now, 52 New York City-based artists and arts collectives have just that, thanks to The Shed’s inaugural Open Call program, announced by CEO and artistic director Alex Poots on Oct. 9. The luxuries of time and space have long eluded even established and mid-career artists, particularly in a city where the rent is too damn high. The Shed, the gargantuan new cultural center located where the High Line meets Hudson Yards, is trying

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WHAT THE BUZZ IS ABOUT NATURE Andrew Cote, with help from family and friends, keeps bees in the city, and gathers a sweet harvest BY DEBORAH FENKER

It’s a busy time of year for honey. The New York Botanical Gardens hosted an exhibit on a recent weekend called Honey & Harvest, and The High Line matched donation dollars earlier this month, inspired by a generous donor passionate about pro-

tecting the productive pollinators who provide the stuff. And a huge contingent of New Yorkers just celebrated what might be honey’s signature holiday: Rosh Hashanah, where the custom of dipping apple slices in honey inspires hope for the Jewish New Year. A recent trip to the Union Square Greenmarket mirrored this apian frenzy. At one of the most popular stands at the market, Andrew’s Honey, it was difficult to discern whether there were more bees or customers thronging the golden jars on display.

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A rooftop beehive. Photo courtesy of AndrewsHoney.com Clinton

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Crime Watch Voices NYC Now City Arts

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Restaurant Ratings Business Real Estate 15 Minutes

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WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW < CITYARTS, P.14

WHO HAS ACCESS TO A PARKING SPACE IN CHELSEA? NEWS

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MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.18

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

WHAT NEXT FOR CHELSEA GALLERIES?

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up rezoning told us she’d like to would and the mid-2000s May 1 The and running this year, for of West Chelsea. Muas an ombudsman city serve Whitney the of opening Art on small businesses within them clear seum of American means not government, helping It’s new buildings, to get Gansevoort Street c to the traffi through the bureaucracy rising rents, that are even more foot things done. forcing some gallerists area. is that Perhaps even more also The irony, of course, to reconsider their Whitney -importantly, the ombudsman the arrival of the and number neighborhood roots art meccas will tally the type small business one of the city’s the end for of complaints by taken in BY GABRIELLE ALFIERO -- could also spell dealers the actions art owners, long-time policy buildStephen some response, and somefor ways to When gallerists Griffin in the area, as their are sold or recommendations If done well, Haller and Cynthiatheir W. ings increasingly begin to fix things. report would Haller reopened follow- demolished. lease the ombudsman’s 26th Street gallery With their 10-year quantitative afrst fi the rebuild Stephen us give cut short, with ing a five-month flooded abruptly shared taste of what’s wrong ter Hurricane Sandy they and Cynthia, who the city, an the space, small businesses in towards building with their first floor phone their and Tony important first step were still without were Lehmann Maupin they the problem. needed to xing fi of galleries, and Internet. Still, where Shafrazi property by June To really make a difference, the happy in the location, will have to to stay for vacate (Shafrazi is suing course, the advocaterising rents, they expected of 2014. find a way to tackle business’ the Manhattes some time. doltold less the landlord, which remain many While Chin Instead, they were their Group, for $20 million reproblem. vexing that Post most the New York than a year later gauge what to demol- lars, said it’s too early tocould have landlord planned ported). another role the advocate on the ish the building. They shopped for planned for there, more information in the neighbor“We had shows bad thing. We had location to find problem can’t be a with the long periods of time.amount hood but struggled a twoThis step, combinedBorough more than just put in a huge the anything efforts by Manhattan to mediate of money to refurbish“We year lease on a street-level in Chelsaid. President Gale Brewer offer space,” Cynthia space. After 13 years Gallery the rent renewal process, were really shocked.”Gallery sea, Stephen Haller signs tangible and early, Haller some For Stephen small left the neighborhoodStux it, it isn’t riswith of progress. For many can’t come and others like joined forces oor are driving business owners, that in a new sixth-fl ing rents that far new devel- Gallery soon enough. on 57th Street, not Chelsea, Zach Feuer them away. It’s

NEWS

luxury building Robotic garage for board draws fire from community BY ZACH WILLIAMS

at a a robotic garage A proposal for in Chelsea has thrown luxury building into the city’s zoning access to parking debate. proposed for a A high-tech garage W. 28th St. has 520 development at Board 4, which is riled Community arguing that it plan, in opposing the more car usage would only invite while only providthe neighborhood, residents. ing parking to rich a special city perThe garage needs 29 spaces rather mit to accommodate allowed the than the 11 automatically opted to oppose by the city. CB4 1 full board meetpermit at its April Carl a draft letter to ing, stating in Planning City the of Weisbrod, chair city criteria for such Commission, that based on the parking foran exception is ago, when many for stock of a decade spaces were used demer industrial future of parking in anticipation velopment in Chelsea. 40 residential have The project will comsquare feet of alunits and 11,213 the ground floor, mercial space on three parking spaces The lowing eight and the developer, respectively. But wants more for Related Companies, is the New York acthe building, which internationally City debut for Zaha Hadid. (Adjaclaimed architect Line, the build cent to the High

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his gallery in After 15 years running to partner with Joel two gallery spaces, (left) leaves the neighborhood team will operate Mesler (right). TheMesler/Feuer, on the Lower East Feuer/Mesler and May 10. Slide, slated to open

Newscheck

2 3

is surging opment, which in part to in Chelsea, thanks High Line the opening of the

City Arts Top 5

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space

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OCTOBER 11-17,2018

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RIVERSIDE PARK ART INSTALLATION CHANNELS HUDSON HISTORY MULTIMEDIA Exhibition at 69th Street Transfer Bridge by NYC artist Tony Oursler runs through October BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

The actress Pearl White, who starred in early silent films created along the Palisades, is one of many historical references featured in Tony Oursler’s “Tear of the Clouds” exhibition, on view this month in Riverside Park. Image: Tony Oursler Studio.

Upper West Siders will have one more reason to look forward to evenings on the Hudson this month. Starting this week, Riverside Park will host a large-scale multimedia installation by the New York City artist Tony Oursler. The project, named “Tear of the Cloud,” after the Adirondack lake that is the Hudson River’s highest source, utilizes the 69th Street Transfer Bridge as a canvas onto which ethereal images alluding to the river’s past will be digitally projected.

Videos cast onto the former rail transfer bridge, itself a reminder of the river’s industrial legacy, draw on the length and breadth of the Hudson Valley and its history, from the painters of the Hudson River School to the birth of hip-hop culture in the Bronx to the technological advances of Samuel Morse and IBM — all with an eye toward tomorrow. “The Headless Horseman and his horse are important references in Tear of the Cloud, as they gallop towards artificial intelligence, the chess-playing computer Deep Blue’s famous knight sacrifice, facial recognition technologies, and bots which have provoked significant questions about our future,” Oursler said in a statement. The exhibition, commissioned by the Public Art Fund, will be accompanied

Sunday, 10/28/2018  11 am-2 pm  285 Jay Street, Brooklyn NY 11201

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by an audio component and creates what Daniel S. Palmer, associate curator with the nonprofit, described as a “powerful, expansive, and transformative experience.” “With this new work, Oursler rethinks how we learn, explore, and share our complex narratives by interweaving the past and the present,” Palmer said in a statement. “In this way, the artist’s multivalent allusions to the region’s stories flow together and offer their vitality like the many tributaries that feed into the Hudson River, coalescing into a source of creativity and inspiration.” The installation will be on view in Riverside Park, near 69th Street, Oct. 10 through Oct. 31 from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., except Mondays.

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CRIME WATCH BY JERRY DANZIG MAN MUGGED ON CHAMBERS

STATS FOR THE WEEK Reported crimes from the 10th precinct for the week ending Sep 30

At 8:40 a.m. on Friday, Sept. 28, a 19-year-old man walking on Chambers Street was approached by man who claimed to have a knife and a gun who said, “Give me something out of this,” according to the account given to police. The man then asked for the young man’s headphones and forced him to withdraw money from an ATM, which the young man did at a nearby McDonald’s, taking out $20 in cash and giving it to the mugger.

