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The local paper for Chelsea THE WORD IS ‘CAMP’ ◄ P.12

WEEK OF JUNE

13-19 2019

INSIDE

THE PLACE WHERE PRIDE BEGAN

NAILING THE CAT BILL

PRIDE 2019

New York poised to become first state to ban feline declawing, P. 2

The Stonewall National Monument in Greenwich Village attracts New Yorkers and tourists alike

ACADEMIC MANIA AT LAGUARDIA HS

BY JADEN SATENSTEIN

LGBT Pride Month is in full swing in New York City, with the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising adding extra interest and excitement to the month’s celebrations. In addition to the annual LGBT Pride March on Sunday June 30, events will include a rally to commemorate the Stonewall Uprising, when members of the LGBTQ+ community rioted in the wake of a police raid on the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in Greenwich Village, on June 28, 1969. The initial incident and the days of demonstrations that followed sparked the modern LGBTQ+ rights movement in the United States. An eight-acre area surrounding the Stonewall Inn was designated a national monument by President Obama in 2016. It includes Christopher Park, directly across the street from the inn. The park features the Gay Liberation Monument, a sculpture of two men standing and two women sitting on a bench together, created in 1980 by American artist George Segal and dedicated in 1992. It draws visitors from near and far, as it did on a sunny afternoon last week.

An alum on her own experience with pressures at the performing arts school, P. 8

Library staff worry about the potential impact of budget cuts. Photo: Diana Ducroz

FUNDING CUTS LOOM FOR NYC LIBRARIES BY DIANA DUCROZ

On a muggy June afternoon, the Columbus Library on Tenth Avenue at West 51st Street is a calm, cool refuge from the noisy streets outside. Vanessa Watson, an office associate, has worked at this branch for longer than she wants to say. She

Thirty years after his death, Alvin Ailey’s genius is still making the world a better place , P. 15

The library itself has changed, too. Once mainly a place to borrow books, it now provides extensive programming and services for children, seniors, immigrants, job seekers, students, the homeless, and people with special needs. In a typical week, the Columbus Library hosts several dozen events and classes. In the basement TechConnect computer lab, anyone may take classes in computer skills, basic to advanced, for free. “We are here to serve everyone. No one is left out,” Watson said. “No library is big enough for all the programs we would like to do.”

BUDGET A grassroots campaign to fight the spending reductions reveals New Yorkers love for their “de facto community centers”

AILEY AT 60: ALIVE, ENGAGING AND INSPIRING

We are here to serve everyone. No one is left out. Vanessa Watson of the Columbus Library has watched the community transform as more families with children move in to the neighborhood. Residents of this once predominately Irish-American neighborhood now request books in languages such as Chinese and Russian.

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A BOOST FOR NEW MOTHERS An UES organization helps Medicaid-eligible women have healthy pregnancies, P. 12

Clinton

Chelsea News NY

CHELSEA NEWSNY.COM @Chelsea_news_NY

Crime Watch Voices NYC Now City Arts

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Restaurant Ratings 14 Business 16 Real Estate 17 15 Minutes 19

WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW < CITYARTS, P.14

WHO HAS ACCESS TO A PARKING SPACE IN CHELSEA? NEWS

9-16

MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.18

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

WHAT NEXT FOR CHELSEA GALLERIES?

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up rezoning told us she’d like to would and the mid-2000s May 1 The and running this year, for of West Chelsea. Muas an ombudsman city serve Whitney the of opening Art on small businesses within them clear seum of American means not government, helping It’s new buildings, to get Gansevoort Street c to the traffi through the bureaucracy rising rents, that are even more foot things done. forcing some gallerists area. is that Perhaps even more also The irony, of course, to reconsider their Whitney -importantly, the ombudsman the arrival of the and number neighborhood roots art meccas will tally the type small business one of the city’s the end for of complaints by taken in BY GABRIELLE ALFIERO -- could also spell dealers the actions art owners, long-time policy buildStephen some response, and somefor ways to When gallerists Griffin in the area, as their are sold or recommendations If done well, Haller and Cynthiatheir W. ings increasingly begin to fix things. report would Haller reopened follow- demolished. lease the ombudsman’s 26th Street gallery With their 10-year quantitative afrst fi the rebuild Stephen us give cut short, with ing a five-month flooded abruptly shared taste of what’s wrong ter Hurricane Sandy they and Cynthia, who the city, an the space, small businesses in towards building with their first floor phone their and Tony important first step were still without were Lehmann Maupin they the problem. needed to xing fi of galleries, and Internet. Still, where Shafrazi property by June To really make a difference, the happy in the location, will have to to stay for vacate (Shafrazi is suing course, the advocaterising rents, they expected of 2014. find a way to tackle business’ the Manhattes some time. doltold less the landlord, which remain many While Chin Instead, they were their Group, for $20 million reproblem. vexing that Post most the New York than a year later gauge what to demol- lars, said it’s too early tocould have landlord planned ported). another role the advocate on the ish the building. They shopped for planned for there, more information in the neighbor“We had shows bad thing. We had location to find problem can’t be a with the long periods of time.amount hood but struggled a twoThis step, combinedBorough more than just put in a huge the anything efforts by Manhattan to mediate of money to refurbish“We year lease on a street-level in Chelsaid. President Gale Brewer offer space,” Cynthia space. After 13 years Gallery the rent renewal process, were really shocked.”Gallery sea, Stephen Haller signs tangible and early, Haller some For Stephen small left the neighborhoodStux it, it isn’t riswith of progress. For many can’t come and others like joined forces oor are driving business owners, that in a new sixth-fl ing rents that far new devel- Gallery soon enough. on 57th Street, not Chelsea, Zach Feuer them away. It’s

NEWS

luxury building Robotic garage for board draws fire from community BY ZACH WILLIAMS

at a a robotic garage A proposal for in Chelsea has thrown luxury building into the city’s zoning access to parking debate. proposed for a A high-tech garage W. 28th St. has 520 development at Board 4, which is riled Community arguing that it plan, in opposing the more car usage would only invite while only providthe neighborhood, residents. ing parking to rich a special city perThe garage needs 29 spaces rather mit to accommodate allowed the than the 11 automatically opted to oppose by the city. CB4 1 full board meetpermit at its April Carl a draft letter to ing, stating in Planning City the of Weisbrod, chair city criteria for such Commission, that based on the parking foran exception is ago, when many for stock of a decade spaces were used demer industrial future of parking in anticipation velopment in Chelsea. 40 residential have The project will comsquare feet of alunits and 11,213 the ground floor, mercial space on three parking spaces The lowing eight and the developer, respectively. But wants more for Related Companies, is the New York acthe building, which internationally City debut for Zaha Hadid. (Adjaclaimed architect Line, the build cent to the High

CONTINUED ON PAGE

25

his gallery in After 15 years running to partner with Joel two gallery spaces, (left) leaves the neighborhood team will operate Mesler (right). TheMesler/Feuer, on the Lower East Feuer/Mesler and May 10. Slide, slated to open

Newscheck

2 3

is surging opment, which in part to in Chelsea, thanks High Line the opening of the

City Arts Top 5

12 13

space

CONTINUED ON PAGE

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NAILING THE CAT BILL PETS New York poised to become first state to ban feline declawing BY DAVID KLEPPER

