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The local paper for Chelsea

WEEK OF JUNE WHAT IF? THE ‘CITY OF NEW MANHATTAN’ < P. 6

15-21 2017

Lee Ielpi, a retired firefighter and co-founder of the 9/11 Tribute Center, stands in front of a wall listing the name every victim, including his son Jonathan. The center reopened in a new location on June 7. Photo: Madeleine Thompson Gays Against Guns, a direct action group advocating stricter firearm laws, organized a Monday evening memorial rally in front of the Stonewall Inn to commemorate the first anniversary of the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando. Photo: Claire Wang

9/11 TRIBUTE CENTER REOPENS

HUNDREDS COMMEMORATE PULSE SHOOTING VICTIMS COMMEMORATION On the first anniversary of the nation’s deadliest mass shooting, they gathered at the Stonewall Inn to pay tribute BY CLAIRE WANG

A curtain of white cloaks flanked either side of the makeshift stage, sashaying gently with a breeze that cooled the sweltering evening.

On Monday night, the first anniversary of the Orlando Pulse nightclub massacre, the veiled volunteers, 49 in all, hoisted poster boards displaying pictures and accompanying tributes of the victims of the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history. Proxies for the fallen, the collaborators appeared to be floating like fluorescent lamps above the cobblestone walkway outside the Stonewall Inn, the Jerusalem of the gay rights movement. Christopher Street, usually quaint and muted, rolled back the clock and

EXHIBITIONS “By remembering yesterday we’re going to make tomorrow better,” says one of the co-founders BY MADELEINE THOMPSON

There is a digital screen towards the exit of the 9/11 Tribute Center that scrolls through the names of those who lost their lives on September 11, 2001. It takes five and a half hours to complete each cycle. In case that doesn’t sufficiently summarize the scope of the exhibit, the screen is located next to a long, somber wall on which every single name is printed. By the time visitors get there, after wandering through story after story of fear and destruction, the last section of the exhibit focuses on resilience and community service, a welcome way

transformed again into the crowded, exuberant place where a once-marginalized LGBTQ community underwent catharsis by celebrating love and life. The scene was made all the more startling because Gays Against Guns, the direct action group that organized the memorial rally, had explicitly recommended that the public wear black to mourn those who died. Much of the two-hour commemoration, which drew at least 200 attendees, swung

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of being ushered out. The 9/11 Tribute Center reopened on Wednesday after moving to 92 Greenwich Street from its previous location on LIberty Street, which was only 6,000 square feet to the new space’s 18,000. Many of the same items moved with the center; a twisted steel beam, a menu from Windows on the World, the shredded firefighter jacket and melted helmet of Jonathan Lee Ielpi, who lost his life rescuing people. Mingling with visitors, a walkie-talkie on his belt, is Jonathan’s father Lee, a former firefighter and co-founder of the Tribute Center. “Here we have the ability to not only expand our size but to drive the mission home,” Ielpi said. “That by remembering yesterday we’re going to make tomorrow better.”

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SPRING ARTS PREVIEW < CITYARTS, P.14

WHO HAS ACCESS TO A PARKING SPACE IN CHELSEA? NEWS

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2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

WHAT NEXT FOR CHELSEA GALLERIES?

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up rezoning told us she’d like to would and the mid-2000s May 1 The and running this year, for of West Chelsea. Muas an ombudsman city serve Whitney the of opening Art on small businesses within them clear seum of American means not government, helping It’s new buildings, to get Gansevoort Street c to the traffi through the bureaucracy rising rents, that are even more foot things done. forcing some gallerists area. is that Perhaps even more also The irony, of course, to reconsider their Whitney -importantly, the ombudsman the arrival of the and number neighborhood roots art meccas will tally the type small business one of the city’s the end for of complaints by taken in BY GABRIELLE ALFIERO -- could also spell dealers the actions art owners, long-time policy buildStephen some response, and somefor ways to When gallerists Griffin in the area, as their are sold or recommendations If done well, Haller and Cynthiatheir W. ings increasingly begin to fix things. report would Haller reopened follow- demolished. lease the ombudsman’s 26th Street gallery With their 10-year quantitative afrst fi the rebuild Stephen us give cut short, with ing a five-month flooded abruptly shared taste of what’s wrong ter Hurricane Sandy they and Cynthia, who the city, an the space, small businesses in towards building with their first floor phone their and Tony important first step were still without were Lehmann Maupin they the problem. needed to xing fi of galleries, and Internet. Still, where Shafrazi property by June To really make a difference, the happy in the location, will have to to stay for vacate (Shafrazi is suing course, the advocaterising rents, they expected of 2014. find a way to tackle business’ the Manhattes some time. doltold less the landlord, which remain many While Chin Instead, they were their Group, for $20 million reproblem. vexing that Post most the New York than a year later gauge what to demol- lars, said it’s too early tocould have landlord planned ported). another role the advocate on the ish the building. They shopped for planned for there, more information in the neighbor“We had shows bad thing. We had location to find problem can’t be a with the long periods of time.amount hood but struggled a twoThis step, combinedBorough more than just put in a huge the anything efforts by Manhattan to mediate of money to refurbish“We year lease on a street-level in Chelsaid. President Gale Brewer offer space,” Cynthia space. After 13 years Gallery the rent renewal process, were really shocked.”Gallery sea, Stephen Haller signs tangible and early, Haller some For Stephen small left the neighborhoodStux it, it isn’t riswith of progress. For many can’t come and others like joined forces oor are driving business owners, that in a new sixth-fl ing rents that far new devel- Gallery soon enough. on 57th Street, not Chelsea, Zach Feuer them away. It’s

NEWS

luxury building Robotic garage for board draws fire from community BY ZACH WILLIAMS

at a a robotic garage A proposal for in Chelsea has thrown luxury building into the city’s zoning access to parking debate. proposed for a A high-tech garage W. 28th St. has 520 development at Board 4, which is riled Community arguing that it plan, in opposing the more car usage would only invite while only providthe neighborhood, residents. ing parking to rich a special city perThe garage needs 29 spaces rather mit to accommodate allowed the than the 11 automatically opted to oppose by the city. CB4 1 full board meetpermit at its April Carl a draft letter to ing, stating in Planning City the of Weisbrod, chair city criteria for such Commission, that based on the parking foran exception is ago, when many for stock of a decade spaces were used demer industrial future of parking in anticipation velopment in Chelsea. 40 residential have The project will comsquare feet of alunits and 11,213 the ground floor, mercial space on three parking spaces The lowing eight and the developer, respectively. But wants more for Related Companies, is the New York acthe building, which internationally City debut for Zaha Hadid. (Adjaclaimed architect Line, the build cent to the High

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his gallery in After 15 years running to partner with Joel two gallery spaces, (left) leaves the neighborhood team will operate Mesler (right). TheMesler/Feuer, on the Lower East Feuer/Mesler and May 10. Slide, slated to open

Newscheck

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is surging opment, which in part to in Chelsea, thanks High Line the opening of the

City Arts Top 5

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space

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BROADWAY WORKERS DEMAND â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;FAIRNESS FOR CASTINGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; LABOR Casting directors march for union representation on the eve of the Tony Awards BY MADELEINE THOMPSON

Just days before the Tony Awards, nearly 100 people marched in front of Radio City Music Hall last Thursday morning to support Broadwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s casting directors in their ďŹ ght for union representation. The group carried signs and chanted â&#x20AC;&#x153;fairness for casting,â&#x20AC;? but their plea wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t limited to the corner of 51st Street and Sixth Avenue. Twitter users, including several Broadway stars, also sided with the casting directors in 140 characters. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Without casting directors, this wonderful job couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exist,â&#x20AC;? wrote J. Quinton Johnson of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hamilton.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get them properly contracted.â&#x20AC;? Casting directors are the only group of Broadway workers who are not in a union. They work on individual contracts with studios, and receive no pensions or health insurance. To remedy that, casting directors have

Protesting in front of Radio City Music Hall. Photo: Madeleine Thompson banded together with the Teamsters Local 817 to attempt to negotiate with Broadway producers, who are represented by the Broadway League. Tom Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell, president of Local 817, pointed out the irony of celebrating some of Broadwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest successes at the Tony Awards without recognizing some of the people who made them happen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The biggest snub of this Tony season, and every past Tony season, has been the casting directors,â&#x20AC;? he said. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell estimated

that the non-film entertainment industry is about 98 percent unionized and, especially since Broadway shows have made record-setting proďŹ ts over the past few years, â&#x20AC;&#x153;it just seems unconscionable that a group of 40 people have to make a decision about â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;can I afford to go to the emergency room?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Despite what Martine Sainvil, communications director for the Broadway League, called â&#x20AC;&#x153;great respect and deep admirationâ&#x20AC;? for casting directors, the producersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; organiza-

tion has not been willing to negotiate with the Teamsters so far. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have had a respectful dialogue in the past year with Teamsters Local 817 but do not believe it would be appropriate for the Broadway League or its producing members to recognize a union as the bargaining representative of professionals who are not employees of our productions,â&#x20AC;? Sainvil wrote in a statement. She added that the League has encouraged the group to appeal to the National Labor Relations Board.