Week to Date

ARMED SHOPLIFTER ARRESTED Police collared a knife-wielding shoplifter. Just after 6 p.m. on Sept. 27, a 34-year-old man entered the Frye Company store at 113 Spring St. and picked up a brown leather bag on display. Approached by a store employee, the would-be shopper took out large black-and-silver kitchen knife and left the store with the $500 bag. A police officer stopped the suspected shoplifter on nearby Broadway, where he was positively identified by the Frye employee. Justin Gaston was placed under arrest and charged with robbery, police said.

Photo by Tony Webster, via Flickr

MAN ARRESTED AFTER MUGGING Yet another downtown mugger was nabbed in late September. At 9:20 p.m. on Tuesday, September 25, a 22-yearold Queens woman passing in front

of 175 Franklin St. was accosted by a man in his mid-30s who then took her bag, police said. Both a witness and the victim later identified the mugger to police, and Edward Moore was arrested and charged with robbery.

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Year to Date

2018 2017

% Change

2018

2017

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

1

0

n/a

Rape

0

1

-100.0

15

14

7.1

Robbery

1

2

-50.0

61

64

-4.7

Felony Assault

3

2

50.0

72

82

-12.2

Burglary

3

2

50.0

57

61

-6.6

Grand Larceny

12

22

-45.5

556 476 16.8

Grand Larceny Auto

1

0

n/a

17

27

-37.0

BANK ROBBED OF $5,700

SHOPLIFTING AT SAKS

At 9 a.m. on Monday, September 24, a 34-year-old man wearing a blonde curly wig and white sunglasses passed a note to a teller inside the Chase Bank at 240 B Greenwich St. which stated, “Stacks of 50’s and 100’s please.” The teller complied and gave the robber $5,700 before the man fled the bank on foot. The teller neglected to press the panic button, and a search of the neighborhood proved fruitless.

Saint Laurent was the designer of the day for three shoplifters recently. At 3:41 p.m. on Saturday, September 29, three men entered the Saks Fifth Avenue store at 225 Liberty St. and took 10 Yves Saint Laurent items worth $5,465 from a table, concealed them and left, fleeing southbound on West Street.


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OCTOBER 11-17,2018

MILLENNIAL SEEKS TO DETHRONE NADLER POLITICS Naomi Levin, a Republican software engineer and defender of Trump, vies to oust a liberal lion of the House BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

An Upper West Side woman who learned about totalitarianism from her Soviet-Jewish refugee parents is trying to topple a powerful Congressional incumbent who could make life hellish for President Donald Trump if Democrats flip the House in the midterm elections. Naomi Levin identifies herself as a pro-Israel, pro-school choice, 30-something Republican who speaks Russian, Hebrew and French, sees Iran as a global menace — and strongly believes that many of Trump’s actions and polices are “very positive and very beneficial” to America. In chunks of the deep-blue district she hopes to represent, it would be a giant understatement to call her defense of Trumpism unfashionable: On the UWS and in Hell’s Kitchen, Hillary Clinton scored 87 percent of the ballot in 2016, demolishing Trump, who managed a mere 10 percent. Still, Levin makes no apologies for a conservative outlook as she mounts a long shot bid to oust U.S. Rep. Jerrold Nadler, the Democrat who has represented the 10th Congressional District for more than a quarter-century — and who is poised to become chairman of the House Judiciary Committee if his party prevails in the general election on Nov. 6. “Jerry represents the far-left side of the district,” Levin said. “He votes no on each and every single bill the Republican majority would support. He’s against lowering the tax burden, against increasing federal funding for charter school programs, against school choice — and he represents the extreme polarization that has have taken control in Washington.” In a district where roughly 70 percent-plus of all registered voters are Democratic — and Nadler crushed his most recent GOP opponent, Phil Rosenthal, by a 192,371-to-53,857 vote tally — it is tough to imagine that

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Naomi Levin on West End Avenue near her apartment off 85th Street. Photo courtesy of Naomi Levin for Congress Campaign such views would gain traction. Levin is undeterred: “What we’re seeing right now is large numbers of career politicians getting defeated all over the country by people with a fresh perspective,” she argues. “The majority of voters now are looking for something and someone new. So my candidacy is coming at a good time in a diverse district where the political landscape is changing.” For more than six years, Levin — a software engineer who graduated from Boston University in 2005 with a degree in biology and computer science — has been living off West End Avenue in the mid-80s. That’s smack dab in the liberal political heart of the 10th CD, which encompasses the Upper West Side, Hell’s Kitchen, Chelsea, Soho, Greenwich Village, Tribeca, Wall Street, Battery Park City and parts of Brooklyn. Isn’t West End Avenue unfriendly political territory? “Believe it or not,” she says, the UWS, despite its historical leftleaning reputation, is one of the most hospitable parts of the district for a Republican based on her personal experience. “For the most part, I’ve gotten a lot of positive feedback,” Levin said. “So many Democrats are disappointed in their representatives, upset with them because so many have abandoned their constituents ... And besides, the mission of my campaign isn’t partisan politics — it’s to focus on the needs of our district.” Of course, it isn’t all sweetness and smiles: “Every once in a while, I’ll get people who are pretty rude,” she said. “There are the people who won’t talk to be when they find out that

I’m a Republican. People who hand me my palm card back. “But I don’t carry a big sign that says, ‘I’m a Republican,’” Levin added. She even demurs when asked if she cast her own vote for Trump: “I don’t think that my personal voting record has an impact on what my mission and my role in Congress would be.” Levin says that she’s “wary” of the president’s “benevolent approach” to dictators in Russian and North Korea, but adds, “I think that with Trump, we need to look at his actions, and his domestic economic policies and his Iran policy have been very positive and very beneficial to this country.” The Levin insurgency is coming at a time when Nadler, whose campaign didn’t return a call for comment by press time, is poised to become a crucial player in any post-midterm drama involving Trump’s survival in office. If he wins reelection and helms the Judiciary Committee, both of which are expected, Nadler has already pledged to open an investigation into the accusations of sexual misconduct and perjury against newly confirmed Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. And he’s repeatedly pushed for a probe into whether Trump’s business interests breach Constitutional anticorruption prohibitions. As for any possible impeachment proceedings, Nadler has signaled a go-slow approach, while also saying, “We have to see more, we need more evidence. We may get there.” Levin counters that the incumbent’s anti-Trumpism is reflexive and comes at the expense of his constituents. “I think Nadler’s mission of obstruction is a reflection of the loss of ability to lose with grace,” she said. Meanwhile, Rosenthal is now out campaigning for Levin: “Naomi is the voice of the next generation,” he said. “She’s the daughter of Soviet emigres, she’s a regular person, not a politician who spent decades in Washington, and she understands the beauty and the importance of our democracy and the freedoms that we cherish here.” invreporter@strausnews.com

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OPEN CALL CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

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to change that. The institution is already positioning itself as New York Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next hub of artistic innovation with the inaugural commissions well before it officially opens in spring 2019. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A fundamental part of our mission is to engage our local communities and support New York Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diversity of talent,â&#x20AC;? said Tamara McCaw, chief civic program officer at The Shed, who co-organized Open Call along with Emma Enderby, senior curator. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Open Call provides the resources local artists need to fully explore their ideas, as well as the platform for reaching higher levels of visibility with new audiences.â&#x20AC;? Developed specifically for New York City-based artists who have havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t had the opportunity to create and present work with large cultural institutions, Open Call spotlights artists from across the creative spectrum. Beating out a pool of nearly 1000 applicants, the recipients each receive a stipend of between $7,000 and $15,000, in addition to support and resources to develop their work. Applicants went through a rigorous vetting process, including a committee of curatorial and producing artists that honed in on inventive and risk-taking proposals. Final selections were made by a panel of New York-based movers and shakers, including poet and cofounder of Cave Canem Cornelius Eady, Harlem Stage managing director James King and ďŹ lmmaker and CEO of the fashion collective Hood By Air Leilah Weinraub. Though the artists selected for Open Call self-identified through the proposal process as either â&#x20AC;&#x153;early-careerâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;emerging,â&#x20AC;? many boast impressive biographies and myriad accomplishments â&#x20AC;&#x201D; just not

