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The local paper for Chelsea

WEEK OF MAY POLAR PURPOSE ◄ P. 18

11-17 2017

A transgender woman found unconscious and unresponsive on this Seventh Avenue sidewalk April 25 has died.

TRANSGENDER WOMAN DIES AFTER BEATING

More than 7,500 sidewalk sheds shade New York City, mostly in Manhattan. A new map gives a better picture of the size and safety purposes of these common features. Photo: Steven Pisano, via Flickr

CRIME

SHEDDING LIGHT ON SHADE BUILDINGS Buildings department maps scaffolding citywide BY MADELEINE THOMPSON

On West 29th Street, between Eighth and Ninth Avenues, one structure stands out in a row of multi-colored, five-story buildings. Number 339 is shrouded in scaffolding and sheltered at the street level by 22 linear feet of sidewalk shed. The permit for that cluster of wood, steel and other material was issued almost a decade ago, in December 2007.

While it’s possible that the shed and scaffolding were taken down at some point over the last 10 years, a Department of Buildings spokesperson said, it is “overwhelmingly likely” that the structures have been up since their initial assembly. A new map engineered by the department charts that edifice and thousands of others — and confirms what for New Yorkers is a truism: sidewalk sheds are everywhere. As of Feb. 1, roughly 7,500 sidewalk sheds provided temporary protection for pedestrians walking under construction sites, according to the DOB. The map also provides evidence for what many suspect: countless of these removable

Succumbs after she was found with head trauma on a Chelsea sidewalk BY RICHARD KHAVKINE

roofs can hardly be described as temporary. When sorted by longevity, the map shows that some of these scaffoldings are more enduring than the tenants and businesses underneath. About half of the 7,500 sidewalks sheds are located in Manhattan, since the borough is home to about 60 percent of city buildings taller than six stories, whose exterior walls must be inspected every five years. Sheds also have to be installed for construction of a building more than 40 feet high, the demolition of a building more than 25 feet high and when dangerous building conditions exist.

A transgender woman who died nine days after being found unconscious on a Seventh Avenue sidewalk was beaten to death, the city’s medical examiner said. Paramedics found Brenda Bostick, 59, with head trauma in front of 343 Seventh, a Five Guys outlet on the east side of the avenue just north of 29th Street, about 10:30 on April 25. She was taken to Bellevue Hospital where she died on May 4, police said. Police are investigating her death as a homicide. The city’s medical examiner said

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that Bostick died of “complications of blunt impact injury” to the head. The southern portion of the block where Bostick was found is draped by scaffolding and while well-traveled daytimes is relatively empty of commerce during the evenings and at night. The restaurant was closed at the time. Employees of a deli on the corner of 29th Street, next door to the Five Guys outlet, said police had been inquiring of the night in question but that workers that Tuesday night had not noticed any commotion outside. Police said Bostick lived at the BRC transition shelter on West 25th Street. The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs said Bostick was the 10th reported killing of a transgender person of color this year. Bostick was black.

3 8 10 12

Restaurant Ratings Business Real Estate 15 Minutes

14 16 17 18

WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW < CITYARTS, P.14

WHO HAS ACCESS TO A PARKING SPACE IN CHELSEA? NEWS

9-16

MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.18

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

WHAT NEXT FOR CHELSEA GALLERIES?

