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The local paper for Chelsea

WEEK OF MAY LAURIE ANDERSON RIFFS ◄ P.12

17-23 2018

Imposing barricades at entrances to Wall Street would be replaced with less obtrusive bollards under a new plan proposed by Downtown Alliance. Photo: Michael Garofalo

A NEW VISION FOR WALL STREET DEVELOPMENT Plan reimagines New York Stock Exchange district with curbless shared streets, improved lighting and seating BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

From the steps of Federal Hall, where George Washington was inaugurated in 1789, a statue of the first president gazes on in bronze across Wall Street toward the marble façade New York Stock Exchange. The streets around the stock exchange are some of Manhattan’s oldest. The neoclassical grandeur of the district’s architecture communicates permanence, prestige, history. The streetscape itself? Less so. “Eurocobble” paving installed in the 2000s to evoke the narrow streets’ colonial past is deteriorated and pockmarked. Moveable police fencing surrounding the stock ex-

change building is a permanent presence, and a vinyl-sided tent fit for a lawn party serves as a security checkpoint. Traffic is restricted in much of the district, but streets where vehicles are permitted are regularly clogged by delivery trucks idling on sidewalks and shoulders. Entrances to pedestrian portions of Wall and Broad Streets are choked with imposing security barriers installed after the September 11, 2001 terror attacks. Tourists jostle with residents and workers to navigate the passageway to Broadway at Wall Street’s western terminus — an already slender corridor in which pedestrians are further constricted by security fencing and scaffolding that takes up much of the street. “Let’s face it: the area has been stuck, to some extent, in a time warp since 9/11,” said Tom Farley, the

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“Boy on Coast Guard Memorial,” Battery Park, 1978. D. Gorton, NYC Parks Photo Archive

THE SUMMER OF ‘78, IN LIVING COLOR PARKS

Then and now: See the full slideshow at CHELSEANEWSNY.COM

For a few tumultuous weeks, New York Times photographers shot the city’s parks and people. The images have just seen the light of day BY RICHARD KHAVKINE

The parks were a sanctuary for his subjects. During the turbulent summer and fall of 1978, the city’s open spaces would be a revelation for D. Gorton. “The parks more than anything I went through illustrated how big Gotham was,” Gorton, a photojournalist with The New York Times from the early 1970s into the 1980s, said last week. “They gave you an insight into the length and breadth of the city,” he said. “When I got into the parks, I got

an expansion of the mind.” Idled by a pressmen’s strike in August of that year, Gorton and seven of his Times colleagues were hired, by an initially wary Parks Commissioner Gordon Davis, to record life in the city’s parks. The eight photographers — Gorton, Neal Boenzi and the paper’s first female shooter, Joyce Dopkeen, among them — together made 2,924 images on sharp, expansive Kodachrome and Ektachrome. “We’re talking hardcore,” Gorton said of the film. “And we knew how to hold our hands still.” Clinton

Chelsea News NY

CHELSEA NEWSNY.COM @Chelsea_news_NY

Crime Watch Voices NYC Now City Arts

3 8 10 12

Restaurant Ratings Business Real Estate 15 Minutes

14 16 17 19

WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW < CITYARTS, P.14

WHO HAS ACCESS TO A PARKING SPACE IN CHELSEA? NEWS

9-16

MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.18

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

WHAT NEXT FOR CHELSEA GALLERIES?

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up rezoning told us she’d like to would and the mid-2000s May 1 The and running this year, for of West Chelsea. Muas an ombudsman city serve Whitney the of opening Art on small businesses within them clear seum of American means not government, helping It’s new buildings, to get Gansevoort Street c to the traffi through the bureaucracy rising rents, that are even more foot things done. forcing some gallerists area. is that Perhaps even more also The irony, of course, to reconsider their Whitney -importantly, the ombudsman the arrival of the and number neighborhood roots art meccas will tally the type small business one of the city’s the end for of complaints by taken in BY GABRIELLE ALFIERO -- could also spell dealers the actions art owners, long-time policy buildStephen some response, and somefor ways to When gallerists Griffin in the area, as their are sold or recommendations If done well, Haller and Cynthiatheir W. ings increasingly begin to fix things. report would Haller reopened follow- demolished. lease the ombudsman’s 26th Street gallery With their 10-year quantitative afrst fi the rebuild Stephen us give cut short, with ing a five-month flooded abruptly shared taste of what’s wrong ter Hurricane Sandy they and Cynthia, who the city, an the space, small businesses in towards building with their first floor phone their and Tony important first step were still without were Lehmann Maupin they the problem. needed to xing fi of galleries, and Internet. Still, where Shafrazi property by June To really make a difference, the happy in the location, will have to to stay for vacate (Shafrazi is suing course, the advocaterising rents, they expected of 2014. find a way to tackle business’ the Manhattes some time. doltold less the landlord, which remain many While Chin Instead, they were their Group, for $20 million reproblem. vexing that Post most the New York than a year later gauge what to demol- lars, said it’s too early tocould have landlord planned ported). another role the advocate on the ish the building. They shopped for planned for there, more information in the neighbor“We had shows bad thing. We had location to find problem can’t be a with the long periods of time.amount hood but struggled a twoThis step, combinedBorough more than just put in a huge the anything efforts by Manhattan to mediate of money to refurbish“We year lease on a street-level in Chelsaid. President Gale Brewer offer space,” Cynthia space. After 13 years Gallery the rent renewal process, were really shocked.”Gallery sea, Stephen Haller signs tangible and early, Haller some For Stephen small left the neighborhoodStux it, it isn’t riswith of progress. For many can’t come and others like joined forces oor are driving business owners, that in a new sixth-fl ing rents that far new devel- Gallery soon enough. on 57th Street, not Chelsea, Zach Feuer them away. It’s

NEWS

luxury building Robotic garage for board draws fire from community BY ZACH WILLIAMS

at a a robotic garage A proposal for in Chelsea has thrown luxury building into the city’s zoning access to parking debate. proposed for a A high-tech garage W. 28th St. has 520 development at Board 4, which is riled Community arguing that it plan, in opposing the more car usage would only invite while only providthe neighborhood, residents. ing parking to rich a special city perThe garage needs 29 spaces rather mit to accommodate allowed the than the 11 automatically opted to oppose by the city. CB4 1 full board meetpermit at its April Carl a draft letter to ing, stating in Planning City the of Weisbrod, chair city criteria for such Commission, that based on the parking foran exception is ago, when many for stock of a decade spaces were used demer industrial future of parking in anticipation velopment in Chelsea. 40 residential have The project will comsquare feet of alunits and 11,213 the ground floor, mercial space on three parking spaces The lowing eight and the developer, respectively. But wants more for Related Companies, is the New York acthe building, which internationally City debut for Zaha Hadid. (Adjaclaimed architect Line, the build cent to the High

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his gallery in After 15 years running to partner with Joel two gallery spaces, (left) leaves the neighborhood team will operate Mesler (right). TheMesler/Feuer, on the Lower East Feuer/Mesler and May 10. Slide, slated to open

Newscheck

2 3

is surging opment, which in part to in Chelsea, thanks High Line the opening of the

City Arts Top 5

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space

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For about 12 weeks, they trekked through the city’s 25,000 acres of withered parkland, chronicling what they found there: a man roasting an entire pig in Prospect Park; another playing drums in a weed-strewn Randall’s Island parking lot; a couple smoking a joint behind a Central Park concession stand; children flying a kite at Rockaway Beach, steps from a fire-scarred pier. For 40 years, no one saw the results. The nearly 3,000 images were nestled in boxes in a Central Park Conservancy office, untouched by hands or light. None were printed until last year. The slides were pristine. And illuminating. Sixty-five are on view at The Central Park Arsenal through June 14.