New York would be the ďŹ rst state in the U.S. to ban the declawing of cats under legislation approved by lawmakers at the request of cat owners, animal welfare advocates and many veterinarians who call the procedure cruel and needless. The bill, which would subject veterinarians to $1,000 fines for performing the operation, now heads to the desk of Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a Democrat, whose representatives said he will review the bill before deciding if he will sign it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cats of New York: Show me your

claws,â&#x20AC;? said Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal of the Upper West Side, who pushed the bill for years despite the opposition the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest veterinary society. She called cat declawing â&#x20AC;&#x153;barbaric and inhumane.â&#x20AC;? Declawing a cat is already illegal in much of Europe and in several Canadian provinces, as well as in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Denver, but no other U.S. state has voted to ban the procedure, which involves amputating a catâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s toes back to the ďŹ rst knuckle. Unlike human nails, a catâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s claws are attached to bone, so declawing a feline requires a veterinarian to slice through tendon and nerves to remove the last segment of bone in a catâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s toes. Supporters of the ban cite estimates that a quarter or more of all domestic cats in the U.S. have had the procedure. The New York State Veterinary Medical Society had opposed the bill, arguing that declawing should be allowed as a last resort for felines that wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop scratching furniture or humans â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or when the catâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s owner has a weakened immune system, putting them at greater risk of infection from a scratch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Medical decisions should be left to the sound discretion of fully trained, licensed and state supervised professionals,â&#x20AC;? the society said in a memo opposing the legislation.

Assemblymember Linda B. Rosenthal pushed the bill for years despite opposition from the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest veterinary society. Photo courtesy of Linda B. Rosenthal

Under the bill, which easily passed the Democrat-led Senate and Assembly, veterinarians could still perform the procedure for medical reasons, such as infection or injury. Veterinarian Michelle Brownstein stopped performing declawing operations 15 years ago at her Rochester-area animal hospital when she said she became convinced the procedure leaves cats with lifelong problems. Some declawed cats exhibit behavioral issues, she said, while others struggle with chronic pain at the amputation site. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The end result is a barbaric pro-

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cats of New York: Show me your claws.â&#x20AC;? Photo via Assemblymember Linda B. Rosenthalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Twitter

cedure that results in the mutilation of the animal,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Frankly, if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re worried about your furniture, then you shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be getting a cat.â&#x20AC;? Now, when a cat owner asks about the procedure, Brownstein said she discusses alternatives, such as routine nail care, scratching posts or even tiny plastic caps that can be placed over a catâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nails. There was little vocal opposition in the Senate, which passed the bill 50-12, or in the Assembly, where the preliminary vote was 92-27. But some lawmakers spoke out against the measure, saying declawing

should be kept legal for rare cases in which cat scratches could pose a hazard to owners with weakened immune systems or other medical issues. Opponents also said they worried that more cats might be given up for adoption or euthanized because their owners would no longer be able to get them declawed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think government should be involved. I think we should leave it to the vets and the owners,â&#x20AC;? said Sen. Robert Antonacci, a Republican from Syracuse.

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CRIME WATCH BY MARIA ROCHA-BUSCHEL TWO INJURED IN COLLISION AFTER POLICE CHASE An 18-year-old male driver caused a collision that injured his 19-year-old female passenger and another driver after a high-speed chase on Twelfth Ave. near West 36th St. on Saturday, June 8 at 1:03 a.m., police said. The suspect was seen driving north on Twelfth Ave. in a reckless manner, fishtailing and making donuts at West 36th St. When police attempted to conduct a car stop, the suspect reportedly evaded officers by driving at a high rate of speed north on Twelfth Ave, before making a U-turn at West 38th St. and driving south on Twelfth. The suspect then made another U-turn at West 36th St, driving north again on Twelfth at a high rate of speed, and tried to evade police by weaving in and out of traffic while disobeying multiple steady red lights and traveling at 60-65 miles per hour in a 35 miles per hour speed zone. The suspect then became involved in a collision that injured his passenger, as well as a driver in another vehicle. Police said that the suspect then left his vehicle and fled the scene, running south on Twelfth Ave. The suspect was ultimately charged with reckless endangerment, reckless driving and leaving the scene of an accident.

STATS FOR THE WEEK Reported crimes from the 10th precinct for the week ending June 2 Week to Date

TRAFFIC AGENT THREATENED ON EIGHTH AVE. Police said that a 30-year-old traffic enforcement agent was threatened in front of 252 Eighth Ave. on Friday, June 7 at 5:36 p.m. The victim said that he was writing a traffic summons when a passenger in the vehicle got out of the car, approached the agent, saying, “I’m going to f*** you up,” and shoved him in the stomach. The motorist then fled north on Eighth Ave. in the vehicle while the passenger fled south on Eighth Avenue on foot. No arrests were made.

SMOKE SHOP EMPLOYEE ASSAULTED Police arrested a 33-year-old man for assaulting a smoke shop employee inside the business at 351 Ninth Ave. on Saturday night, June 8. The victim told police that the suspect walked into the store and started to argue with the employees, refusing to leave. The suspect then reportedly hit the victim with a nylon bag containing a spray can, causing a cut to the victim’s left eye. The victim told police that he had pain and swelling to his eye as a result.

Year to Date

2019 2018

% Change

2019

2018

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

0

0

n/a

Rape

0

0

n/a

5

6

-16.7

Robbery

4

2

100.0

39

35

11.4

Felony Assault

1

2

-50.0

36

44

-18.2

Burglary

1

0

n/a

33

40

-17.5

Grand Larceny

19

15

26.7

294 307 -4.2

Grand Larceny Auto

1

1

0.0

3

MAN ARRESTED FOR ASSAULT A 29-year-old man was arrested for assault in front of 369 West 16th St. on Friday, June 7 at 3:50 a.m. The victim told police that he had been eating halal when his friend and another man started arguing. When he tried to break up the argument, he said, the supect punched him in the face.

6

-50.0

CONSTRUCTION WORKER ALLEGES HARASSMENT WITH NOOSE A man working on the roof of 401 Ninth Ave. told police on Friday, June 7 that a co-worker had been harassing him since Tuesday, June 4. The worker told police that the man hung a noose in his work area and also confessed at a safety meeting to tying a rope in a noose shape. No arrests have been made.


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STONEWALL CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Respect and Progress For New Jersey resident Francesca Scirocco, visiting the monument is a must-do every time she’s in New York. “Especially being a member of the community, it’s so important for us to kind of be around and just make sure we pay our respects to those who started such a big movement,” Scirocco said. While some visit the monument often, others only recently learned of the Stonewall Uprising. “I read about the riots this morning and I had never heard about them, never knew anything about them,” said Baltimorenative Jamil Batcha. Batcha noted the importance of the monument as a way to recognize and acknowledge the historic oppression of LGBTQ+ people in the United States, and the progress that still needs to be made toward equality. “Growing up in the 1990s and stuff, homosexuality was still taboo and I think everyone, myself included, probably used the word ‘gay’ too often in a negative connotation,” Batcha said. “And so I know I’ve changed, and people have taught me and hopefully others have as well.”