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up rezoning told us she’d like to would and the mid-2000s May 1 The and running this year, for of West Chelsea. Muas an ombudsman city serve Whitney the of opening Art on small businesses within them clear seum of American means not government, helping It’s new buildings, to get Gansevoort Street c to the traffi through the bureaucracy rising rents, that are even more foot things done. forcing some gallerists area. is that Perhaps even more also The irony, of course, to reconsider their Whitney -importantly, the ombudsman the arrival of the and number neighborhood roots art meccas will tally the type small business one of the city’s the end for of complaints by taken in BY GABRIELLE ALFIERO -- could also spell dealers the actions art owners, long-time policy buildStephen some response, and somefor ways to When gallerists Griffin in the area, as their are sold or recommendations If done well, Haller and Cynthiatheir W. ings increasingly begin to fix things. report would Haller reopened follow- demolished. lease the ombudsman’s 26th Street gallery With their 10-year quantitative afrst fi the rebuild Stephen us give cut short, with ing a five-month flooded abruptly shared taste of what’s wrong ter Hurricane Sandy they and Cynthia, who the city, an the space, small businesses in towards building with their first floor phone their and Tony important first step were still without were Lehmann Maupin they the problem. needed to xing fi of galleries, and Internet. Still, where Shafrazi property by June To really make a difference, the happy in the location, will have to to stay for vacate (Shafrazi is suing course, the advocaterising rents, they expected of 2014. find a way to tackle business’ the Manhattes some time. doltold less the landlord, which remain many While Chin Instead, they were their Group, for $20 million reproblem. vexing that Post most the New York than a year later gauge what to demol- lars, said it’s too early tocould have landlord planned ported). another role the advocate on the ish the building. They shopped for planned for there, more information in the neighbor“We had shows bad thing. We had location to find problem can’t be a with the long periods of time.amount hood but struggled a twoThis step, combinedBorough more than just put in a huge the anything efforts by Manhattan to mediate of money to refurbish“We year lease on a street-level in Chelsaid. President Gale Brewer offer space,” Cynthia space. After 13 years Gallery the rent renewal process, were really shocked.”Gallery sea, Stephen Haller signs tangible and early, Haller some For Stephen small left the neighborhoodStux it, it isn’t riswith of progress. For many can’t come and others like joined forces oor are driving business owners, that in a new sixth-fl ing rents that far new devel- Gallery soon enough. on 57th Street, not Chelsea, Zach Feuer them away. It’s

NEWS

luxury building Robotic garage for board draws fire from community BY ZACH WILLIAMS

at a a robotic garage A proposal for in Chelsea has thrown luxury building into the city’s zoning access to parking debate. proposed for a A high-tech garage W. 28th St. has 520 development at Board 4, which is riled Community arguing that it plan, in opposing the more car usage would only invite while only providthe neighborhood, residents. ing parking to rich a special city perThe garage needs 29 spaces rather mit to accommodate allowed the than the 11 automatically opted to oppose by the city. CB4 1 full board meetpermit at its April Carl a draft letter to ing, stating in Planning City the of Weisbrod, chair city criteria for such Commission, that based on the parking foran exception is ago, when many for stock of a decade spaces were used demer industrial future of parking in anticipation velopment in Chelsea. 40 residential have The project will comsquare feet of alunits and 11,213 the ground floor, mercial space on three parking spaces The lowing eight and the developer, respectively. But wants more for Related Companies, is the New York acthe building, which internationally City debut for Zaha Hadid. (Adjaclaimed architect Line, the build cent to the High

CONTINUED ON PAGE

25

his gallery in After 15 years running to partner with Joel two gallery spaces, (left) leaves the neighborhood team will operate Mesler (right). TheMesler/Feuer, on the Lower East Feuer/Mesler and May 10. Slide, slated to open

Newscheck

2 3

is surging opment, which in part to in Chelsea, thanks High Line the opening of the

City Arts Top 5

12 13

space

CONTINUED ON PAGE

25

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MAY 11-17,2017

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

GOOD REASON FOR A BAD HAIR DAY WHEELS Get Women Cycling gears up to rally support for new riders with launch of its third annual #ShowMeHelmetHair social media campaign BY GAIL EISENBERG

“The ‘hat tip’ gesture is a playful welcome to the start of bike season,” says Angela Azzolino, program creator and executive director of Get Women Cycling. “Our goal is to unite cyclists and provide support for active women, femaleidentifying, and non-gender conforming people by offering a way to engage with cyclists on post-ride appearance — an issue often cited as a deterrent to sustained bicycle riding.” Gender disparities became apparent to Azzolino in 2014 after she graduated from the Bicycle Mechanic Skills Academy, a 12-week job program launched by the Lower East Side’s Henry Street Settlement and Recycle-a-Bicycle.

