Page 1

The local paper for Chelsea

WEEK OF JUNE MANIFESTATIONS OF POWER ◄ P.12

14-20 2018

PUBLIC LIBRARIES WIN CASE FOR BUDGET BOOST FUNDING City spending deal gives NYPL increase to maintain service amid rising costs BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

At Radical MMA on West 29th Street, René Dreifuss trains students in mixed martial arts-oriented jujitsu. Photo courtesy of Radical MMA

THE ART OF THE FIGHT FITNESS At Radical MMA in Chelsea, a Japanese aesthetic BY MICHAEL DESANTIS

Anyone who enters Radical MMA in Chelsea is required to get barefoot and step onto a black pad inside a small blue rectangular bucket holding a cool sanitizer. They then step out onto a rug and descend stairs to a long, rectangleshaped room and take a second footbath. Only then can they walk

onto the large gray mat where they’ll practice martial arts techniques or sparring for the next few hours. “Osu,” they declare, Japanese for “I will persevere through hardship.” René Dreifuss, 47, the owner and driving force behind Radical MMA, enforces Japanese martial arts values and demands respect, discipline and a desire for self-improvement. His pupils range from amateur mixed martial arts fighters with dreams of going pro to those simply getting in shape. He says Japanese-style formalities help separate Radical MMA from other fight-training schools in

New York. His students agree: Dreifuss’s approach, they say, has made them more mature, confident and tenacious in their everyday lives. Piaras McGarry, an amateur fighter who moved to New York City from Northern Ireland last year, said he’s been surprised to find himself cursing less outside the gym since he began training there. “Me being Irish, we like to curse every second,” McGarry, 22, said. “Training at Radical has improved my overall life in terms of my vocabulary.”

New York City’s public library systems received increased funding in the city budget for the coming fiscal year following a public campaign waged by library officials, who said the additional money is necessary to maintain current operating hours and programming, which have been threatened in recent years by rising costs. The budget hike requested by the city’s three public lii brary systems — $16 million n in additional expense fundding, along with $60 million n in new capital funding — was as included in the $89.2 billion n budget deal struck June 11 by y the City Council and Mayor or Bill de Blasio. “Today, as we face rising g costs across so many areas, s, we need further support to o avoid service reductions — reductions of hours, branch h closures during construction n projects, or fewer materials ls and programs,” Tony Marx, x, the president of the New York rk Public Library said in written n testimony delivered at a Counncil budget hearing last month. h. The library systems, with h

The 2019 city budget deal agreed to on June 11 by Mayor Bill de Blasio and the City Council includes additional expense funding for the New York Public Library that officials say will help the system avoid making cuts to operating hours. Photo: Steven Strasser

BY THE NUMBERS New York Public Library has:

neighborhood branches

annual visitors library cardholders

circulating items in the system’s collections

CONTINUED ON PAGE 15 CONTINUED ON PAGE 9 Clinton

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research libraries in Manhattan

Crime Watch Voices NYC Now City Arts

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Restaurant Ratings Business Real Estate 15 Minutes

14 16 17 19

WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW < CITYARTS, P.14

WHO HAS ACCESS TO A PARKING SPACE IN CHELSEA? NEWS

9-16

MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.18

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

WHAT NEXT FOR CHELSEA GALLERIES?

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up rezoning told us she’d like to would and the mid-2000s May 1 The and running this year, for of West Chelsea. Muas an ombudsman city serve Whitney the of opening Art on small businesses within them clear seum of American means not government, helping It’s new buildings, to get Gansevoort Street c to the traffi through the bureaucracy rising rents, that are even more foot things done. forcing some gallerists area. is that Perhaps even more also The irony, of course, to reconsider their Whitney -importantly, the ombudsman the arrival of the and number neighborhood roots art meccas will tally the type small business one of the city’s the end for of complaints by taken in BY GABRIELLE ALFIERO -- could also spell dealers the actions art owners, long-time policy buildStephen some response, and somefor ways to When gallerists Griffin in the area, as their are sold or recommendations If done well, Haller and Cynthiatheir W. ings increasingly begin to fix things. report would Haller reopened follow- demolished. lease the ombudsman’s 26th Street gallery With their 10-year quantitative afrst fi the rebuild Stephen us give cut short, with ing a five-month flooded abruptly shared taste of what’s wrong ter Hurricane Sandy they and Cynthia, who the city, an the space, small businesses in towards building with their first floor phone their and Tony important first step were still without were Lehmann Maupin they the problem. needed to xing fi of galleries, and Internet. Still, where Shafrazi property by June To really make a difference, the happy in the location, will have to to stay for vacate (Shafrazi is suing course, the advocaterising rents, they expected of 2014. find a way to tackle business’ the Manhattes some time. doltold less the landlord, which remain many While Chin Instead, they were their Group, for $20 million reproblem. vexing that Post most the New York than a year later gauge what to demol- lars, said it’s too early tocould have landlord planned ported). another role the advocate on the ish the building. They shopped for planned for there, more information in the neighbor“We had shows bad thing. We had location to find problem can’t be a with the long periods of time.amount hood but struggled a twoThis step, combinedBorough more than just put in a huge the anything efforts by Manhattan to mediate of money to refurbish“We year lease on a street-level in Chelsaid. President Gale Brewer offer space,” Cynthia space. After 13 years Gallery the rent renewal process, were really shocked.”Gallery sea, Stephen Haller signs tangible and early, Haller some For Stephen small left the neighborhoodStux it, it isn’t riswith of progress. For many can’t come and others like joined forces oor are driving business owners, that in a new sixth-fl ing rents that far new devel- Gallery soon enough. on 57th Street, not Chelsea, Zach Feuer them away. It’s

NEWS

luxury building Robotic garage for board draws fire from community BY ZACH WILLIAMS

at a a robotic garage A proposal for in Chelsea has thrown luxury building into the city’s zoning access to parking debate. proposed for a A high-tech garage W. 28th St. has 520 development at Board 4, which is riled Community arguing that it plan, in opposing the more car usage would only invite while only providthe neighborhood, residents. ing parking to rich a special city perThe garage needs 29 spaces rather mit to accommodate allowed the than the 11 automatically opted to oppose by the city. CB4 1 full board meetpermit at its April Carl a draft letter to ing, stating in Planning City the of Weisbrod, chair city criteria for such Commission, that based on the parking foran exception is ago, when many for stock of a decade spaces were used demer industrial future of parking in anticipation velopment in Chelsea. 40 residential have The project will comsquare feet of alunits and 11,213 the ground floor, mercial space on three parking spaces The lowing eight and the developer, respectively. But wants more for Related Companies, is the New York acthe building, which internationally City debut for Zaha Hadid. (Adjaclaimed architect Line, the build cent to the High

CONTINUED ON PAGE

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his gallery in After 15 years running to partner with Joel two gallery spaces, (left) leaves the neighborhood team will operate Mesler (right). TheMesler/Feuer, on the Lower East Feuer/Mesler and May 10. Slide, slated to open

Newscheck

2 3

is surging opment, which in part to in Chelsea, thanks High Line the opening of the

City Arts Top 5

12 13

space

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ETHNIC EATING FROM NYC’S FAMOUS FOODIES CUISINE

course, the ubiquitous Chinese dumpling. Pictures, too.

8 cookbooks that offer a world of feasts in your own kitchen

Daniel Boulud’s Cafe Boulud Cookbook, by Daniel Boulud (Scribner). A treasury of classic French cuisine with occasional nods to the cookery of Italy, Spain and East Asia, plus family history from the owner of Café Boulud and recipes written by cookbook author Dorie Greenspan. There is also a glossary applicable to all kinds of cookers, everything you need to know about pots and pans and even a list of reputable and reliable purveyors.