An Apology at Last In addition to the excitement of Pride Month and the 50th anniversary, many visitors were drawn to the site last week to celebrate another monumental event — New York Police Commissioner James O’Neill’s official apology for the department’s actions during the raid and the anti-gay laws of the time. New York resident Michael Connor decided to visit the site after hearing O’Neill’s apology, stating that it was a “monumental day” for the advancement of LGBTQ+ rights. “Every step is a step in the right direction,” said Connor. “It’s really about creating a sense of love. And so

To see something of that much importance in my heritage as an LGBTQ person is amazing. Rhysand Brown, a visitor from Ringgold, Georgia people are starting to feel that. And I think that even our police commissioner sees that, because our city is just based on love.”

Paying Homage Christopher Park, currently lined with rainbow flags for Pride month, welcomes both those coming to visit the monument and people simply looking for a relaxing place to sit and enjoy the city. “I just kind of like the vibe around here,” Julianna Eddy, a photographer visiting the city from Connecticut, said. “I feel like it’s really safe and just a good place to kind of just meet people.” This positive energy reflects the sense of acceptance and celebration of identity felt by many visitors, including Rhysand Brown, a member of the LGBTQ+ community who visited New York from Ringgold, Georgia. Brown was “overwhelmed” by the displays of LGBTQ+ pride he witnessed at the monument. “Especially since it’s the 50th anniversary, everything’s rainbow and everything’s Pride and you see all these things that remind you that you’re not alone in who you are and that you still have the same community even though you may be far away from it,” Brown said. “And I just wanted to pay homage to my predecessors in the trans and gay community . And it’s just surreal. To see something of that much importance in my heritage as an LGBTQ person is amazing.”

The Gay Liberation Monument in Christopher Park, by sculptor George Segal. Photo: Jaden Satenstein

Photos courtesy of NYC Mayor’s Office

HONORING TRANSGENDER ACTIVISTS HISTORY A new monument in the Village will pay tribute to Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera BY JASON COHEN

A monument recognizing two transgender activists will soon be not only the first of its kind in the city, but in the world. On May 30, Mayor Bill de Blasio and First Lady Chirlane McCray announced the next She Built NYC monument will honor pioneering transgender activists Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera. The Department of Cultural Affairs has launched an open call for artists who want to be considered as designers for the monument honoring Johnson and Rivera. The monument was recommended by the She Built NYC committee, which was started in June 2018 by McCray, Deputy Mayor Alicia Glen and the Department of Cultural Affairs. Its goal is to commission a public monument or artwork on city property that honors women’s history in New York City. The Department of Cultural Affairs has committed up to $10 million over the next four years to new public monuments and commemorations. The proposed location for the monument is in Ruth Wittenberg Triangle, a prominent public space in the heart of West Village neighborhood

landmarks that were essential to LGBTQ history and advocacy, including the Stonewall Inn and St. Vincent’s Hospital. “Transgender and non-binary communities are reeling from violent and discriminatory attacks across the country,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio. “Here in New York City, we are sending a clear message: we see you for who you are, we celebrate you, and we will protect you. This monument to Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera will honor their pioneering role in the fight for human rights in our city and across the world.” Johnson and Rivera founded STAR, renamed Street Transgender Action Revolutionaries in 2001, a housing and support organization for homeless LGBTQ youth and sex workers; they were also leaders in the Stonewall uprising and lifelong advocates for LGBTQ rights, particularly around racial and economic justice for LGBTQ people experiencing homelessness and poverty. In addition to their work and advocacy for LGBTQ, homeless and HIV positive youth — particularly young people of color who were marginalized by broader LGBTQ rights efforts — they were also pioneers in early efforts to further disability justice efforts. Members of the LGBTQ community are thrilled about the monument, said Glenda Testone, executive director of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center on West 13th St.

“Supporting and raising awareness of leaders like Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, who fought for the rights of LGBTQ and marginalized people, is an honor,” Testone said. “I hope that our country continues to expand our understanding and support of one another, and that the monument serves as a constant reminder to do that.” According to Testone, the duo laid the groundwork for the activism of TGNCNB (transgender, gender nonconforming and non-binary people) and communities of color. “TGNCNB people and people of color have historically been omitted from ‘official’ narratives about the LGBTQ rights movement as a whole, and we’re still fighting that today,” she said. “Monuments to New Yorkers like Marsha and Sylvia serve as an important statement that we will not go back.” Maria Sjödin, deputy director of OutRight Action International, located at 80 Maiden Lane, said since the mayor announced the monument people from all over the world have been flooding social media with posts. “First of all, I’m very happy about this,” she said. It’s certainly about time for the city to recognize these trans activists in the role they played. But, it’s also increasingly important ... This was the whole spectrum of LGBTIQ individuals and these two amazing trans women leading this revolution.”


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FATAL FALLS RISING AMONG OLDER ADULTS HEALTH Traumatic brain injuries and hip fractures lead to health declines â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but exercise and balance programs can reduce risks BY LINDSEY TANNER

New research shows fatal falls have nearly tripled in older Americans in recent years, rising to more than 25,000 deaths yearly. The ďŹ ndings highlight the importance of fall prevention. A separate study bolsters evidence that programs focusing on improving muscle strength and balance can help achieve that goal. Both studies were published last Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Circumstances werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t included in the data, but traumatic brain injuries and hip fractures leading to steep health declines are among causes of death in older adults who fall.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deaths from falls may have increased because older people are living longer, living longer independently, and are living longer with chronic conditions,â&#x20AC;? said Elizabeth Burns, a study co-author and health scientist at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Preventionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s injury center. She noted that some medications also make older adults prone to falls. That includes prescription drugs affecting balance. Burns said research shows their use of certain psychiatric medications that can cause drowsiness and vision problems has increased substantially in recent years. The new analysis included 16 years of U.S. vital statistics data on adults aged 75. Fatal falls increased from 8,600 in 2000 to 25,190 in 2016. Separate CDC data show they climbed even higher in 2017, to almost 26,440 fatal falls in Americans aged 75 and older. The rate in the study more than doubled, from 51 fatal falls per

Photo: Design for Health, via ďŹ&#x201A;ickr

100,000 people to 122 falls per 100,000. The results echo studies of fatal fall trends in the Netherlands and other European countries. Weight-bearing exercise such as walking; balance exercises; and resistance exercises to strengthen muscles can also reduce risks for falls, said Dr. Marco Pahor of the University of Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aging and geriatric research department, who wrote an accompanying journal editorial.

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The program studied in the second study involved exercises three times a week at home for a year, with ďŹ ve sessions led by a physical therapist. These include seated and standing leg lifts, knee bends and backward walking, plus walking half an hour at least twice weekly. Participants were 344 Canadian adults aged 70 and older who had experienced a recent fall. Half were randomly assigned to the program plus usual care by a doctor; the re-

mainder received only usual care. There were 236 falls during the study among the exercise group compared with 366 falls among the others. Pahor said many older adults arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t aware of programs that can help them. Many U.S. communities offer fall prevention exercises programs at senior centers, and the National Council on Aging offers tips online.