Angela Azzolino (left) with Gina, a GWC member, after a few test rides. Photo: GWC She’d read about such discrepancies in reports by industry non-profits like the League of American Bicyclists, but when she was promoted from bike builder to mechanic at a Brooklyn bike shop, she witnessed them firsthand.

“As the only female in a consumer-facing gig on the main service floor I began to experience the sexism in the industry; not so much from my colleagues but from patrons and sales reps,” Azzolino recalls. “I noticed how women would en-

ter the shop and look past me to inform the male mechanic of their needs. I noticed women coming to buy bicycles with such enthusiasm and then leaving empty-handed because they were overwhelmed. I noticed a lack of repeat visits from female customers who had purchased bikes and/or accessories,” she says. A red taillight went on in her head. In 2015 the native New Yorker parlayed her twentyfive years of user experience design expertise to develop GWC, whose mission is to elevate and sustain female bicycle ridership through engagement, education, and service reform. GWC and its initiatives have received citywide support from sponsors like New York staple Veselka, NYC Velo bike shops in Hell’s Kitchen and the East Village, as well as active bike advocates Cathy and Daniel Flanzig of Flanzig & Flanzig (aka New York Bike Lawyers), the sibling-run midtown law firm whose focus is on representing seriously injured cyclists throughout NYC.

Angela Azzolino tips her helmet. Photo: GWC Azzolino’s organization may be young, but her passion for cycling is longstanding thanks to her uncle Pete. He gave her a Schwinn Varsity 10-speed when she was sixteen, and she’s had a bike attached to her hip for the nearly three decades since then. “Everyone who knows me knows me with my bike. I use my bike to commute and explore,” says Azzolino. “In fact, when I got my first car in 2005, I drove it like I rode my bike, opting for streets over highway because I was so used to riding bicycles. It didn’t even occur to me that I

could take the highways.” The #ShowMeHelmetHair campaign includes a welcome party and fundraiser on May 17th at Joli Beauty Bar, where stylists will demo hairdos and products that work well for helmet wear. Just in time for Bike to Work Day on the 19th. For more information about Get Women Cycling and the #ShowMeHelmetHair campaign, go to www.getwomencycling.com Follow GWC on social media: @getwomencycling

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Yiddishe Mamas: Mother’s Day Walking Tour

SUNDAY, MAY 14TH, 11AM KEVIN HART I Can’t Make This Stuff Up

BILL NYE Jack and the Geniuses at the Bottom of the World

MAYIM BIALIK The Big Bang Theory

NICOLA YOON Everything, Everything

Museum at Eldridge St. | 12 Eldridge St. | 212-219-0888 | eldridgestreet.org Take to the Lower East Side for a tour that puts the focus on the Jewish women who called the LES home. Anarchist Emma Goldman and Visiting Nurse Service founder Lillian Wald will be among the featured names. ($30)

Hal Rubenstein: Red Carpet Style DAN BROWN The Da Vinci Code

VERONICA ROTH The Divergent Series

CONNOR FRANTA YouTuber

JEFF KINNEY Diary of a Wimpy Kid Series

TUESDAY, MAY 16TH, 6PM Museum at FIT | Seventh Ave. at 27th St. | 212-217-4558 | fitnyc.edu Get red carpet-ready at Hal Rubinstein’s (100 Unforgettable Dresses) discussion of contemporary style and the influence of big night looks in the Katie Murphy Amphitheatre. (Free)

Just Announced | TimesTalks: Samantha Bee and Jason Jones KRYSTEN RITTER Marvel’s Jessica Jones

KWAME ALEXANDER The Crossover

MARC MARON WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

JEFFERY TAMBOR Are You Anybody?

THURSDAY, JUNE 1ST, 7PM The New School | 55 W. 13th St. | 212-229-5108 | newschool.edu Samantha Bee is the first woman to host a late-night satirical show. She’ll be in conversation with former “Daily Show” correspondent Jason Jones, who co-produces Full Frontal With Samantha Bee (and who also happens to be her real-life husband). ($40)

DAV PILKEY Captain Underpants

MARGARET ATWOOD The Handmaid’s Tale

JASON REYNOLDS When I Was the Greatest

RAINBOW ROWELL Eleanor & Park

For more information about lectures, readings and other intellectually stimulating events throughout NYC,

sign up for the weekly Thought Gallery newsletter at thoughtgallery.org.