But if the rally was anything to go by, support is growing for the casting directors. Tara Rubin, casting director for smash hit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dear Evan Hansen,â&#x20AC;? which won six Tony Awards on Sunday night, said on Thursday that her profession is fairly young in terms of being fully recognized, but that it deserves the same beneďŹ ts and guarantees as the others in the industry. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been doing this for 30 years,â&#x20AC;? Rubin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not going to enjoy many of the beneďŹ ts when we get them, but I really hope that my colleagues in the ďŹ eld can enter into their careers knowing that they have basic American protections.â&#x20AC;? Cindy Tolan, casting director for â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time,â&#x20AC;? emphasized that Broadway studios should be able to cover such a small group. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not talking about thousands of people,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The price of one Broadway premium ticket for one night is more money than [the cost of] one week for one casting directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beneďŹ ts.â&#x20AC;? Madeleine Thompson can be reached at newsreporter@strausnews.com

De Blasio Affordable Housing Myth #3 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Keeping New Yorkers in their homes has been a top priorityâ&#x20AC;Ś and our rent freeze program is designed to do just that.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Mayor Bill de Blasio (Source: City of New York Website)

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De Blasioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Housing Policies: Politics & Hypocrisy Next Week: De Blasio Myth #4


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WHAT IF? THE ‘CITY OF NEW MANHATTAN’ NY SCHEMES A century-old plan to expand Manhattan by 50 square miles south of the Battery BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

Governor Andrew Cuomo is fond of saying that the Second Avenue Subway, which opened earlier this year nearly a century after it was first proposed, is “proof that government can still get big things done.” The new subway line, Cuomo said, heralds “a new era in New York where there is no challenge too great, no project too grand.” Naturally, the governor’s critics have been quick to dismiss Cuomo’s claims as self-serving and hyperbolic. And whatever one’s thoughts on the governor or the Second Avenue line, the critics have a point — the chutzpah required to build three new subway stops (in a city with over 400 others) doesn’t quite measure up to the ambition of the great civic undertakings of Manhattan’s past. Projects like the Brooklyn Bridge, which was the longest span in the world and the first bridge or its kind; or the Holland Tunnel — cursed and unappreciated by modern commuters, but a true engineering marvel of its time (ventilating the tunnel was deemed an impossibility before construction by none other than Thomas Edison). Today, in an era in which even building a direct train line connecting Manhattan to LaGuardia Airport is a political impossibility, it seems reasonable to ask: do New Yorkers really think big anymore? T. Kennard Thomson was not shy about dreaming up big things. Thomson, a wellregarded civil engineer in the early twentieth century, contributed to the construction of the upstate canal system and more than twenty of New York’s early skyscrapers. He is perhaps best remembered today, however, for his improb-

Engineer T. Kennard Thomson, the man behind New Manhattan. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Thomson’s revised 1930 plan showing the City of New Manhattan. Image: New York Public Library able plan, proposed in 1911 but as yet unrealized, to extend the island of Manhattan several miles south into New York Harbor, creating the “City of New Manhattan.” Thomson detailed his plan in a 1916 Popular Science article. He begins, “At first glance, a project to reclaim fifty square miles of land from New York Bay, to add one hundred miles of new waterfront for docks, to fill in the East River, and to prepare New York for a population of twenty million, seems somewhat stupendous, does it not?” Even a century later, stupendous seems to be an understatement. But despite the doubts of some contemporaries, Thomson was certain that the project was feasible,

citing “the majority of engineers” and “hundreds of letters of encouragement.” Thomson called on the city to build a network of coffer dams south of the Battery, which would be filled in to create newly habitable land. Governor’s Island, subsumed into the new landmass, would cease to exist as an island. New Manhattan’s new Battery would extend to within a mile of Staten Island, and the Staten Island ferry would be replaced by a “set of tubes and tunnels.” Taxes on the new land, along with increased property tax revenue from increasingly valuable land on Staten Island, Thomson said, would help offset the immense expenses of the project, which he esti-

mated would cost “a great deal more” than the then-recently completed Panama Canal. He wrote, “[T]he returns would quickly pay off the debt incurred, and then would commence to swell the city’s money bags, until New York would be the richest city in the world.” Almost as a sidebar, the plan also calls for filling in the East River. “It would not be much harder to get to Brooklyn than to cross Broadway,” Thomson wrote. (Perhaps some of today’s L train commuters dreading the impending closure of the tunnel now wish they could walk from Williamsburg to Manhattan so easily.) Thomson makes no mention of what would have become of the Brooklyn, Manhattan, Wil-

liamsburg, and Queensboro Bridges, all of which were in operation by 1916, without a river to span. With the old East River paved over, you’d need a new one, of course. So Thomson planned to dig a canal, “forty feet deep and one thousand feet wide, from Jamaica to Flushing Bay.” Thomson presented his plan directly to Mayor William J. Gaynor in May 1911. The mayor’s response, if the current state of the Battery is any indication, was less than enthusiastic. Undeterred, Thomson continued his efforts to build support over the next few decades. A map in the collection of the New York Public Library shows that by 1930 Thomson had significantly revised his plan. In the updated map, the plan to fill in the East River is abandoned, New Manhattan is bisected by a triple-decker boulevard

(“Lower deck for railroads; middle for automobiles; top for Airplane Landings.”), and about half of the new land is labeled as part of New Jersey. In hindsight, selling New Yorkers on the idea that New Jersey would become part of Manhattan might have been the most politically impossible aspect of the entire scheme. Alas, Thomson’s vision never became reality, and it’s probably for the best. Some ideas are too big for their own good. But his plan, fanciful as it is, has familiar features, fitting into the long history of New Yorkers rearranging Manhattan to suit their own purposes, imposing their will upon the natural landscape (Battery Park City and the FDR Drive are examples of the many pieces of the city built upon artificial land reclaimed from the rivers). It’s a reminder of what thinking big once looked like.


JUNE 15-21,2017

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CITY’S SCHOOL DIVERSITY PLAN GETS MIXED REVIEWS SCHOOLS The Department of Education issues remedy for changing the racial balance of students BY MADELEINE THOMPSON

Students, parents, educators and politicians were less than impressed with the Department of Education’s plan to diversify New York City schools, which was released last week in response to a 2014 study that found the city’s schools to be one of the most segregated in the country. “Despite the fact that the overall metro share of enrollment is 35 percent white and 22 percent black, the typical black student attended a school in 2010 with 12 percent white and 51 percent black classmates,” the study, conducted by UCLA’s Civil Rights Project, reported. The education department’s plan to remedy this starts with its goals to increase the number of children in a school with 50 to 90 percent black and Hispanic students by 50,000, lower the number of schools that are more than 10 percentage points above or below the city’s average on the Economic Need Index, and make more schools inclusive by serving English Language Learners and students with disabilities. Critics say these goals aren’t enough. “[This plan] doesn’t deal at all with K to eighth grade, which is where the inequities begin,” said New York Times Magazine reporter

Mayor Bill de Blasio with Chancellor Carmen Fariña at an event last Thursday announcing new Advanced Placement courses. Photo: Ed Reed/Mayoral Photography Office Nikole Hannah-Jones on NY1 last week. “Ninety-percent black and Latino is considered intensely segregated school, and most black kids in the system are already attending schools that are 90 percent black and Latino. So this is basically a non-plan.” Others say the broad inclusion of issues detracts from race as the heart of the city’s problem. The education department announced in the plan several

new steps it will take to accomplish its goals, including setting up a School Diversity Advisory Group to “tackle citywide policies and practices such as admissions and program planning,” eliminating “limited unscreened” high school admission policies that prioritize students who visit schools they’re interested in and improving school climates by reforming discipline methods. The city also expand

preparation for and availability of the Specialized High School Admissions Test, but a report by Chalkbeat this past March found that there was “virtually no change in the number of black or Hispanic students offered admission to schools like Stuyvesant and Brooklyn Tech.” Despite the UCLA study’s blunt analysis of schools in terms of integration and segregation, the DOE plan avoids us-

ing either word. So has Mayor Bill de Blasio, when asked about the plan at various points over the last week. “I know if I start to use certain terminologies, people will miss the forest for the trees,” he said on WNYC’s “The Brian Lehrer Show” last Friday. “I’m not going down that rabbit hole. We have to get to the core of the problem. The core of the problem is we have to break down racism and other bias in our society. We have to increase economic opportunity. We have to increase diversity in housing.” In the segment, the mayor cites the rezoning of Upper West Side schools that revealed deep divisions in the community as an example of success. Kim Watkins, who led the rezoning process for the Upper West Side’s Community Education Council, credited the city with making a first step given the scope of the challenge facing the school system. “I would like to see a little bit more about how some of the finer points will be implemented,” she said. “I found it striking that though there was a working group that had some parents and advocates involved … I wish we could’ve seen a little more come forward to the community at large. I think we could do a lot better in terms of transparency.” She did not hesitate to describe the city’s school as segregated.