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ACADEMIC MANIA AT LAGUARDIA HIGH SCHOOL

The author as a freshman at LaGuardia High School. Photo courtesy of Rachel Kalina

I also wanted to win. I wanted people to think I was smart. I wanted to go to an elite college. So I took as many AP classes as the school allowed. And it all made me angry. I was doing what a good student was supposed to do; I took AP US History and got a four out of five on the AP test. I took honors government. I took the US history SAT2, scored over 700 out of 800, and retained nothing. To this day, I don’t know the date of the revolutionary war. So I wasn’t surprised to hear about the recent student protests at LaGuardia High School over the encroachment of AP classes and strict grade-based admissions. Before honors and AP classes, I used to read all the assigned books in English ahead of time. Not on purpose, just because I loved reading. The honors track ended that. I remember a moment in AP English Literature when the teacher had to step out of the room. “Start discussing ‘Portrait of the Artist’ while I’m gone.” The door closed behind her. Silence filled the room. Finally, a girl spoke. She was one of those students who always came prepared. During class discussions, self-assured, fully articulated thoughts floated from her lips like pearls. “I haven’t read the book at all,” she said. The second student to speak was a quiet girl, sad-looking in the vein of Sylvia Plath, who usually exhibited almost the same level of poetry

EAST SIDE OBSERVER BY ARLENE KAYATT

BY RACHEL KALINA

In the summer before my freshman year at LaGuardia High School in 2007, I did poorly on an entrance test and didn’t qualify for honors English. In my non-honors English class, we studied Shakespeare. I had seen quite a few Shakespeare plays at that point, and had even gone to a camp two years before in which I’d played servant number two (thank you very much) in a production of “The Merchant of Venice.” Nevertheless, due to my poor entrance test I was put into a class filled with kids who had barely heard of Shakespeare. “But soft! What light through yonder window breaks?” “What does that mean?” asked the teacher. “The light’s so strong, it’s smashing the window,” said one of the students. “Not exactly.” The teacher broke down each line. We acted out the scenes in groups. My group put on a puppet show. I built a miniature set, complete with balcony. The acting majors in my group made sock puppets and performed. It was awesome. The next year, I was on the honors track for good; honors English, then AP English Language, then AP English Literature. In “Brave New World,” there is a scene in which babies enter a room filled with books and flowers. The babies crawl towards the display, but as soon as they reach it, a piercing noise goes off and an electrified floor shocks them. The babies learn to associate books and nature with pain and to stay away from them. That’s how AP English made me feel. It made me want to run from literature; it was a trap, every beautiful book followed by an electric shock in the form of a deadening essay topic or test.

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in her class commentary as the great writer herself. “I just skim SparkNotes the night before discussion or before I post online in the class forum.” Now a boy: “Me, too.” More confessions followed from my brightest classmates on down, until we came to the consensus that no one sitting in that room had at any point read any portion of “Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.” And here’s the thing; two things actually. The first is that because of the time spent on SAT study, SAT2 study, revising college essays, doing extracurricular activities designed to enhance our college eligibility and finishing the homework for all those other AP classes, we simply didn’t have time to read the book. The second thing is that if we had wanted to learn, we wouldn’t have been taking AP classes; we would have taken classes that allowed us time to read books. It’s encouraging that the current students of LaGuardia are pushing back against tougher academic courses and admissions standards. It means they want to learn and that they care about their art. Unlike my generation, instead of just subverting the system, they’re facing up to the administration and attempting to change the status quo. If they succeed, they’ll make room for real learning to happen, in classes like English as well as the arts.

Staying stone — A new kind of stone is replacing the stones that were sold at the little jewelry shop that was located opposite Ruppert Park on East 90th Street, just west of Second Avenue. Don’t remember its exact name — something like East Asian III. Its window was invariably filled with all manner of stone, from diamonds and emeralds to rubies and sapphires to estate antiques to tchotchkes with a Russian flair. Within at least a day of closing, the shop was broom clean, painted, and the new tenant was busy moving in and ready to do business the next day. Couldn’t wait to find out what was coming. The flyers they hand out say “Body Work — 1 Hour $50 — 11:00 AM — 10:30 PM.” Included in the body work is a stone massage where small black rocks, aka hot stones, are used with aromatic oils. Each massage room has a curtained door. Seems that the small neighborhood businesses coming to the UES are trending to coffee cafes, doggy day care, nail spas. Stones not so much. Need a new nomenclature for small businesses. Calling them momsand-pops just doesn’t tell the story. Lesson learned — Have to say that Starbucks, at least the one at the corner of East 87th Street and Lexington Avenue, has taken seriously the failure of a Philadelphia Starbucks’s to allow a non-customer (one who doesn’t make a purchase) to use the bathroom. The 87th Street location has the code number allowing access to anyone — customer or not — taped to the door of its bathroom. Under the old system, the code number was on the receipt you got when you made a purchase. Good for Starbucks. Restaurant redux — It’s New York, restaurants come, restaurants go. In one instance, at least, the same restaurant did both. It left so the landlord could demolish the building (yes, this is NY, happens every day) and replace it with a hotel, and came back when the hotel was built and

ready to open in the old location. So it was with Ben & Jack’s steakhouse on East 44th Street between Second and Third Avenues. Initially opened in 2005 by the Sinanaj brothers — Ben and Jack (there’s also Harry, Jeff and Russ; all own the Empire Steakhouse restaurants) — with a 15-year lease that would terminate in 2020. Sometime in 2012 the Ben & Jack’s landlord notified them that the building was being demolished and a hotel would be built. Keeping the well-run, high caliber restaurant was an imperative for the landlord, and it fell to brother Jeff to cut a deal with the landlord that would bring Ben & Jack’s back to its old home. And five years later, in 2017, it happened. The brothers, who are veterans of the venerable Peter Luger’s, as are a contingent of cousins, reopened in the Even Hotel (owned by Intercontinental) in a new space at the old location with the same great steaks and cocktails and impeccable service. Great when a landlord and a tenant can cut a deal that keeps a business in business. In steak parlance — that’s rare and well-done. Restaurant redo - Tandoor Oven on East 84th Street, just west of Third Avenue on the north side of the street, was at the same location with the same owner for 30 years. That changed in August of 2018 when Tandoor Oven changed hands and the new owners upgraded the menu and interior and replaced the old street canopy with a spiffier, more elegant one. The new ownership includes Nimma Reddy, a chef who owns restaurants in New Jersey and Connecticut. The new menu focuses on regional but authentic Indian dishes which are popular across the country. On the new appetizer menu, there’s Cauliflower Manchurian, a popular north Indian street food inspired from Asian cuisine, and Kale Sprouts (definitely au courant). Prices are 21st century — Chicken Saag (then spelled Shaag) was $8.50. Currently, spelled Saag, at $16.95. Looking forward to at least another 30 years of the terrific Tandoor Oven tradition at the same location. Priceless.


JUNE 13-19,2019

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FUNDING CUTS LOOM CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

net, books or other media because of cost.” Another user, Jennifer, posted “From my earliest memories as a child, the library has been a sacred and special place where all are welcome. As an adult, I want my children to have the same fond feelings I had growing up!” For Rebecca, “It’s this exhilarating feeling of walking down an aisle of books and knowing there are so many stories waiting to be picked and I’d have the chance to read them all. The library is my second home.”