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MAY 17-23,2018

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PEDESTRIAN SAFETY IN FOCUS AT WEST END AND 70TH TRAFFIC Dangers of intersection draw scrutiny after fatality BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

Community Board 7 is discussing measures to improve safety at West 70th Street and West End Avenue after a pedestrian was struck and killed by a vehicle at the busy Upper West Side crossing earlier this month. An 85-year-old woman died on the morning of May 3 after she was hit by a Jeep as she attempted to cross West End at 70th Street. Police and residents discussed the incident and safety issues at the intersection at a meeting of the community board’s transportation committee on May 8. Though the fatal incident is still under NYPD investigation, Captain Thomas Palmer of the 20th Precinct, which covers the Upper West Side between 59th and 86th Streets, said video evidence shows that the woman crossed against the light and did not have the right of way.

A pedestrian was killed May 3 crossing West End Avenue at West 70th Street. Three pedestrians and one bicyclist were injured in collisions at the intersection last year. Photo: Michael Garofalo The motorist, who stayed at the scene and cooperated with police, had been traveling north on West End Avenue. The driver stopped at a red light at 70th Street, proceeded through the intersection after the light turned green and hit the pedestrian in the opposite crosswalk. “I wouldn’t expect that that person was traveling at an excessive rate of speed, because they had just started from a stop,” Palmer said. “It was just unfortunate that the woman attempted to make it

across the street in that short amount of time.” “Unfortunately the motorist just didn’t see her,” he added. According to NYPD data, the collision was the fifth to date this year at the intersection, which has four lanes of northsouth traffic on West End Avenue, with vehicles traveling in either direction permitted to make left and right turns off the avenue. Pedestrian traffic is often heavy, especially in the morning and afternoon as students walk to and from P.S. 199

nearby on 70th Street. Three pedestrians and one bicyclist were injured in collisions at 70th Street and West End Avenue last year. Roberta Semer, the chair of Community Board 7, lives nearby and said the intersection has been persistently dangerous. “Over the last 20 or 25 years there’s probably been four or five fatalities on or near that corner, all involving seniors,” Semer said. Cars traveling south on West End and turning right onto 70th Street create a hazardous situation for walkers, Semer said. “They don’t see the pedestrians in the crosswalk,” she said. “I have almost been hit on several occasions.” Semer believes the location should be considered for expanded “daylighting,” a safety measure wherein the Department of Transportation removes parking spots and institutes no-standing zones near corners to improve sightlines and make pedestrians more visible to motorists. Currently, daylighting is in effect from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. at the corner. Andrew Albert, the transportation committee’s co-chair,

said that an exclusive turn signal for vehicles at the intersection could also be beneficial, as it would reduce the potential for collisions between turning vehicles and pedestrians crossing simultaneously. A Department of Transportation official at the meeting said the agency would be happy to participate in neighborhood outreach and examine possible changes to daylighting and signal timing at the intersection. West End Avenue accounts for “a disproportionate amount of summonses” written in the 20th Precinct, Captain Timothy Malin said, “mainly because it’s a high residential zone with a lot of pedestrians.” NYPD traffic enforcement, Malin said, will be “ramped up, especially as the weather gets warm and we have more and more pedestrians out there.” Police have visited senior centers to educate locals about safe crossing practices, and Malin said they would extend their outreach to residential buildings and schools, at the community board’s request. A school crossing guard at 70th and West End said that

she is “amazed there’s not more accidents” at the intersection. “We need something done immediately,” she said. The crossing guard, who declined to give her name, said she hopes for increased automated camera enforcement, which would require state authorization. “The cars have no respect for the speed limit,” she said. “They break red lights all the time.” As previously reported in the West Side Spirit, unauthorized commercial traffic is a regular presence on West End Avenue. Trucks and other commercial vehicles are not permitted to travel on West End unless it is necessary in order to arrive at their destination. But in spite of the ban, residents frequently complain of charter buses, 18-wheelers, and other commercial vehicles using the avenue as a thoroughfare. Malin said the NYPD will work to address commercial traffic on West End. Is there a particularly dangerous intersection in your neighborhood? Tell us : reporter@strausnews.com

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CRIME WATCH BY JERRY DANZIG STATS FOR THE WEEK Reported crimes from the 10th district for the week ending May 6 Week to Date

Photo by Tony Webster, via Flickr

KNIFEPOINT SHOPLIFTING At 2:50 p.m. on Saturday, May 5, a man went into the Superdry store at 22 Fulton St., took jacket and track pants valued at $145, put them inside his backpack and tried to leave the store without paying. Approached by a manager, the man then pulled out a silver knife and asked the manager, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Do you want to get cut?â&#x20AC;? before ďŹ&#x201A;eeing the store, heading westbound on Fulton accompanied by a woman.

SUV TAKEN AND ABANDONED At 7:50 a.m. on Saturday, May 5, a 42-year-old man left a white 2015 Ford Escape unattended with the keys in the ignition and the car running, next to the exit of a parking lot at 294 Pearl St. A male then hopped into the vehicle and drove off, heading southbound on Pearl. The vehicle was found abandoned 20 minutes later at the intersection of John and Pearl Streets, with surveillance footage later showing the thief ďŹ&#x201A;eeing westbound on John, taking the vehicleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s keys with him.

BALENCIAGA SAGA Friday the 13th was an unlucky day for a local Balenciaga store. At 1:29 p.m. that Friday, April 13, four men entered the designer location at 148 Mercer St. and took shoes, a womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cap, two womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pouches and two womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wallets, for a total haul of $4,040. The incident was not reported until May 3 due to ongoing discussions with an insurance ďŹ rm.

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Year to Date

2018 2017

% Change

2018

2017

% Change

Murder

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n/a

0

0

n/a

Rape

1

0

n/a

5

6

-16.7

Robbery

3

1

200.0

27

27

0.0

Felony Assault

0

3

-100.0

33

41

-19.5

Burglary

3

2

50.0

36

27

33.3

Grand Larceny

12

15

-20.0

251

215

16.7

Grand Larceny Auto

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0

n/a

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-33.3

BIKE THEFT

NO-NO7

Even a sturdy lock canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always protect an unattended bicycle. At 7:45 p.m. on Thursday, May 3, a 46-yearold man locked his bike to scaffolding in front of 261 Broadway. When he returned at 9:30 p.m. his ride was gone. In all, he was out a Giant tri-cross bike valued at $1,800, a lock and a helmet.

With all the shoplifting at Duane Reade stores, one wonders how the chain stays in business. At 3:33 p.m. on Monday, April 30, two individuals entered the DR store at 315 North End Avenue and took a selection of cosmetics without paying. Police later searched the neighborhood but could not locate the shoplifters or the stolen merchandise. The items taken included 11 packages of No7 foundation makeup, 24 packages of No7 makeup, and 35 packages of No7 face cream totaling $1,452.


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MAY 17-23,2018

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Useful Contacts

Drawing Board

POLICE NYPD 10th Precinct

BY PETER PEREIRA

230 West 20th St.

212-741-8211

150 West 19th St.

311

FIRE FDNY Engine 3/Ladder 12

ELECTED OFFICIALS Councilmember Corey Johnson

224 W. 30th St.

212-564-7757

State Senator Brad Hoylman

322 Eighth Ave. #1700

212-633-8052

Assembly Member Richard Gottfried

242 W. 27th St.

212-807-7900

COMMUNITY BOARD 4

330 W. 42nd St.

212-736-4536

Muhlenberg

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212-924-1585

Columbus

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212-586-5098

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CON EDISON

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MAY 17-23,2018

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FOCUSING BUSY BRAINS Why every camp should be teaching and practicing meditation with campers BY LAURIE PALAGYI

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The wonder of a child â&#x20AC;&#x201D; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something we strive for in adulthood. Imagination, amazement and the simple appreciation for lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s little treasures: the gold spray of sunlight through a window, or the taste of cool rain on your tongue. Kids are accustomed to using their senses to experience life. They look, touch, smell and even taste their way through the world. This natural inclination toward mindfulness makes teaching kids to meditate easier than we thought. In fact, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a no-brainer. Experts are now incorporating meditation and mindfulness practices into the learning process, and schools across the country have begun adding meditation to their curriculum with positive results. But what about camps? When it comes to camp, meditation is an activity that beneďŹ ts everyone. Counselors and

other staff can create a more positive environment by trading timeouts and typical tactics for punishing misbehavior for a more progressive form of behavioral modification â&#x20AC;&#x201D; meditation.

we notice our breathing and connect to ourselves by purposely turning away from external noise and distractions. This important ritual teaches kids about self-care and selfrespect, and it ultimately aids emotional balance.