OFFICIAL SELECTION qFLIX Philadelphia Film Festival

9/11 TRIBUTE CENTER CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 The exhibit opens with a quote from the Dalai Lama that introduces a recurring theme: “Just as ripples spread out when a single pebble is dropped into water, the actions of individuals can have far-reaching effects.” Ielpi described the center’s docents as ripples because they all come from the community of people most affected by the 9/11 attacks, whether as family members, responders or survivors. The center has designated space for them to serve as living history. Gail Langsner, a pet sitter

with a warm smile, lived on Liberty Street at the time, in the building where the Tribute Center used to be. “I had eight birds that I had to take care of that day,” she told a small group of visitors on Sunday afternoon, during the center’s soft opening. “I couldn’t figure out how we were going to get them out. [My husband] borrowed some sheets from my neighbors and stacked up the little travel cases and made these bundles that he hung over a broomstick. We walked out of the building like every picture of fleeing refugees you’ve ever seen, with parrots.” Whether in video form, in person or in writing, storytelling is central to the Trib-

ute Center’s new layout. The winding path of the exhibit guides visitors from the history of Lower Manhattan to post-9/11 recovery and community service efforts. Stories from immigrants and architects line the walls at the entrance, setting up a vision of the area as a global center of trade. Interactive screens allow people to choose from a plethora of video interviews with those affected by 9/11. And, above all, the barely recognizable objects discovered in the rubble speak for themselves. Educating visitors was a key goal for Ielpi, who feels people don’t know enough about the details and impact of that day. “This new center has the lux-

OFFICIAL SELECTION Phoenix Film Festival

OFFICIAL SELECTION Boston LGBT Film Festival

A spokesperson for the Department of Education said the term “diversity” is used because it’s broader and enables administrators to speak to more than one type of diversity at once. The spokesperson said the plan is based on numerous conversations the agency had with schools, elected officials, parents and researchers over the past year, and encouraged those interested in improving schools to contribute their own feedback. Council Member Helen Rosenthal, who was heavily criticized for her support of plans to integrate schools on the Upper West Side, said she was glad to see an effort being made to address issues with the school system but emphasized that this is just the beginning. The rezoning conversations that took place in Rosenthal’s district were often heated and tearful, with parents who did not want to be moved for the sake of integration saying it wasn’t because of racism but because they wanted to keep their communities together. Even so, Rosenthal has hope that progress can be made. “Among the parents that had a vote, nine to one said [the rezoning] was great,” she said. “Yes it was hard, but it was nearly unanimous.” Madeleine Thompson can be reached at newsreporter@ strausnews.com

Grand Jury Prize for Best Documentary qFLIX Philadelphia Film Festival

OFFICIAL SELECTION Fort Lauderdale Gay & Lesbian Film Festival

OFFICIAL SELECTION Desperado LGBT Film Festival

OFFICIAL SELECTION BEND Film Festival

ury of space to work through what happened, rebuilding and understanding,” he said. “Every day I realize how far we haven’t come.” He hopes that highlighting organizations like Beyond the 11th, a nonprofit founded by two women who were widowed on 9/11 to support widows in Afghanistan, will inspire people to channel what they learned and felt in the Tribute Center into their own communities. “We just have to figure out a way to try and understand what peace is in this world,” he said. Madeleine Thompson can be reached at newsreporter@ strausnews.com

260 West 23rd St. , 212-691-5519 www.cinepolisusa.com , Check Theatre for Showtimes SPECIAL Q&As OPENING WEEKEND CHECK WEBSITE FOR DETAILS

Starts Friday June 16 Cinépolis Chelsea


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SHAKESPEARE IN THE DIGITAL AGE “Et tu, Brute?” Change has come to Shakespeare in the Park BY LORRAINE DUFFY MERKL

This summer event has been a ritual for me for the past 37 years. I have my routine down pat: at the crack of dawn, I (sometimes joined by my husband or daughter) hike over to Central Park with a blanket and good book, order breakfast from Andy’s Deli (“Bacon and egg on a roll and coffee with milk. I’m just past the big rock.”) Then I (we) sit on line for the next four hours to get free tickets to whatever Bard performance is offered. For the 2017 season at the Delacorte Theater, “Julius Caesar” is currently playing with the controversial Trump-a-like portrayal of the title role, and a female actor as Marc Antony. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” begins July 11. The process has always been simple enough: you wait, then everyone rises in unison and moves towards the theater where a staffer with tick-

ets asks how many in your party; each person’s allowed two tickets. This year though, when The Public Theater personnel made their way down the winding path shouting the usual instructions about no line cutting and bringing food/beverages into the show, they added a new twist: everyone had to register for tickets on their smartphones. Say what? According to a theater representative, the new digital system is meant to keep the shows as open to as many people as possible, by cutting down on how many times someone can see the play, as well as making scalping more prohibitive. We needed to type in shakespeareinthepark.org/register in order to get a Patron ID number. At noon, the line would move toward the box office where the employee at the desk would look up our ID and print out the tickets. For those without a smartphone or stymied by doing anything electronically, staff members would come around with iPads

Statue of Romeo and Juliet in Central Park. Photo: Ron Cogswell, via flickr and give an assist. After the momentary jolt of panic from having a new step added to the process, it turned out to be no big deal. Yet I found myself massaging my temples to thwart my oncoming headache. Make no mistake, I have always embraced technology, but I find it refreshing when transactions need not require my email address. New York City, with its population of 8.55 million packed together on an island, can still be a very isolating place, the age-old complaint that

many people don’t even know their neighbors. On a beautiful summer day, you can go in a crowded Carl Schurz Park and still feel alone. In many of our stores, efficiency is valued over friendliness, where both merchant and buyer want to get in and get out in a New York minute. There are many empty stores on East 86th Street as well as avenues like Madison, Lex, and Third due to, not only skyrocketing rents, but the fact that people just would rather do business online and have the goods come to them. I’m no stranger to this behavior myself — that’s why I appreciate the rare exchanges like going into the candy store/newsstand across from my house where I kibitz with the owner, who always wants to know why I’m not buying a lottery ticket for what is invariably “the biggest jackpot ever.” I like my interactions at the Mansion Diner — the Upper East Side’s answer to Cheers — where everybody knows your name and treats you like they’re glad you came. I take comfort in my relationships (as mundane as they are) with my neighborhood stores like Angel

Nails, Mekong Laundry, and Oxford Cleaners. I know them; they know me. Shakespeare in the Park, albeit seasonal, has always been a part of my lay of the land. I guess the modification to online registration, although slight and well intentioned, triggered that there might be bigger changes to come, like a virtual line. Perhaps that would be a relief for some, but not for me. Over the years, I have learned to welcome the camaraderie of waiting for tickets with other New Yorkers, fielding the proverbial question “What’s the queue for?” from passersby, and just the unbroken hours taking in the bikers/dog walkers/ musicians and general people watching that is Central Park. I don’t know if, in summers to come, the experience as I’ve known it will go on. I guess all that matters is that the show does. And like Caesar, I “shall go forth.” Lorraine Duffy Merkl is the author of the novels “Back to Work She Goes”and “Fat Chick,” for which a movie version is in the works.

A WHOLE NEW YORKVILLE EAST SIDE OBSERVER BY ARLENE KAYATT

No fair there — Say what you will, and like it or not, street fairs have become a part of NY summers and early fall. Kvetch about the sameness of what’s there, the street closings, the traffic diversions, whatever. For bigger or smaller, better or worse, I love them. What I don’t love is when streets where the fair begins and/or ends are misidentified. Most recently the fair scheduled for Lexington between 57th and 42nd started at 53rd Street. No vendors from 57th to 53rd. It’s one thing to walk the walk and look/see/ shop the stalls along the way. Quite another to walk the empty streets with no vendors in sight. It’s not the end of the world, but it’s the weekend and I don’t want to complain. Mayor NIMBY — Mayor de Blasio and his UES neighbors/constituents

just don’t like each other. Never have. The mayor doesn’t deny it. Nor do the voters in those districts. In the last mayoral election, Republican Joe Lhota beat de Blasio on the UES. (Citywide Lhota got only 24 percent of the vote.) And it’s not a love-hate relationship between de Blasio and two of three local Democrat clubs on the Upper East Side. It’s all hate. So much so that the mayor refuses to show up at club events of two local clubs — Four Freedoms and Lenox Hill Democratic Club — but will show up for the third UES club — Lexington Democratic Club. All three are progressive clubs. The mayor does show up at West Side Democratic club events. When asked at an UWS club event about the antipathy of his closest neighbors on the East Side, de Blasio candidly said that he wasn’t “comfortable on the Upper East Side,” and didn’t like living there. So it wasn’t surprising that Four Freedoms and LHDC voted “No Endorsement”

Mayor Bill de Blasio and First Lady Chirlane McCray at the inaugural ride of the Second Avenue subway. Photo: Edwin J Torres/ Mayoral Photo Office. in the upcoming mayoral primary race and the Lexington club voted to endorse the mayor. The other candidates seeking to run in the primary are Sal Albanese and Robert Gangi. Only when a candidate is endorsed by a club does his or her name appear on the club petitions seeking to get candidates on the ballot. So when you see those green colored petitions on the streets and de Blasio’s name does not appear, you’ll know it’s because he doesn’t like his UES neighbors.