BY CAROL ANN RINZLER

Miami loves Latin; San Francisco, Asian; and Chicago, middle European. But New York is where America comes to eat all around the world. In a city that speaks — and probably cooks in — more than 170 languages, Zagat’s restaurant roster lists 60-plus ethnic and regional cuisines ranging from A (Afghan, African, Argentinean, Asian, Australian, Austrian) through the Three I’s on every politician’s world tour (Ireland, Israel, Italy) and maybe on to Z if one of the African restaurants in town serves dishes native to Zambia, Zimbabwe, or Zaire. Naturally, many New York’s famous foodies and restaurant aficionados have written the books you need to bring the good stuff home to your own kitchen, all available at your favorite bookstore such as the UES’s own Kitchen Arts and Letters, the LES’s Bonnie Slotnick’s Cookbooks, the West Village’s Joanne Hendricks Cookbooks or Amazon.com. A small sampling (in alphabetical order):

Balaboosta: Bold Mediterranean Recipes to Feed the People You Love, by Einat Admony (Artisan). The chef and owner of Bar Bolonat and Taïm (a third restaurant, Balaboosta, is currently closed for relocation), Admony bases the 140 recipes in her book on her Israeli heritage (Yemenite, Persian) to offer a cuisine that leans toward the Mediterranean, fitting all who live within site of the lovely blue sea.

The Food Lover’s Guide to the Best Ethnic Eating in New York City, by Robert Sietsema and Calvin Trillin (Arcade Publishing). This entire city’s worth of notes on ethnic eating in all five boroughs features restaurants whose menus include dishes from such farflung culinary outposts as Armenia, Bulgaria, Ecuador, Malaysia, New Guinea, West Africa and yes, even regional America.

Chinatown, New York, by Ann Volkwein

The Go Green East Harlem Cookbook/ El Librio de Cocina Viva Verde East Harlem, edited by Scott M. Stringer (Jones

(Collins Design), does the honors for the largest Chinese community in the Western hemisphere, with special mention to special restaurants and recipes for fresh seafood, a variety of pork dishes, dim sum delicacies and, of

Books) during the NYC Comptroller’s previous incarnation as Manhattan Borough President. You can read this in English if you start from one end and Spanish if you turn the book and start from the other. Either way, the recipes

— contributed by members of the largest Puerto Rican community outside Puerto Rico — are updated to bring traditional dishes into line with modern nutrition guidelines: less fat, more fiber, and fresh foods at every turn.

The Irish Pub Cookbook, by Margaret Johnson, pictures by Leigh Beisch (Chronicle Books). There are approximately 2,000 Irish pubs in the Big Apple, roughly one for every 43,113 New Yorkers or, to put it another way, one for every 210 Irish among us. Surprisingly, none of the pub people appears to have written his or her own book but this illustrated volume by Massachusetts-transplant Johnson suffices with recipes for more than 70 pub classics

ranging from Shepherd’s Pie to fish and chips and whiskey bread pudding.

Rao’s Cookbook: Over 100 Years of Italian Home Cooking, by Frank Pellegrino (Random House). Recipes from the legendary ten-table restaurant that has been in the Rao-Pellegrino family since 1896 — with a recent offshoot at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas — include such sterling standbys as marinara sauce, seafood salad, roasted peppers with pine nuts and raisins, baked clams, lemon chicken and so on, a gift to those who may never score a seat at the real Rao’s tables but can still enjoy their classic Italian cooking.

The Veselka Cookbook: Recipes and Stories from the Landmark Restaurant in New York’s East Village, by Tom Birchard and Natalie Danford (Thomas Dunne Books) offers up recipes from a Ukrainian restaurant on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, once home to a large contingent of Eastern Europeans (veselka means rainbow in Ukrainian). The collection includes such classics as pierogi, five different kinds of borscht, grilled kielbasa and poppy seed cake. As a bonus, Veselka owner Birchard tells pleasant tales of celebrity customers. Carol Ann Rinzler is the author of “Nutrition for Dummies.”

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CRIME WATCH BY BY MARIA ROCHA-BUSCHEL MAN HARASSED BY 5-YEAR-OLD

STATS FOR THE WEEK Reported crimes from the 10th district for the week ending June 3

A 61-year-old man reported that he was harassed by a young child while he was out walking his dog, police said. The told officers he was in front of 427 West 26th St. on Friday, June 8 at midnight when a 5-year-old girl, a resident in his housing development, directed shouted expletives at him. He told police he felt alarmed and feared for his safety.

Week to Date

CUSTOMER BREAKS MAN’S NOSE An employee at Chelsea Bell reported that he was assaulted while trying to close the bar at 316 Eighth Ave. on Sunday, June 10 around 4 a.m. The victim told police that he and other employees were trying to get the MAN to leave the bar so they could close when a fight broke out and he was elbowed in the face, breaking his nose. No arrests were made at the time of the incident.

Photo by Tony Webster, via Flickr

MAN STEALS, DROPS RAZORS, ROGAINE

MAN ARRESTED FOR DOMESTIC ABUSE

A Rite Aid employee at 188 Ninth Ave. reported that a man attempted to steal almost $800 in razors and hair care products from the store on Thursday, June 7 around 5:15 p.m. Police said that the man took 13 Gillette razors of various styles, three boxes of Viviscal, four boxes of women’s Rogaine and two boxes of Rogaine for men. The stolen merchandize is valued at $739. A security officer approached the suspect on the street, after which the man dropped the items and fled on West 23rd.

Police arrested a 49-year-old man for assaulting his 26-year-old boyfriend inside their apartment at 229 West 16th St. on Saturday, June 9 at 8:50 p.m. Police said that the suspect put the victim in a headlock and choked him during a domestic dispute, causing swelling to his lip, minor bleeding and difficulty breathing. Police did not have further information on what the argument was about.

Year to Date

2018 2017

% Change

2018

2017

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

0

0

n/a

Rape

0

0

n/a

6

7

-14.3

Robbery

2

1

100.0

34

35

-2.9

Felony Assault

1

2

-50.0

41

52

-21.2

Burglary

0

1

-100.0

39

31

25.8

Grand Larceny

14

11

27.3

306 260 17.7

Grand Larceny Auto

2

0

n/a

7

12

-41.7

COCAINE ARREST AT 14TH STREET STATION

MEN ARRESTED FOR WRECKING DOT SIGNS

Police saw a 30-year-old man for snorting cocaine inside the subway station at Eighth Avenue and West 14th Street on Friday, June 8 at 2:50 a.m., and arrested him. Police said that the man was seen sniffing a white, powdery substance from a MetroCard using a rolled up $1 bill while standing on the downtown platform for the A/C/E train.

Police arrested 23-year-old and 24-year-old men for criminal mischief in front of 118 10th Ave. on Saturday, June 9 at 2:55 a.m. Police said that the men were knowingly destroying Department of Transportation “no standing” and “taxi stand” signs that were on the sidewalk by pulling them out of the ground.

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ASIAN-AMERICANS ASSAIL SCHOOLS DIVERSITY PLAN EDUCATION Mayor has proposed elimination of test criteria for admission to specialized high schools BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

Asian-Americans have voiced robust objections to Mayor Bill de Blasioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan to increase diversity in New York Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s specialized high schools, claiming the proposal to overhaul admissions at the elite institutions would unfairly and inordinately impact Asian-Americans. The mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan, unveiled last week, would modify admissions standards at eight of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nine specialized high schools (including Stuyvesant High School and the High School for Math, Science and Engineering in Manhattan), where offers are currently determined solely by applicantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; scores on a three-hour exam. The mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposal calls for the Specialized High School Admissions Test, or SHSAT, to be eliminated, a step that would require state authorization. Under de Blasioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan, which has won the support of a number of elected officials and education groups, the test would be replaced with a new composite admission score based on studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; classroom grades and performance on state standardized exams. The top 7 percent of students at each middle school in the city would receive offers from specialized high schools. The plan is aimed at remedying persistent racial segregation in the specialized high schools, which are among the most selective and prestigious public schools in the nation. Black and Latino students make up just 10 percent of the student body at specialized high schools despite comprising 70 percent of the population in the public school system as a whole. White and Asian students, by contrast, are overrepresented. The administration projects that the plan would drastically increase the

Opponents of Mayor Bill de Blasioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposal to overhaul admissions to specialized high schools held a rally at City Hall June 10. Photo: State Senator Marty Golden, via Facebook