MAY 11-17,2017

3

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

CRIME WATCH BY MARIA ROCHA-BUSCHEL DECKS OF HEROIN FOUND A man reported to police that he found a suitcase full of heroin at the corner of West 34th Street and 12th Avenue Thursday, May 4, at 8:30 p.m. He told police that he found the suitcase on the sidewalk and when he opened it, the bag contained multiple sealed decks of heroin in addition to clothing. He told police that he then drove the suitcase to the Midtown North Precinct at 306 West 54th St. to report the contents of the bag to police.

MAN PUNCHES CAB WINDOW AND IS ARRESTED Police arrested a 55-year-old cab passenger for criminal mischief when he punched another driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s car after an accident at the northwest corner of Eighth Avenue and West 23rd Street on the early morning of Sunday, May 7. The driver of a car told police that she got into an accident with the taxi and both she and the taxi driver noticed that there wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t any damage and there were no injuries so neither was going to ďŹ le a report. But the taxi passenger got out of the taxi and punched other carâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s window three times, cracking the glass. He also kicked the front of the car. The

taxi driver told police that he then took the suspect to his hotel, with the victim following in her car. Police said that the suspect also refused to pay the $12 fare when the taxi arrived at his hotel.

DRUNK DRIVING ARREST Police arrested a 65-year-old man for drunk driving at the southwest corner of 10th Avenue and West 29th Street Saturday, May 6, at 7:20 p.m. Police said that the suspect was swerving on West 29th Street and when he was stopped, he had bloodshot, watery eyes and was unsteady on his feet.

MAN STEALS TUBES OF TOOTHPASTE A Duane Reade employee reported that a shoplifter stole $150-worth of toothpaste from a store at 455 West 37th St. Saturday, May 6, at 10:32 p.m. The employee told police that she saw the man grab 22 tubes of toothpaste on the storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s security camera. He was about to walk out of the store when the employee noticed he was attempting to leave without paying and when he saw her about to confront him, he reportedly ďŹ&#x201A;ed north on 10th Avenue. No arrests have been made.

MAN THREATENED OVER PARKING SPACE

STATS FOR THE WEEK Reported crimes from the 10th precinct Week to Date

A 40-year-old man reported that another driver threatened him while they were both trying to park their cars at the southeast corner of Ninth Avenue and West 15th Street Friday, May 5, at 5 p.m. Police said that the two drivers got into the argument while still inside their cars but the suspect got out of his car and the argument continued, with the two drivers pushing each other. The victim told police that the suspect then reached into his car, grabbed a razor blade and pointed it at him. The victim said that he then stepped back, but the suspect then got back into his car and drove away.

Year to Date

2017 2016

% Change

2017

2016

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

0

0

n/a

Rape

1

1

0.0

6

4

50.0

Robbery

0

1

-100.0

26

23

13.0

Felony Assault

2

0

n/a

38

25

52.0

Burglary

1

3

-66.7

25

29

-13.8

Grand Larceny

18

10

80.0

204 231 -11.7

Grand Larceny Auto

1

1

0.0

7

10

-30.0

MAN BUSTED FOR STOLEN CITI BIKE FOB, ID Police arrested a 44-year-old man for possessing a stolen Citi Bike key fob Friday, May 5, at 11:50 p.m. in front of 527 West 22nd St. Police said that an officer recognized the suspect from a previous open investigation and when he was searched, he was found to be in possession of a Citi Bike key fob, as well as a stolen identiďŹ cation card. The suspect was charged with criminal possession of stolen property. photo by Tony Webster via ďŹ&#x201A;ikr

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MAY 11-17,2017

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

Useful Contacts POLICE NYPD 10th Precinct

230 West 20th St.

212-741-8211

BY PETER PEREIRA

FIRE FDNY Engine 3/Ladder 12

150 West 19th St.

311

ELECTED OFFICIALS Councilmember Corey Johnson

224 W. 30th St.

212-564-7757

State Senator Brad Hoylman

322 Eighth Ave. #1700

212-633-8052

Assembly Member Richard Gottfried

242 W. 27th St.

212-807-7900

COMMUNITY BOARD 4

330 W. 42nd St.

212-736-4536

Muhlenberg

209 W. 23rd St.

212-924-1585

Columbus

742 10th Ave.