Beauty, beans, and burgers — The 86th Street commercial district, including 2nd and 3rd Avenues and several streets north and south, will soon be home to the cosmetic industry with stores in varying sizes. Right now, there are the small and boutique-y Sabon and L’Occitane. There’s the medium-sized Bluemercury. The even bigger, maybe ginormous Sephora. And roll out the carpet for Ulta, the uber/ mega beauty emporium coming to the southwest corner of 86th and Third to

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the location last occupied by HSBC Bank. That’s the beauty part. Now comes the coffee beans. Already in residence are two Starbucks — one on Lexington, one on Third, both on 87th Street — and a FIKA on Lex and 88th. And the sit-down-and-be-served coffee at Maison Kayser. The newbies to be added to the brew are Very Truly, a sliver of a shop on Third between 88th and 89th, and Birch Upper East Side on 88th Street between 3rd and Lex. And let’s not forget that burgers are in the mix, too — from Shake Shack to Burger King to McDonald’s to the recently opened Wahlburgers on 2nd and 85th, and the not-so-old, not-so-new-in-thenabe Bareburger on 87th and 2nd. It’s a whole new Yorkville. It’s cracked — Is it okay, or is it a health-code violation, for a restaurant or coffee shop to serve coffee in a cracked cup? On two separate occasions, in two different establishments, hot coffee was served in a cup that had a crack. When told about it, one barista said, “Oh, it won’t spill. We use it all the time.” Another said, “Don’t worry, it won’t cut your lip or tongue.” Huh?

Editor-In-Chief, Alexis Gelber editor.ot@strausnews.com Deputy Editor Staff Reporters Richard Khavkine Madeleine Thompson editor.otdt@strausnews.com newsreporter@strausnews.com Michael Garofalo Senior Reporter reporter@strausnews.com Doug Feiden invreporter@strausnews.com


JUNE 15-21,2017

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

BHARARA UNBOUND POLITICS The former U.S. attorney, effusive since being fired by Trump, is wooed by Democrats BY STEVE PEOPLES

Preet Bharara, center, at a Washington, D.C., event in 2015. Photo Rod Lamkey Jr./Financial Times As Manhattan’s top federal prosecutor, Preet Bharara cultivated an image as a lawman above politics. No more. In the three months since he was fired by President Donald Trump, the former U.S. attorney has lashed out at the Republican administration in speeches and on Twitter. He’s also jabbed at the president of Turkey, called one GOP congressman a “fool,” and said if another were an immigrant, he’d face deportation. With the constraints of a law enforcement job gone, Bharara has found a more political voice for himself, especially online. He has already been approached by Democrats who want him to run for elected office as soon as next year. People close to Bharara say he’s eager to maintain an active voice in the political debate — particularly anything to do with the president who forced him from the job he loved. It remains unclear, however, if the 48-year-old India-born attorney will continue to speak out as a private citizen or as a political candidate. Some friends want him to enjoy his new post as a “distinguished scholar” at New York University, where he is contemplating writing a book or contributing to his brother’s media site. Others want him to join a private law firm, where his experience battling public corruption could be put to practical use. “A lot of people want a lot of things from Preet. I’m not sure Preet wants any of that for himself,” said former Justice Department attorney Viet Dinh, a close friend of Bharara’s since college. “Right now, what he wants to do is spend time with his family, enjoy a quasi-academic perch and take a breath.” Bharara declined to be interviewed for this story, but friends and colleagues paint the picture of a man who has no plans to disappear from the spotlight after being forced out after seven years leading the

U.S. attorney’s office in Manhattan — a region that covers Trump Tower. The conditions are already in place for a transition from federal prosecutor to political prospect. Already, a captivated New York media is quick to promote Bharara’s Twitter feed, which is packed with slaps at Trump and other Republicans. He tweeted Wednesday that “people — including presidents — reap what they sow.” Earlier this month, he went after California Rep. Dana Rohrabacher: “One benefit of being a private citizen is that I can now publicly say that Rep. Rohrabacher is a fool.” And in March, he threw shade at New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, whose administration was plagued by the so-called Bridgegate controversy: “Yes, we all know that Chris Christie is great at spotting & screening out problematic staff,” he wrote. At the same time, Bharara wears his dismissal as a badge of honor, even if he’s not quite over the hangover of losing the job Trump once told him he could keep. The president fired Bharara in March as part of a broader effort to replace U.S. attorneys appointed by President Barack Obama. “I loved that place like people love their family,” Bharara said during an April speech at Manhattan’s Cooper Union. “I was asked to resign. I refused. I insisted on being fired, so I was.” The dismissal may have helped Bharara’s political career, should he want one. A Siena College poll released after his March dismissal found that 37 percent of New Yorkers had a favorable opinion compared with 13 percent who view him unfavorably; 50 percent didn’t know enough about him to have an opinion. “Prior to being fired by Donald Trump, he was an incredible talent. Being fired by Donald Trump took him to another

level,” said veteran Democratic strategist Steve Elmendorf. “The only thing blocking his future, I’d say, is that he wasn’t born in the United States so he can’t run for president. He’s as qualified as anyone.” Others have made similar leaps from federal prosecutor to high-profile elected office, including Rudy Giuliani, who held the same U.S. attorney post as Bharara in the 1980s and became New York City’s mayor, and Christie, who went straight from being the top federal prosecutor in New Jersey to governor. Yet there are significant hurdles as Bharara considers a future in politics. Enamored Democratic strategists have encouraged him to run for office, but New York’s political landscape is crowded and hostile. Ambitious Democrats are already entrenched in the most logical landing spots for the coming years at least. Gov. Andrew Cuomo is preparing for re-election in 2018 and may seek the presidency in 2020. Attorney General Eric Schneiderman is already eyeing the governor’s mansion in the coming years. And New York City’s mayoral election is just five months away. And while his Twitter feed gets a lot of attention, his friends point to the Cooper Union speech as a guide for how he plans to stay relevant, at least in the short-term. “As a private citizen, I am surrendering neither my voice, nor my law degree, nor my citizenship,” Bharara said. “And I really do hope that those remain potent tools to effect change in America, because God help us — because God help us — if we have to count only on people in public office to make a difference.” “And by the way, I don’t have any plans to enter politics,” he added. “Just like I have no plans to join the circus.”

N U F E R R E E H S M T R M A U T S S

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JUNE 15-21,2017

Opens June 16

More Events. Add Your Own: Go to chelseanewsny.com

Thu 15 Fri 16 ▲CHELSEA GALLERY WALKING TOUR

Listen with your whole body 20 Contemporary Artists 10,000+ OMs 6LWH6SHFLÀF,QVWDOODWLRQV %XGGKLVW0DQWUDV 5LWXDOV

#TheWorldIsSound 150 WEST 17TH STREET BETWEEN 6TH AND 7TH AVES. RUBINMUSEUM.ORG

This exhibition is made possible through the generosity of HARMAN. Major support is provided by Rasika and Girish Reddy. The Rubin also thanks Preethi Krishna and Ram Sundaram and contributors to the 2017 Exhibitions Fund.

Corkbuzz Wine Studio, 75 Ninth Ave. 1 p.m. Free. (Reserve a spot) The Chelsea Music Festival’s first-ever Chelsea Gallery Walking Tour, visit several galleries, delve into ways visual art can “measure” time. Starts at Corkbuzz in Chelsea Market, and ends at C24 Gallery with light reception and performance. chelseamusicfestival.org

‘ELIXIR OF COLOR’ | OPENING Agora Gallery, 530 West 25th St. 6-8 p.m. “The large-scale abstract paintings of American artist Sherry Rinderer are as vibrant in color and form as they are profound in meaning.” 212-226-4151. agora-gallery. com

THE CHUCK BRAMAN JAZZ BAND

Sat 17 RECORD & CD SHOW

Hudson River Park, Pier 45 7 p.m. Free Friday nights mean great local music on Pier 45. Chuck Braman’s Quintet features Bill Mobley, trumpet; Dave Riekenberg, tenor sax; Art Hirahara, piano; Noriko Ueda, bass; and Chuck Braman, drums.

The Watson Hotel, 440 West 57th St. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $6 (8 a.m. preshow $25). Record, CD, tape and memorabilia dealers from NY, NJ, PA, CT, RI, VA, MA and OH offering a large selection of new and used, rare, collectible and more common items. showsandexpos.com

RICHARD RENALDI’S ‘MANHATTAN SUNDAY’

LIGHTSABER TRAINING | FAMILY

Aperture Foundation, 547 West 27th St. “Photographs taken in Manhattan between midnight on Saturday and noon on Sunday, an homage to NY nightlife and a celebration of NY as palimpsest onto which millions of people project their ideal and imaginary lives.” 212-505-5555. aperture.org

Chelsea Recreation Center, 430 West 25th St. Chelsea Parks & Recreation Center along with Saber Guild: Empire Temple hosting a first-ever Force Family Fun Day, featuring games, adult and kids lightsaber training, live lightsaber show, photo ops and face painting. 212-255-3705. empiresaberguild.com


JUNE 15-21,2017

Sun 18 Mon 19 ▲5K RUN & WALKATHON Finland Center Foundation, 601 West 26th St. 9-10 a.m. $25-$30 Join the Finland Center’s Midsummer 5K Run and Nordic Pole Walkathon on Father’s Day to support the Kota Alliance’s work for gender equality. “Yes, this benefits men too, particularly in the realm of fatherhood.” 646-704-8000. finlandcenter.org

TASTE OF JEWISH CULTURE STREET FESTIVAL Sixth Ave. between West 48th & 49th Streets 11 a.m. Free The Fourth Annual Taste of Jewish Culture Street Festival features dozens of food purveyors “putting their individual ethnic spins on traditional Jewish foods.” Klezmer Brass All Stars and the Klezmer-rock band, Golem; activities for youngsters. circle.org

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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

KING KONG | FILM Bryant Park, Sixth Avenue & 42nd Street 5 p.m. Free The HBO Bryant Park Summer Film Festival kicks off with an iconic New York City film, “King Kong”: “The granddaddy of all monster movies ... a variation on the old ‘beauty and the beast’ story.” bryantpark.org

‘ENDS OF THE EARTH’ | PLAY Alchemical Theater, 104 West 14th St. 7:30 p.m. $5 suggested donation; RSVP required New play by The InViolet Company: Dennis and Julie, happily married, never wanted children. But then, suddenly, Dennis does. “Ends of the Earth” explores climate change and anxieties of modern life. 212-545-4117.