I really disagree with the mayor on this. He could have started the conversation with the elected officials and the community and come up with a plan together to present to Albany.â&#x20AC;? Council Member Margaret Chin number of black and Latino students admitted to specialized high schools â&#x20AC;&#x201D; raising the proportion of admission offers to those groups from 9 percent to 45 percent. But any substantial change in student demographics at the specialized high schools would disproportionately impact AsianAmericans, who currently receive more than half of all offers. Hundreds of specialized high school students, parents, and alumni, many of them Asian-American, rallied at City Hall June 10 to protest the mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Keep the test,â&#x20AC;? chanted protesters, some carrying signs stating their intention to vote out elected officials who support the proposal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These schools have so many lowincome students and immigrants, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the ones who are going to be the biggest losers,â&#x20AC;? said David Lee, the vice president of the Chinese American Citizens Alliance of Greater

New York, one of the groups that participated in the rally. Lee and others argue that racial disparities in admissions testing results demonstrate larger failings in the public school system that would not be addressed by the mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to ďŹ x the pipeline to make sure middle school students have the skills they need for the test,â&#x20AC;? he said, adding that after school SHSAT prep classes should be expanded. Ray Liu, a 2000 graduate of Stuyvesant who attended the rally, said the main issue for many specialized high school alumni is fairness. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Having high standards that are fair is something we really want our alma maters to maintain,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not against changing the admissions standards, as long as itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fair and applied consistently across the board to everyone,â&#x20AC;? he said, adding that course

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for the mayor and the chancellor to really get feedback from the people who are going to be impacted.â&#x20AC;? In a June 6 letter to de Blasio, Chin called for a formal process to address Asian-American familiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; concerns with the plan, which she wrote â&#x20AC;&#x153;does not address the fact that far too many students are at a disadvantage on the day of the SHSAT.â&#x20AC;? Chin, an alumna of a specialized high school, Bronx Science, wrote that the city should â&#x20AC;&#x153;identify immediate ways to make the existing process fairer,â&#x20AC;? such as increasing outreach efforts to ensure that students know about the admission test when they begin middle school and expanding test prep programs for low-income students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the long-term, we must strive to make sure that our Middle Schools are preparing every student, regardless of race and socioeconomic status, for the rigors of the SHSAT,â&#x20AC;? Chin wrote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really disagree with the mayor on this,â&#x20AC;? Chin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He could have started the conversation with the elected officials and the community and come up with a plan together to present to Albany.â&#x20AC;? The state Assembly will not vote on legislation to eliminate the SHSAT before the current legislative session ends later this month, Speaker Carl Heastie said, in spite a move by the Assemblyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s education committee to advance the bill. Rebecca Seawright, who represents the Upper East Side and Roosevelt Island in the Assembly and sits on the education committee, voted against the proposal and echoed Chinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s complaints about the lack of public discussion of the proposal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I cannot support legislation on the future of specialized high schools with little opportunity for student, teacher, parent, alumni, and educator input,â&#x20AC;? Seawright said in a statement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We must be thoughtful and look at the issue holistically, with all stakeholders present before making a decision which will impact millions of children and families in New York City for decades to come.â&#x20AC;?

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grades can vary by school and classroom, making them an unreliable metric. The mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan to accept the top 7 percent of students from each middle school, he said, would unfairly place students at some schools at a competitive disadvantage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not about maintaining some proportion of Asian people in specialized high schools,â&#x20AC;? Liu said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about making sure that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fairness and consistency in the admissions process.â&#x20AC;? The mayor and others have said that SHSAT results are unfairly tilted to students from families with the resources to pay for private tutoring and prep courses. (Prep books for the test are consistently in high demand at librariesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;two SHSAT prep books were among the top 50 adult non-fiction titles in terms of check-outs over the last six months at the New York Public Library; over that period, SHSAT test prep books were checked out over 2,600 times.) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true, the test prep industry does thrive in Asian communities, but the parents have made a decision to spend their hard earned dollars on these classes,â&#x20AC;? Lee said, adding that parents often turn to private prep courses because they feel schools fail to adequately prepare students for the SHSAT. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing this for survival,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rely on the public school system.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We hope that all this activity in the last few days has convinced the mayor and [Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza] that they should speak to us,â&#x20AC;? Lee said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Of course diversity matters to us, but any solution should include everyone.â&#x20AC;? Margaret Chin, who represents much of Lower Manhattan, including Chinatown, in the City Council, said in a telephone interview that the de Blasio administration did not do enough to solicit public input before announcing the plan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think mostly people were upset that they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a chance to voice their opinion or concern,â&#x20AC;? Chin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important

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FEAR AND FASHION: THE KATE SPADE STORY

JUNE 14-20,2018

FLOWERS AND WINE FOR BOURDAIN

LIVES Or how a whimsical, business-savvy designer created a global brand, empowered the women who carry her bags – and ultimately, lost a harrowing battle to her demons

I am stunned.” Tweet from Bette Midler, singersongwriter-actress-customer

BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

It was, for a very long time, the classic Manhattan success story: Fueled by outsized dreams and driven by creative furies, an ambitious, gifted young Kansas City woman with a degree in broadcasting exits the Midwest to find fame, fortune, and ostensibly, happiness, in New York. She builds a fashion brand, transforms it into a worldwide, multimillion-dollar corporation, and positions it as a cultural touchstone and beacon for legions of aspiring women. Soon, she’s a household name. Trappings of wealth and social status quickly follow. The co-op at 850 Park Avenue, complete with fireplace. The beach vacations in Baja, Mexico. The Carlyle Hotel — her “favorite spot for cocktails,” she says in a blog post. Raoul’s on Prince Street in Soho, her preferred restaurant. And then it all goes catastrophically awry. On Tuesday, June 5 at 10:20 a.m., a housekeeper in her spacious apartment off East 77th Street enters the bedroom and finds her hanging from a red scarf tied to a doorknob. A suicide note is discovered at the scene. Born in Missouri in 1962 as Katherine Noel Brosnahan, she died as Katherine Noel Frances Valentine Brosnahan Spade, having legally changed her name in 2016. But the handbag and accessories entrepreneur — who a quarter-century ago became synonymous with a brand beloved by a generation of young, urban women — will always be remembered as Kate Spade. She was 55 and left behind her husband of 24 years, Andy Spade, who was also her business partner, and their daughter and only child, 13-yearold Frances Beatrix Spade. Three days after her death, amid the heightened focus on mental-health issues it triggered, chef Anthony Bourdain hanged himself in his hotel room near Strasbourg, France, where he was filming an episode of CNN’s “Parts Unknown.” He was 61. Like Spade, the globetrotting author of “Kitchen Confidential,” whose body was discovered by fellow toque Eric Ripert, was long associated with Park Avenue, though a part that must have

Tribute in the window of Kate Spade shop on Columbus Avenue. Photo: Alexis Gelber seemed light years away from the Silk Stocking District. Bourdain won celebrity status in the 1990s as executive chef of Les Halles, the French brasserie on Park Avenue South off 29th Street, and on June 8, his fans and viewers and diners adorned the shuttered culinary landmark with letters and flowers.

A SPOUSE’S STATEMENT In a family more sprinkled with stardust than shrouded in tragedy, Kate Spade’s survivors include brother-inlaw, David Spade, the stand-up comedian formerly of Saturday Night Live,” and niece Rachel Brosnahan, the Golden Globe-winning star of “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel.” “Kate was the most beautiful woman in the world,” Andy Spade said of his wife in a statement a day after her death. “My daughter and I are devastated by her loss, and can’t even begin to fathom life without her. We are deeply heartbroken and miss her already.” Spade also pulled back the curtain on a life that to the outside world, and plenty of friends, too, seemed as joyous, vibrant and radiant as her witty, color-splashed design creations. “There were personal demons she was battling,” he wrote. Specifically, she suffered from depression and anxiety for “many years,” and had been taking medication for both conditions over the past five years. “She was actively seeking help and working closely with her doctors to treat her disease, one that takes far too many lives,” he added. There was

no substance or alcohol abuse, he said, despite tabloid reports. Marital issues, though unspecified, were also at play, the statement made clear. Within hours of her death, loving photos of the couple surfaced. There they were, formally dressed, for the Met’s Costume Institute Gala, and there again, stylishly dressed, at a fundraising soiree in their home for the New York Center for Children, a favorite charity. A lively video shows a mariachi band serenading them as they dance, seemingly carefree. But for the past 10 months, the Spades had been living apart, though they weren’t legally separated, and “never even discussed divorce,” Spade wrote. He took a second Park Avenue apartment, 14 blocks north. Even so, they saw each other or spoke daily, raised their daughter jointly, dined and vacationed together as a family. “We were best friends trying to work through our problems in the best way we knew how,” he said. “We were together for 35 years. We loved each other very much and simply needed a break.” How different it must have seemed in 1983 when they met at a men’s clothing store in Phoenix where both worked during their time as students at Arizona State University. After graduating in 1985, they moved to the city. A year later, Kate Spade, 24, landed a temping job at now-defunct Mademoiselle magazine. She became a top fashion editor, and by 1991, when she left as senior accessories editor, she knew the industry cold.