212-586-5098

Mt. Sinai – Roosevelt

1000 10th Ave.

212-523-4000

New York-Presbyterian

170 William St.

212-312-5110

CON EDISON

4 Irving Place

212-460-4600

TIME WARNER CABLE

605 Sixth Ave.

347-220-8541

Old Chelsea Station

217 W. 18th St.

212-675-0548

US Post Office

421 Eighth Ave.

212-330-3296

US Post Office

76 Nineth Ave.

212-645-0351

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MAY 11-17,2017

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

WAIT LIST – STUDIO/ 1 BED ONLY 55-75 West End Avenue / One Columbus Place Beginning in MAY 2017, a WAIT LIST ONLY for low income apartments STUDIO/ 1 BED ONLY located at 55-75 West End Avenue / One Columbus Place will be opened to individuals whose incomes meet the following guidelines: Apartment Size

Household Size*

Monthly Rent**

Total Annual*** Income Range Minimum - Maximum

Studio

1

$613

$22,903- $26,720

1 Bedroom

1 2

$659 $659

$24,549 - $26,720 $24,549 - $30,560

*Subject

to occupancy criteria **Includes Gas ***Income requirements subject to change Applicants will be required to meet income guidelines and additional selection criteria. Send Post Card ONLY to: URBAN ASSOCIATES, LLC P.O. Box 4089 New York, NY 10023 Requests for an application must be received by May 22, 2017. Completed applications must be returned by REGULAR MAIL ONLY to the P.O. Box that will be listed on the application. Application must be postmarked by May 26, 2017.

No Broker’s Fee. No Application Fee. Bill de Blasio, Mayor New York City Housing Development Corporation Gary Rodney, President

www.nychdc.com

5


6

MAY 11-17,2017

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

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20 17

SCAFFOLDING CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 According to DOB Deputy Com m i s sione r A rc h a n a Jayaram, publishing the map is part of an effort to â&#x20AC;&#x153;start being more transparent about our massive amount of dataâ&#x20AC;? that was made possible by a recent investment into the agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s analytics team. Jayaram said the map, and the accompanying â&#x20AC;&#x153;Facade Safety Report,â&#x20AC;? will help tenants and owners appreciate their buildings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Understanding the relationship between sidewalk sheds and facades, I think, is a critical piece of information in that if you have an unsafe facade, you should have a sidewalk shed,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If your facade is ďŹ xed, you shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have one.â&#x20AC;? The map allows users to view sidewalk sheds throughout the city by the age of their permits, their size and their safety status. But for some, it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a big enough step toward bringing down sidewalk sheds that have overstayed their welcome. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Residents are less concerned about the scaffolding on the

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*TTVF%BUF Thursday, June 1st "E%FBEMJOF Friday, May 26th The local paper for the Upper East Side

The local paper for the Upper West Side

The local paper for Downtown

The local paper for Chelsea

The organization said that last year it responded to 23 killings of transgender and gender-nonconforming people, the highest number of homicides recorded by the

other side of the city than the scaffolding thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blocking out their light and air and causing things to drip on their head,â&#x20AC;? Upper East Side Council Member Ben Kallos said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Business owners have told me that when scaffolding goes up their profits go down.â&#x20AC;? Though he said he appreciates the Department of Buildingsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; effort, he is hoping for more concrete progress. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What you can tell is that the city is covered in green dots representing scaffolds like a sickness,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to do something about it.â&#x20AC;? Kallos introduced legislation in the City Council late last year that would require scaffolding to be taken down after six months, or sooner if work is not being done. The billâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only other sponsors are Council Members Ydanis Rodriguez and Karen Koslowitz, though it has been endorsed by the New York State Restaurant Association and the New York City Hospitality Alliance. This has frustrated Kallos, who believes â&#x20AC;&#x153;elected officials should be working for the people, not for real estate interests.â&#x20AC;?