Rendering of The Shed, designed by Diller ScoďŹ dio + Renfro in collaboration with Rockwell Group

Open Call provides the resources local artists need to fully explore their ideas, as well as the platform for reaching higher levels of visibility with new audiences.â&#x20AC;? Tamara McCaw, chief civic program officer, The Shed

a previous commission with a large or major institution. Recipients include designers, rappers, dancers, activists and makers, all of whom will have the chance to bring their creative visions to two stages in The Shedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s innovative space: a 500-seat black box theater and a 17,000 square-foot open air plaza with The Shedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s movable shell ceiling. Recipients include Prince Harvey, a Dominica-born artist and musician known for recording his first album in an Apple Store and for STAY BOLD: 100 DAYS 100 SONGS, where he released a song a day for 100 days as a protest against President Trump; artist Gabriela MarĂ­a Corretjer Contreras, who utilizes textiles and performance as a way of imagining a future for a society with an

â&#x20AC;&#x153;identity crisis;â&#x20AC;? and vocalist and composer Tariq Al-Sabir, who has premiered roles in the Smithsonian-commissioned operetta â&#x20AC;&#x153;Qadarâ&#x20AC;? and in the social justice opera â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stinney,â&#x20AC;? in addition to jingle writing, ďŹ lm scoring and music production. The inaugural group of artists will launch the Shedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2019 season and continue into 2020. All of the performances will be free. Core to The Shedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is commissioning and presenting leading artists and thinkers from all disciplines under one roof. Just like the structure itself, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lofty goal â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but one that now has plenty of creative fuel behind it. For more information, visit theshed. org/commission/open-call

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BEES CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Andrew Cote, a Connecticut native, comes from a family that has been keeping bees since the 1800s, at Silvermine Apiary. His family is still an integral part of the business: his father, Norm, makes regular appearances at the market; his mother, Polly, still helps keep the books; and his brother and nephew help with the hives. And those hives are myriad: he still has colonies in Connecticut, but the main draw at the Greenmarket are his signature New York City honeys, harvested from rooftops, community gardens, select balconies, and even from cemeteries, where the sprawling grounds give bees a little more elbow room. Not that they need much: bees are locavores, usually not flying more than a a few miles from their hives. And for this, city bees have avoided much of the havoc wreaked on rural hives. Cote is frequently asked how bee populations are faring, what with the all the attention recently given bees and their mysterious demise. Lucky for him, and for those of us who love honey, while it might seem counterintuitive that bees living in the city would suffer less imminence than their bucolic counterparts, evidences show they are. City bees are not exposed to the pesticide use and nefarious mono-cropping practices of big commercial agriculture, which are two of the most pernicious causes of colony collapse. Mono-cropping, which focuses on cultivating a single commodity on a farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s acreage, offers a stingy variety of pollens for bees, and pesticides can be as harmful to bees as they are to the insects they are targeting. Two other factors, climate change and mite infestations, do affect hives in the city, but

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All abuzz on a city rooftop. Photo courtesy of AndrewsHoney.com responsible beekeeping can counter some of the latter. The former, of course, is a mammoth issue, and the direction that current action and legislation are taking isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t helping. In fact, among the many curious practices in which bees partake (like the Waggle Dance, a sort of mating mambo), climate change may be having a deleterious effect. Not ones to soil their own stomping grounds, bees they basically â&#x20AC;&#x153;hold itâ&#x20AC;? all winter, until the weather warms and they reenergize out of their quasi-dormant, cold-weather mode for a long awaited â&#x20AC;&#x153;potty breakâ&#x20AC;? often referred to as an elimination ďŹ&#x201A;ight. This occurs as soon as the weather warms, sometimes false-starting the bees into action only for them to be struck back by a sudden cold snap. Thus, erratic temperatures further jeopardize already challenged bee populations. And the overturning of legislation enacted by the Obama administration â&#x20AC;&#x201D; by permitting increased use of pesticides and eliminating measures designed to curb global warming â&#x20AC;&#x201D; could cause

multi-faceted damage on hive health. Fortunately, Cote may be the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preeminent beekeeper, by being passionate about responsible beekeeping and by doing his part to encourage healthy bee populations. It is he, along with two NYPD ofďŹ cer beekeepers, who the city calls to capture rogue swarms. There were quite a few of these this summer, with swarms ranging from equal to the size of a grapefruit to a backpacksized behemoth composed of half a hiveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth of bees â&#x20AC;&#x201D; upwards of 30,000 little buzzers. Cote has a special vacuum that gently and safely sucks up the swarm, which he then transports to one of his less populous hives, where the bees continue to produce their delectable honey. Andrew sells a variety of honeys at his stand, and online at www.andrewshoney.com. His best-sellers are a thick, centrifuge-whipped honey that is creamy and spreadable â&#x20AC;&#x201D; amazing on toasty rusks. Other favorites include an incendiary ghost-pepper-infused honey (terriďŹ c with roast chicken or drizzled on goat cheese), and an array of signature rooftop honeys, with hives spanning four of the ďŹ ve boroughs, and well into Westchester and Connecticut. As fall ushers in its new strains of flora and subsequent allergens, Coteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stand gets even busier with hordes of the afflicted seeking relief through his hyper-local honey. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s produced closest to where you suffer the most is said to be the more effective, since the honeys are derived from the same pollens causing you anguish. So whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re augmenting your holiday feast, seeking an alternative to Claritin or just sweetening your tea, Andrewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Honey offers a premium product, and allows you to support a local business, and a guy who really cares about bees.

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Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to chelseanewsNY.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

REMEMBER HENRY STERN NOW BY BETTE DEWING

Should John Jay Park pool be renamed for former city Parks commissioner Henry Stern while he can still enjoy the honor or be renamed, as is usual, only after the honoree has departed this life? Community Board 8’s Park’s Committee voted a unanimous “yes” to renaming forthwith. But New Yorkers nevertheless need to hear about this longtime parks commissioner and his dedicated and visionary work for parks and the city at large. And, yes, Henry was a bit of an eccentric, which sparked more media coverage of places and concerns too often overlooked. And sometimes caused some misunderstandings. And, remember as well, prior to being parks commissioner, Stern was a City Council member-at-large for Manhattan, and with Council Member Bobbie Wagner Jr. tried

in vain to have subway station rails installed, Stern was a man for safe travel, in general, and his remark about city biking was a truth-in-anutshell, a Sternism. He said: “A bicycle can be more scary than a car, because it’s small, swift and silent and can come at you from any direction.” But among the few city officials who agreed was Police Commissioner Ben Ward who warned: “Scofflaw biking is scaring the public to death.” Stern did post “No bicycling” signs on pedestrian park paths, and pushed for greater park patrol enforcement but there’s still a long way to go. Stern is being honored, of course, for his enormous contribution to parks citywide, including, the extraordinarily loving care he gave to park trees – city trees in general. And, he closely monitored the many recreational places, especially the safety of playgrounds, not to men-

tion public swimming pools. But also endearing were the more personal things Stern initiated like giving park names to park-goers, his staff and others. Stern, though, was a central figure in lawsuits alleging discrimination at Parks during his tenure, which the city eventually settled for tens of millions of dollars. But, of course, there also was Stern’s strong commitment to public swimming pools, exemplified by his involvement with John Jay Park pool. The city’s public pools were lifesavers, he reportedly said, for those unable to travel to beaches. Yes, even in this affluent Upper East Side location there are such people, and they especially want the pool to bear Henry Stern’s name while he still can appreciate the honor. Stern is reportedly in ill-health, due to Parkinson’s disease. And don’t we need to hear about that in

Henry Stern. Photo: swedennewyork, via flickr a time when so many afflicted elders especially drop out of sight,of public view, even those who once so magnificently served the public like Henry Stern? Surely now it’s their care that needs close monitoring – their diseases and disorders which need more research to find better treatments and also cures - even if the population were not aging.