Tue 20 NATIONAL BALD EAGLE DAY St. Peter’s Chelsea, 346 West 20th St.

6:30-7:30 p.m. Created by conservationist Rick Carrier in ‘76 and declared a national day by Reagan in ‘82. Learn about the bald eagle and conservation initiatives. 212-929-2390. stpeterschelsea.com

‘MADE YOU LOOK’ | FILM SVA Theatre, 333 West 23rd St. 7-9:30 p.m. $3-$5 “‘Made You Look: Four Decades of Hip-Hop’s Impact in Cinema’ traces the 35-year rise of hip-hop culture in film and hip hop’s media presence from its independent roots to the global force it is today.” 212-592-2980. sva.edu

Chelsea residents are uncompromising, and so are Duette ® honeycomb shades with Top-Down/Bottom-Up by Hunter Douglas. At the touch of a button, you can lower the top half of the shade to let in light while keeping the bottom closed to preserve your privacy.

FREE FOR A LIMITED TIME, JANOVIC IS INCLUDING THE LUXURY OPTION OF TOP-DOWN/BOTTOM-UP ON ALL DUETTE® CELLULAR SHADES AT NO CHARGE.

Wed 21

GRAMERCY PARK 292 3rd Avenue @ 23rd St 212-777-3030

GREAT ACCORDION RENDEZVOUS Bryant Park, Sixth Avenue & 42nd Street 7-9 p.m. Free Make Music NY Mass Appeal and Celebration of the NYC Accordion Community in twopart evening featuring accordion “open mic” led by Brooklyn Accordion Club, and informal gathering of accordionists performing together. bryantpark.org

LET IN THE LIGHT WITHOUT GIVING UP YOUR PRIVACY

YORKVILLE 1491 3rd Ave @ 84th St 212-289-6300

UPPER EAST SIDE 888 Lexington Ave @66th St 212-772-1400

HELL’S KITCHEN 766 10th Ave @ 52nd St 212-245-3241

UPPER WEST SIDE 159 W 72nd St @ B’way 212-595-2500

LOWER EAST SIDE 80 4th Ave @ 10th St 212-477-6930

SOHO 55 Thompson St @ Broome 212-627-1100

CHELSEA 215 7TH Avenue @ 23rd St 212-646-5454 212-645-5454

UPTOWN WEST 2680 Broadway @ 102nd St 212-531-2300

LONG ISLAND CITY 30-35 Thomson Ave 347-418-3480


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JUNE 15-21,2017

HELLFIRE AND HOMECOMINGS Paintings and more at NYHS mark the centennial of the nation’s engagement in World War I

BY VAL CASTRONOVO

The city’s commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the United States’ entry into World War I continues this spring with the opening of a somber show at the New-York Historical Society, “World War I Beyond the Trenches.” Featuring more than 55 works culled from a recent exhibit at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, plus posters and artifacts from the museum’s collection, the show examines American artists’ responses to the war “over there” and its ramifications at home. World War I was the first real hightech war, waged with tanks, airplanes, machine guns and poison gas. Artists bore witness to the appalling carnage — some first-hand, most from a distance — and recorded their impressions in a variety of styles, in the mo-

IF YOU GO WHAT: “World War I Beyond the Trenches” WHERE: New-York Historical Society Museum & Library, 170 Central Park West (at 77th Street) WHEN: through Sept 3 www.nyhistory.org ment and over time. American expat painter John Singer Sargent, who served briefly as a field artist in 1918, was commissioned by the British War Memorials Committee to create a work for a Hall of Remembrance. His monumental tableau “Gassed” (1919), on loan from the Imperial War Museums in London, makes its New York debut at the Historical Society and is the show’s grim emotional center. Recalling Bruegel’s “The Blind Leading the Blind” (1568) and the famous biblical proverb (Matthew 15:14), the

Claggett Wilson (1887–1952). “Flower of Death—The Bursting of a Heavy Shell — Not as It Looks, but as It Feels and Sounds and Smells,” c. 1919. Watercolor and pencil on paperboard, 16 ½ × 22 in. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Alice H. Rossin, 1981. Photo: Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC/Art Resource, N.Y.

John Steuart Curry (1897–1946). “The Return of Private Davis from the Argonne,” 1928–40. Oil on canvas, 38 ¼ × 52 ¼ in. The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas, Museum purchase funded by the Caroline Wiess Law Accessions Endowment Fund. ©Estate of John Steuart Curry, courtesy of Kiechel Fine Art, Lincoln, NE. canvas depicts a line of British soldiers with bandaged eyes staggering toward a dressing station at Le Bac-deSud after a mustard gas attack. They trudge across wooden planking, flanked by piles of gassed comrades in the foreground, while life goes on in the background, where offduty troops play soccer. As art historian David Lubin writes in the catalog, “World War I and American Art,” the work “implicitly criticizes the war — that is, the handling of the war by ‘blind’ politicians and generals.” Generally speaking, Sargent’s presentation of the hostilities tends to be more sanguine — and indirect. Most of the watercolors on display emphasize the mundane aspects of a soldier’s life, with the ugliness of war suggested but not addressed head-on. Wounded men in a medical tent read newspapers and sleep; Scottish soldiers lounge outside a bombed building. Some of the most powerful works are the creations of servicemen who were wounded in the war and used art to document the experience but also to heal. Horace Pippin was an AfricanAmerican soldier who served in the Harlem Hellfighters (369th Infantry), a segregated unit. He was shot during the Meuse-Argonne offensive and suffered partial paralysis in his right arm. More than a decade later, he began “The End of War: Starting Home” (1930-33), a thickly painted narrative

work in which German soldiers in gray uniforms are seen surrendering to black troops in dark-brown uniforms that blend into the landscape. As Lubin writes: “Perhaps the relative ‘invisibility’ of the black soldiers ... had something to do, in the artist’s mind, with their relative invisibility in American culture at large ...” Pippin made the frame, which is dotted with the tools of war — miniature grenades, tanks and rifles. As guest curator Robin Jaffee Frank explained on a recent tour, “It’s similar to African-American storytelling quilts, which show the tools of everyday life. Here the tools tell the story of war.” Claggett Wilson was another wounded warrior who used art to tell war stories. A Marine who was gassed at the Battle of Belleau Wood in 1918, he created a series of graphic watercolors chronicling war wounds — men caught on barbed wire, falling from bullets and agonizing over lost limbs. His “Flower of Death — The Bursting of a Heavy Shell — Not as It Looks, but as It Feels and Sounds and Smells” (c. 1919) is an abstract rendering of an explosion, with fire and flying cinders engulfing the landscape as two traumatized soldiers are caught in the crossfire. But most artists experienced the war at a safe remove. Georgia O’Keeffe was inspired by her brother’s enlistment to paint “The Flag” (1918). A red-whiteand-blue watercolor with a red flag

partially subsumed by a wild blue sky, it suggests anxiety and ambivalence. Socialists and anarchists displayed red flags at meetings during the war, scholar Anne Classen Knutson notes in the catalog, and some states outlawed their display. As Knutson writes about O’Keeffe’s provocative image, “[T]here is a friction between the two primary colors: is the patriotic blue obliterating the potentially subversive red, or is the red holding strong?” George Bellows weighed in with a more definite view. Initially a pacifist, he was swayed by the 1915 Bryce Report detailing alleged German atrocities in occupied Belgium (most, but not all of it, true) to support American intervention. In “The Germans Arrive” (1918), German troops are shown savaging civilians. A townsman’s hands have been sliced off by a soldier’s long, bloody knife; another soldier has grabbed a woman by the neck. Bellows’ violent imagery is tempered by Childe Hassam’s Impressionistic flag paintings, Jane Peterson’s soothing watercolor of women rolling bandages for the Red Cross, John Steuart Curry’s mournful scene of the belated burial of a friend’s remains and George Benjamin Luks’ riotous depiction of an Armistice celebration on the night of November 11, 1918. Through Sept. 3.


JUNE 15-21,2017

A RADIO DEVOTEE REPORTS HIS OWN STORY to Cher, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sean Connery, the late Mary Tyler Moore, they were all such sweet people and lovely to talk to. I always tried to get a picture with them. That helped to do this book because I had pictures of many of the celebrities.

BOOKS Longtime correspondent Bill Diehl talks about writing his memoir and the celebrities he covered BY MADELEINE THOMPSON

Bill Diehl’s interest in and love for radio dates back to his childhood in Corning, New York, when he would listen to “The Lone Ranger” program on WCLI. One glimpse into the station’s control room on a visit with his father was all it took. Diehl bought a crystal set that served as his own personal radio, became an announcer at WCLI’s Youth Bureau Time radio show and went on to report for ABC News Radio for nearly 50 years. He partially retired in 2007, but remains a correspondent in entertainment. We spoke to Diehl about his recent memoir “Stay Tuned: My Life Behind the Mic,” which collects memories and highlights from a lifelong involvement in the profession.