BOUTIQUE BUSINESS In 1993, she launched the eponymous Kate Spade, with the man she’d marry one year later, and unveiled a collection of nylon handbags — “Exactly the kind of bag I’d want but can’t find,” she said — that managed to be stylish, practical, cheerful, whimsical, all at the same time. At age 31, she was a towering success, birthing a lifestyle phenomenon and a business model — she handled design details, he managed advertising and branding — for how a husband

Like so many people, I was stunned and saddened by the death of Anthony Bourdain on June 8. And, if only to assuage my own mourning, I felt I had to do something to honor his life that day. So I took off on my lunch break and brought a bottle of Chianti to Brasserie Les Halles on Park Avenue and 29th Street. Now shuttered but still unreplaced, the restaurant was where Bourdain used to be chef. It was also where, back in the late 1990s, my father and I would often enjoy Sunday brunch of pied de cochon with mustard, one of the many delights of Bourdain’s menu and one of our favorite things in the city. The flowers were just beginning to appear. Photo and text by Howard Chua-Eoan

and wife can partner and profit. By 1996, Kate Spade had opened its first boutique at 59 Thompson Street in 400 square feet in Soho. Growth was turbo-charged. Hungry for space, the shop in 1997 moved four blocks to 454 Broome Street, tripling in size. The design brand became one of the most recognized on earth. It opened 140 retail stores in the U.S. and 175 abroad over two decades. Yet though it bore Spade’s name and logo, it quickly ceased being a family-controlled company. In 1998, the partners began cashing out. They sold 56 percent of the line to Neiman Marcus, stayed on board to helm design, and then in 2006, a year after their daughter was born, sold their minority stake to Neiman Marcus, which later sold it to Liz Claiborne. Kate Spade herself formally exited Kate Spade in 2007. Choosing family over fashion, she kept a low profile, devoting herself to raising Frances Beatrix Spade. It was in this period, her husband’s statement suggests, that

the bouts of depression worsened. Still, in 2016, she launched a new accessories label, Frances Valentine, legally changed her name, reengaged with the industry in a comeback bid, and advertised that her designs had “become a bit more grown up since the early days,” along with the tastes of her clientele. Would the old magic work anew? Horrifically, her suicide makes the question moot. But her place in fashion’s pantheon, and in the memories of the women she served, is secure. Perhaps Bette Midler, recalling the “wonderful illusions she created,” summed it up best: “I am stunned,” she tweeted. invreporter@strausnews.com Any readers who are thinking about suicide, or are concerned about a loved one’s mental health, should call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, at 1-800-273-8255 (TALK), which provides 24/7 free and confidential support services for people in distress.


JUNE 14-20,2018

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Voices

Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to chelseanewsNY.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

FILM AT 11 EAST SIDE OBSERVER BY ARLENE KAYATT

The tipping police — Imagine getting a notice from your credit card company telling you that you’re a “great” tipper. That’s what they emailed me after they noticed I had left a tip that far exceeded the percentages recommended by the tip meisters who say the high-end tip should be 20 percent of the bill (there’s disagreement as to whether that includes tax or not). So? That was my thought. Like why is it anybody’s business what tip I give? Maybe, like Bill O’Reilly in his hey-

day, they are just looking out for me? Or maybe the bartender inflated the tip? Give me a break. Not sure that credit card companies should be getting into the nitty gritty of customer spending practices. They might consider working on other issues that impact consumer credit and online access to credit information. And take into consideration privacy of consumers. Forget it. That was another lifetime. I’m sure if the credit card company asks the tip-averse Danny Meyer, he might tell them to pass the tip along to the boss who will somehow figure out how to increase prices to accommodate generous tipping. At the end of the day, credit card companies should focus their resources and stop scrutinizing tips. There are some things that should be left to customer discretion as well as their ability to complain about charges they didn’t make.

Ordering protection — It continues to boggle the mind (mine at least) that Christine Quinn’s WIN (Women in Need), which has been providing housing and services for homeless women and children for over 30 years, will not provide round-theclock, or almost any, security for the WIN supportive housing being built on East 91st between First and Second Avenues. These are at-risk families. Many of the women, their children and their pets have been subjected to domestic violence and, at one time or another, have gotten an order of protection from the court. Without sufficient security, these women and children will live in fear of their abuser having access to them — their abuser will be able to harass them by trying to gain entry to the building premises; by hanging around the building; by approaching the children and the women when

they come and go from the building. There is a school in the building. However, the children who live in the supportive housing may attend other schools. During the day, there is activity in the building — there are support services on premises. And there is an open space on an upper floor which is accessible to anyone who enters the building. WIN believes that by having cameras in elevators and in other areas in the building there is sufficient security. I disagree. That kind of security is insufficient. When WIN made its presentation to a Community Board 8 committee last year, the committee capitulated. One board member was heard to say, “Why should they (WIN residents) have (security) when other buildings on the block don’t?” And another board member expressed fear that “It won’t be built if there are too many demands.”

First things first. Women and children who have been homeless and who have been subjected to domestic violence deserve to have a safe place to live and not have to live in fear that their abuser will gain entry to where they live because there is no human security to confront and turn the abusers away. Cameras are effective after the fact.

Late night moves, make that movies — It was a Sunday, 11 p.m. Just finished dinner. On the way home passed Two Door Tavern on Third and 89th. They are now showing a weekly late movie. A great way to end the night and start the week. This particular Sunday it was Woody Allen’s “Hannah and Her Sisters,” and the next week’s showing was “Beavis and ButtHead Do America.” No cover. Just pay for drinks. Popcorn’s on the house. Nice way to end the week and good way to generate late-night business.

THE QUIET RADICALISM OF KATE SPADE She let the world know that a woman can be serious and ambitious, and still carry a bright pink wallet BY ALIZAH SALARIO

Everyone seemed to own a Kate Spade bag. Everyone, that is, except me. In the late ’90s, the popular girls at my suburban Chicago high school toted the designer’s signature black nylon sack with the tiny Kate Spade tag. The bag managed to be both demure and distinctive; it was just a black bag, but it was also the black bag. The bags were go-to gifts for bat mitzvahs and birthdays. To me, they signaled belonging in a tribe of ambitious and privileged young women conscious of their place in the world. These young women were my peers, and like me, they desired a more cosmopolitan life after graduation. If you had a Kate Spade bag, you belonged, and if you could belong at my competitive high school, then you just might belong somewhere bigger and better, too. Maybe I didn’t want the bag. Maybe I just wanted bigger and better. When the shocking news of Kate