So these conditions must be seen, not hidden, for this to occur especially in a society which so inordinately values the young and fast movers and talkers. Again, we need to hear more about Henry Stern’s life now, ideally, to see him at those civic meetings he once so faithfully attended. And how we need to hear Stern speak, however, haltingly, about the hard truths about Parkinson‘s and other disabling conditions which keep those afflicted away from these community meetings, at which decisions affecting entire communities are made. Time for a much needed change and with no one more qualified to lead it than an unparalleled public servant like Henry Stern at age 81. It’s not an impossible dream, not if enough of us share it — and with the able-bodied enabling those who are not, to be seen and heard on a public level. And in general — to never let them be out of sight and mind — or forgotten. dewingbetter@aol.com

FOUL VS. FAIR: WHO WILL TURN OUT? BY MEREDITH KURZ

A light rain fell when the #CancelKavanaugh rally started last Thursday near Trump Tower, but it quickly became a downpour as the crowd of protesters swelled. Anti-Trump protesters have always been cordoned off across the street from Trump Tower, with the meager number of pro-Trump supporters slightly south, on the same side of the street of Trump’s building. Taking the NYPD by surprise, it seemed, activists were directly marching on the sidewalk in front of Trump Tower. Officers finally moved the protesters farther south of Trump’s building, but the march was soon over. The rain stopped, people faded away, most leaving soggy signs. There were no arrests. The foul-weather voters could determine next month’s midterm outcomes. According to a 2007 study in The Journal of Politics, statistics favor Republicans in inclement elections.

As at this rally, many pro-Trump supporters are quiet about their preference. The trick for pollsters is to uncover his secret voters. There was only one counter-protester willing to show his stripes at the #CancelKavanaugh rally. He held an oversized “Trump 2020” banner, marching along with the protesters, yelling, “Losers!” He said he’s been at every protest since April 2017. He felt Christine Blasey Ford should be heard, but that Kavanaugh should get in. There was a scuffle when he and another man exchanged words. A nearby officer quickly quelled the dispute. A woman in a torn dress and fake blood all over her was handing out red-splotched flyers quoting the Old Testament — “‘They had sex with her and abused her all night long until morning,’ Judges 19:25.” A wide group of organizations sponsored the rally, from the Women’s March which gathered more than three million people nationwide in

2017, to a group called the Socialist Rifle Association, with the National Lawyers Guild, Black Women’s Blueprint and many others. The only escape from the rain was the Trump Tower overhang: reporters and photographers hovered there, with the doormen and the NYPD. One young man there looked like a businessman who just left work; tie and jacket off, but in a white collared shirt and suit pants. He did not want to give his name, but said he was a conservative Republican. He calmly explained why he wasn’t coming forward to express himself as a counter-protester: he’d been aggressively harassed in the past over his atypical Manhattan opinions. “I don’t think Republicans are conservative enough,” he said with a quiet smile. He supported Trump and approved of Kavanaugh, citing his twelve years on the D.C. courts, and the many times the Supreme Court endorsed his opinions. He noted that

four of Ford’s friends denied that the alleged assault happened as Ford explained it, and that he’d never seen a group of people try to ruin someone else’s life. He admitted he’d like to see Trump behave more formally and that the president had a big ego. However, he likes that Trump “sells” America, claiming we have the best products, the best employees. He’s very happy with the new trade agreement with Mexico and Canada. “Trump cares about, and is doing a good job with, our economy,” he said. “He gets work done. The voters knew what they were getting, and they voted him in.” The protesters had many varied opinions, yet all agreed Kavanaugh didn’t belong on the Supreme Court and that Trump should be voted out. Most felt the president should not be impeached because it would continue this ongoing political feud. As a generalization, the women

An open Trump supporter at the protest. Photo: Meredith Kurz protesters seemed focused on the disparity between being their being in the majority numerically while being grossly underrepresented politically. The men on both political sides seemed more focused of the power struggle between the two political parties. One woman I spoke to said Kavanaugh had “expressed a disdain for a political slant of some Americans.” This Saturday there is a rally in Washington, DC sponsored by the Women’s March. There is no estimate on the size of the rally. Weather forecast? Fair.

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;HEY, WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE HAVING AN EVENTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ACTIVISM NYUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College Democrats are expanding their range of activities as the midterm elections approach

We think a company thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been around for generations should offer a product thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guaranteed for a lifetime.

BY TEDDY SON

The New York University College Democrats have stepped up their game as the 2018 midterm elections draw closer by the day. The student political club has expanded their range of sponsored events to an almost weekly basis, while also conducting regular panel meetings every Thursday evening. One such event was a panel of speakers discussing foreign policy after Donald Trumpâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presidency. Author Peter Beinart, former diplomat and Deputy White House Chief of Staff Mona Sutphen and Center for American Progress member Brian Katulis gathered at the New York University Kimmel Center on September 20 to talk about the future of foreign policy in the Democratic party. These events are not only limited to members of the College Democrats, but also open to general students as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a very active social media account, and we do try to reach out and promote large events,â&#x20AC;? said club secretary Arman Becan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We try to use our reputation, our name recognition to reach out and say â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Hey, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re having an event ...â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and of course we encourage anyone whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interested in liberal and Democratic politics to come to our meetings to learn more.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are [students] dissatisďŹ ed with the Trump administration and dissatisďŹ ed with Republicans in Congress,â&#x20AC;? said club president Oliver Jones. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We welcome anybody whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s working to counteract this administration in terms of preventing its horrendous agenda from passing.â&#x20AC;? The College Democrats also discussed the outcome of Christine Blasey Fordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hearing regarding her accusations of sexual abuse by Brett Kavanaugh. Held on the September 27, club members and other students gathered in the Grand Hall of New York Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Global Center for Academic and Spiritual Life (GCASL) to re-live Ford and Kavanaughâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s testimonies. Although the students decided to remain anonymous due to the sensitive emotions being discussed,

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Photo courtesy College Democrats of NYU, via Facebook

We believe that each candidate, each district, each race is unique, so we believe that Democrats need to tailor their message to move along the liberal spectrum from more conservative to more progressive based on what they believe their constituents are.â&#x20AC;? Arman Becan, club secretary, NYU College Democrats

most participants agreed that Ford had been treated rather unfairly in her part of the hearing, which led to a further discussion about the treatment of female representatives in the Democratic party. Another event on October 4 involved a phone-banking session to support Congressional candidates Antonio Delgado and Max Rose, with a handful of students making calls in the GCASL basement to potential voters to promote the campaigns of both candidates. According to both Jones and Becan, the main aim of the club is not to stick to any sort of specific Democratic model or advance any particular policy, but to remain ďŹ&#x201A;exible and try to get Democrats into office to continue along a more liberal path for state politics. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal is electing Democrats,â&#x20AC;? said Jones. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We [also]

have to look at ourselves as NYU College Democrats and looking at where we ďŹ t into the party ďŹ xture.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We believe that each candidate, each district, each race is unique,â&#x20AC;? said Becan, â&#x20AC;&#x153;so we believe that Democrats need to tailor their message to move along the liberal spectrum from more conservative to more progressive based on what they believe their constituents are.â&#x20AC;? Further activities sponsored by the College Democrats includes a trip to Staten Island neighborhoods where they will get the word out about the Max Rose campaign by knocking on doors and talking to residents. In addition, the College Democrats also opened up a small booth in the Kimmel Center lobby to encourage people to go out and vote.

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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

She loved theater. So she gave.

OCTOBER 11-17,2018

Discover the world around the corner. Find community events, gallery openings, book launches and much more: Go to nycnow.com

Photo:Stephen Paley

10

Some Some say say Helen Helen Merrill was was the the theater. theater. During her life, life, she she fostered fostered the careers of of dozens dozens of of playwrights. playwrights.

EDITOR’S PICK

Wed 17 JAZZ AMBASSADORS: COLD WAR DIPLOMACY

Today, Today, 21 21 years years after her death, death, the the fund fund she she started in The The New New York York Community Community Trust supports supports emerging emerging and distinguished distinguished playwrights.