How Busy Campers BeneďŹ t from Meditation Practice

3. Meditation Relieves Anxiety and Stress

1. Meditation Helps Busy Brains Focus

Meditation puts a positive spin on the traditional time out. It is neither a punishment nor a time to reďŹ&#x201A;ect on misbehavior. Instead, meditation encourages kids to pause, breathe and simply notice the sensations in their bodies, allowing children to access their natural rhythm of self-awareness and mindfulness. Kids learn that tight ďŹ sts and tense muscles are signs of stress. And when their brains become calm, their bodies follow.

Meditation is an exercise just like any other, and with practice we can train our chaotic brains to become calm. Science proves meditation has a positive effect on our brains and is a helpful technique for relieving anxiety and stress and promoting better sleep. Children who have trouble focusing or who become anxious, homesick or frustrated can benefit from meditation. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a practice they can use throughout their lives, so why not teach them the basics early on? Camp is a great place to learn new skills while making memories and forging friendships.

2. Meditation Fosters Self-Esteem and Emotional Balance Meditation is a means to selfsoothe. As we sit in stillness,

How to Make Meditation a Part of Camp Activities

1. Seated Meditation Sitting still is a struggle for some kids, so adding meditation to the equation might seem impossible, but practice can train even the most active campers to master meditation


MAY 17-23,2018

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WHERE TEENS BECOME TEAMS Rowing programs for kids across NYC. Check out our week-long summer camp programs starting in June at rownewyork.org/camps.

Photo: Nicole Bratt, via flickr — for at least a few minutes. Let kids choose a posture — a cross-legged pose or anything comfortable. Encourage them to relax, be still and take deep, long breaths. The goal here is to begin with short sessions and build up to longer, more focused sessions.

2. Walking Meditation Walking meditation incorporates nature. Like other forms of meditation, it invites kids to tune in to the sensations of their bodies. How does the grass feel against their skin? How does their stride change as the terrain becomes rough or rocky? The goal here is mindfulness, and connecting with nature can be a wonder-

fully grounding experience.

3. Guided Meditation There are many ways to teach guided meditation to kids. In our technology-entrenched world, you should find many great options via YouTube videos, MP3 recordings and online tutorials. Voice narration is soothing and may even offer gentle music or nature sounds to enhance the experience. This type of meditation may be easiest for kids who are fidgety or have trouble meditating without the aid of a narrator. Whatever type of meditation you choose, make the process fun and pressure-free for campers. When busy minds begin to wander, encourage kids

to notice their thoughts without judgment or shame, and simply bring their minds back to a place of calm focus. Experiment with meditation mats and cushions, or allow kids to make their own. Meditation is an excellent tool kids can use to become more focused, positive, and peaceful throughout their lives. Camp is a great place to begin the journey inward! Laurie Palagyi is executive director of the West End House Girls Camp. www.wehgirlscamp.org Reprinted by permission of the American Camp Association. ©2018, American Camping Association, Inc.

ACTIVITIES FOR THE FERTILE MIND

thoughtgallery.org NEW YORK CITY

How to Talk About Privacy (Without Sounding Like a Conspiracy Theorist)

FRIDAY, MAY 18TH, 7PM

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The Strand | 828 Broadway | 212-473-1452 | strandbooks.com “Privacy is not dead in the United States, but it does seem to be circling the drain”: professor Lawrence Cappello leads a Think Olio session ($20, includes complimentary beer).

The Future of Evidence: Legal Expert Alexis Agathocleous + Neuroscientist Elizabeth Phelps

WEDNESDAY, MAY 23RD, 7PM Rubin Museum of Art | 150 W. 17th St. | 212-620-5000 | rmanyc.org Staff attorney for the Innocence Project Alexis Agathocleous speaks with neuroscientist Liz Phelps about memory, visual evidence, and how the two might contribute to a more just world ($22).

Just Announced | Two Presidents. One Unprecedented Evening.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8TH, 8PM Temple Emanu-El | 1 E. 65th St. | 888-718-4253 | emanuelnyc.org Two days after the November mid-term elections, historian Doris Kearns Goodwin moderates an evening with President Bill Clinton and President George W. Bush. Tickets available to the public starting June 6 ($250; VIP photo line also available).

Clinton

For more information about lectures, readings and other intellectually stimulating events throughout NYC,

sign up for the weekly Thought Gallery newsletter at thoughtgallery.org.


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Voices

Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to chelseanewsNY.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

BUSINESS PLANS EAST SIDE OBSERVER BY ARLENE KAYATT

Re-imaging moms and pops — Those family owned businesses that still exist — and are not being replaced by empty storefronts along the avenues — need to be reimagined and rebranded as Small Businesses. It matters and really brings the business model into the 21st century and with it the importance and necessity of branding. The eponymous moms and pops who opened the shops decades ago are usually long gone, with the businesses now owned and op-

erated by second, third and maybe fourth generations of those founders. Case in point was made for me when the Ansonia Democratic Club recently honored Tip Toe Shoes, started by Mom and Pop Wasserman more than 70 years ago. Their son, Dan, ran the business with his parents. Dan is still active, but he has passed the reins to his son — the third generation. The store, on 72nd Street between Broadway and Columbus Ave., remains the go-to place for neighborhood residents: The children who got their shoes at Tip Toe now shop there with their kids. In truth, the “mom and pop” nomenclature is derivative of the immigrant population that came

to America either just before or after World War II. The children who took over the businesses are the boomers and yuppies of yore. If they fall under the mom and pop umbrella, well, OK. But the third- and fourth-generations — the Gen Xers and millennials and beyond — are too far removed from the long-ago start-ups, and have earned the right and are entitled to be identified as “small businesses” while proudly proclaiming their heritage, as evidenced by Tip Toe Shoes and the East Side’s Michael’s Consignment which was written about in last week’s Our Town, and similarly owned businesses.

Disaster en route — The uptown bus stop at Third Avenue and 42nd Street is a disaster waiting to happen. The entire block — corner to corner between 43rd and 42nd Street — is dedicated to accommodating the M101, M102 and M103. Good planning since the stop is in the immediate vicinity of Grand Central. The sidewalk is fairly wide. There’s a Staples on the corner. And the street line along the curb where the buses stop has flower beds which are pretty but create a bottleneck when accessing — or trying to access — the buses. Adding to the inconvenience is that when two or

three buses come along at the same time, and the prospective rider tries for a bus that’s in the middle of the block. If the sidewalk is crowded with other riders and pedestrians there’s a good chance the bus will leave without said would-be passenger. It would be great if the bus drivers cooperated and waited as riders sprint or schlep to get on the bus before it departs. Forget it. The drivers have no problem closing the door in your face and leaving you to resume running up and down the block amid the flower beds, the street traffic and, now, the scaffolding poles.