Spade’s suicide broke on Tuesday, I felt a personal sense of loss, as though she had been a friend. Clearly, I’m not alone. Chelsea Clinton tweeted about receiving her first Kate Spade bag from her grandmother. Lena Dunham also paid tribute on Twitter, writing that Spade “had a quirky visual language that captivated Bat Mitzvah girls and artists alike.” Some of my high school friends posted on Facebook, including Straus News contributor Caroline Rothstein, who wrote, “Your work was integral to my own well-being in ways that shaped and changed my world.” These sentiments are no exaggeration. For those of us who came of age with Kate Spade bags in our orbit, she sent a message about who we could be in the world. Her bags carried many young women into adulthood, and for that, there is collective sense of indebtedness. When I went downtown on weekends, my father’s girlfriend taught my sister and me how shop the markdowns at Filene’s Basement and TJ Maxx on State Street. She carried a knockoff Chanel purse with padded sides, a double C clasp and that signature strap, a gold chain

woven with leather. The Chanel aesthetic appeared gauche to me. It was flashy; Kate Spade was understated. At the time, I was keen on rejecting looks of my youth — particularly the puffy headbands with bows and pink outfits of my father’s girlfriend bought for me. Being grown up meant being simple and sophisticated. Kate Spade represented this aesthetic. She was Kate Spade New York, and New York was the epitome of style. New York was where things happened, where I imagined a smarter, bolder version of myself would move someday to become a writer. There was hope: Kate Spade was from the Midwest, and she had become very New York. In retrospect, the thing about that Kate Spade bag was that it functioned as a backdrop. The bag didn’t define you. It allowed you to define who you wanted to become. By the time I moved to New York City in 2009, the Kate Spade heyday was over. The height of the brand’s popularity coincided with that of “Sex and the City,” when the statement bags became a talisman of success. This year marks the show’s 20th anniversary, and certain aspects, like the faux empowerment via consumerism it

peddled, have not aged well. The parts of SATC that still resonate are the same things Kate Spade tapped into. Like Carrie Bradshaw waltzing around in an outlandish tutu and simple tank, she knew how to merge cutting-edge and classic. Kate Spade made fashionable purses accessible, and she gave us permission to desire them. She let the world know that a woman can be serious and ambitious, and still carry a bright pink wallet. Yes, her bags were mainstream, but what she did was pretty radical. Spade taught us that dressing up is not just fun and games. It’s like scaffolding — it supports the self we want to present to the world. But it’s also very delicate. The minute we stop believing in the worlds we create with our image, they crumble. It would be unfair to speculate about the circumstances surrounding her suicide, but the loss of Spade is a reminder that the people who bestow the most brightness and beauty on the world often do so to stave off their own darkness. Her death is testament to the fact New York success stories are always part truth and part illusion, and that an impossibly cheerful brand image many have hid, and hurt,

Kate Spade store in Soho, 2006. Photo: Ralph Daily, via flickr the human being behind it. Some people might wonder what all the fuss is over a purse. The fuss, I believe, is the way certain items mark our lives. A friend wrote to tell me about the parrot green Kate Spade bag gifted to her by an ex that she still holds onto because receiving it felt like she had arrived. Another friend told me about two pieces she purchased from Kate Spade’s Saturday’s store in SoHo that she cherishes — a refined square neck red shirt and a three-in-one striped canvas bag that she loves “like a child loves a stuffed animal.” The bag has carried her from coast to coast and to places in-between, a steady companion in a period of change. In a world where the shadows seem to be creeping in from all corners, there is something radical about wanting more for yourself. And if it takes an elegant bag that makes you feel like you’ve already arrived to get there, then so be it.

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JUNE 14-20,2018

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Meet Joe Cacciola

René Dreifuss, 47, the owner and driving force behing Radical MMA. Photo courtesy of Radical MMA

MMA CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 McGarry said Radical MMA, on West 29th Street between Seventh and Eighth Avenues, has more rules than any other academy he’s been to — he’s lost count of how many places he’s trained. For example, Dreifuss’s gym was the first time McGarry used a footbath. Dreifuss said cleanliness is a huge part of Japanese culture. His other rules, printed on a sheet of paper titled “Dojo Etiquette,” include not being selfish or egotistical. He gives students opportunities to fix any problematic behavior to meet his guidelines. If they don’t reform, Dreifuss bans them. The same goes for any first-time offender who does something unconscionable like act sexist towards the academy’s women or recklessly injuring a training partner. Dreifuss said those are behaviors he’s seen at “meathead gyms,” which he equated to college frats. He’s witnessed fighters who practice with the same effort as they would in a fight and could potentially concuss his training partner. “Most of the fights they get into are stupid bar brawls they could walk away from,” Dreifuss said. “That’s not selfdefense, that’s ego-defense. They’re not afraid of the guy breaking into their home and putting a gun to their head. They’re afraid of being shown up in front of their bros. That’s the allure of a meathead gym. I

hate that.” Every Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., McGarry heads to Radical MMA to train with fellow amateur fighters Marlon Wiprud and Yu Ji. As three of Dreifuss’ most experienced students, they spend hours drilling rigorous fight training while trying not to injure one another. Each man is over 6 feet tall and slightly over 200 pounds. Wiprud said the intense workouts pay dividends whenever he’s fighting someone in the ring. “When you and another person are trying to knock each other out in front of 1,000 people, it’s obviously a stressful situation,” Wiprud said. “When you go through a lot of stress in training, it gives you this mental edge, where you’re like, ‘There’s no way you trained harder than me.’” The sound of thuds reverberate throughout the room as students attempt to take their sparring partners down to the mat. Among them is Juan “Wolf Man” Jimenez, who came to Radical MMA a few years ago to get in shape. Standard gyms where the workout partners are treadmills and weights were boring, Jimenez, 28, said. He entered the academy at nearly 170 pounds — overweight. “I used to be tired all the time,” Jimenez said. “I thought it was normal. I realized it’s not normal; I was just out of shape.” Now, he said he fluctuates between 130-135 pounds. He

achieved that goal, but has set new ones for himself after deciding to remain at Dreifuss’s school. Jimenez said he has no interest in becoming a professional mixed martial artist, but enjoys testing himself in amateur Brazilian jujitsu competitions. Those feature grappling an opponent on the ground while trying to control and submit them through either choking or extending a limb. Dreifuss trains a handful of female students, and he’s not afraid to put them up against males in practice. Aleysa “Mouse” Yelisowa said she’s been benefited a lot in the outside world by the opportunity to train with men. “I’m going to go into the risk management field soon, where it’s going to be mostly maledominated,” Yelisowa, 28, said. “I don’t feel nervous anymore. Once you can fight guys, you’re not really intimidated by them in an office setting.” She’s now even considering becoming a fighter once she sharpens up her striking: the punches, kicks, knees and elbows that mixed martial artists throw. Meanwhile, she continues to practice grappling. Dreifuss closes out each session by reminding his students the importance of discipline. He tells students that they may find themselves passing on the knowledge of martial arts and wants them to teach the same values of respect and discipline he once learned in Japan. Dreifuss then dismisses the class. “Osu,” the students shout in unison.

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JUNE 14-20,2018

ACTIVITIES FOR THE FERTILE MIND

thoughtgallery.org NEW YORK CITY

From Colonial New York to Global Capitalism

FRIDAY, JUNE 15TH, 7PM

Discover the world around the corner. Find community events, gallery openings, book launches and much more: Go to nycnow.com

The Strand | 828 Broadway | 212-473-1452 | strandbooks.com New School professor of sociology Benoit Challand gets together with artist Kamau Ware for a look at the rise of New York, and capitalism in general, that goes beyond the usual exclusionary narratives ($20, includes complimentary beer).

The Future of Responsibility: Feminist Activists The Guerrilla Girls + Artist Chitra Ganesh

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20TH, 7PM Rubin Museum of Art | 150 W. 17th St. | 212-620-5000 | rmanyc.org As institutions from Hollywood to the international art world face a reckoning, hear from the Guerrilla Girls, who have been raising issues of racial and gender inequality since 1985 ($22).

Just Announced | Nelson Mandela at 100

MONDAY, JULY 9TH, 7PM Symphony Space | 2537 Broadway | 212-864-1414 | symphonyspace.org Performances, readings, and reflections make up a night of celebration for the centennial of Nelson Mandela’s birth. Four-time Tony Award nominee Condola Rashad, The Blacklist’s Hisham Tawfiq, and novelist Salman Rushdie will be among the participants ($35).

For more information about lectures, readings and other intellectually stimulating events throughout NYC,

sign up for the weekly Thought Gallery newsletter at thoughtgallery.org.

EDITOR’S PICK

Mon 18 GARDEN PARTY: A TASTE OF PRIDE

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Advertise with Chelsea News today! Call Vincent Gardino at 212-868-0190

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Pier 84, Hudson River Park, 460 West 44th St. 6 p.m. $85-$99 212-620-7310. gaycenter.org Kick off Pride Week with an array of tastings from acclaimed NYC restaurants including Eataly and The Standard Grill, meet culinary visionaries and sip on seasonal cocktails at an open bar all while watching the sun set over the Hudson River. Sponsored by the LGBT Community Center.