What made you decide to write this book and what do you want readers to know about you? I’ve been a witness to and a participant in a changing world of entertainment. With the book, I tried to just reminisce out loud, if you will, and share some favorite remembrances with others through this book filled with photos and memorable interviews that go back to the early ‘80s when I first started covering the Academy Awards. That came out of the blue. I wound up ... in LA, and I’m standing on the red carpet next to all of these incredible people, up close and personal. I’ve got my microphone, I’m asking them questions. That was a real trip. Next year, they said, “You want to do it again?” I said, “Yeah, fine. I love it.” By the mid-‘80s they made me a permanent entertainment news correspondent, covering all of these venerated personalities who are included in the book.

So that experience changed the direction of your career. What appealed to you about covering entertainment and celebrities? I’m not sure what it is. My wife always has said to me, “You love

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How have you seen the radio industry change throughout your career? Do you see radio continuing to be a major way of spreading the news? people.” That’s an easy phrase to say, but I’m excited meeting celebrities. They’ve always had a special attraction to me. I’ve followed their lives, read celebrity books and magazines. I just think that they shine and they’re exciting to be with. It’s not that I want to be them, but I want to be a little part of their lives, a fly on the wall.

You elaborate in your book, but what were some of the most interesting celebrity interviews you did? Certainly Robin Williams has to be one of the biggest highlights. I heard that he was appearing at a comedy club called Catch A Rising Star, which was on the East Side, a couple of blocks from me on First Avenue. I think it was ‘82 I did the interview. I went down to the club, met his manager, and gave him my card. He said “Well, he might do an interview, but he’s awful busy. I really don’t know if you could do it, but I’ll give him your card.” I go back to the network, and I’m working in the studio, doing my newscasts and everything. All of a sudden the phone rings. “Hi, it’s Robin Williams. Do you still want to talk to me?” I said, “Of course, that’d be great.” He said, “I’ll be over in about 15 minutes.” He shows up, and we do this really funny interview. I interviewed him a couple of times. He was the kind of person that you could just give him the microphone and he would go off on anything. When Robin died suddenly, I went back to that audiotape that we had done and I played it as part of one of our magazine shows. A lot of these people could be divas and very into themselves, but some of these people were really, really nice. I didn’t try to be confrontational with people. Everybody from Dolly Parton,

The biggest thing obviously is that we’re no longer using audiotape, which is really old school now. It was probably right after the turn of the century at ABC [when] we decided to go to digital audio, digital editing. I thought, “This is it. I’m never going to figure this out.” My daughter, Suzanne, who is now 45 years old, said to me, “Dad, come on,” she says, “You can do it.” I figured it out, and I’m still doing it. We have even a new editing system now, which has given me even more headaches but somehow I’ve learned how to do that. You can hear a radio station anywhere in the world now, from Australia to China. That’s a new world ... [ABC has] moved with the times, and we’re still pumping out those newscasts every hour and giving our stations a lot to listen to. I’m very proud to be part of it.

ACTIVITIES FOR THE FERTILE MIND

thoughtgallery.org NEW YORK CITY

O’Keeffe’s Contemporaries: Four (More) Modern Women

FRIDAY, JUNE 16TH, 7PM The Strand | 828 Broadway | 212-473-1452 | strandbooks.com Head up to the Rare Book Room for a look at four modern women artist contemporaries of Georgia O’Keeffe. To explore: Peggy Bacon, Isabel Whitney, Florine Stettheimer, and Abastenia St. Leger Eberle. ($20, includes complimentary beer and wine)

Complicit: Screening + Panel Discussion

SATURDAY, JUNE 17TH, 7PM IFC Center | 323 Ave. of the Americas | 212-924-7771 | ifccenter.com Catch a screening of the documentary Complicit, which follows Chinese factory migrant workerturned-activist Yi Yeting and his fight against the global electronic industry. A panel discussion with filmmakers Heather White and Lynn Zhang will follow. ($15)

Just Announced | Drugs in Documentary Films: A Showcase

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21ST, 5:30PM Open Society Foundations–New York | 224 W. 57th St. | 212-548-0600 | opensocietyfoundations.org PBS POV co-hosts a dialogue and screening of excerpts from recent films that provide insight into the human toll of the international drug control regime. (Free)

For more information about lectures, readings and other intellectually stimulating events throughout NYC,

sign up for the weekly Thought Gallery newsletter at thoughtgallery.org.

The local paper for Chelsea

Advertise with Chelsea News today! Call Vincent Gardino at 212-868-0190

So much of the entertainment business happens in or revolves around L.A. Why have you stayed in New York all these years? The first time I went [to L.A.], the palm trees and the celebrity life out there, it was very, very attractive and so forth. At one point, there was talk that ABC might move its headquarters, or radio news headquarters, out to LA. My wife said, “That’s very nice. I’ll come out and join you occasionally.” My wife is a real New Yorker. She would never want to move away. I always wanted to be in New York. This was what I built my career on as a news guy. I always thought New York was the pinnacle. This interview has been edited and condensed. Madeleine Thompson can be reached at newsreporter@ strausnews.com

ChelseaNewsNY.com


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JUNE 15-21,2017

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

NEW PROTECTIONS FOR PETS LAWS State lawmakers vote to strengthen animal cruelty penalties BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

People convicted of extreme animal cruelty would be prohibited from owning a companion animal under legislation passed by the New York state Senate on Tuesday. The Senate also voted to increase potential jail time and fines for aggravated animal cruelty and require offenders to undergo psychological testing. The measures were passed on the Legislature’s annual animal advocacy day, which brought several dogs, captive owls, hawks, reptiles and one pony to the state Capitol for a day of lobbying and outreach. “It’s the most bipartisan, nonpartisan day of the session,” said Republican Sen. James Tedisco of Glenville, the sponsor of the bills. “It’s a privilege to have an animal; it’s your responsibility to take care of them.”

Under one of the measures, the maximum penalties for aggravated animal cruelty would increase from two years in prison and a $5,000 fine to four years in prison and a $10,000 fine. The state Assembly already is considering their own version of the bills. “It is essential that we speak up for animals and be their voice,” said Democratic Assemblywoman Linda Rosenthal of Manhattan, the sponsor of several animal welfare bills in the Assembly, including one that would outlaw the declawing of cats. Another bill before lawmakers would make it a felony to harm a dog, cat or other companion animal during the commission of another felony, such as a burglary. That measure passed the Senate in January and awaits action by the Assembly. Rosenthal’s bill prohibiting the surgical declawing of cats appears unlikely to get a vote in either chamber this year, thanks to opposition from the state’s leading veterinary organization, which argues the procedure must remain as a last option for felines that won’t stop scratching furniture or humans.

Photo by Virginia State Parks, via flickr

RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS

Pier 60

Pier 60 23Rd Street And West Side Highway

A

Umami Burger

432 Avenue Of The Americas

A

Gelato Giusto

164 9Th Ave

A

Google Water Tower Cafe

111 8 Avenue

A

MAY 25 - JUN 7, 2017 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit http://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/services/restaurant-grades.page. Walter’s Bar

389 8 Avenue

A

Nomad

1170 Broadway

A

Chandni Restaurant

13 West 29 Street

A

Dunkin’ Donuts

316 West 34 Street

A

Bean N Bean

320 8Th Ave

A

2Beans

817 Avenue Of The Americas

Not Yet Graded (60) Insufficient or no refrigerated or hot holding equipment to keep potentially hazardous foods at required temperatures. No facilities available to wash, rinse and sanitize utensils and/or equipment.

Dunkin’ Donuts

243 9 Avenue

A

Miss Korea

10 West 32 Street

A

Miss Korea Barbecue “Sun” 10 W 32Nd St

A

Pinkberry

7 W 32Nd St

A

O’reilly’s Off Fifth

21 West 35 Street

A

Bagel Maven Cafe

370 7 Avenue

A

Just Made Sushi (Dd Maru) 267 West 17 Street

A

Momoya Chelsea

185 7Th Ave

A

Lenwich

66 W 9Th St

A

Aleo

7 West 20 Street

A

Barcade

148 W 24Th St

A

Pastai

186 9Th Ave

A

Starbucks

378 6 Avenue

A

Sushi Tokyo

121 W 19Th St

A

E.A.K. Ramen

469 6Th Ave

Closed By Health Department (92) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food not cooled by an approved method whereby the internal product temperature is reduced from 140º F to 70º F or less within 2 hours, and from 70º F to 41º F or less within 4 additional hours. Food Protection Certificate not held by supervisor of food operations. Food contact surface improperly constructed or located. Unacceptable material used. No facilities available to wash, rinse and sanitize utensils and/or equipment. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.