RECLAIMING PRIDE FOR THE LGBTQ COMMUNITY BY JAY W. WALKER

In the last two months, Heritage of Pride (HOP), the organization entrusted with the annual LGBTQ Pride Parade/March and the official NYC Pride events around the city throughout June, has revealed some rather shocking changes to this year’s celebration. Among these changes, decided behind closed doors with no public discussion with members of the city’s LGBTQ communities, were limiting each marching contingent to no more than 200 people; issuing wrist bands to those contingents and stating that no one without a wrist band would be able to join in the march; and a drastic and illogical change to the march route. These facts were originally discovered by activists who had marched with advocacy groups last year behind a rainbow banner saying, “WE RESIST.” The activists, myself among them, were made aware of these changes in late March when we were rebuffed by HOP in our effort to allow a Resistance contingent in this year’s march. Many LGBTQ New Yorkers are unaware of these changes, which run contrary to the spirit of Pride as an open event for all members of the New

ACT UP and Rise and Resist at the Gay Pride March down Fifth Avenue, June 25, 2017. Photo: Elvert Barnes, via flickr York’s LGBTQ communities. Heritage of Pride said the reasons for limiting contingents were due to the long running time of the Pride March in recent years. This flies in the face of the facts: the numbers of corporations participating in the march had exploded over the past few years, and their floats are largely to blame for the march’s congestion issues. Then came the matter of the route change. For over 20 years the Pride March has begun in midtown and proceeded down Fifth Avenue, then

west along 8th and Christopher Streets, ending between Greenwich and Washington Streets near the Pride Fest street fair. This year’s parade route will begin at Seventh Avenue and 17th Street, move south to Christopher Street, then east to Fifth Avenue and north to Madison Square in the mid-20s. The Pride Fest will remain in the far West Village. Marchers will end up two miles from the Pride Fest and all the bars, restaurants and businesses of the West Village where revelers spend time after the march.

On their website, HOP claimed the route change was in preparation for next year’s Stonewall 50th Anniversary Pride. Next year New York will also be the host of World Pride, the international LGBTQ Pride celebration held in a different global city each year. How HOP reasoned that the best way to prepare for a huge influx of international and American visitors to next year’s Pride was to shrink the span of the Pride March this year is anyone’s guess. In March we asked for meetings with HOP and the NYPD. We were told that we would be given the opportunity to address the changes at HOP’s “open meeting” in mid-April and that they would set up a closed-door roundtable discussion among representatives of HOP, the NYPD and members of the six organizations who had come together to work on our goals. We were happy to meet with HOP at the open meeting to go over the issues surrounding the changes to the march. Then HOP canceled their April open meeting. We now had no way to publicly discuss our concerns prior to the roundtable with the NYPD. We decided that our only option was to formally draft our demands to both HOP and the NYPD and deliver them in person. Under the

name of The Reclaim Pride Coalition, we did so and sent copies to Mayor deBlasio’s office. Within two days, HOP and the NYPD cancelled the round table discussion. It became clear that HOP and the NYPD did not want these concerns addressed, at least not publicly. So we scheduled a town hall and invited HOP and the NYPD to attend. The 80 to 100 people who came to the town hall agreed with the demands and signed up to be kept informed about steps moving forward. No one identifying themselves as NYPD attended. Three senior organizers from HOP attended but did not speak during the town hall. HOP had notified us a day earlier that they would respond to the formal demands by May 21, just over one month before the Pride March. On Monday May 14 and Tuesday May 15, as this paper was going to press, Heritage of Pride was scheduled to hold their May open meeting and a Pride March planning meeting, respectively. Members of the Reclaim Pride Coalition hope to attend both, unless they too are canceled. Jay W. Walker is an organizer for the activist groups Gays Against Guns and Rise and Resist, as well as The Reclaim Pride Coalition. In April he received a 2018 Gay City News Impact Award for his activism.

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holders. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The figure isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t all that daunting when you think about what the city has spent on areas like Times Square and Astor Place,â&#x20AC;? Lappin said. Private fundraising for the project has not yet begun. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t had specific discussions with anybody, but we certainly know that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interest from the private owners, and we need the city to partner with us,â&#x20AC;? Lappin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The city has to step up.â&#x20AC;? Various city agencies contributed to the report, including the Transportation Department, Economic Development Corporation and Department of City Planning. Deputy Mayor Alicia Glen, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer and Council Member Margaret Chin, who represents the district in the city council, each issued statements in support of Downtown Allianceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efforts. Anthony Notaro, chair of Community Board 1, said that the influx of new downtown residents since 9/11, as the Financial District transformed from a primarily nine-to-five commuter hub to the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fastest growing residential neighborhood, has made smooth pedestrian ďŹ&#x201A;ow in the district more important than ever. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Safety is always paramount, but making this a usable space is critical,â&#x20AC;? he said. Notaro expects the community board to support the plan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone will have their say, but in concept we love the idea,â&#x20AC;? he said.

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Renderings released by Downtown Alliance show the Charging Bull statue relocated from Bowling Green to the corner of Wall and Broad Streets. Mayor Bill de Blasio announced in April that the city intends to move the bull and the Fearless Girl statue to the vicinity of the New York Stock Exchange due to pedestrian safety issues at the statuesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; current location. Rendering: WXY Architecture + Urban Design Street would be reconfigured to expand loading space and reduce congestion. New planters would double as seating areas, replacing the low-slung concrete benches that now line Broad Street. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They look so uncomfortable and people sit on them and eat their lunch every day,â&#x20AC;? Downtown Alliance President Jessica Lappin said. The security zoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s borders will remain unchanged under the plan, and perimeter fencing will remain in place around the New York Stock Exchange building, but bulky bronze blocks and hydraulic barriers at vehicle checkpoints will be replaced with simpliďŹ ed metal bollards like the slender poles used in Times Square, creating a more welcoming atmosphere for tourists and loosening pedestrian bottlenecks. The plan also envisions a more attractive and permanent screening entrance for the stock exchange. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Obviously the New York Police Department was very involvedâ&#x20AC;? in the planâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recommendations, Lappin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Safety and security is paramount, and anything that we were proposing we wanted to be sure it was in line with the necessary safety measures to make this area secure.â&#x20AC;? Downtown Alliance estimates that the proposals would cost roughly $30 million to implement, and recommends that the city fund the project in partnership with private stake-

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MAY 17-23,2018

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May 17 – 19 THREE FEMALE CHOREOGRAPHERS ON WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT New York Live Arts, 219 West 19th St. 7:30 p.m. $30 212-620-5000. newyorklivearts.org The all-female dance company Ariel Rivka Dance collaborates with the acclaimed Amy Marshall Dance Company and choreographer/dancer Chanel DaSilva for a season of provocative dance about empowering female expression. The collaboration kicks off this week with two new works — “She,” a dance that delves into the emotional waves of motherhood, and a solo work that reflects on the sacrifices one makes for passion — as well as the acclaimed “No Words.”

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Thu 17 Fri 18 SEARCHING FOR JEWISH HERITAGE WITH JOSEPH BERGER The Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th St. 6:30 p.m. $5-$15 After his parents died, Joseph Berger set off on a “roots journey” to Poland with his sister. What they discovered was both emotional and surprising. Joseph Berger, a former New York Times reporter and author of “Displaced Persons: Growing Up American After the Holocaust,” shares his experiences. 212-294-8301 programs.cjh.org

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Bryant Park 7:30 p.m. Free A familiar sight — a romantic Bryant Park wedding — develops into a modern-day twist on Shakespeare’s classic comedy, full of madcap revelry and literary fantasy. Come borrow a blanket and enjoy the great outdoors as you watch a playful rendition of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” as part of Bryant’s Park picnic series. nycgovparks.org

Mannes School of Music 55 West 13th St. 4:30 p.m. $10-$20 This new series features women who work with elements or a combination of music, theater, dance, poetry and/or visual arts in an unconventional way. Each event showcases three innovative women artists and their work, followed by a talk-back after the performances. womenbetweenarts.com


MAY 17-23,2018

11

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

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2018 Sun 20 Mon 21 Tue 22 FAMILY SUNDAY: TRANSCENDENT TALES Rubin Museum 150 West 17th St. 1 p.m. Free with museum admission Celebrate the story of your past, present and future by building your own crankie, a portable storytelling panorama. Come to the Rubin for some family art-making, then stay for an exhibition tour, storytelling and a thematic gallery search. 212-620-5000 rubinmuseum.org

JANE MAYER IN CONVERSATION: INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM The New York Public Library Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street 5 p.m. $40 New Yorker magazine staff writer Jane Mayer joins Paul Holdengräber for a conversation spanning her decades-long career. Mayerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in-depth investigative reporting has long uncovered hard truths about American life. 212-340-0863 nypl.org