Thu 14 Fri 15

Sat 16

► SIMON DOONAN: ‘SOCCER STYLE’

ANNUAL 32BJ ARTS SHOW

The Strand 828 Broadway 7 p.m. $29.99 admission & signed copy of the book/$15 admission and gift card Simon Doonan has two passions in life: fashion and football. Strange bedfellows? Not anymore. The style choices of today’s soccer stars offer a fascinating window into the heart of the game, and Doonan entertainingly explores the magic and madness of this unique culture, paying homage to soccer style icons from George Best to Lionel Messi along the way. 212-473-1452 strandbooks.com

OPENING RECEPTION: ‘THESE BAGS WE CARRY ARE FILLED WITH PROMISE’ New York Live Arts 219 West 19th St. 4:30 p.m. Free Artists Nick Cave and Bob Faust have created a kaleidoscopic mural from one of Cave’s iconic soundsuits constructed entirely of woven bags collected from around the world. “These Bags We Carry Are Filled With Promise” is a through-the-looking-glass interpretation of the baggage we all walk through life with. It’s anything but weighty. Through September. 212-691-6500 newyorklivearts.org

SEIU 32BJ 25 West 18th St. 1 p.m. Free Enjoy artwork by doormen, superintendents, cleaners, security officers and other union members and their families. This year’s theme is “Artists without Frontiers.” 212-539-2793 32bjarts.org


JUNE 14-20,2018

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CREATE A VIEW JUST AS BEAUTIFUL ON THE INSIDE THIS SPRING Save $100 on Hunter Douglas Shades until June 25, 2018 at

Sun 17 Mon 18 Tue 19 â&#x2013;˛ THE MAGIC OF OMAR OLUSION Pier 62, Hudson River Park at West 23rd St. 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Free Chelsea is in for some magic and mystery this summer. Queens-based magician Omar Olusion, known for his sense of humor and creativity in bringing magic tricks to the masses, often asks audience members to volunteer. Be warned. 212-627-2020 hudsonriverpark.org

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;THE RECOVERINGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;: LESLIE JAMISON WITH CUTTER WOOD

FIRST DRAFT: OUTDOOR READING SERIES

NYPL Mid-Manhattan Library 476 Fifth Ave. 6:30 p.m. Free, registration recommended Blending memoir, criticism and reporting, Leslie Jamison upends the traditional addiction narrative in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Recovering.â&#x20AC;? In â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love and Death in the Sunshine State,â&#x20AC;? the disappearance of a motel owner sends Cutter Wood careening into a murder investigation. Join Jamison and Wood as they discuss the intersection of literature and lived experience. 212-340-0863 nypl.org

Herald Square at Broadway Sixth Ave. and 34th St. 5:30 p.m. Free First drafts are full of raw energy, and so is this uncensored, weekly open mic that encourages artistic expression, experimentation and development across all genres. Sponsored by the youth poetry nonproďŹ t Urban Word, readers are encouraged to share their work in a safe and nurturing environment. Listen, read and drop the mic. 212-352-3495 34street.org

Wed 20 GUERRILLA GIRLS AND ARTIST CHITRA GANESH The Rubin Museum 150 West 17th St. 7 p.m. $22 From the removal of confederate statues to allegations of sexual harassment, institutions are being called to reevaluate their use and abuse of power. Join Rubin Museum Fellow Chitra Ganesh and feminist activists the Guerrilla Girls for a discussion about how individuals, working with or within institutions, can take responsibility in our new cultural era. 212-620-5000 rubinmuseum.org

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The Walt Disney Company gifted this Tsesah crest to the Smithsonian Institution. It’s on view at The Met Fifth Avenue through Sept. 3. Photo: Adel Gorgy

Cameroonian Crest (tsesah) from the late 19th-early 20th century, on loan from The Menil Collection. Photo: Adel Gorgy

MANIFESTATIONS OF POWER Royal masks from Cameroon, stunning and evocative, at The Met BY MARY GREGORY

It’s all quite subjective, but some things just emanate a presence. Then again, maybe it’s not. The artists who carved the towering royal Tsesah crests from Cameroon now on display at The Met Fifth Avenue sought to depict power and authority. They did it through size, style and psychology, and the sculptors who created them were carefully selected for their mastery. Turning a corner into the exhibition gives a sense of how successful they were. They’re jaw-droppers, the kind of pieces that force you to stop and look. Just as Renaissance bishops, cardinals and popes established and enhanced their rank through patronage of and commissions for artists like Leonardo and Michelangelo, the rulers of the Bamileke peoples of Cam-

eroon expressed their importance through art. Royal Tsesah crests were reserved for the king of kings, the sovereign fon, the seat of consolidated of power for some 100 chiefdoms that spread across the Grassfields region of Cameroon. Tsesah crests were their crowning glory. The faces are massive, standing roughly 3 feet tall. They’re stunning, using abstracted, exaggerated forms. They’re evocative, suggesting distance in time and way of life. They’re imposing and impressive, despite being rough from age and repeated use, or perhaps because of that. Although very few Tsesah crests survive (only 15 are known) they have been recognized by artists, curators and critics for decades for their strikingly original, creative figuration. One was displayed in an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in 1935, selected for its aesthetic quality, rather than its royal heritage. A photograph showing the installation of the crest in MoMA’s galleries is included in the

show. Imagine the impact it would have had on young modernists. Recently, The Met acquired what may be the very first Tsesah crest, carved more than 200 years ago. “The Face of Dynasty: Royal Crests from Western Cameroon” is the inaugural appearance of that piece. It’s joined by three others, the largest grouping so far in an American museum. Also included is an expansive, powerhouse of a geometrically patterned textile known as ndop, which provided the backdrop for moveable, outdoor courts and ceremonies. While each is unique, the form of the mask is prescribed. The face of the Tsesah features an exaggerated concave brow, stretching seemingly to the sky. It tops pointed oval eyes, cheeks that come out horizontally toward us, flaring nostrils open to the viewer (offering, perhaps, a suggestion of royal breath) and impossibly broad lips, often hinting at a smiling visage. The major portion, the brow, is arched, and in three of the works on

This crest, or Tsesah, on loan from McClain Gallery, features intricate diamond patterned carving on the brow. Photo: Adel Gorgy view, incised with decorative patterns — chevrons, checkerboards and lines — that may represent stylized images of indigenous animals like crocodiles, also emblematic of power. The crests would be held by attendants above the head of the ruler during dances to celebrate his sovereignty, or during royal ceremonies like funerals, enthronements and the delivery of judicial sentences. They were visible proclamations of the power invested in the head they crowned. Tsesah crests were first collected by Westerners in the early 20th century, the curators, Yaëlle Biro and Alisa LaGamma, point out. By that time, they were no longer being worn. “According to oral history, the last time Tsesah was danced in Bandjoun was on the occasion of the funeral of fon Fotso II in 1925,” the wall text states. One of the descendants of the master carvers provided some understanding of the masks, their usage and cultural importance. In the 1970s, Paul Tahbou, a carver from Bandjoun where

the crests originated, supplied the names of some of the previous artists, including his father. The art form was transmitted from generation to generation, as were the works of art, themselves. According to Tahbou, they traced back centuries. Tsesah crests were the Bamileke ruler’s primary insignia of power. As authority passed from one ruler to another, so did the mask. When it became too worn, it was retired and a new one was commissioned. Only one could exist at a time. It was the visual embodiment of the monarchical idea, “The king is dead, long live the king.”

IF YOU GO WHAT: “Face of Dynasty: Royal Crests from Western Cameroon” WHERE: The Met Fifth Avenue, Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas WHEN: Through Sept. 3


JUNE 14-20,2018

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JUNE 14-20,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS

Neighborhood Scrapbook

MAY 30 - JUN 5, 2018 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml. Potbelly Sandwich Works

333 7th Ave

A

Dr Smood

1151 Broadway

Grade Pending (27) Appropriately scaled metal stem-type thermometer or thermocouple not provided or used to evaluate temperatures of potentially hazardous foods during cooking, cooling, reheating and holding. Filth flies or food/ refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/ or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies.