JUNE 15-21,2017

PULSE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 wildly from elation to heartbreak, soaring gospels to solemn name reading. The Orlando massacre has inspired activists and allies alike to better insulate the LGBTQ community from more gun violence by urging politicians to pass stricter laws regarding the purchase of firearms. “We do this work because 93 people a day are killed by gun violence in this country,” said Gays Against Guns organizer Kathy Moreno. “We do this work because many of our elected officials are in bed with the NRA.” Facilitated by 20 prominent LGBTQ nightclubs, the tribute featured entertainers, activists, community leaders and Keinon Carter, a survivor of the shooting. “At the age of 15, I lost my older brother to a gun,” said Carter, who spoke to the audience from a wheelchair. “Recently, I almost lost my life to a gun. There is no other words for it — it needs to stop.” Carter had been pronounced dead at the club before his sister saw his body move. Though Carter admitted that he does not know how to end gun violence, he said that, nonetheless, “We need to come to the understanding that weapons are meant to protect, not to hurt.” Iconic musical performances scaled the emotional spectrum, as

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popular local vocalists and acapella groups took on haunting ballads like “Over the Rainbow” and “Hallelujah” as well as empowering dance tracks like Amy Winehouse’s “Valerie” and Lady Gaga’s “Born This Way.” During the rally’s intervening solemn segments, Council Member Corey Johnson and Public Advocate Letitia James read out the slain victims’ names along with either testimonies to their character or heartrending accounts of their final hours at the club. Dubbed the “Gays Against Guns Human Beings,” the veiled all-white figures standing in for each of the 49 victims individually walked across the stage following each tribute. “I expected the rally to be a lot sadder,” said Lindsey, 26, “but I really appreciated this conscious effort to heal from this tragedy by challenging it with joy and optimism.” The short stories attached to the names of the victims, she said, were personal touches that “felt humanizing.” Lindsey and her friend, Shannon, 28, both have distinct memories of their initial reactions to the Orlando shooting. The two had been planning on going to the Brooklyn Pride the next day, Shannon said. “It was so scary — just knowing that our safe space was under attack when we’d felt so safe the night before. “Part of what makes this rally so great is that it shows us it’s okay to wait afraid, and to be afraid together.”

A sign at St. Veronica’s Church, which is scheduled to close this summer. Photo: Estelle Pyper

ST. VERONICA’S TO CLOSE RELIGION Historic Christopher Street church merged with nearby parish in 2006 has seen declining attendance BY ESTELLE PYPER

A large sign attached to the gates of St. Veronica’s Church on Christopher Street reads: “Help us keep St. Veronica Open.” Draped on the black iron gate at the front of the Greenwich Village church, the sign includes a plea for community involvement. “This is your church. Do not abandon it,” the sign reads in both English and Spanish. After serving as a place of worship and communal gathering for more than 120 years, plans to close the historic building are imminent, with a last Mass scheduled for June 25, according to parishioner and church advocate Terri Cook. Cook, though, said an “alumni” Mass would be celebrated July 23 at which the community will also be welcome. Churchgoers assume the closing is due to the dwindling attendance and decreasing membership. The Rev. Santiago Rubio, the church’s pastor since 2010, did not respond to an email seeking comment. But Joseph Zwilling, a spokesman for the Archdiocese of New York, suggested that St. Veronica’s 2006 merger with the nearby Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe at St. Bernard’s, on West 14th Street, was a determining factor. “The parish was merged a decade ago with Our Lady of Guadalupe parish and the pastor of Our Lady of Guadalupe has decided that the church is no longer needed for Mass and sacraments on a regular basis,” Joseph Zwilling, spokesman for the Archdiocese of New York, said. The merger essentially meant the parish had two churches, Zwilling said, adding that he was not sure whether declining attendance also had an effect on the decision to close St. Veronica’s. “It’s all one unit but two different sites — and so that pastor has just decided now to combine everything into one site,” he said. Cook said the dwindling of Masses and other church functions led to the loss of congregants. “The congregation of St. Veronica’s has been starved out little by little. It’s such a crime because it is such a wonderful church,” she said. “I’m so annoyed.” Just two Masses are held at the church, both of them on Sundays: one at 10 a.m. (which Cook suggested is too early for the Greenwich Village community), followed by a Spanish Mass at 11:30. Churchgoers and community mem-

St. Veronica’s Church, on Christpher Street between Washington and Greenwich Streets, will close this summer. Photo: Martin Furtschegger, via Wikimedia Commons bers want to keep the space alive, regardless of whether services continue at St. Veronica’s. Cook and other congregants meet weekly to discuss possible futures for the church. While they recognize the church will close, they are still trying to attract more members, increase the number of services and ensure that the building remains a community space. “We know the church is going to close, but we’re fortunate that it won’t be torn down,” Cook said. “So we know we have time to keep working on this and to keep on making noise and putting pressure on the (Archdiocese of New York).” They write letters to church officials, collect signatures for a petition (they now have over 300) and raise money for church upkeep restorations. Andrew Berman, the executive director of the Greenwich Village Society of Historic Preservation, lamented the church’s closure. “It would be very sad for it to no longer function as a house of worship or at the very least as some communal gathering place,” he said. Berman and others mainly fear the loss of the church’s extensive history. The burgundy Victorian Gothic building has been a presence within the community since the 1890s, originally built as a place of worship for the growing Catholic population, many of them Irish immigrants. During the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s and ‘90s,

the church opened its doors to those affected by the disease, and built a memorial for its victims. St. Veronica’s and much of the surrounding area were landmarked in 2006 as part of an extension of the Greenwich Village Historic District, as a result of efforts by Berman and GVSHP, preventing the demolition and alteration of the church’s exterior. “We did it because it’s architecturally significant and worthy of preservation,” Berman said. He added that although the church’s exterior is safe, the interior is could be subject to alterations. “What’s so wonderful and important about spaces like these is they are places where people come together and have a shared experience,” he said. “We’d love to see it continue on as it has been. If that’s not the case, we’d ideally love to see it turned into some sort of use where it remained accessible to the public.” The congregation and GVSHP continue to reach out to the priest and the surrounding community in hopes of maintaining the church. Once St. Veronica’s closes, members are expected to move to St. Bernard’s for services. “None of us want to go there,” Cook said with a sigh. “The church has seen almost every phase of growth that New York City has. What’s in the church has never changed since 1903. That is why it is so important.”


16

JUNE 15-21,2017

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

Business

SMALL BUSINESSES STILL WAITING FOR TAX RELIEF REAL ESTATE Commercial rent tax reform not included in city budget BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

An effort to include commercial rent tax reform in the $85 million budget deal agreed upon by the mayor and city council earlier this month fell short, but legislators remain hopeful that a measure aimed at easing the tax’s impact on Manhattan small businesses will succeed in the months to come. “It’s unfair and antiquated and doing real harm to Manhattan businesses,” said City Council Member Dan Garodnick, one of the leaders of the latest effort to reduce the number of businesses that pay the commercial rent tax. Under the commercial rent tax as it currently stands, certain business tenants in Manhattan south of 96th Street are taxed at an effective rate of 3.9 percent of base rent. Businesses paying less than $250,000 in rent annually are exempt from the tax. A bill introduced by Garodnick and fellow Council Member Helen Rosenthal last year would raise the exemption threshold from the current $250,000 to $500,000 in annualized rent, thus unburdening approximately 30 percent of businesses that currently pay the tax. A separate proposal introduced this year and also co-sponsored by Garodnick and Rosenthal would exempt certain grocery stores from the tax as well. The commercial rent tax has long

Advocates say reforming the commercial rent tax will make life easier for rentstrapped Manhattan retailers. Photo: David Wilson, via flickr been a peculiar feature of the city’s tax code; Florida is the only state in which businesses are taxed similarly. When the tax was first imposed in 1963, it applied to commercial spaces citywide. But over the years, revisions to the code have gradually carved out exemptions for large swaths of the city. Since 1996, businesses located in the outer boroughs and Manhattan above 96th Street have not paid the tax. Since 2001, tenants with annualized rents below $250,000 have been exempt from the tax. In 2005, certain tenants in Lower Manhattan were exempted to provide relief to the area’s businesses in the aftermath of 9/11. The legislators supporting the proposal say that the bill will benefit large numbers of Manhattan businesses without having a significant negative

impact on the city’s coffers. According to the city’s Department of Finance, raising the exemption threshold to $500,000 would exempt about 3,300 commercial tenants — about 30 percent of the businesses that currently pay the tax — and would decrease revenue by $52 million in the next fiscal year, just six percent of the projected $848 million the tax will generate. According to the city’s Independent Budget Office, newly exempted businesses would save, on average, $13,250 annually. Because the commercial rent tax is imposed as a percentage of overall rent, a small number of businesses with high rents contribute an outsized share of the total revenue brought in each year by the tax. In the 2016 tax year, 368 taxpayers, less than five per-

cent of all businesses taxed, accounted for over half of the total revenue generated. Garodnick said he would like to see the commercial rent tax repealed in full eventually, but that raising the exemption threshold is more practical way to address the matter in the immediate term, given the more significant budgetary impact a full repeal would entail. A common complaint among small business owners is that the commercial rent tax is unfair because it layers one tax upon another. Because landlords consider their own property taxes in charging rents, they say, and annual tax increases are often passed on to tenants in the form of rent hikes, the commercial rent tax is at least in part a tax on the property tax. “Such pyramiding is considered undesirable from a best practice perspective,” the Independent Budget Office stated in its analysis of the tax presented to the city council earlier this year. Robert S. Schwartz, the owner of Eneslow Pedorthic Enterprises, operates two retail shoe stores in Manhattan. Schwartz, who sits on the board of the Manhattan Chamber of Commerce, which supports the bill, said that rising costs have eroded profitability for small businesses. “Look at all the vacancies on Second Avenue and Park Avenue and Madison Avenue,” he said. “There’s a reason: it’s because the rents are out of control. The real estate tax and commercial rent tax make it ridiculous.” The bill to increase the threshold enjoys broad support in the city council,