â&#x2013;˛ #YEAHYOUWRITE AUTHOR SERIES Boâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kitchen & Bar Room 6 West 24th St. 6:30 p.m. Free Authors Julia Glass, John Freeman Gill, Maureen Brady and Rae DelBianco will share their new work at #YeahYouWrite, a monthly reading series held in the dark and dreamy Boâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kitchen lounge. Enjoy food and beverages, then take part in a rapid-ďŹ re Q&A session, open mic and book signing. 212-234-2373 bosrestaurant.com

Wed 23 â&#x2014;&#x201E; ELLEN FORNEY: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ROCK STEADYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; The Strand 828 Broadway 7:30 p.m. $19.99 admission & signed copy of the book/$5 admission and store gift card Ellen Forneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bestselling graphic memoir â&#x20AC;&#x153;Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, and Meâ&#x20AC;? now has an eagerly-awaited sequel: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rock Steady: Brilliant Advice From My Bipolar Life,â&#x20AC;? offers tips and tricks, and serves as a guide to navigating life. 212-473-1452 strandbooks.com

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“Chalkroom,” VR Installation. Photo: Canal Street Communications

RIFFS Laurie Anderson on art, life and virtual reality BY MARY GREGORY

Renowned performance and multimedia artist and Manhattanite, Laurie Anderson presented her virtual reality installation, “Chalkroom,” for the first time in New York recently at the Tribeca Film Festival. It’s a tourde-force of words, sounds, imagery, drawing and imagination designed to take viewers far from their quotidian experiences. Created with artist Hsin-Chien Huang, “Chalkroom” gives the audience a chance to fly through buildings, clouds and an imaginary universe made of words. Anderson’s got lots going on these days. Along with her VR presentations, she’s touring, performing, giving talks and readings from her new book, “All the Things I Lost in The Flood,” and will have a museum-filling solo exhibition at Guild Hall in East

Laurie Anderson. Photo: Ebru Yildiz

Hampton in June and July. She shared some of her thoughts in a conversation, which was edited for length and clarity.

which is made up of a million details and is all about number crunching and a lot of things that are extremely unglamorous.

MG: As an artist who uses words, music, performance and space and has said your work references disembodiment, VR seems like a perfect fit.

What does the act of creation do for you in your journey?

LA: I don’t know about that. I think you can certainly do the same thing if you’re making a pencil drawing or writing a novel. Virtual reality is a new medium, so I think it shocks people in a way, and they maybe experience things a little differently but I don’t think it’s a magic bullet that suddenly we can all express ourselves so well.

You don’t seem pinned down to a particular medium. You draw, you write poetry, you compose and play music. Is traveling between art forms part of that feeling of flying and disembodiment? No. I think that once I’m inside a piece, or trying to make a piece of music, I’m grounded in another way. When you’re doing stuff like that, you’re really kind of problem solving. It’s very different from the experience of the viewer or the reader to actually try to make these things. That’s a completely different experience — one

MAY 17-23,2018

It’s the most fun you can possibly imagine. It’s basically a godlike thing to do. It wasn’t there, and you put it there. It’s staggering what you’re actually kind of doing. So it’s very exciting. I guess it’s probably the most fun that I have. I love inventing things.

Love and empathy run so much through your work. A lot of my work is about violence and a lot of it is about war. I’ve done many prison projects....

Yet still those pieces are filled with empathy — trying to engender empathy. And in terms of responsibility, too, and what we can do about things.... I’m just thinking of one example. I had to give a talk a couple of nights ago with Chelsea Manning, who I really respect, and I was just thinking about some of the things that she had said and that Nadya from Pussy Riot had said. It was part of a music festival in

Houston. It was the kind of music festival that decided ‘well, let’s also do some social issues’ which sounds scary, but it was really wonderful. So the three of us were talking about prison, and I’ve never been in prison but I have done work with people who have been. One thing that both Nadya and Chelsea said about being in prison was so staggering to me. You know, when they said it, I just looked at the audience and their mouths were just open, thinking ‘oh my God.’ What they said about being in prison, what they learned in prison, was they both learned that it was really important to help people who didn’t have as much as you do. And I was just floored by that statement, because a lot of people go to prison and they’re just banging their gavels, and they’re outraged. And they want to change society, and they want to blame people — the wrong people put them in prison for the wrong reasons. No. These two people said they had learned it was really important to help people that didn’t have as much as they did, and I thought, this is colossal. Can you imagine if Americans had empathy what a difference it would make? And I thought I will try to do what I can to encourage that....

We say we live in this information rich culture and we’re totally ignorant. And then we have these heated discussions about things that nobody even knows what they’re talking about.... Nobody’s curious. Everybody just wants to defend their own side. And we know why that’s happening. We’re all fed news of only what we want to hear. It’s like medieval kings who say, just give me the good news of what’s happening in the court. I don’t care what’s happening out on the fields to the peasants. No, I just want to know the gossip, and what’s part of my world. So we all suffer from that. Now we have a so-called government that’s just screaming at each other. It’s like an ongoing porn show. It’s like, wow, I’m really not interested in hearing these guys anymore. It’s been a theme for me in my work. I try to spend time looking at this country and doing portraits of what it is, or how we can describe it. From a story point of view, and how people tell stories, it’s an intensely interesting moment because nobody can quite understand what’s going on. The stories are multiplying so fast that nobody has a grip on it at all.


MAY 17-23,2018

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14

MAY 17-23,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

HANGING GARDENS OF BREARLEY SCHOOLS School unveils design details of its $1 million plan to rebuild and jazz up the long-loathed overhang above the East River Esplanade BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

No more dark shadows, pigeon droppings, hideous-looking netting, leaking brown water, rusted steel columns and cracked and flaking concrete. Say goodbye to that dismal floodlighting, unsightly chicken-wire fencing — and the overall prison-like appearance of one of the Upper East Side’s worst eyesores. The Brearley School on May 10 presented its long-awaited blueprints for the rehabilitation of the 3,720-squarefoot, steel-and-concrete platform it leases from the city above the John

Finley Walk on the East River Esplanade between 82nd and 83rd Streets. Designed by Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects PC, the preliminary plans call for a “hanging garden concept” that would enliven the 100-foot long, 40-foot wide, city-owned structure, and its underbelly – the part pedestrians pass beneath. There are two proposed color schemes, one blue and one green. The designs haven’t been finalized yet, and Brearley, which has agreed to pay $1 million to rebuild the 79-year old structure, is expected to fine-tune them. But the proposed elements for the reconfigured platform — known as “The Pier” or “The Overhang” — unveiled to the public by the private allgirls school include evergreen vines, shrubs and groundcover, coastal grasses, green screens, ornamental bulbs and multi-stem, deciduous tree

A rendering of an elevated platform on the East River Esplanade included as part of a $1 million plan to enliven the long-dead space under the Brearley School’s playground. Rendering: Brearley School / Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects PC

in 36-inch planters. So what’s the optimal color for the overhead platform, which Brearley uses as a playground for its students? Should it be environmental green or sky-blue? “I prefer the blue,” said City Council Member Ben Kallos, who represents the area. “It creates an element of looking up at the sky, it provides a lighter color, and it references both the water and the sky,” he added. “But I’m just one of the 168,000 people in the district who are entitled to an opinion.” Actually, Kallos played a central, if backstage, role in the process that led to Brearley’s commitment to spruce up The Pier. Its most recent 20-year lease had expired in October 2015, and Kallos asked the Department of Citywide Administrative Services, which negotiates with private parties leasing city property, to ensure that any lease renewal require Brearley to make capital improvements, take responsibility for maintenance and provide account-

ability to the community. After two years of back and forth talks between Brearley, DCAS and Kallos, a deal was hammered out: The school agreed to invest $1 million in the structural and aesthetic rehabilitation of The Pier, and its annual rent for the waterfront aerie jumped from a mere $8,022 to $32,000. In return, it signed a 20-year lease with two 10-year renewal options, meaning it can retain tenancy of the elevated space until at least 2058. Three months of capital construction are expected to begin by June 2019, and project completion is anticipated by the September 2019 start of the next school year, the school said. “I will finally be able to walk by without having anything dripping or falling on my head,” Kallos said. East Siders who prefer blue or green, or otherwise want to comment or offer suggestions on the project, can write Brearley at facilitiesproject@brearley. org. invreporter@strausnews.com

RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS MAY 2 - 8, 2018 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml. Dunkin’ Donuts Hudson News

2 Pennsylvania Plaza

A

Tick Tock Diner

481 8 Avenue

Grade Pending (27) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored.