Possible Cuts in Service New York City’s public libraries are de facto community centers, the crossroads of the neighborhoods they serve. Like branches across town, the Columbus Library does its best to keep up with the changing needs of its community, limited only by available resources. But in a time of rising costs and increased demand, Mayor Bill de Blasio’s proposed $92.5 billion city budget for fiscal year 2020 allocates $387.1 million for public libraries, a drop of $11.7 million from the previous year’s amount. The city’s three library systems — the New York Public Library, Brooklyn Public Library, and the Queens Borough Public Library — have instead requested an increase of $35 million in expense funding, as well as another $963 million in the 10-Year Capital Plan for repairs, renovations, and expansion of aging and overburdened facilities. Library representatives warn that cuts to funding could force libraries to reduce services, with weekend hours the most at risk. To help them in their campaign to restore and increase funding, the three library systems have asked New Yorkers to

The Columbus Library computers are an important community resource. Photo: Diana Ducroz

post ‘sticky notes’ of support online in addition to sending emails and letters to city officials.

Love Letters to Libraries Since launching in March, the “Invest in Libraries: Libraries Make NYC Stronger” campaign has generated over 70,000 letters to city hall and collected over 5,000 digital sticky notes, as New Yorkers from all over have sent in their little yellow love letters expressing their feelings for their libraries. The campaign has garnered some high-profile supporters, such as Sarah Jessica Parker and writer

Jennifer Egan, but the notes from everyday New Yorkers are the heart of the campaign. In note after note, people from all over the city talk about their library as a place of refuge, of connection, of learning and exploration, as a home away from home, a place not only to escape their troubles but also to find the help to rise above them. Notes left by users of the Columbus Library follow the same themes. A patron named John wrote “Columbus Library is a lifeline of education for the community, especially those who are of limited financial means and cannot easily access the inter-

Laboratories for Learning Amy Geduldig, assistant director of media relations for the NYPL, believes the campaign is having a positive effect, not just on the potential outcome of the budget negotiations, but on the supporters themselves. “It expands beyond the neighborhoods, but it also focuses on them, so it’s a really collaborative effort from New Yorkers across the city,” Geduldig said. The online visibility of the notes reinforces to viewers not only “how people appreciate their libraries and the programs and services that they use, but also just how widespread it is.” The deadline for budget approval is July 1, when the new fiscal year begins. City Council Speaker Co-

rey Johnson said on Thursday that negotiations over the library funding are still underway. Johnson has been a staunch advocate for an increase in library funding. “Libraries are one of the most egalitarian things, not just about NYC, but about society. Libraries are a gateway to new immigrants. Libraries are laboratories for learning. Libraries are places for children and for seniors,” the Speaker said. “Libraries are essential to a healthy democracy and a healthy society, and that is why we’re fighting so hard for libraries.” Johnson’s comments echoed many of the sentiments written on the sticky notes. Some patrons of the Columbus branch take it even further. “For me, the library has been a way to escape to a better place within the pages of a book that allowed me to pick and choose a better narrative for my life. It has been a safe haven,” said a patron named Nataly. “If I could stay in the library from morning to the nighttime I would,” wrote another, named Sally. Vanessa Watson loves the Columbus Library just as much. “This little branch is kind of a gem in the neighborhood, one of these little tiny gems that you don’t see until you look close,” she said. “A jewel, a jewel that is very precious.”

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ACTIVITIES FOR THE FERTILE MIND

thoughtgallery.org NEW YORK CITY

Underground University: De-Toxing Your Masculinity

Calendar NYCNOW

TUESDAY, JUNE 18TH, 6:30PM Caveat | 21 Clinton St. | 212-228-2100 | caveat.nyc Multi-media artist Chinisha Scott leads a session through a rebel university catalog. Experts and storytellers will be on hand to talk about masculinity: past, present, and future ($15 advance, $20 door).

Joy, Rigor, and the Power of Wise Masculinity: Bobbito Garcia with Kate Johnson

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19TH, 7PM Rubin Museum of Art | 150 W. 17th St. | 212-620-5000 | rmanyc.org DJ, filmmaker, NYC street basketball legend, and dad Bobbito Garcia talks about leading with love, in conversation with meditation teacher Kate Johnson ($25).

Just Announced | An Evening with Margaret Atwood

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20TH, 8PM The Town Hall | 123 W. 43rd St. | 212-997-1003 | thetownhall.org On the heels of a new pop culture visibility (and a legal climate that’s revealing her as all the more prescient), Margaret Atwood talks about her forthcoming novel The Testaments, which takes up events 15 years after Offred’s final scene in 1985’s The Handmaid’s Tale ($59 and up).

For more information about lectures, readings and other intellectually stimulating events throughout NYC,

Discover the world around the corner. Find community events, gallery openings, book launches and much more: Go to nycnow.com

EDITOR’S PICK

Thu 13 - Sat 29 PILOBOLUS The Joyce Theater 175 Eighth Ave 2:00 p.m., 7:30 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. $56 joyce.org 212-242-0800 Combining dazzling surrealism, poetic movement, and sheer physical strength, Pilobolus makes a highly anticipated return with two programs featuring vintage audience favorites from across the decades.

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The Whitney 99 Gansevoort St 7:30 p.m Free with online registration In collaboration with 2019 Whitney Biennial artist Tiona Nekkia McClodden, and inspired by the Meatpacking District’s queer club culture, the Whitney celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots with a free after-hours event featuring DJ Shyboi, performances, and viewing of the 2019 Whitney Biennial. whitney.org 212-570-3600

The Magnet Theater 254 West 29th St 11:30 p.m. $7 Short-form improv is making a comeback! Join us as we feature some of Magnet’s brightest comedians playing hilarious improv games using suggestions from a live audience (you!). magnettheater.com 212-244-8824

National Museum of the American Indian 1 Bowling Green 1:00 p.m. Free Explore the exhibition “T.C. Cannon: At the Edge of America” and create multimedia projects inspired by T.C. Cannon that examine themes of identity, representation, and place. Create linocut prints and cool patterns inspired by Cannon’s vibrant backgrounds. Experiment with different perspectives as you print on a variety of materials from paper to textiles. americanindian.si.edu 202-633-6644


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The Strand 828 Broadway 7:00 p.m. $15 Join us as award-winning author James Wood celebrates his latest book, which is sure to intrigue. strandbooks.com 212-473-1452

Anthology Film Archives 32 Second Ave 5:15 p.m. $12 In this rarely-screened color Warhol film, Andy’s mother Julia Warhola — then living in a basement apartment in Warhol’s Lexington Ave townhouse — makes a rare onscreen appearance, ostensibly playing one of the many faded stars in Warhol’s cinematic constellation: a bathing beauty for Mack Sennett who has racked up 25 ex-husbands and is currently being attended to by her 26th, played by Richard Rheem. Mostly, though, the emphasis is on Julia’s everyday life, as she cooks, cleans, irons, and talks to and about her beloved son. anthologyfilmarchives.org 212-505-5181

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Wed 19 ► JOY, RIGOR, AND THE POWER OF WISE MASCULINITY The Rubin Museum 150 West 17th St 7:00 p.m. $25 Learn how Bobbito Garcia — a DJ, filmmaker, NYC street basketball legend, and father — has redefined masculinity in the worlds of hiphop, sports, and entertainment, exemplifying just how cool it can be to lead with love. rubinmuseum.org 212-620-5000