Walter’s Bar

389 8 Avenue

A

Cafe Nunez

240 West 35 Street

A

Waldy’s Wood Fired Pizza & Penne

800 6 Avenue

A

The Ainsworth

122 West 26 Street

Grade Pending (5) Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

McDonald’s

490 8th Ave

A

Salt And Pepper Restaurant & Cafe

139 West 33 Street

Grade Pending (49) Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewageassociated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

The Kunjip

32 W 32nd St

A

Hoops Cabaret and Sports Bar

48 W 33rd St

A

Purple Rice Korean Kitchen 263 W 30th St

A

Ichiran

132 W 31st St

A

Sam Won Garden

37 W 32nd St

Not Yet Graded (27) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored.

Ovest Pizzoteca

513 West 27 Street

A

Google 5BB

76 9 Avenue

A

Tastalu Panini

75 9th Ave

A

Doughnuttery

425 W 15th St

A

Champion Pizza

2 W 14th St

Not Yet Graded (28) Food worker does not use proper utensil to eliminate bare hand contact with food that will not receive adequate additional heat treatment. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/ sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Wiping cloths soiled or not stored in sanitizing solution.

Cafe Loup

105 West 13 Street

A

Brownstein Caterers

557 West 23 Street

A

Tequila Chito’s Mexican Grill

358 West 23 Street

A

Google Water Tower Cafe

111 8 Avenue

A

Pastai

186 9th Ave

A

Dr. Holly S. Andersen holds a proclamation from Mayor Bill de Blasio honoring “Hands Only CPR Day.” Photo courtesy of the Ronald O. Perelman Heart Institute

HANDS-ON CARE First responders know that administering CPR effectively is one of the most important skills to help save the lives of those suffering from cardiac arrest. Last week, the Ronald O. Perelman Heart Institute of the NewYorkPresbyterian Hospital and the American Heart Association teamed up with the New York City Health Department to launch their second annual #HandsOnlyCPR camapaign as part of National CPR Awareness week. The new initiative, which will spread the word throughout NYC’s five boroughs, includes a PSA called “It’s Sexy to Save a Life,” with the Tony award-winning cast of “Chicago.” The Hands Only program focues on a three-step method introduced in 2008 to replace mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. “We want people to knonw it’s simple, they cannot hurt someone who will die without their help and there are Good Samaritan Laws in every state to protect someone who tries to save a life,” said cardiologist Dr. Holly S. Andersen, director of education and outreach at the Perelman Heart Institute and a clinical associate professor of medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine. The Hands Only technique, she said, “makes it easy to jump in and help someone in an emergency.”

Cast members of “Chicago” with Jason Patrick Sand, who produced the #HandsOnlyCPR video. Photo courtesy of the Ronald O. Perelman Heart Institute

The three steps of Hands Only are: CHECK for responsiveness and breathing CALL 9-1-1 or have someone call for you chest compessions. Kneel over victim. With straight arms COMPRESS Start and interlocked hands, push hard and fast in center of the chest, two compressions per second at least two inches deep.


JUNE 14-20,2018

LIBRARIES CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

The funding will also be used to purchase new books for NYPLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s collections, particularly picture books to promote early literacy and test preparation books that are consistently in high demand from students. The rest will be dedicated to maintenance needs that are ineligible for capital funding â&#x20AC;&#x201D; critical repairs to ďŹ&#x201A;oors, heating and cooling systems and cracking paint in NYPL libraries, which are 84 years old on average. The public library systems have seen their city funding grow considerably under the de Blasio administration, rising from $301 million in the budget adopted the year before de Blasio took office in 2014 to over $372 million in the ďŹ scal year ending June 30. But as of the budget passed last year, the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s libraries had yet to fully recover from cuts imposed in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. In spite of the spending increases under de Blasio, the systemsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; expense budget still fell short of pre-crisis levels when adjusted for inďŹ&#x201A;ation. Jimmy Van Bramer, the Queens Council member who chairs the Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s libraries and cultural affairs committee, pushed for the mayor and

Council to fund the librariesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; request, calling the $16 million expense budget increase â&#x20AC;&#x153;a relative drop in the bucket of a $90 billion budget.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have the means to do this, we just need the political will to make it happen.â&#x20AC;? Van Bramer said at a recent budget hearing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The people of the City of New York beneďŹ t so much by a relatively small investment.â&#x20AC;? In addition to the $16 million in expense funding, the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s library systems also received an additional $60 million for capital projects, split evenly among the three systems. NYPLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s total capital needs exceed $1 billion, Marx said, but the additional $20 million will be used to address the systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most pressing requirements, including accessibility upgrades and technology improvements to better protect patronsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; privacy and security. Key negotiations in the $89.2 billion budget deal centered on the inclusion of a â&#x20AC;&#x153;fair faresâ&#x20AC;? proposal championed by Council Speaker Corey Johnson, which will fund a $106 million transit subsidy for nearly 800,000 low-income New York City residents.

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the City Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s support, requested $16 million more than the $372 million in expense funding allocated in the mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s previous budget proposal. Of the $16 million, library official said, roughly $7 million will be allocated to the New York Public Library, which operates 88 neighborhood branch libraries in Manhattan, the Bronx and Staten Island. The remainder would go to the Brooklyn and Queens public library systems. According to Marx, NYPL plans to devote the majority of its share of the new funding â&#x20AC;&#x201D; $4.6 million of $7 million â&#x20AC;&#x201D; toward funding wages, beneďŹ ts and other costs associated with library staff, which have grown in recent years as New York enacted paid family leave and increased the minimum wage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Library fully supports and aligns with these values,â&#x20AC;? Marx said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nevertheless, these increased costs have significantly stretched our budget, requiring an additional investment to continue our current levels of service.â&#x20AC;?

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JUNE 14-20,2018

Business

Real Estate

ASK A BROKER BY ANDREW KRAMER

My husband and I recently saw a beautiful and large apartment in the Sutton Place neighborhood that we fell in love with and we want to make an offer on it. The apartment has everything going for it, including a reasonable asking price, however the maintenance is on the high side. We were told that’s because it’s a land-lease building. What is a land-lease building and is it something we should pursue?

I know the building and yes the rooms are huge as are the views and the amenities but, oh ... that maintenance. Unlike most co-ops that own the ground that they sit on, a land-lease building leases the land for a designated number of years (and gets re-negotiated at each renewal), which translates to higher maintenance for all its shareholders. The upside is the price of the apartments in land-lease buildings tend to be significantly lower than in regular co-op buildings. I would advise you to sit down with your accountant, like everyone else who has purchased in the building before you, and do the math. Is the higher maintenance offset by the lower asking price? How much more would you have to pay for a similar apartment with lower maintenance? There are some uncertainties involved, however it’s certainly great space and location for those willing to take the plunge. Andrew Kramer is a licensed associate real estate broker with Brown Harris Stevens Residential Sales

Photo: Aaron Hawkins, via flickr

COLLEGE: IT’S AN INVESTMENT PLANNING A financial adviser on how parents and students can prepare for the increasingly high cost of tuition BY MARK SERUYA