Paris Baguette

6 West 32 Street

Grade Pending (33) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored.

Starbucks

100 West 33 Street

A

The Ramble Cafe

10 Hudson Yards

A

Turntable LP Bar

34 W 32nd St

A

Chandni Restaurant

13 West 29 Street

A

AMC Theatres

312 W 34th St

A

La Gusto Pizza

382 8th Ave

Grade Pending (24) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Evidence of rats or live rats present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

Subway

156 West 29 Street

A

Starbucks

399 7th Ave

A

Pier 60

And West Side Highway

A

Murray’s Bagels

242 8 Avenue

A

Stella’s Pizza

110 9 Avenue

A

Spain Restaurant & Bar

113 West 13 Street

Grade Pending (20) Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewageassociated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Spirit Of New York

Pier 62 West 23 Street - Chelsea Pier

Grade Pending (18) Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewageassociated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

Formerly Crows

85 Washington Pl

Grade Pending (11) Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

Tipsy Parson

156 9 Avenue

Grade Pending (3)

Just Made Sushi (DD Maru)

267 West 17 Street

A

Zagara Wine Bar

216 7th Ave

A

Rocking Horse Cafe

182 8 Avenue

Grade Pending (22) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Filth flies or food/refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewageassociated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies.

Le Grainne Cafe

183 9 Avenue

A

Dirty Bird To-Go

204 West 14 Street

A

Bareburger

103 W 14th St

Not Yet Graded (19) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred.

Telegraphe Cafe

107 W 18th St

A


MAY 17-23,2018

15

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

SUMMER OF ‘78 CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 DISARRAY The city that August was just two years removed from the brink of bankruptcy, and just a summer on from the last of the Son of Sam killings and a crippling, mayhem-filled 25-hour citywide blackout that spilled into riots, looting and arson. Its roads and bridges were crumbling; its subway bedevilled by tinpot stock, crime and graffiti; its police officers and firefighters chastened by massive layoffs; its population near a post-Great Depression low; its homicide rate hovering at record highs. “The city was hemorrhaging people, jobs and public confidence,” said Kenneth T. Jackson, a professor of history at Columbia University and the editor of “The Encyclopedia of New York City.” The 1970s, he said, “were just about the nadir of the city’s 400 years.” Parks, along with pools and libraries, were budgetary casualties. Years of spending and staffing cuts had rendered the city’s open spaces to little more than a collection of litterstrewn lots with broken toilets and tumbledown amenities. “By the time I got here, it was like a person that needed 12 bypasses,” Davis, who was appointed Parks commissioner in January 1978 by the newly elected mayor, Ed Koch, said of the city’s parks system. “All the arteries were clogged.” Nevertheless, people came, on their own or in groups, to Central Park, Riverside Park, Battery Park City, Washington Square Park.

LOOKING AHEAD Gorton was hired by The Times following stints shooting for Students for a Democratic Society and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. “I was a bit more of an ideologically motivated photographer,” he said. Those sentiments would influence and inspire his work that summer. “I was really taken with the poor, powerless, marginal people who at the time made up most of the people” in the parks, he said from his home in Carbondale, Illinois. “I was interested in the social dynamics of people — what are people doing, who are they, where are they from. I thought it was important.” Gorton, then in his mid-30s, and his colleagues made pictures of cricketers in Van Cortlandt Park, plein air painters in Pelham Bay Park, sunbathers at Orchard Beach, people reading,

“Tender Vittles, Cats on Parade,” Central Park, 1978. D. Gorton, NYC Parks Photo Archive couples kibbitzing, a woman sleeping. Among the photographs at The Arsenal in Central Park is one of participants in that year’s Puerto Rican Fiesta Folklorica, taken in all likelihood by Gorton from upper Bethesda Terrace. Hundreds are gathered around “Angels of the Waters,” the fountain below. To the left of the frame, in the middle distance, is a young man, one pant leg rolled up, atop one of one the west steps’ pillars. He is staring at us, his look hard, challenging. Davis, the parks commissioner, likened him to a centurion or a Greek statue. “You don’t really know what’s in his mind. But one of the things that’s in his mind, is ‘I’m here and you’re there and I’m looking right at you. And this is my space. And that’s why I’m standing here,’” Davis said at The Arsenal earlier this month. “It’s almost as if he were looking at me.”

REGENERATION Jonathan Kuhn, the director of art and antiquities for the Parks Department who curated the exhibit, said he sought to convey in his choice of photographs the multiplicity of New Yorkers’ experiences and attitudes during that epoch. “I wanted to show this contrast and sometimes collision between the decayed nature of the parks at that time and the sheer joy of the people using them,” he said. “I was interested in this moment where we had sort of bottomed out. Either we were going to take back the parks or they were going to cease to be relevant.” The parks would, in time, blossom again. Davis, speaking about the Fiesta Folklorica photo, had reason to recall the occasion: It was the first time in about five years that water was flowing in the fountain. He again imagined the young man’s thoughts: “OK, you got the water in the fountain. What

else are you going to do to make things better?” Davis, widely credited for sparking the city park’s renaissance, got to work. During his five-year tenure as commissioner, Bryant Park was rehabilitated, Central Park’s Sheep Meadow and Great Lawn were rejuvenated, and its cast-iron bridges rebuilt. He also commissioned a fullscale restoration of Central Park, much of which would be managed and funded by the private, nonprofit Central Park Conservancy, which he helped found in 1980. Gradually, then in droves, runners, cyclists, birdwatchers, baseball players, hikers and walkers, including Elizabeth Barlow Rogers and her children, flocked to the park. Four decades on from that hardscrabble summer, Central Park’s Kentucky bluegrass and ryegrass are thriving, vibrant symbols, maybe, of so much regeneration. “It’s become very beautiful,” Rogers, who was appointed Central Park administrator by Koch in 1979 and was instrumental in the creation the Conservancy, said this week. “It’s this great civic triumph.” Kuhn, the curator, said that parks are the ultimate measure of a city’s health. “There are few places in life where we all come together. Cities at their essence are such places and parks within cities compound that collective experience,” he said. Four decades ago, eight photojournalists at the top of their game set out to take the temperature of a city being buffeted from within and without. For at least one of them, the occasion would be rejuvenating, and inspiring. “Being in the parks was such a lovely thing,” Gorton said. “If you’re going to be living a pressure cooker, you get to relax a bit. It’s a beautiful thing. And you learn.”

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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

MAY 17-23,2018

Business

Real Estate

Eve Birnbaum speaking at a mentor program in July 2017 sponsored by the Association of Corporate Counsel - New York City Chapter. Photo: Penny M. Williams

FIRST STEPS TO YOUR SECOND ACT WORK A career counselor suggests doing a self-assessment by answering three key questions

Photo: NatalieMaynor, via flickr

BY EVE D. BIRNBAUM

ASK A BROKER BY ANDREW KRAMER

Our broker presented us with 2 offers on our Lincoln Center co-op after our first Open House. One is all-cash for $20,000 below our asking price. The second is at full ask, however they will be financing and are intending to use the apartment part time as a pied-a-terre, which our building handles on a “case by case” basis. As much as we’d like to get as much as we can for our place, we don’t want to make a foolish decision ... help!