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JUNE 13-19,2019

THE WORD IS ‘CAMP’ This year’s spring exhibition at The Costume Institute, a multimedia experience, traces the origins of the aesthetic style and its impact on fashion and more BY VAL CASTRONOVO

Who knew the term had so many meanings and layers? The first section of this ambitious show is devoted solely to contextualizing and defining the elusive word — “camp” as a verb, an adjective, a noun — with a soundtrack featuring Judy Garland singing camp anthem, “Over the Rainbow.” Susan Sontag’s influential essay from 1964, “Notes on ‘Camp,’” a 58-point treatise on the subject, is the frame, the lens through which to view more than 250 paintings, sculptures, drawings, manuscripts, porcelains, photos and pushing-theenvelope fashions that give concrete form to the idea, the clothes especially.

waistcoat with satin trim (see Napoleon Sarony’s photos of the playwright posing in Aesthetic ensembles). It’s Jazz Age flapper dresses, Josephine Baker and Tiffany lamps. Tiffany lamps? Note #8: “Camp is a vision of the world in terms of style — but a particular kind of style. It is the love of the exaggerated, the “off,” of things-being-what-theyare-not. The best example is in Art Nouveau, the most typical and fully developed Camp style. Art Nouveau objects, typically, convert one thing into something else: the lighting fixtures in the form of flowering plants, the living room which is really a grotto.” (See Tiffany Studios, “Tulip” Lamp, 1907-12.)

The Corner of a Circular Room The term is nothing if not elastic, and fantastic, so much so that a visitor can leave the show and not

Dethroning the Serious “Sontag gave us a grammar, mmar, a language by which to understand erstand and to appreciate and to discuss cuss [camp]. And in a way she’s the hero of the exhibition,” Andrew Bolton, lton, Wendy Yu Curator in Charge of The Costume Institute, said at a preview last month. Sontag’s defining principles nciples are conveyed over speakers, kers, illuminated on a ticker tape pe and appear as text on vitrines. nes. Camp is extravagance (“a woman walking around in a dress made of three million ion feathers”), artifice and nd style. It’s kind, it’s generrous, it’s fun. Note #41: 41: “The whole point of Camp mp is to dethrone the serious.”” It’s ironic. It’s subversive. rsive. It’s democratic. It encompasses sses highart, mass-culture and queer ueer culture. It’s Versailles (“camp Eden”) den”) — the theatricality of Louis XIV and his cross-dressing younger er brother, “Monsieur” — and the 19th century dandy. Note #45: “Camp is the modern dandyism.” Imagine Oscar Wilde, the “dandyaesthete,” in a velvet jacket and

Ensemble by Jeremy Scott for House of Moschino, spring/summer 2018; courtesy of Moschino. Image courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photo © Johnny Dufort, 2019

Gallery view of “The Psychopathology of Affluence”-themed fashions, featuring Vaquera’s wearable Tiffany jewelry pouch, flanked by Mary Katrantzou’s “Harry Dress” (left) and “Winston Dress.” Image courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, BFA.com/ Zach Hilty

be certain she has it “down.” But, as fashion critic cr Vanessa Friedman suggests, it’s it’ like the famous defipornography: you know it nition of por see it. when you se Bolton said the exhibit was much challenging to produce than more challe previous shows at the Inany of the pr “mainly because camp is so stitute “mai define. It’s a huge, huge difficult to d concept ... A cultural historian once said s that trying to define camp is i like sitting in a corner of a cir circular room. And it’s so true.” It’s a sensibility that seems to find its clearest expression in fashion. The ensembles on fash view, view by a string of haute designers, are presented in desig themed them niches on two levels in the show’s second section, with labels like “Outrageous lab Aestheticism,” “Gender With Aesthetic Genitals,” “Gender Without Genitals” and “Rediscovery of History’s “R Waste.” Bring Bri binoculars and look up! “Rainbow” is piped in, along with recitations o of Sontag’s criteria and other insights from the experts (“camperts”?), but it’s the designers themselves who give voice to the commentary. The experience is pure theater — “an echo chamber,”

IF YOU GO WHAT:“Camp: Notes on Fashion” WHERE: The Costume Institute at The Met 1000 Fifth Avenue WHEN: Through September 8 www.metmuseum.org/ per Bolton — with the outfits competing with the aural effects for our attention. Note Mark Booth’s aperçu from his 1983 book, “Camp,” alongside a Giambattista Valli evening dress in pink synthetic tulle: “The simple, bold colours of camp are ice-cream colours: camp’s favourite colour is pink: nursery pink, sugary pink, screaming pink.” When asked about exhibit highlights, the curator singled out its intellectual underpinnings: “All the categories. I like the categories because the categories are based on particular comments [by] Susan or other scholars. What we tried to convey is that camp is really a site of debate rather than consensus.”

An Actual Freudian Slip What is not debatable is that the ensembles here are statements. They are cheeky, humorous, rebel-

lious, hyper-male, hyper-female, androgynous and flat-out outlandish, fashioned from tulle, silk satin, sequins, suede, velvet, lace, leather and pink-and-black ostrich and coque feathers (the latter for a screaming-pink flamingo headpiece by Stephen Jones for House of Schiaparelli). There’s a “Freudian slip” dress by Marc Jacobs — yes, an actual slip of a dress in silk jersey with Freud’s profile splashed across the front — because, as writer and artist Philip Core decreed in “Camp: The Lie That Tells the Truth” (1984), “CAMP is cross-dressing in a Freudian slip.” Jeremy Scott from House of Moschino presents a jokey TV-dinnerthemed ensemble, with peas and carrots, while Vaquera riffs the classic Tiffany jewelry pouch to create a wearable blue facsimile, because why not? It’s camp, and it’s comical. Accessories are arranged in display cases at the center of the room. Philip Treacy’s “Smiley Face” headpiece in yellow acrylic is paired with Christopher Isherwood’s 1970 dictum, “Camp is happiness.” Sounds like an inversion of the lyrics to the Peanuts song, “Happiness.” Look around at this exuberant show and it’s hard not to agree with him. Nailed it.


JUNE 13-19,2019

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RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS

Neighborhood Scrapbook

MAY 29- JUN 4, 2019 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml. Billymarks West

332 9 Avenue

A

Chipotle Mexican Grill 283 7 Avenue

A

Penn Sushi

0 Penn Station

Grade Pending (35) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Food Protection Certificate not held by supervisor of food operations. Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, cross-contaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

Center PlateConcourse CafeJacob K Javits Convention Center

655 W 34Th St

A

Space Billard

34 W 32nd St

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The Smith

1150 Broadway

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Hotel Stanford

43 W 32nd St

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Photo: Robert Guttersohn

Warner Media Cafeteria

30 Hudson Yards

A

Claudio’s Pizzaria

334 8th Ave

Not Yet Graded (20) Food Protection Certificate not held by supervisor of food operations. Hand washing facility not provided in or near food preparation area and toilet room. Hot and cold running water at adequate pressure to enable cleanliness of employees not provided at facility. Soap and an acceptable hand-drying device not provided.