Sidewalk sheds were mandated by the City Council after the death in 1979 of Barnard College student Grace Gold, who was struck by a falling piece of a building on West 115th Street and Broadway. It was not the last time such a tragedy would occur â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 2-year-old Greta Greene died in 2015 after a piece of terra cotta fell on her from eight stories. Roberta Semer identified sidewalks sheds as a concern of Community Board 7, of which she is chairperson, and said she was grateful for the map. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At both our land-use and business committee meetings, we discussed trying to ďŹ gure out where all the sidewalk sheds were, and then two weeks later this wonderful map appeared,â&#x20AC;? she said. Semer told of several cases where she noticed businesses struggling under longstanding sidewalks sheds, but conceded that â&#x20AC;&#x153;on the other hand, you want to protect people.â&#x20AC;?

coalition. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are facing a crisis of violence,â&#x20AC;? Beverly Tillery, the executive director of the AntiViolence Project New York chapter, said in a statement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a society we can stop this epidemic by hiring trans women of color, making sure they have safe places to live

and standing up when we see or hear them being demeaned and attacked and simply by valuing their lives. The moment to act is now.â&#x20AC;? Anyone with information on the incident is asked to call the NYPDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crime Stopper hotline at 800-577-TIPS (8477).

Madeleine Thompson can be reached at newsreporter@ strausnews.com

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MAY 11-17,2017

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

AN ANGRY WELCOME HOME EXECUTIVE VISIT Hundreds protest Trump’s first visit to Manhattan as president BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

President Donald Trump’s first trip to Manhattan since taking office was brief. In the span of a few hours on Thursday, May 4, the president departed from Washington, arrived at Kennedy Airport, attended a reception at the Intrepid Sea, Air, and Space Museum marking the 75th Anniversary of the Battle of the Coral Sea, and left the city for his New Jersey golf club. The demonstrations inspired by Trump’s return lasted longer than the visit itself. By the time the presidential motorcade arrived at the Intrepid at around 7 p.m., many of the enthusiastic marchers lining the West Side Highway opposite the aircraft carrier had been protesting Trump’s visit for five or more hours. Hundreds of enthusiastic demonstrators chanted anti-Trump mantras and waved signs with slogans like “This village doesn’t want its idiot back!” and “NY hates you!” “I’m sure he’ll take some kind of perverse satisfaction in this, being the narcissist that he is,” Roberta Degnore, a professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology, said as she awaited Trump’s arrival. Protester Melissa Hill waved

Hundreds of demonstrators marched from a rally at Dewitt Clinton Park to the Intrepid Sea, Air, and Space Museum, where Trump attended a reception honoring veterans of the Battle of the Coral Sea. Photo: Michael Garofalo by protesters, chanting “You lost!” and “Thank you, Trump!” After several intense confrontations between Trump supporters and protesters, police herded the supporters into a separate pen. Police said there were no arrests. Earlier in the afternoon, hundreds gathered at DeWitt Clinton Park for a rally led by local politicians before marching six blocks south along the West Side Highway to the Intrepid. New York City Public Advocate Letitia James, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, state Senator Brad Hoylman and others addressed the protesters, who waved signs and banged pots and pans in approval of the anti-Trump sentiment. “This illegitimate president has waged a war on the American people,” James

I’m sure he’ll take some kind of perverse satisfaction in this, being the narcissist that he is.” Roberta Degnore, professor at FIT a sign imploring passing vehicles to “honk for revolution.” Drivers who obliged were met with cheers from the crowd. Hill explained that she was visiting from Minneapolis and had chosen to spend the final day of her trip at the demonstrations. “When I heard about this I had to stop my vacation and start protesting,” she said. A small group of Trump supporters draped in U.S. flags and wearing “Make America Great Again” hats taunted the protesters. The pro-Trump demonstrators marched back and forth along the barricaded pens on the sidewalk occupied