It’s wonderful to receive 2 offers after your first open house. I suggest you conduct a “best and final” round with your buyers in hopes the all-cash buyers will increase their offer. Even if they don’t, they may be your better bet. In addition to not having to worry about whether they can obtain a mortgage, the all-cash buyers also don’t have the pied-a-terre cloud hovering over them. There’s a 50 percent chance the board will say no and that will put you several months behind the eight ball, you’ll most likely have lost the all-cash buyer and your place will be back on the market. It’s always wise to go with the candidate that will most likely pass the board, even if it’s the one that puts less money in your pocket. Andrew Kramer is a licensed associate real estate broker with Brown Harris Stevens Residential Sales

The baby boomers are not retiring — ever! We’ve entered the era of the “never retirees.” Every day, I encounter more and more clients, colleagues and friends who want to exit their “big jobs” while still remaining productive — and preferably by staying in the work force. Are you one of them? Maybe you are a parent whose kids have left the nest (at least for now) and who has enough financial stability to consider leaving your high-paying job to pursue a passion. Or perhaps you simply want more free time. Whatever your motivation, and wherever you are in your Second Act pursuit — whether in the dreaming stage or the ready-totake action stage, and whether you know exactly what you want to do or just know that you don’t want to keep doing what you are doing, the first step is to do a selfassessment and honestly answer three key questions.

1. What do you most want to change? Your first step to your first step

is to prioritize what you most want to change about your current situation. The answer can be as mundane as carving out more time for yourself in your current job, or as dramatic as leaving your lifelong career cold turkey to do something completely different. If you’re at the pinnacle of a long career, any change will most likely result in a diminution in status and compensation. For this reason, you need to be clear about the change you are seeking and willing to make trade-offs to achieve it. But before you turn to question 2, a word about “change.” Change is always hard, and can be particularly difficult at this stage of life. Dr. Marian GetzlerKramer, a veteran clinical psychologist, advises that “when clients respond by saying that they ‘are too busy’ or ‘can’t afford to’ or ‘don’t have skills’ ... to do anything else, it is often masking their fear of change, fear of losing identity, or simply fear of the unknown.” In order to move forward, says Dr. Getzler-Kramer, you must explore the underlying fear, address it and open yourself up to risk. Even if you have a financial or other reality that limits your ability to make a change right now, there is still value in doing the self-assessment and determining your priorities. There are changes you can make or aspire

to make without diving headlong into your second act.

2. What key strengths do you want to use in your second act? Here you need to take stock of your skills, expertise and talents that have been valued and rewarded in your career. This includes personality traits (for instance, intellectually curious, quick study, personable) as well as work competencies (analytic skills, leadership skills, subject matter expertise). Identify which of these were not only important in attaining your current success, but also energize you and give you satisfaction. It is not uncommon that the same skill or expertise that you are valued for in your current job is the one that makes you want to weep from boredom or burnout. Don’t list these! This is exactly what you don’t want to be doing in your second act. Find strengths that meet both criteria — you’re good at it, and it energizes you when you use it. You will need to think in terms of skills and traits, rather than your actual job. The task is to break down your day-today activities into the specific discrete skills you use, as well as the roles you play at work. Finally, the strengths that you identify should also be ones that you can “sell” in seeking your second act. (For example: your even-tempered personality could be a key strength

in your current workplace, but it’s not “saleable,” whereas your management skills can be easily articulated and sold.)

3. What are your work goals? It’s not enough to know what you don’t want to do. While it may be too early in your journey to specifically know what job you want, you must identify what a positive end result would look like. At this stage of our lives, the goal is often “value-driven” — working for a particular cause or organization, or pursuing a particular passion or interest. Your goal could also be informed by identifying your key strengths, and finding a position that aligns better with those strengths than your current job. Finally, it is important to recognize and accept that your second act may not afford you the external indicators of “success” that we have sought from the time we entered the work force. And by that I mean: money, status, title, big office, recognition or power. You will need to redefine “success” as achieving the change you are seeking, using the skills that energize you and being in the work environment that makes you happy. Eve Birnbaum, founder of Eve Birnbaum Associates, career consultants, is a former law firm partner.


MAY 17-23,2018

17

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

  

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18

MAY 17-23,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

SOMETHING YOU’D LIKE US TO LOOK INTO DO HAVE Email us at news@strausnews.com? YOU

A SEPHARDIC BOOM ON THE UES RELIGION Syrian Jews relocate from Brooklyn to the East Side — and a major new communal institution rises up to accommodate them BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

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A 14-story, $65 million building now wrapping up construction on East 82nd Street between Lexington and Park Avenues reflects a sea change in Jewish life on the Upper East Side — and the arrival and maturity of a new and deeply religious populace. When the Moise Safra Community Center opens its doors this fall, it will quickly become the premier social, spiritual, educational, recreational, cultural and culinary center for the fast-growing Sephardic set pouring into Manhattan. Designed to cater largely to Orthodox Jews of Syrian ancestry, the Safra Center — in its programming, ambition and vision, if not its budget — will inevitably be likened to the 92nd Street Y. Or at least a more religious version of the historically Ashkenazi institution that now serves people of all faiths on its Lexington Avenue campus just 10 blocks to the north. The 73,000-square-foot structure will operate as a vertical campus packed with two

The Moise Safra Community Center on East 82nd Street, set to open this fall, will become the central community hub for the Sephardic Jewish population of the Upper East Side. Photo: Douglas Feiden synagogues, three kosher cafes, a swimming pool, library, fitness center, wellness center and two sprawling outdoor terraces, plans filed with the city’s Department of Buildings show. Shoehorned into a tight urban space that once housed three adjoining townhouses, the center will become one of the busiest buildings in town: It boasts study rooms, lecture rooms, prayer rooms, ballrooms, a dining lounge, bike storage, art classrooms and studios for dance and yoga. Over a month-long period, Safra Center executives declined several requests for interviews and a tour, saying they weren’t yet ready to tell

their story publicly. That didn’t dampen enthusiasm for the center’s debut. At Congregation Or Zarua, a Conservative synagogue directly across 82nd Street, Rabbi Scott N. Bolton is rolling out the metaphorical red carpet for a place where Jews of all backgrounds are welcome to participate. “It’s East meets West, and Sephardi meets Ashkenazi,” the rabbi said. “We look forward to cooperative ventures, block parties at holiday times, and an increased traffic in programming that will create a Jewish buzz on the block.” The Safra Center launch comes amid a surge in the population of Jews whose

families trace their roots to the Mid-East, North Africa and the Mediterranean Basin — and who have recently been putting down stakes in the East 60s, 70s, 80s and low 90s. “We’re putting down roots here, we’re building here, we’ve invested here, we have everything we need right here,” said Rebecca Harary, who was the Safra Center’s founding executive director and Republican nominee for an East Side City Council seat in 2017. An empty-nester with four of her six children married and a fifth leaving for college, she and her husband made a tentative move from Brooklyn to the UES seven years ago. They never looked back. Meanwhile, other neighborhood mainstays are bursting at the seams, including Manhattan Sephardic Congregation on East 75th Street, the largely Moroccan synagogue founded by Rabbi Raphael Benchimol in 1990 as the first the first fulltime Sephardic synagogue on the UES. “This community is continually growing, and as more centers and institutions are being built, the more it can be expected to grow,” the rabbi said. invreporter@strausnews.com

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SHARING A PASSION Co-founder of the World Science Festival on educating and entertaining the city BY ANGELA BARBUTI

Journalist Tracy Day earned four Emmy Awards for her reporting on subjects of politics and war. However, she once worked on a documentary series for ABC News, which, unlikely enough, led to her foray into science. Through that project, she met scientist Brian Greene, a physics and mathematics professor at Columbia, and the two eventually married. “I discovered, when Brian and I got together, that there is a passionate audience of people who wanted science content,” she explained. “People were scalping tickets to go to Brian’s talks.” The couple’s idea for the World Science Festival came when Brian was invited to a science festival in Italy. “Brian and I at the same time started thinking, “Is there anything like this in America?””

The rest goes down in the scientific history of our city as the World Science Festival was born. Launched in 2008, it creates programming for the top scientists and thinkers in the world. This year, it runs from May 29 through June 2. Programing will range from the study of black holes to editing DBA, and there is something for all ages, from children to post docs.