MILESTONE CELEBRATION FOR CORLEARS

Stop & Eat

39 W 31st St

A

Lady M Confections

1178 Broadway

A

King’s Street Coffee

121 W 30th St

A

Ninth Street Espresso 221 W 29th St

A

Zoni Language Center 22 W 34th St

A

Legends NYC

6 West 33 Street

A

Dong Chun Hong Chinese Restaurant

312 5 Avenue

Grade Pending (45) Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Live roaches present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/ sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Personal cleanliness inadequate. Outer garment soiled with possible contaminant. Effective hair restraint not worn in an area where food is prepared. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Gigi Cafe

307 7 Avenue

Grade Pending (29) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food not cooled by an approved method whereby the internal product temperature is reduced from 140º F to 70º F or less within 2 hours, and from 70º F to 41º F or less within 4 additional hours. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies.

Skylight Diner

402 West 34 Street

A

Highline Pizzeria

503 West 28 Street

A

Friedman’s

132 West 31 Street

A

On Saturday, June 8, Corlears School celebrated its 50th birthday with a classic backyard party. More than 60 alumni, founding families, staff, and parents gathered at the independent school to reconnect and reminisce in honor of the momentous anniversary year. The Chelsea school, which began in 1968 as a nursery school on the Lower East Side, prides itself on being a neighborhood school for the entire city, building a strong academic foundation for young learners ages 2-10 in an inclusive, vibrant community.

Photo: Robert Guttersohn

“Corlears’ community has a history of educating young children to be critical thinkers and compassionate leaders — a vision established by our founding families and educators in 1968 and championed by our teachers, staff, students, and parents today,” said David Egolf, Head of School. “We are honored to celebrate this milestone year for the school and make even more memories with our biggest friends and supporters from the past and present.”


JUNE 13-19,2019

15

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

AILEY AT 60: ALIVE, ENGAGING AND INSPIRING DANCE Thirty years after his death, Alvin Ailey’s genius is still making the world a better place

Dance is for everybody. I believe that dance came from the people and that it should always be delivered back to the people.”

BY MARY GREGORY

Alvin Ailey didn’t make it to 60. He died in 1989 at age 58 in Lenox Hill Hospital due to complications from AIDS. The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, however, continues his legacy and vision and is celebrating its 60th season. In 1958, Ailey led his troupe of young African American performers onto the stage of the 92nd Street Y and changed the world of dance forever. They’ve since been recognized as global ambassadors of American culture and some of the most original, dynamic, passionate and unforgettable artists on the world stage. They return from a cross-country tour to New York for their 2019 Lincoln Center season from June 12-16. Several programs offer chances to see world premieres of new dances by up-and-coming choreographers, and ground-breaking pieces like

Alvin Ailey

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in Rennie Harris’ “Lazarus.” Photo: Paul Kolnik.

Rennie Harris’ soulful, hip-hop inspired ballet, “Lazarus.” Each performance will conclude with Ailey’s masterwork, “Revelations.” Drawn from life experiences like celebrations and spiritual milestones such as baptisms and funerals, “Revelations” transforms the

familiar into elegant art. Through a combination of jazz, gospel, blues, inventive choreography, and expressive movement that’s at turns tense, triumphant, and tender, it gives voice and vision to African American cultural experience. Says dancer Hope Boykin, “‘Revelations’

takes you on a journey from struggle through surrender to salvation.” In addition to his renown as a dancer and choreographer, Ailey is remembered as a human rights and LGBTQ icon. In that spirit, the troupe will participate throughout Pride Month in New York with spe-

cial performances and free lessons at Ailey Extension as part of NYC Dance Week (June 13-22). Coinciding with the troupe’s 60th anniversary, Fox Searchlight just announced that the director of the Academy Award winning film “Moonlight,” Barry Jenkins, will be directing a film based on Ailey’s life and work. “I am trying to show the world we are all human beings, that color is not important, that what is important is the quality of our work, a culture in which the young are not afraid to take chances and can hold onto their values and self-esteem, especially in the arts and dance,” said Ailey. “That’s what it’s all about to me.”

I can’t get health insurance through my job, but I can with GetCoveredNYC’s help. Free help signing up for low- or no-cost health insurance, regardless of immigration status • Call 311 • Text CoveredNYC to 877877 • Visit nyc.gov/health and search health insurance Message and data rates may apply. Text STOP to quit, HELP for more information. For Terms of Use and Privacy Policy, visit nyc.gov/health

Health

Bill de Blasio Mayor Oxiris Barbot, MD Commissioner


16

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JUNE 13-19,2019

Business Curb appeal. Photo: Steven Strasser

SMARTER LIVING: WHY LAYOUTS MATTER REAL ESTATE On gracious entry spaces, trends in floor plans and the enormous bathroom craze BY FREDERICK W. PETERS

What not to do. Photo: Andrew J. Kramer

‘GREEN’ MOVES ARE GOOD MOVES ASK A BROKER I’m a big environmentalist and I try to do whatever I can to save the planet. I recently went so far as to boycott making online purchases to cut down on the amount of waste from the packing materials. Witnessing my next door neighbor’s recent move — with all the cardboard, bubble wrap, etc. consumed — put me over the edge. In today’s world, aren’t there alternatives available to minimize our footprint when moving? You bring up a very important and relevant issue that’s on a everyone’s mind today. Every time someone moves into a

new home, there is a tremendous amount of trash — most destined for recycling ... we hope! We do need to open our eyes to the volume of waste we create and do something about it. Outside of loading up your Prius and hauling your stuff yourself to your new place, here’s a great way to start — try using a reusable plastic bin borrowing service like www. bin-it.com or www.rentagreenbox.com. You rent plastic bins/boxes for your move, fill them up, move, empty them out, and then they are collected to be re-used. Spread the word about this service. Every little step can make a big difference!

Does every home need a great room? Do buyers need, or even want, a dining room? How important is the kitchen, especially in a market like New York? Does it matter whether the ceiling is 9 feet high, or 8 feet high, or 11 feet high? While in our data-hungry age values tend to be calculated on a price per square foot basis, how those square feet are deployed is actually just as important as how many there are. Many properties with huge square footage still provide nowhere to comfortably settle in, while sometimes small homes and apartments can be enormously cozy and inviting. So what makes some layouts work so much better than others? Here are a few ideas. • First, let’s address the question of “wasted space.” During the 1950s and 1960s, no doubt the nadir of American architecture, architects and designers had the notion of efficiency clearly in mind. In those times, this desire for efficiency contributed substantially to the creation of unappealing spaces. Foyers

were eliminated. Ceilings were lowered. Tiny walkthrough kitchens entered the apartment design vernacular. Somehow the architects of that era contrived to make a two-bedroom unit feel less spacious than a prewar studio. While there is certainly such a thing as wasted space, the architects of that era misunderstood where it lay. Homes without a sense of entry tend not to feel welcoming. Apartments with low 8-foot ceilings create a cramped feeling even if the rooms lay out to a decent size. Many buyers continue to feel drawn to older homes (or new homes in which the architects have learned from older homes) because they so often lend a feeling of spaciousness even in small spaces by offering an entry foyer, or a hallway leading to the bathroom, or an alcove. • Where space often IS wasted in the homes of today is in duplicating room functions. If you have a great room off the kitchen will you ever actually use the living room? If you park in or next to the garage, then walk into the kitchen, will anyone ever enter through the front door? In the vast mansions being built today in Florida, or Aspen, or the Hamptons, the rooms are often so big and so poorly laid out that it is inevitable that