with 39 of the legislators in the body having signed on as co-sponsors since it was first introduced in May 2015. The lone potential stumbling block to passage is Mayor Bill de Blasio, who has not publicly taken a position on the bill. On May 22, a coalition of 27 local, state and federal elected officials sent a letter to the mayor urging him to support reform efforts. Among the officials who signed the letter were Garodnick, Council Members Helen Rosenthal, Ben Kallos, Mark Levine, and Margaret Chin, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, and U.S. House representatives Carolyn Maloney and Jerrold Nadler. In an email statement in response to a request to explain the mayor’s position on the council’s commercial rent tax reform proposal, mayoral spokeswoman Freddi Goldstein instead pointed to alternative measures taken up by city hall to aid small businesses, which haven’t included adjustments to the commercial rent tax. “We’re committed to helping small businesses thrive and continue to look for ways that we can help,” Goldstein said. “This administration has a strong track record of helping small business, including the reduction of fees and fines, expanding free legal consultation programs, and providing marketing support through our new initiative, ‘Love Your Local.’” Garodnick said he anticipates that the city council will vote on the bill at some point this year. “We have a lot of support in the council, and we hope to have the support of the mayor in this process,” he said.

ON THE SIDE STREETS OF NEW YORK MIYA SHOJI — 228 WEST 18TH STREET When Miya Shoji opened in 1951, it was not as a house of elegant carpentry. In fact, the company went through many phases — from selling flowers to Japanese knickknacks — before Hisao Hanafusa eventually guided the business toward wood design. When Hisao arrived in the United States in the 1960s and began working at Miya Shoji, it was owned by another Japanese immigrant, but Hisao eventually made it his own, and devoted the business entirely to the art of Japanese carpentry. He now owns and operates the shop with his son, Zui. The Hana-

fusas use only traditional tools and methods to create classic Japanese pieces — shoji (screens used to divide rooms), chests of drawers, tables, and flat bed frames. The style is meant to look as if it came to be naturally, fit together with joints as opposed to hammers and nails. “It is made to last,” Zui explained. It is important to father and son that their stunning work, which has been featured in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, be passed down from generation to generation. To read more, visit Manhattan Sideways (sideways.nyc), created by Betsy Bober Polivy.

Father and son. Photo: Tom Arena, Manhattan Sideways


JUNE 15-21,2017

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17


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JUNE 15-21,2017

Got an EVENT? FESTIVAL CONCERT GALLERY OPENING PLAY Get The Word Out! Add Your Event for FREE

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JUNE 15-21,2017

To read about other people who have had their “15 Minutes” go to chelseanewsNY.com/15 minutes

YOUR 15 MINUTES

A FILM THAT CARRIES ITS WEIGHT Writer-producer-director Rob Margolies on his comedy chronicling a young man’s struggle It was Rob Margolies’ 60-pound weight loss that inspired his new film, “Weight,” which is centered around that very struggle. “I guess what made me want to tell the story is just the uniqueness of the situation. There’s never really been a movie about some guy who is struggling to lose weight,” the Upper West Side resident explained. When looking for the perfect protagonist, Margolies consulted another Upper West Sider, casting director Judy Henderson, whom he always looks to when he has complex, or difficult, roles to fill. “In this case, finding a guy who is 300 pounds is definitely a challenge. There weren’t many people who submitted for the role. But she ended up getting me a bunch of excellent actors.” The one who stood out was Zackery Byrd, who makes his film debut in this role. Part of his contract includes an obligatory weight loss, and with the help of a company sponsor called Sun Basket, who is supplying him with a

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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

year’s worth of food, and exercising with a trainer multiple times a week, he is approaching that goal. Ten percent of the project’s proceeds will go to diabetes research, one of the factors that Margolies says attracted his cast, Jason Mewes, Randy Quaid, Ashley Johnson, Kathy Najimy and Peter Scolari, who all took pay cuts to star in the film.

How did you get your start in the industry? I basically had a love for it since I was 6 years old. Just growing up, my mom used movies and TV as like a pacifier for me. At about 12 years old, I was in sixth grade, I realized that you can actually have a living working on movies. So I started writing screenplays when I was that age. From there, I nurtured my creativity. My junior year of high school, I was 17 years old, I ended up making my first feature film with a bunch of my friends in high school. I would never show anybody, obviously. It was pretty bad. Then that summer, I spent at the New York Film Academy and then when I graduated high school, I went to Chapman University to study film.

How did you lose weight and what made

you want to tell this story? Just eating right and exercisxercising. The old-fashioned way is how I lost the weight. I like e to call the film a modern-day John Candy movie had he decidcided to get healthy and lose se weight. The tone and the he style of the movie is like ke that. There was a friend of mine who’s obese and was as diagnosed with diabetes tes about a year ago. I guesss his struggle and own mentall capacities are what made me put two and two together her and start writing the script. pt. .

What was the atmosphere like on set?

feat in itself. Plus there are 22 locations on top of that. So there are a lot of company moves. I wouldn’t call it stressful, per se. But it was like nonstop, a lot of work. When this movie wrapped, I literally slept for 16 hours straight and was still exhausted.

What ar are some of the locations in the film? Some of the signature locations are a bowling alley, a doctor’s to office, a lot of Central Park. We had a diner in P Brooklyn. The Dogpound B (a Tribeca gym). Another sponsor of ours, Tribeca. A mansion out in Jersey for one of the scenes. Of fo course, the main location cou was the main character’s wa apartment which was actuap ally in Jersey City, but it can all definitely pass for a Brookde lyn apartment.

What were the challenges to Wh

I handpicked the entire cast ast fillming in New York City? and crew, so there were no Parking is obviously a fights. Everyone got along. hard one. You can pay for ng. h It was really smooth. Butt I a parking lot, but getthink a lot of the crew memmtting the equipment up to bers weren’t used to my each location was sort of y e style of work. The way thatt the t one thing my team I work, there really are no was struggling with. breaks. I just go go go go. The other thing is, of It’s sort of my mentality. course, the size of cerI’m shooting this movie, Filmmaker Rob Margolies. tain locations. Obvi95 pages in 17 days is a Photo: Brandon McClover ously in New York City,

a doctor’s office and apartments and all that kind of stuff are way smaller than they are elsewhere. And then of course, a lot of outdoor-type stuff, like weather conditions. Forty percent of the film is outside.

Who are some filmmakers you look up to? The people I look up to aren’t necessarily the kind of people that this film is sort of in the vein of. Some of my favorite filmmakers are pretty clichéd answers, Quentin Tarantino, Stanley Kubrick, Paul Thomas Anderson. David Fincher is probably my favorite director right now. So they’re all very different than my personal style, but comedy is my wheelhouse and I just embrace that.

This is your sixth film. Who are some actors you’ve kept in touch with? Oh, so many of them. Charlie Sheen, Hilary Duff, are some of the bigger ones. And then Jane Adams, Joe Morton, Alexa Vega. Spencer Grammer is a really good friend of mine; we have children around the same age. Pretty much all of them except for maybe one or two, who I’ll leave nameless. www.weightthemovie.com www.robmargoliesfilmmaker.com

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WORD SEARCH by Myles Mellor F Z O L C H A R A C T E R X F

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M S I Y E A R S T P I V N N O

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26 Alternative maker 27 Puffed up 28 60s haircut 29 One of the Bobbsey twins 33 “Are we there ___?” 35 Stand ___ me 37 Ticked off 38 Pig’s home 40 Over, poetically 41 Latitude 43 Reddish-brown 46 Earth 48 Da Vinci painting ending 49 Military group 50 Tijuana coin 51 “The Early Show” network 52 Modern address 53 TV chef 55 Everyday article

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Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9X9 grid that has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3X3 squares. To solve the puzzle each row, column and box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9. Puzzles come in three grades: easy, medium and difficult.

N

12

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SUDOKU by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan

by Myles Mellor

B

2

CROSSWORD

S

Clinton 1

JUNE 15-21,2017

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SPECIAL FIRST-TIME HOMEBUYER PROGRAMS*

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TOP PRICES PAID t1SFDJPVT $PTUVNF+FXFMSZ (PMEt4JMWFS 1BJOUJOHTt.PEFSOt&UD

AVAILABLE IN MANHATTAN

300 to 20,000 square feet

Elliot Forest, Licensed RE. Broker

212 -447-5400 abfebf@aol.com

Entire Estates Purchased

212.751.0009

I CAN SELL YOUR HOME OR APARTMENT QUICKLY!

N e s t S e e ke r s I N T E R N A T I O N A L

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Antique, Flea & Farmers Market

ways to re-use

SINCE 1979

East 67th Street Market (between First & York Avenues)

Open EVERY Saturday 6am-5pm Rain or Shine Indoor & Outdoor FREE Admission Questions? Bob 718.897.5992 Proceeds BeneďŹ t PS 183

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old

newspaper

#

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Make your own cat litter by shredding newspaper, soaking it in dish detergent & baking soda, and letting it dry.


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