What do you love? We We can can help help you you create create aa charitable charitable legacy. legacy.

Contact Jane Wilton: (212) 686-2563 or janewilton@nyct-cfi.org

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Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum, Pier 86 7 p.m. $45 212-245-0072. intrepidmuseum.org This panel discussion features jazz master Jimmy Owens, musician Wycliffe Gordon and historians Ingrid Monson and Penny Von Eschen. moderated by Professor Robert O’Meally, founder of the Center for Jazz Studies at Columbia University. After the discussion, Gordon & His International All Stars will perform a reimagining of a concert behind the Iron Curtain.

Thu 11

Fri 12

Sat 13

‘MARCH UNDER AN EMPTY REIGN’

DANCE: ‘...ITS TIME...’

HOPELESSLY DEVOTED: A BURLESQUE TRIBUTE TO ‘GREASE’

The Joyce 175 Eighth Ave. 7:30 p.m. $35 Recognized for her vivid imagery and wit laced with unexpected beauty, choreographer Donna Uchizono makes a long-awaited return to The Joyce with the world premiere of “March Under an Empty Reign.” Featuring six dancers, the work acknowledges the New York Quadrille’s fourperspective stage, and explores what seeps through the cracks of confinement. Through Oct. 13. 212-691-9740 joyce.org

Theater at the 14th Street Y 344 East 14th St. 7 p.m. $20-25 Freemove Dance’s debut evening-long work is choreographed by Jenn Freeman and conceived as a meditation on each individual’s complex relationship to time. Five dancers transition through changing ambiances, styles and energies, driven by the evocative live drum score, composed by percussionist Dani Markham, who has performed with Childish Gambino. Through Oct. 14. freemovedance.com

The Triad Theater 158 West 72nd St. 9 p.m. $30/advance, $35/ door This homage to the greatest high school movie musical of 1978 tells the story of Candy Applebottom, her paramour Twinky Boots, their middleaged high school friends and the secrets they’re keeping. Part burlesque show, part singalong, part drag extravaganza, this is theater for a good cause: proceeds will benefit the NYCLI chapter of Pets for Vets. 617-429-0870 lesfemmesfatalesnyc.com


OCTOBER 11-17,2018

11

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

Photo by Subhrajyoti07 via WikiMedia Commons

Sun 14 Mon 15 Tue 16 ▲ SEMINAR: PERSPECTIVES ON PADMASAMBHAVA The Rubin 150 West 17th St. 10 a.m. $16-$65 Tibetans have long celebrated Padmasambhava, the Lotus Born, as the Second Buddha. At this first international seminar dedicated to the subject, organized with Columbia University and Skidmore College, experts will address how Padmasambhava’s legacy also plays an increasingly important role in the practice and spread of Tibetan Buddhism around the world. 212-620-5000 rubinmuseum.org

▼ FIRST PERSON: MARGALIT FOX

TIMES TALKS: JILL SOLOWAY

Center for Jewish History 15 West 16th St. 6:30 p.m. $15/$10 students and seniors With an eye for quirky details, Margalit Fox wrote more than 1,400 obituaries at The New York Times, and gained a legion of followers. Fox will join author Ruth Franklin in conversation about her own life, her favorite obits and her new book, “Conan Doyle for the Defense: The True Story of a Sensational British Murder, a Quest for Justice, and the World’s Most Famous Detective Writer.” 212-294-8301 cjh.org

The New School 63 Fifth Ave. 7 p.m. $45 Jessica Bennett, gender editor at The New York Times, moderates a conversation with Jill Soloway, the Emmywinning screenwriter, director and author. They will discuss Soloway’s upcoming book “She Wants It: Desire, Power, and Toppling the Patriarchy,” and her memoir tracing their evolution from a straight, married mother of two to identifying as queer and non-binary. 212-229-5108 newschool.edu

Wed 17 ALL USED UP: ‘DISMANTLING THE GAZE’ International Center of Photography 250 Bowery 6:30 p.m. Free This program builds on ICP’s series “Dismantling the Gaze,” which considers looking, power, and visual culture in the #MeToo movement, and “Queering the Collection,” which presents work of and outside ICP’s Collections to expand the voices of queer artists. 212-857-0000 icp.org

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OCTOBER 11-17,2018

Rendering of The Frick Collection from 70th Street, courtesy of Selldorf Architects

GILDED AGE GRANDEUR MEETS BRUTALISM As The Frick Collection’s expansion and renovation plans move forward, the museum seeks a temporary home at The Met Breuer BY KENNEDY MCDONALD

Frick Collection officials are in discussions with their counterparts at The Met about moving a selection of The Frick’s works into The Met Breuer while renovations and an expansion take place at the Gilded Age mansion on Fifth Avenue. Under a provisional agreement, some of The Frick’s Old Masters collection and amenities would move into The Breuer in 2020. “I didn’t expect to be engaged in a discussion about an entire building that would allow us to show the collection, host education programs, offer library services, store the collection, and have staff under one roof.” Ian Wardropper, The Frick’s director, said in a statement. “That the Breuer is architecturally significant, purpose-built as a pub-

lic museum structure, and in the same neighborhood as us adds further to the appeal. It feels like an amazing number of factors have aligned.” The arrangement would free The Met to refocus resources toward enhancing the modern and contemporary galleries at its Fifth Avenue flagship. The discussions follow the Landmarks Preservation Commission’s approval in June of The Frick’s latest renovation plan — a major milestone for the museum in its long-sought effort to expand. In 2015, public outcry — mostly regarding the proposed elimination of The Frick’s beloved Russell Page Garden — led The Frick’s board of directors to withdraw and ultimately revise the initial renovation plan. The recently approved plan — designed by architect Annabelle Selldorf in collaboration with architecture firm Beyer Blinder Belle — features the garden as the centerpiece of the renovation. The plan also includes an expansion of the museum shop as well as a new second floor above the

reception hall, a café and an education center. The Frick must still secure approval from the Board of Standards and Appeals before work can begin. “We anticipate submitting our application in October. We cannot make any assumptions about the duration or outcome of this process, which often involves many visits over a period of months.” said Heidi Rosenau, a spokesperson for The Frick.

From Beaux-Arts to Brutalist While it may be located only five blocks away, the Brutalist-style Breuer building is a far cry from the BeauxArts sensibilities of The Frick. What might it look like when JeanHonoré Fragonard’s “The Progress of Love” from 1772 leaves the goldtrimmed walls of the airy Fragonard Room for the Breuer’s harsh lines and concrete? “This is a very exciting opportunity to see our works in a different space and perhaps install them in ways we don’t here (i.e. chronologically or by

school) but no determinations have been made yet as to what we will do,” Wardropper said in his statement. “We look forward to fleshing out those conversations once our discussions with The Met have concluded.” During The Frick’s provisional stay, The Met would remain official stewards of the property, which in turn is still owned by the Whitney Museum of American Art. It’s not yet known what the Whitney intends for the Breuer when The Met’s lease expires in 2023. After the Whitney relocated to Chelsea in 2015, the Breuer’s flexible lighting and minimalist, moveable panels provided at fitting space for The Met’s experimental exhibitions of 20th and 21st century art. The Frick Collection, on the other hand, resides in the former residence of its founder, the Gilded Age industrialist Henry Clay Frick. Designed in 1913 by architect Thomas Hastings in ornate Beaux-Arts style — from which modernists like Marcel Breuer intentionally departed — the Indiana limestone mansion features unwav-

ering symmetry, arched windows, whimsical molding and a bounty of neoclassical nods in its numerous, varied rooms. Complete with oak paneling, Oriental rugs and abundant gold detail, The Frick envelopes its collection of Old Masters, 19th-century paintings, sculptures and decorative art in a unique, intimate distillation of Gilded Age life. In contrast to the flexibility of the Breuer’s galleries, the Frick mansion was designed from the start with the intention of displaying Henry Clay Frick’s art and eventually becoming a public museum. Several of the collection’s paintings and furnishings remain configured exactly as they were when Frick and his family still lived in the mansion. With The Frick’s works destined to reside in The Met Breuer for at least two years, one might wonder how the Renoirs, Goyas and Rembrandts will appear in an environment so vastly different from their carefully curated home.