with time the owners will develop a routine which sees them using the kitchen, the bedroom, and maybe one or two other rooms. No one can effectively occupy 20,000 square feet! People, no matter how fancy they are, like to feel cozy. • What about curb appeal? If the façade of the home offers passers-by a view only of a front door (unused) and a double garage door, it presents a blank frown to the guest approaching from the street. The garage belongs at the back or side of the house, leaving the architecture of the front façade to create an invitation to approach. • Inside, an entry foyer should welcome new arrivals into the home. In the best layouts, rooms radiate off the foyer in a way which provides both reassurance and mystery. One finds oneself drawn in, both engaged by the public rooms which ARE visible, and simultaneously intrigued by the hallways or doorways leading to rooms which are not. While an enfilade of rooms, one opening into another, can be lovely, a railroad flat in which you see it all the minute you enter, is not. • I have read several articles recently about how separate rooms are making a comeback. People apparently no

longer want their living room, dining area, and kitchen all to be combined into one large open space. They want to be able to hide their dirty pots and pans when friends come for dinner. (This of course doesn’t apply so much to most New Yorkers, who all want state-of-the-art kitchens with name brand appliances even though they never cook and use their ovens as sweater storage!) It’s a harbinger of the return of grace to floor plan design. • Finally, what’s up with the enormous bathroom craze? I understand the appeal of two sinks, a stall shower, and a water closet, but does the master bathroom need to be the third biggest room in the house? No one spends THAT much time in there. Styles and tastes evolve. What seemed user friendly in 1960 may seem dated or unattractive today. Fundamental principles of good architecture always outlast fads. A layout which both beckons the visitor in while providing tantalizing glimpses of other, not fully visible spaces, will always possess appeal. Some things don’t change. Frederick W. Peters is Chief Executive Officer of Warburg Realty Partnership


JUNE 13-19,2019

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

Real Estate Sales

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JUNE 13-19,2019

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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

YOUR 15 MINUTES

To read about other people who have had their “15 “1 15 M Mi Minutes” innuute tes” s ggoo to chelseanewsNY.com/15 minutes

THE SILENCE OF THE SURVIVORS Author Patricia Bischof on how the Holocaust affected her parents, and her upbringing in New York BY MICHELLE NAIM

The atrocity which left approximately 6 million Jews dead did not only follow with the pain and trauma of those who were lucky enough to survive it, but also their children who had to live with their parents’ roaring silence day in and day out. In her book, “Memoir of a 2G: Story of Secrecy and Resilience,” Patricia Bischof speaks with a voice that we don’t often hear. The title refers to a designation that Bischof described as “someone whose parents endured, witnessed, [or were] involved, during the Holocaust, in the Second World War.” She writes of the difficulties she faced as a child of two Holocaustsurvivor parents. Her father, Henry Bischof, and her mother, Ruth Renzema, met in New York and began a family. Straus News spoke with

Bischof, who lives on the Upper East Side, about her upbringing and how she came to write her story. Both of your parents were Holocaust survivors? My mother was from Prussia and she left for the USA in 1937 as a tourist. Her mother [my grandmother} knew things were going on, and sent her on a boat here. My mother was from the northern part [and] my father was from a southern part of Germany, Munich. And Dachau was just outside of Munich. My father was in Dachau for 22 months and he came here in 1947. My mother escaped [from Germany], but still she was a survivor. She didn’t come here because she wanted to be the President of the United States. You didn’t know your grandparents growing up? I know you and your cellphone that’s taping my voice better than I knew what my father and mother went through. Nothing was talked about. Not untypical of children

growing up with parents that had that kind of background. What parent wants to tell their children about atrocities? So I somewhat understand it, on the other hand, I’m not happy that I don’t know what went on. I was just getting to know my father when he died. I was 19 years old. My mother, when he used to come home from work, she would say, “Leave your father alone.” I mean, he was depressed. I didn’t know that then but [it] makes sense now. Why should people read this? It’s very apropos in the sense that my parents were immigrants, they were refugees. And they came to this country, the land of opportunity. And I see the parallel with people coming from South America, or Mexico, or Russia, they’re coming for a land of opportunity. Nothing is a perfect situation, America included, but it’s the best deal in town. I was brought up very patriotic by my mother. I put my hand on my heart and I was a Girl Scout later and [I was taught to] have respect for the flag. Patricia Bischof with her memoir. Photo: Michelle Naim

So neither of your parents ever spoke about their struggles? If we left the light on or the refrigerator door was left [open] more than a second, [my father] would freak out. I don’t know if that had to do with him being incarcerated. I remember there was this bread drawer and there were pieces of bread in the back that were a little bit older, and he flipped. I think it had to do with the concentration camp, that we’re wasting, we’re not going to eat that bread, we’re going to throw that out? And here’s this new bread, you’re going to eat that? He was very angry. How would your mother react to that? I think my mother tried to help my father. I don’t want to say remold him, but just try to help him. I think she was more grounded, certainly. For some reason my mother couldn’t [open up] with me. Maybe I was too close because I [was] her offspring. I said, the Shoah Foundation is looking for people to be interviewed that had the kind of history you’ve had. She said yes. I couldn’t believe it. I think this was part of her healing, her ability to finally let go and tell her truth. So I set up the interview. I was emotional, it was the first time [I ever heard her talk about it.] Photo via Amazon.com

What hit you about it? That she was able to finally let go. For people such as my mother and my father, to dredge up past history, that’s why people don’t want to talk about it. It’s quite emotional; psychologically it can do something to them as well. What do you remember about your father? I asked him, when he would come home from work, “How was work today?” “Lousy!” He would always say that. I didn’t ask him every day, but he would always say that. “Hi Dad, how was work today?” “Lousy!” That I do remember. I attribute it to this — my father was a very elegant, dapper European man. If he were to be introduced to you, he would take his hat off. He had some elegance about him and his store. It was a fabric store, with elegant fabrics — linens and worsted wools, pure silks. And the women, they wanted polyester and all that stuff. [He] had to try and sell what the public wanted and I think that that’s maybe where he missed out. Is your mother still alive? Talk about finality of numbers — December 31, 1996 is when she died.

What was that like for you? I was relieved. My mother was so judgmental. I was so creative when I was a youth, I’d show her the clothes I’d made for my doll and she’d complain about it. She never said anything good and that was throughout life, except for that one time she said, “Ya, I’ll interview.” And she apologized once, that’s one thing I remember. What would you ask your parents if they were here? I would love to know exactly how my father got in [to Dachau]. What it took for him to recuperate from living in that kind of turmoil. What it was like growing up in Europe under the kind of environment that’s a little bit similar to today in the sense that there’s a dislike if you’re not total America. You know, we’re all Americans, we all have souls, we all have some worth to ourselves. This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity and space.

Know somebody who deserves their 15 Minutes of fame? Go to chelseanewsNY.com and click on submit a press release or announcement.


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Clinton

14 17

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20 23

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S O O M Y M L T E E A T B R B

W E Q W S K K A H E R B D W Z

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Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9X9 grid that has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3X3 squares. To solve the puzzle each row, column and box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9. Puzzles come in three grades: easy, medium and difficult.

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22

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SUDOKU by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan

by Myles Mellor

55

2

CROSSWORD

58

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JUNE 13-19,2019

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com


JUNE 13-19,2019

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