N U F E R R E E H S M T R M A U T S S

said. “He’s trying to strip us of our most basic fundamental rights.” The president’s itinerary initially included two stops in Midtown, at his penthouse apartment in Trump Tower and at the Peninsula Hotel a block away for a meeting with Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull (Trump instead met later with Turnbull aboard the Intrepid), but his arrival in New York was delayed after Republican representatives joined Trump at the White House to celebrate the House’s vote, earlier in the day, to pass the American Health Care Act.

A small crowd of protesters — and a handful of Trump supporters — gathered along Fifth Avenue outside Trump Tower even after word spread that Trump would head directly to the Intrepid upon his arrival in New York, but the scene was subdued in comparison to earlier protests outside the building after Election Day and the inauguration. “It actually looks like less people than normal,” one police officer remarked as he directed pedestrian traffic opposite Trump Tower. The NYPD maintained a significant presence outside the president’s former primary residence, as it has since the election. Days before Trump’s visit, Congress reached an agreement to allocate $68 million to reimburse local governments for costs associated with protecting the president and his family, the culmination of a months-long effort by local leaders to secure federal funding and ease the burden on the city’s budget. NYPD security at Trump Tower cost the city $24 million during the period from Election Day to Inauguration Day. Trump’s wife, Melania, and son, Barron, have continued living at the tower since Trump moved to the White House in January. Their security costs the city an estimated $127,000 to $146,000 per day. During presidential visits, that figure rises to $308,000 per day. After the ceremony at the Intrepid, headed across the Hudson River to Trump National Golf Club in New Jersey. “Rather than causing a big disruption in N.Y.C., I will be working out of my home in Bedminster, N.J. this weekend,” Trump posted on Twitter the next day. “Also saves country money!”

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Voices

Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to chelseanewsNY.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

OUR UNSUNG HEROES GRAYING NEW YORK BY MARCIA EPSTEIN

I walk up Broadway with my aching knees and watch the people all bent over, with walkers and canes, some just using shopping carts for support. It reminds me of being pregnant; I noticed everyone who was also pregnant, though I never had before. Now I see all the halt and the lame gamely plodding on; shopping, eating out, just living their lives. Most of them must be in more pain than I am. I don’t have a cane or walker (yet!). I do look bent over, I’m told. Friends are constantly trying

to straighten me up as I yelp in surprised pain. My spine has multiple problems though I don’t know what they are; my doctor has learned that I am a minimalist (another word for phobic) and don’t want tests and scary diagnoses. As long as I can get out of bed in the morning I consider it a good day. And so far, so good. But I digress. It’s the brave souls in much worse shape than I am who leave me in awe. I wonder if they are alone. I am grateful to have a supportive partner, and he’s saved me from many a scary situation (like being run over) by grabbing my arm. Of course he’s not with me all the time, but I can’t imagine

being totally alone and braving the streets to do necessary chores when your spine looks like the letter C. These brave and intrepid souls make me feel like a wimp when I say “ouch” or I have trouble going down stairs. These folks are our unsung heroes. This leads me to a relevant topic. The Center for Independence of the Disabled, NY (CIDNY) is a non-profit organization, founded in 1978, that is part of the Independent Living Centers movement. This is a national network that enhances opportunities for people with disabilities to direct their own lives. CIDNY does not provide housing but it helps people with disabilities and also employs people with disabilities. The staff includes social workers, lawyers and other professionals, including those who speak the many languages used throughout our diverse city. They

have many services, including counseling, independent living skills, healthcare access, peer counseling and nursing home transition. CIDNY has advised government officials on how to make public service better for the disabled. Some of their priorities are transportation, health insurance, education and entitlements. The organization offers training and assistance to public officials, healthcare workers and other service providers on disability issues. It also offers help with skills such as finding housing, transportation, budgeting and goal-planning. CIDNY has two offices, one in Manhattan and one in Queens. Their address in New York is 841 Broadway. They can be reached at info@cidny.org and their telephone number is 212-674-2300. A worthwhile organization indeed. Since I am writing this on the day