Photo: Patrick Nouhailler, via flickr

The time has finally come when your first born is graduating high school and is heading to college. You have looked forward to this day, yet you discovered that the money you saved isn’t enough. The price of a college education has risen steeply each year and, without proper advance planning, the cost likely will exceed your cookie jar contents. There is no denying the high cost of tuition. From 1980 to 2014, college tuition increased an average of almost 260 percent compared to the nearly 120 percent increase in consumer items. In 1980, the average annual cost of tuition, room and board and fees at a four-year college was $9,438. That had climbed to $23,872 by 2014 — and it is still increasing. While the decision to invest in

a college education is ultimately a personal one, research shows that a college education is indeed worth the cost. A recent study shows that jobs paying the median household income of $53,000 or more annually made up nearly half of new jobs added during the economic recovery, and 97 percent of these jobs went to college graduates. In addition, the wage difference between college graduates and non-graduates nearly doubled — from 33 percent to 62 percent — from 1980 to 2013. Some analysts maintain that the gap between increased education costs and increased inflation is sufficiently narrow to keep the gap between college and the working world manageable. They point out that although the average cost of a four-year college education at a public institution has increased by 9 percent between 2012 and 2017, general inflation increased during the same period by 6 percent, leaving the increased cost once inflation is factored in at 3 percent. Has the average student’s ability to pay for those increases kept pace with inflation and the

rising costs of a degree? Seventy percent of all students grapple with debt. Can they earn enough to pay off the debt in a reasonable time? That is the overriding question each potential college student must answer before enrolling. As parents, we can help minimize the debt our children incur by planning wisely to cover as much of the cost as possible without loans or financial aid. That planning starts early ... perhaps even at our child’s birth. Starting that far in advance may help offset future costs — with a longer timeline, parents may utilize investment vehicles that could allow for greater returns, but which may be too risky for shorter timelines. As one option, consider 529 college savings plans, which allow for the money to grow with significant tax-advantages. These accounts may grow larger than an identical taxable account where earnings are taxed every year. Additionally, when the funds withdrawn are used for qualified education expenses, including tuition, fees, room and

board expenses, supplies and equipment, they are free from state and federal income tax. How much to save? A general rule is to save what would be the full cost of four years of college in the year the student was born, which translates into approximately one-third of the cost eighteen years later once your child enters freshman year. The second third of the cost might come from your current earnings during your child’s college years. The final third can be borrowed through a combination of parent and child loans. Regardless of where you fall in the discussion about costs versus financial benefit of a college degree, there is one thing that you can count on: a proactive approach to saving and planning financially can go a long way when it comes time to start tuition payments. Mark Seruya is a Managing Director at Morgan Stanley Private Wealth Management based in New York City. He can be reached at 212-903-7699 or mark.seruya@morganstanleypwm. com.


JUNE 14-20,2018

17

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

  



  

 

 



  

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18

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

Without my Child Protective Specialist, I wouldn’t have gotten my sisters back. They were with me every step of the way. Shaquana, Manhattan

ACS CHILD PROTECTIVE SPECIALISTS — Protecting kids, supporting families.

LEARN MORE

at

NYC.GOV/CPS

JUNE 14-20,2018


JUNE 14-20,2018

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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

YOUR 15 MINUTES

To read about other people who have had their “15 Minutes” go to chelseanewsNY.com/15 minutes

PRESCRIBING LITERACY Pediatrician Leora Mogilner oversees a local chapter of Reach Out and Read BY ANGELA BARBUTI

As a pediatrician in the Division of General Pediatrics at Mount Sinai, Dr. Leora Mogilner brought Reach Out and Read, a national literacy nonprofit, there in 1998. When children come in for a pediatric visit, starting as newborns, they are given a brand new developmentally and culturally appropriate book to take home. The Upper East Side resident also serves as the medical director of Reach Out and Read of Greater New York, which recently marked 20 years of serving the city’s most underserved communities with the tools of literacy. On June 5, at the Loeb Boathouse in Central Park, she was honored for her work with the program, which includes helping the organization grow from serving only 18 sites in 2000 to now 275,000 kids yearly at 223 sites.

How did you first learn about Reach Out and Read? I had heard about it from a colleague who heard about it at an American Academy of Pediatrics meeting. And I thought it was a fantastic idea. Basically the idea is that you teach parents about the importance of reading to their children from the time they’re babies. And we give out brand new books. Their parents are taught about how important it is to reach to their children. And we also have volunteers in the waiting room who read to kids and model reading aloud for parents.

How have you grown the program? We now give out books at every well visit, starting with the newborn visit. So we used to start at six months, and now we start with the first visit. And we actually now give out books in the hospital, before a baby is discharged. So that’s a new innovation in the last year in the well nursery before mom goes home at Mount Sinai, she gets a brand new book to share with her baby and advice about things she can do with her baby and the book. It’s not just reading the book to them, but it’s using it as a proxy, a way for a child to hear their parents’ language. But it also gives parents and children something to bond over.

What does your job as medical director of Reach Out and Read of Greater New York entail? I train staff at other clinics; I’ve made training videos. I go to different sites to train other practitioners and help consult with different organizations to ensure that our programs are giving the highest quality of care that they can give.

Is it geared towards a certain demographic?

What is vision for the future of the program?

Everyone who comes to our clinic participates in the program. I will say that in the New York City area, there are hundreds of programs and the majority of them are located in clinics that are serving underserved populations. While reading and sharing books from birth is important for everyone of every demographic, we’re especially focused on children who are growing up in poverty, who may not have access to this information and the resources, like books.

We would ultimately like to ensure that we have funding so that every child who goes to the doctor for a well visit is able to leave with a brand new book they’re excited about. And parents get information they need to make reading and sharing books a part of their children’s lives. I would love to see this at every clinic and every practice in New York City.

Where do you get the books from? Who do you partner with? We run books drives every year. We have generous donors who donate

Dr. Leora Mogilner, the medical director of Reach Out and Read of Greater New York, with Chelsea Clinton at a recent benefit for the nonprofit. Photo: Michael Wilson

money. The Reach Out and Read coalition of Greater New York provides some funding to each of their programs, so we get some of our book budget from them. Some of it we fundraise on our own. There’s also the National Reach Out and Read program, so we’re also eligible to get books through the national program. So we piece it together. We also partner with our local Barnes & Noble. They’ve done an amazing job running book drives and fairs for us, which have been wonderful.

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JUNE 14-20,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

Clinton COLOR GREENWICH VILLAGE by Jake Rose

Color Washington Square Park Washington Square Park became a park in 1827. Scan or take a picture of your work and send it to molly.colgan@strausnews.com. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll publish some of them. To purchase a coloring book of Greenwich Village venues, go to colorourtown.com/gv

WORD SEARCH by Myles Mellor The puzzle contains the following words. They may be diagonal, across, or up and down in the grid in any direction.

U B K K Z T Y Y R F P A S S W

Q Q U I F S C A O X N K B E M

V A R G V H J L C K K B T K X

A Z P O D E S D K K E L M N U

C N V T U L P H S E A Q N V R

D F P T X T M O U N T A I N N

S V Y R V E E T D X X Y H Y H

D A R E Y A Q D S V S G W C F

P A A S I X W T X A Z C M L P

H N M L T N O Y M L Y R O I T

W I S B I R D E R L L J R M W

Q G S F M P A T H E Q W R B Q

I J K T R E K R T Y G W I K F

J H Z K S O X X T H I K I N G

Trek Valley Wetlands

Shelter Storm Trails Trees

Pass Path Rocks Route

Birder Climb Hiking Mountain

C T V E X R R S C Q C Y S J F

WORD SEARCH by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan

6

1

4

3

1 1

4

6

3 4

3 3 5 9

5

5

ANSWERS

8

2

2

9 7

9 8 1

5

2

9 2

5

Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9X9 grid that has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3X3 squares. To solve the puzzle each row, column and box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9. Puzzles come in three grades: easy, medium and difficult.

Level: Medium

4

U B K K Z T Y Y R F P A S S W

Q Q U I F S C A O X N K B E M

V A R G V H J L C K K B T K X

A Z P O D E S D K K E L M N U

C N V T U L P H S E A Q N V R

D F P T X T M O U N T A I N N

S V Y R V E E T D X X Y H Y H

C T V E X R R S C Q C Y S J F

D A R E Y A Q D S V S G W C F

P A A S I X W T X A Z C M L P

H N M L T N O Y M L Y R O I T

W I S B I R D E R L L J R M W

Q G S F M P A T H E Q W R B Q

I J K T R E K R T Y G W I K F

J H Z K S O X X T H I K I N G

5 9

8 1

4

7

2 1

5 3

6

4

3 7

2 9

8

6

6 2 3 7 9 8 4 1 5

9 6 2 4 7 5 8 3 1

7 3 8 1 6 2 5 4 9

4 5 1 9 8 3 6 2 7

3 8 9 6 4 1 7 5 2

2 7 6 3 5 9 1 8 4

1 4 5 8 2 7 9 6 3


JUNE 14-20,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

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JUNE 14-20,2018

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Chelsea News - June 14, 2018  
Chelsea News - June 14, 2018  
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