OCTOBER 11-17,2018

13

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

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OCTOBER 11-17,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

UWS SHELTER MOVING, GETS NEW PROVIDER COMMUNITY Residents raise concerns at announcement BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

Freedom House, an Upper West Side homeless shelter long a source of neighborhood grievances, will soon close and be replaced by a new facility nearby.

The city’s Department of Homeless Services plans to close the shelter, at 316 West 95th St., between West End Avenue and Riverside Drive, late this fall. A new 200-resident shelter operated by a different nonprofit provider will open one block south on West 94th Street by December. Since it opened during the Bloomberg administration in 2012 with no advanced public notice under an emergency contract, “Freedom House has never shed the reputation

of being a problem site,” said Helen Rosenthal, who represents the neighborhood in the City Council. For years, neighbors have complained of Freedom House residents engaging in aggressive panhandling, drug dealing, harassment and other disorderly activity, prompting calls from Rosenthal and members of the local community for the shelter to be closed or placed under new management. Steven Banks, commissioner of the

New York City Department of Social Services, which oversees the Department of Homeless services, acknowledged that the shelter had fallen short of the agency’s standards. “This particular location has not been an effective facility for serving our clients, and [Rosenthal] has been extremely helpful in pointing out ways in which there have been challenges for both our clients and the community,” he said. The new shelter, also between West End Avenue and Riverside Drive at

306 West 94th St., will be operated by Praxis Housing Initiatives, a Manhattan-based nonprofit. “We have a high-quality provider that wants to provide services on the Upper West Side, they have a track record of providing excellent services, they have a building in which our clients could get better services, and that was really the catalyst for going in a different direction here,” Banks said.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS SEP 26 - OCT 2, 2018 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml. Tick Tock Diner

481 8 Avenue

A

Pad Thai

409 8th Ave

A

Rare View Rooftop

152 West 26 Street

Grade Pending (38) Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewageassociated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored.

Caffe Bene

39 W 32nd St

Grade Pending (24) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

L’Amico / The Vine

839 6th Ave

A

Rowland’s Bar And Grill / Chef Street

151 W 34th St

A

2Beans

817 Ave of the Americas

CLOSED (48) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Food For Thought Catered Events

130 West 25 Street

A

Whitmans

500 W 30th St

Grade Pending (21) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewageassociated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies.

Death Avenue

10th Ave

A

Spain Restaurant & Bar

113 West 13 Street

Grade Pending (27) Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored.

Tipsy Parson

156 9 Avenue

A

Black Smith

158 W 25th St

Not Yet Graded (48) Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, cross-contaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/ refuse/sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored.

Okuda

458 W 17th St

A

Salam Cafe & Rest

104 W. 13th St. (Unit One)

A

Terroir At The Porch

Highline W 15th Street @ 10th Ave,

A

Mansions Catering

4042 West 8 Street

Grade Pending (42) Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Hand washing facility not provided in or near food preparation area and toilet room. Hot and cold running water at adequate pressure to enable cleanliness of employees not provided at facility. Soap and an acceptable hand-drying device not provided. Toilet facility not provided for employees or for patrons when required. No facilities available to wash, rinse and sanitize utensils and/or equipment.

Charm’s

200 8th Ave

CLOSED (76) Food not cooked to required minimum temperature. Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food Protection Certificate not held by supervisor of food operations. Live roaches present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies or food/ refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/ or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Personal cleanliness inadequate. Outer garment soiled with possible contaminant. Effective hair restraint not worn in an area where food is prepared. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

The Pho 2

273 8th Ave

A

O Cafe On 7th

65 W 11th St

Not Yet Graded (26) Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, crosscontaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/ sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.


OCTOBER 11-17,2018

15

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

FURY IS ALL THE RAGE NEIGHBORHOODâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BEST BOOKS

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Rebecca Traister is furious, and she feels â&#x20AC;&#x153;fucking greatâ&#x20AC;? about it. Traister, award-winning author, journalist and New York magazine writer at large, and Aminatou Sow, co-host of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Call Your Girlfriendâ&#x20AC;? podcast, spoke to a packed house at the New York Public Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main branch on Oct. 2 to mark the launch of Traisterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anger.â&#x20AC;? Obviously, cracked Sow, Traister engineered the bookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s release with the current news cycle. Yes, the joke landed. But looking around â&#x20AC;&#x201D; at an audience ranging from young professionals to older activists on the feminist scale, at the middleaged woman Instagramming her â&#x20AC;&#x153;suff RAGEtteâ&#x20AC;? shirt, at the teetering stacks of books that would sell out by the end of the evening, at the audience giving a standing ovation before the talk even began â&#x20AC;&#x201D; it was clear that womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anger isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just a blip in the news cycle or a trend piece. Female rage is both a catalyst for and consequence of American history. If the room stuffed to the gills was any indication, there are still pages and pages yet to be written. It was with this in mind that Sow and Traister launched into a passionate conversation about just how womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anger functions as a political propellent, particularly at a moment when almost daily, a new incident fans the ďŹ&#x201A;ames. (Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth noting that at approximately the same time as the book talk, President Trump was imitating Christine Blasey Fordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee at a campaign rally in Mississippi.) Traister did not pull any punches. Yes, she said, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s risky to show anger. Angry women are often characterized as â&#x20AC;&#x153;hysterical, performative, unhinged.â&#x20AC;? These shrill harpies and furious freaks are the very opposite of the cool girl trope, noted Traister, the pop culture ideal rewarded by the patriar-

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Rebecca Traister and Aminatou Sow at the New York Public Library. Photo courtesy of the NYPL chy for keeping her cool. For women of color, the stakes of showing anger are even higher. Anger can get you ďŹ red. Anger can get you killed. Which, of course, is why womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anger is sanitized and tamped down. Perhaps itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also why neither Traister nor others thought of womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anger as a worthy lens to view politics until the 2016 election. Traister called her book idea a moment of clarity, and a narrative through-line became immediately obvious. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anger is â&#x20AC;&#x153;consequential ... only women never had their fury hailed as fundamentally transformative and patriotic,â&#x20AC;? she said. The audience nodded in recognition. Traister envisioned working on a book about female anger over a period of years. But that was before the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s March, before young women were some of the most vocal activists on gun control, before #MeToo, before the Kavanaugh hearings. The fast and furious pace of political upheaval and outrage turned a marathon into a four-month sprint. Yes, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good and Madâ&#x20AC;? comes at a time when womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anger has reached a boiling point. But Traister is quick to point out that as a country, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been here before, many times. It was women who led labor and civil rights efforts that transformed our nation. For instance, Clara Lemlich called for a general strike that became the shirtwaist workers uprising, resulting in new labor agreements with all but a few factories â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one of which was the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory. For the record, Rosa Parks wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just tired. She was intentional in the act of refusing to stand. And yes, she was angry.

Traister certainly isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the ďŹ rst to recognize that womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anger can be a propulsive force. But by looking at â&#x20AC;&#x153;the speciďŹ c nexus of womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anger and American politics,â&#x20AC;? and how many of the movements for social change and progress are woven within it, Traister presents an illuminating reframing. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anger isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t threatening because a shrieking banshee may spontaneously combust. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s threatening because angry women run for office. They expose corruption and wrongdoing. Most recently, the unapologetic rage of Ana Maria Archila and Maria Gallagher, the activists who confronted Senator Jeff Flake in an elevator, used anger as a vehicle for disruption and change. Anger makes it impossible to look away. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anger has proven not only productive, but patriotic, even revolutionary. So why is it that the righteous anger of our forefathers â&#x20AC;&#x201D; our â&#x20AC;&#x153;national lullaby,â&#x20AC;? Traister calls it â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is the song we have on repeat? This reporter couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help but think about what was missing from the audience: men. Too bad more of them werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t there to witness what Traister and Sow tapped into: anger allows women to be be seen â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what feels so damn good. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the anger thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bad, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the swallowing and holding it in,â&#x20AC;? Traister noted. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good and Madâ&#x20AC;? hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been on shelves long. But the very fact of its existence reframes womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anger for what it so often is: a catalyst for change. The Traister-Sow talk will be rebroadcast on the NYPLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Library Talksâ&#x20AC;? podcast, which comes out on Sunday, Oct. 7.