Tell us about your background in journalism. I come from ABC News and broadcast journalism in general. So my career was largely focused on politics and war. I was a longtime producer at “Nightline,” and covered things like the fall of the Berlin Wall and the Gulf War and Mandela’s release in South Africa and drug wars in Colombia. It was kind of amazing and an exciting time in broadcast journalism. My career was largely based on nonfiction, informational programming about current affairs and policy and wars and such.

The World Science Festival, founded by the journalist Tracy Day, this year runs from May 29 through June 2.

What was your vision for the festival and what is its programming like? Number one, to do it in New York, which we were advised against by many people. they said, “Go do something like this in a small town where you could own the town.” And we didn’t want to do that. We thought, “New York is where we live and it’s an intellectual and cultural playground and let’s use this place and all of the energy.” We wanted to bring science to the general public. Initially people said, “Who’s your audience?” And we said, “Well everyone. But we’re not naive. But we do want to reposition science into kind of the middle of popular culture So we’re going to think about these various audiences and program to them.” So many of the programs are in big theaters and meant for a general audience, largely an adult audience. But some kids are interested; it’s incredible. You see these 10 and 12-yearolds at these very in-depth programs. And then we have salons that are meant for a more informed audience, post-doc graduate students, that sort of things.

As CEO what does your job entail? What’s a typical day like for you? Well my heart and soul and the way I view the world is really content. So for me, unlike maybe other CEOs who are more involved in the business aspectsI do that too-but I really focus on what the content is that we’re creating and distributing. But of course, running an organization, I always say I’ve learned so much about things I knew nothing about.

Tracy Day earned plaudits for her war reporting. She now runs an annual science festival.

You are hosting a gala honoring trailblazing women. Tell us about those being recognized.

We really wanted this year to take almost a “Hidden Figures” approach to women scientists who have so changed the world. And even if people know their names- people know Marie Curie’s name, but don’t really know her story. And so to be able to tell that story in a way that incorporates narration and music and visuals, so that’s it a very emotional and informational experience for the audience, I hope will have a huge impact. So Marie Curie is one of them, Rosalind Franklin. Alice Ball, who was a chemist in Hawaii and she discovered treatment for leprosy and she died very young. When the research was published, it was published under the name of the president of the university, who took the research and claimed it. It was only when a female researcher discovered this, that they made it right and gave her her due posthumously. And Vera Rubin, one of these groundbreaking women in physics who passed away recently. Not enough people know her name, particularly young women. The other woman, Maryam Mirzakhani, is an Iranian mathematician who won a fields medal, which is a very prestigious honor in mathematics.

I see you also offer events for kids. We have many lab visits, with a focus on girls and women. So there are lab visits to women-run labs. A small group experience for girls. And these women scientists are just spectacular and in their bones they understand how important it is for them to be mentors and to expose these girls to what they do. One program that we’ve done since we’ve launched is something called Cool Jobs. We wanted kids to know that the way they think about scientists and what they do may

not be really what they do at all. There are scientists who build roller coasters. So these scientists, one is a forensic scientist, one is a herbatologist, one is a mechanical engineer, one is a sports tech engineer and then another engineer. Their job is to get up on the stage and sell their job to those kids. Kids rush the stage; it’s really a beautiful sight. We have a lot of outdoor, free events for families and kids. We have a City of Science program down at Washington Square Park. That’s the Manhattan version of City of Science, a year-round set of events we do at each of the boroughs. And then we have a Star Party at Brooklyn Bridge Park on Saturday night. You can learn all about the universe and look through telescopes and listen to people talk about space. That’s a hugely popular program.

I know it’s hard to choose, but what’s an event you’re looking forward to attending? There are a couple of really interesting heavy content programs that I love. One of them is a program that Brian is actually doing on black holes. The other one is a program that is looking at the evolutionary underpinnings of why we believe. It’s called “The Believing Brain.” It’s about evolution, neuroscience and spiritual instinct. www.worldsciencefestival.com

Know somebody who deserves their 15 Minutes of fame? Go to chelseanewsNY.com and click on submit a press release or announcement.


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by Myles Mellor

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Clinton 1

MAY 17-23,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

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MAY 17-23,2018

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PUBLIC NOTICES

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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

PUBLIC NOTICES

MAY 17-23,2018


MAY 17-23,2018

CLASSIFIEDS MASSAGE

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC AUCTION NOTICE OF SALE OF COOPERATIVE APARMENT SECURITY PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: By Virtue of a Default under Loan Security Agreement, and other Security Documents, Karen Loiacano, Auctioneer, License #DCA1435601 or Jessica L Prince-Clateman, Auctioneer, License #1097640 or Vincent DeAngelis Auctioneer, License #1127571 will sell at public auction, with reserve, on June 6, 2018, in the Rotunda of the New York County Courthouse, 60 Centre Street, New York, NY 10007, commencing at 1:15pm for the following account: Michael Angelo Tata a/k/a Michael A. Tata, as borrower, 651 shares of capital stock of 451 West Owners Ltd. and all right, title and interest in the Proprietary Lease to 451 W. 22nd Street, Apt. 4F, New York, NY 10011 Sale held to enforce rights of Bank of America, NA, who reserves the right to bid. Ten percent (10%) Bank/Certified check required at sale, balance due at closing within thirty (30) days. The Cooperative Apartment will be sold “AS IS” and possession is to be obtained by the purchaser. Pursuant to Section 201 of the Lien Law you must answer within 10 days from receipt of this notice in which redemption of the above captioned premises can occur. There is presently an outstanding debt owed to Bank of America, NA (lender) as of the date of this notice in the amount of $326,644.30. This figure is for the outstanding balance due under UCC1, which was secured by Financ-

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PUBLIC NOTICES

ing Statement in favor of Bank of America, NA recorded on January 13, 2006 in CRFN 2006000024833. Please note this is not a payoff amount as additional interest/fees/penalties may be incurred. You must contact the undersigned to obtain a final payoff quote or if you dispute any information presented herein. The estimated value of the above captioned premises is $386,000.00 Pursuant to the Uniform Commercial Code Article 9-623, the above captioned premises may be redeemed at any time prior to the foreclosure sale. You may contact the undersigned and either pay the principal balance due along with all accrued interest, late charges, attorney fees and out of pocket expenses incurred by Bank of America, NA. and the undersigned, or pay the outstanding loan arrears along with all accrued interest, late charges, attorney fees and out of pocket expenses incurred by Bank of America, NA, and the undersigned, with respect to the foreclosure proceedings. Failure to cure the default prior to the sale will result in the termination of the proprietary lease. If you have received a discharge from the Bankruptcy Court, you are not personally liable for the payment of the loan and this notice is for compliance and information purposes only. However, Bank of America, NA, still has the right under the loan security agreement and other collateral documents to foreclosure on the shares of stock and rights under the proprietary lease allocated to the cooperative apartment. Dated: April 25, 2018 Frenkel, Lambert, Weiss, Weisman & Gordon, LLP Attorneys for Bank of America, NA 53 Gibson Street Bay Shore, NY 11706 631-969-3100 File #01-083143- #94880

PUBLIC NOTICES

Telephone: 212-868-0190 Email: classified2@strausnews.com

POLICY NOTICE: We make every effort to avoid mistakes in your classified ads. Check your ad the first week it runs. The publication will only accept responsibility for the first incorrect insertion. The publication assumes no financial responsibility for errors or omissions. We reserve the right to edit, reject, or re-classify any ad. Contact your sales rep directly for any copy changes. All classified ads are pre-paid.

PUBLIC NOTICES

ESTATE SALE 4 Floors of DESIGNER CLOTHES & Shoes, Donna Karan, Christian Louboutin Shoes, etc. CHINA & FLATWARE. One of a Kind DISHES - No 2 Alike STARTS 5/3/18. EVERY DAY NOON TO 5:00

212-427-8885

Volunteering is Ageless Learn why organizations want you and how to get started!

Volunteers of All Ages Needed

Tuesday, May 22, 2018 3:00²5:00 Church of the Incarnation 209 Madison Avenue at 35th Street Subways: 4,5,6,7 Buses: M2, M3, M4

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RSVP to reserve your place 212 889-4805 or www.volunteer-referral.org

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