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OCTOBER 11-17,2018

Business

THE QUICK AND THE LATE Testing same-day delivery offered by a range of services — from traditional retailers to online-only merchants BY ANNE D’INNOCENZIO

It was a Friday and I was eagerly awaiting my vegetable spiralizer, red wine and Roku stick. They all arrived as promised. But where was that book and makeup I ordered? And my pizza? Same-day delivery offers the tantalizing convenience of online ordering with nearly the same immediacy of store buying. But how well are stores pulling it off? I settled in on my couch and spent a Friday trying several different services, from traditional retailers to online-only merchants. Some stores did better than others. Amazon Prime Now, Instacart and FoodKick all delivered my items within a certain time frame. At the other end of the spectrum were some doozies. One delivery — Bobbi Brown eye shadow from online luxury purveyor Net-a-Porter — didn’t arrive at all. Ordering from Barnes & Noble included glitches both on the website and on the app, and a book that didn’t come until nearly 9 p.m. The pizza? That came later than I was told as well, and I was hungry. Here’s my take on what went well — and what didn’t. EASE OF ORDERING: Using the Amazon Prime app on my phone was probably the quickest experience of those I tried. I ordered four items — socks, a vegetable spiralizer, calcium pills and a case of bottled water — and it took just two minutes. The most cumbersome experience was with Barnes & Noble. I started on the app at 10 a.m. to order Kristin Hannah’s novel “Winter Garden,” but kept encountering a glitch when I tried to insert my address. After three tries, I switched to my computer, but I had a similar problem there too. I called customer service a little after 11 a.m., and 24 minutes later I placed the order. I could have walked to the local Barnes & Noble store and bought the book quicker than that! DELIVERY: Only four of the seven retailers including the pizza parlor

Where was my pizza? Photo: Lou Stejskal, via flickr offered a specific time frame for delivery. Knowing when something will arrive really helps. I didn’t think I’d be waiting around in my apartment for 11 hours. Amazon Prime, Instacart and FoodKick, owned by FreshDirect, all promised to deliver between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. All three came in that period. I had a nice experience at Best Buy, too, receiving the Roku stick a little after 2 p.m. when I was told it would arrive by 9 p.m. Net-a-Porter said my eyeshadow would come by 7 p.m. At 6:52 p.m., I called for an update and was told there was a problem with the order, and I would get it tomorrow. I was told that the computer system was confused by the apostrophe in my last name, and so my order was put on hold, without my getting any updates. No thanks! I canceled the order. It would have been nice for them to alert me earlier that there was an issue. As for Barnes & Noble, the customer service representative on the phone couldn’t give me a delivery time. At 7:05 p.m., I got a text saying the book was on a truck in New Jersey and heading toward me. It arrived around

9 p.m. — still the same day, after all. The margherita pizza and the salad? Ordered at 12:10 p.m., they were supposed to arrive at around 12:45 p.m. but didn’t arrive until about half an hour after that. FEES: The highest was at Net-a-Porter, which charged $27.22 including the flat delivery charge of $25 and other fees. I guess if I were ordering a $500 dress, it wouldn’t matter. But I was ordering eyeshadow that cost about $76. Instacart’s delivery fee — $11.99 — was also high, bringing the total cost of my chips and guacamole to $26.16. The delivery charge is based on customer demand for the delivery window you request. Barnes & Noble’s delivery fee was just $3.99, while Best Buy’s was $5.99. Amazon Prime waived the delivery fee because my order came to more than $35. FoodKick also didn’t charge a fee because my red wine and pesto totaled $22.13, above the $20 minimum for free delivery. So by 9 p.m., I had most of what I ordered, including a book, wine and pizza. Would I try these services again? Yes, but I definitely know which retailers come through.

A order An of “Winter Garden” G from Barnes fr and Noble. an


OCTOBER 11-17,2018

17

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

  



  

 

 



  

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18

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

OCTOBER 11-17,2018

SHELTER CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14

ACTIVITIES FOR THE FERTILE MIND

thoughtgallery.org NEW YORK CITY

John Judis: The Nationalist Revival

MONDAY, OCTOBER 15TH, 7:30PM The Strand | 828 Broadway | 212-473-1452 | strandbooks.com Author John B. Judis follows up his study of the rise of Trump (The Populist Explosion) with a book examining the resurgence of nationalism. Judis traces back nationalism’s history to see if a return of wider wars and depressions is imminent ($5 gift card or $15.99 signed copy purchase).

TimesTalks: Jill Soloway

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16TH, 7PM The New School | 63 Fifth Ave. | 212-229-5108 | newschool.edu Gender editor for the New York Times Jessica Bennett speaks with Emmy-winning screenwriter and director Jill Soloway. They’ll discuss Soloway’s upcoming book, She Wants It: Desire, Power, and Toppling the Patriarchy, and today’s takes on“gender, inclusion, desire, and consent” ($45).

Just Announced | Tenement Talk: The Politics of Domestic Workers

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1ST, 6:30PM Tenement Museum | 103 Orchard St. | 212-982-8420 | tenement.org A trio of authors and scholars discuss the immigrants and migrants who have historically done domestic work, and the ways they’ve shaped movements and general political reform out of it (free, RSVP required).

For more information about lectures, readings and other intellectually stimulating events throughout NYC,

sign up for the weekly Thought Gallery newsletter at thoughtgallery.org.

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You may be eligible if you: > Are at least 18 years old > Have had mild psoriasis for at least 6 months

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Compensation is provided.

Locals learned of the city’s plans for the site at an Oct. 4 meeting with elected leaders and DHS and Praxis officials at P.S. 75 on West 95th Street. A few dozen neighborhood residents attended the forum, which was billed in flyers as a “community update” on Freedom House. The Praxis proposal aims to address key deficiencies that Rosenthal and local groups identified as contributing factors to many of the problems plaguing Freedom House. Freedom House lacks an indoor common space, prompting residents to gather on the sidewalk and in Riverside Park. Additionally, Rosenthal said, security at Freedom House is provided by a third-party firm contracted by Aguila, Inc., the nonprofit provider that runs Freedom House, and not wellintegrated into the shelter’s operations. Praxis will hire its own security guards and the new shelter facility will feature indoor common space and a courtyard area for residents. Praxis CEO Svein Jorgensen told residents at the Oct. 4 meeting that he and his colleagues would regularly attend community advisory board meetings, employ staff to patrol the area, engage with neighbors to address concerns and address loitering and public nuisance issues. “We will be part of the community,” Jorgensen said. DHS intends to terminate its contract with Aguila and close Freedom House in the weeks to come. Including Freedom House, the city has four contracts with Aguila, for which the nonprofit receives $34 million annually in public funds. The nonprofit’s other contracts will remain in effect after Freedom House closes. DHS officials declined to address DHS’s assessment of the quality of services at the other Aguila facilities or whether DHS plans to phase out its contracts with Aguila entirely, as the agency has done with other underperforming providers. “We’re always looking at their portfolio,” Banks said, adding, “we’re raising the bar and so we’re reviewing all of our providers constantly.” Banks said he is hopeful that the Freedom House building will become permanent affordable housing after the shelter closes. DHS officials declined to share details regarding how such a transition might play out.

Praxis Housing Initiatives will operate a new shelter at 306 West 94th Street. Photo: Michael Garofalo Several residents expressed concern over the site’s future at the Oct. 4 meeting, fearing that Freedom House could eventually be replaced with another shelter or supportive housing. DHS Deputy General Counsel Aaron Goodman said that the agency has no plans or proposals at this time for another shelter at the location. Rosenthal shared some attendees’ skepticism toward DHS’s response. “I hear it the same way you hear it,” she said. “It’s not a guarantee.” “I will flip out if they put a shelter where Freedom House is now,” Rosenthal said. “That is unacceptable to me.” The site of the West 94th Street shelter is the Alexander Hotel, an SRO-style building. Praxis identified the building and submitted a proposal for the site through DHS’s openended bidding process for new shelters. Six permanent residents living in the building will not be evicted as a result of the transition. The new shelter will serve as a temporary residence for adult families — for example, a couple experiencing homelessness or a grown child caring for a parent — the same population served by Freedom House. “To the extent that residents of Freedom House aren’t connected to permanent housing yet, they’ll be able to move into the new site,” Banks said. The new shelter will have capacity for roughly 200 residents, about the same as Freedom House. Some attendees questioned the fairness of siting the new shelter on the block, which is in the vicinity of several supportive housing facilities. Another topic of concern brought up repeatedly by neighbors, dissatisfied with what they characterized as the ineffectiveness of the community advisory board model in fixing issues during Freedom House’s six-

year history, was the perceived lack of avenues for meaningful recourse to spur response to recurring problems. “We will continue to work with the community as much as we can, in any way possible, to answer any and every question that comes our way as the community has concerns,” said Lori Boozer, a special adviser at DSS. “I’m interested in getting in that building and seeing for myself that it’s in good shape,” Rosenthal said, adding, “It’s really important to me that the community hear this and that we hear their concerns. I’m going to continue to hold DHS’s feet to the fire to make sure that what we’re talking about actually plays out.” A public hearing on the proposal is scheduled for Oct. 18. Closing down and replacing problem shelters such as Freedom House is one aspect of the de Blasio administration’s “Turning the Tide on Homelessness” plan to overhaul the city’s approach to homelessness, which DHS officials explain evolved in a haphazard manner over the previous decades to include shelters operated by not-for-profit providers contracted by the city, commercial hotels and so-called “cluster” sites consisting of private apartments largely in the Bronx and Brooklyn. The city is working to end the use of cluster sites and hotels, as well as to reduce the overall footprint of the system while opening 90 new shelters. DHS has ended the practice of opening new shelters without advanced notification and now provides public notice of plans for new facilities at least 30 days in advance. Last year, the shelter system census remained flat roughly from the previous year for the first time in over a decade.


OCTOBER 11-17,2018

19

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YOUR 15 MINUTES

To read about other people who have had their “15 Minutes” go to chelseanewsNY.com/15 minutes

THE SECRETS OF SECRETIONS Dr. Randi Hutter Epstein discusses her new book about the history of hormones, and why it’s both a story of amazing advancements by brilliant scientists, and crazy claims by hacks and charlatans BY ALIZAH SALARIO

Hormones. Just over a century ago, little was known about these tonguetwisting chemicals. Now oxytocin, estrogen and testosterone roll off the tongue and into daily conversation. Their basic functions — regulating fighting or fleeing, puberty and sex, for instance, are common knowledge, but exactly how hormones work, and the extent of their influence, remains a mystery to many. In “Aroused: The History of Hormones and How They Control Just About Everything,” author Randi Hutter Epstein shares the human stories behind these fascinating secretions. Epstein, a medical writer, lecturer at Yale University, Writer in Residence at Yale Medical School, and an adjunct at the Columbia School of Journalism, spoke to Straus News about why p y hormones are like our internal Wi-Fi, the women who made remarkable discoveries about these chemical messengers, and why no one goes hungry on the Upper West Side.

How did you become interested in the history of hormones in the first place? My first book was called “Get Me Out: A History of Childbirth from the Garden of Eden to the Sperm Bank.” So while I was doing that book I started looking into hormones because our hormones change, and it takes hormones to make a baby. A s I sta r ted look i n g i nto t h e h i s to r y of hormones, wh ich was tangential to the first book, I rea lized that starting at the turn of the twent ie t h ce ntury, when it

Dr. Randi Hutter Epstein. Photo: Nina Subin

comes to hormones, it’s been over a century of amazing advances but also ridiculous claims. And while those outrageous claims make for funny and wacky stories, it also means what can we learn [from those stories]...I can’t believe we were peddling some of this stuff in the 1920s — some of the charlatans — but as we all know, history repeats itself. So a lot of what I found in the 1920s in terms of cures for libido, and people wanting certainty, and people promoting hormone cures to make you feel balanced, it was very similar, different remedies but very similar ideas, to what’s going on today.

You manage to seamlessly weave the nitty-gritty science in with the personal stories of scientists and subjects. Can you tell us a little about your writing process? I usually write on the top of my blank sheet of paper “topic” like whether I’m going to be talking about, I don’t know, pregnancy or growth hormones — topic, story, or what is the point, so I’m always searching for the story that’s going to tell the science. I think the other thing is I have a really short attention space, p , so I think of that as I’m explaining the science. If I’m starting to go on for a page or two, I’ll figure out oh, maybe we can break this up and go back to some conversation ... I do rewrite a lot, and I delete a lot, too.

A lot of women were trailblazers in the study of hormones, like New Yorker Rosalyn Yalow and Georgeanna Jones. Was that intentionally part of your book? You’re the second person to ask k me that. It wasn’t consciously in-tentional, however when I’m do-ing my research I can’t help but love the stories of these women who should get more attention, but they don’t ... Like when it came to Georgeanna Jones, I remember I was talking to this group of friends who are writers, and you know how things go ... We were sitting around drinking and talking about the writing process, and I started to tell them about Howard and Georgeanna Jones, and while they did create America’s first test-tube baby together, and while she made a landmark finding of the pregnancy hormone while she was a female medical student (and there weren’t many female medical students back then), I also happened to throw out that she and her husband shared one desk their entire careers. I can tell you I’m happily married, my husband and I have known each other since we were 17, but if we shared a partner’s desk we would not make it till lunchtime. And the fact they worked for decades together, they shared one car, they stared at each other, they worked in the same office, they were besottedly in love, I was like, America’s first test-tube baby? Well ell that’s okay. Sharing a desk with your husband and having that spark keep going for decades? That’s astonishing. That’s a miracle. So I was telling this story, and someone in my group said, “That’s how you begin your chapter.”

Today when we talk about hormones people tend to ascribe almost magic powers to them. I’m pregnant at the moment, and that certainly seems to be the case? Oh absolutely. We ascribe so many magic powers to them. I mean, they are, in some ways, I wouldn’t say magical, but hormones are astonishing in the sense that I like to consider them our internal Wi-Fi ... It used to be that we thought every message in the body was transmitted by nerves, it just marched along, or it went through the blood and it just sort of washed up like oxygen ... but a hormone is a chemical that’s secreted from one gland and reaches a faraway target, like email. Like your pituitary [gland] will send out a little chemical of something —

the pituitary is in the brain — and that chemical will know to target specific cells, whether it’s the ovary or the pancreas or the testes or the thyroid, so it’s really amazing that it’s like a bow and arrow. It’s really amazing that it knows where to go, but we tend to think of [hormones] as this nebulous thing. Oh, you’ll be “hormonal.” What does that really mean?

You’re a longtime Upper West Side resident. What do you love about the neighborhood? When my kids were little (now they’re 18-25), I remember they watched the movie “Home Alone” and they thought in case you ever forgot about us — I mean, right, like I’m going on a family vacation and I’ll get halfway around the world and think, damn I forgot the kids — in case that ever happened, they wanted to figure out if they could eat three meals a day. And they did! They could go into Zengoni’s on 83rd and Columbus, they

could go into Broadway Farms, they knew the people at both places ... and they figured out the restaurants ... like T & R Pizza. Yes, it’s back, yay, on 78th! That’s a nice thing for kids to grow up knowing. They felt that they were in a community ... not to mention that I feel this strong sense of community, and we’re in each other’s business all the time, but then I can just walk a few blocks and be in Central Park and feel like I’m in the middle of nowhere, which I love. Interested in having Randi Hutter Epstein speak at your book group? You can contact her via her website: randihutterepstein.com

Know somebody who deserves their 15 Minutes of fame? Go to chelseanewsNY.com and click on submit a press release or announcement.


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Clinton 1

OCTOBER 11-17,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

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