after the House Republicans’ vote to repeal Obamacare, I feel the need to add that I might be wise to overcome my fears and have some tests and procedures done now, before it’s all taken away from us. I have a constant pit in my stomach about what’s going on in this country, and I know many of you do also. So very scary, so very immoral and heartless. How can these people (you know who they are) jump around with glee while taking away our basic human rights, which of course don’t affect them. I have remained in a state of shock since Election Day. I wish I knew what else to say. If I prayed, I’d say let’s all pray. And hope. And protest and take action. Here’s hoping the Senate will come through for us.

A SALUTE TO A NEIGHBORHOOD EXEMPLAR BY BETTE DEWING

A makeshift memorial grew outside the Super-Del Market on York Avenue near 78th Street, hours after Manikkam Srymanean, a manager at the market, was struck and killed April 22 by a yellow cab nearby.

If ever there was a “love-one-another” New Yorker, it was Manikkam Srymanea, known to all as “Mano.” Many of us wouldn’t have known about him, had he not been so tragically killed, reportedly by a turning cab as he crossed York Avenue near 78th – just outside the Super Del Market he managed for decades. (The police investigation is ongoing and no charges had been filed as of this week.) And had he not been such a mensch as noted in a memorial sign now outside the deli, his tragic death, on April 22, would not have received considerable media coverage or remembered in a packed memorial service at St. Monica’s. Mano, incidentally, was Hindu. He was surely the epitome of someone who takes the “love-one-another” commandment to heart; a role model of the very finest kind, as speaker after speaker at his memorial service recalled. He was known, they said, for his everyday kindnesses, his smiles, his greetings by name. (But how we need those in general in a less and less

connected culture). They recalled his numerable generous, “second mile” acts for people down on their luck or ill or unable to get to the store. When an elderly woman’s computer broke and Mano gave her his own. He paid for another elderly woman’s funeral after no one claimed her body at the morgue. Mano, 50, who lived on East 78th Street nearby, was a great everyday friend to all, including to the children, parents and teachers from nearby PS 158. And I just now learned how grief counseling was needed after Mano’s so untimely, so tragic and yes, preventable death. But we must hear again and again how vehicular failure to yield when turning into a crosswalk is the number 1 killer and maimer of pedestrians. We need on-the-spot warning signs and stencils the Transportation Department is reluctant to provide. The word must really get out there and stay out there until it becomes as abhorrent a traffic crime as driving drunk. Ah, think how Mothers Against Drunk Drivers made the real difference. And let Mother’ Day this May be the start

President & Publisher, Jeanne Straus nyoffice@strausnews.com

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of Mothers Against Failure To Yield. The same for Father’s Day in June and Grandparents Day in September. And may this small but densely populated Yorkville community become renown for this continuing crusade — a role model for all neighborhoods — as safe traffic activists. So much to say and do with a need for many a column, editorial and sermons, including memorial service notes taken by my son Todd because my hearing is no longer “20/20.” And while little was said at the memorial service about Mano’s so tragic and wrongful death, now we need to hear, to remember, about the lasting loss and grief especially for those who so personally loved Mano – and how, as my son Jeff said, “so that the changes needed to prevent such traffic tragedies really get made – at long last, are made.” It can be done if enough of us try – if enough of us try. To be continued, of course. BETTEDEWING@aol.com

Editor-In-Chief, Alexis Gelber editor.ot@strausnews.com Deputy Editor Staff Reporters Richard Khavkine Madeleine Thompson editor.otdt@strausnews.com newsreporter@strausnews.com Michael Garofalo Senior Reporter reporter@strausnews.com Doug Feiden invreporter@strausnews.com


MAY 11-17,2017

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

REGISTERED NURSES REHABILITATION THERAPISTS MEDICAL SOCIAL WORKERS CERTIFIED HOME HEALTH AIDES

Your elderly mother just told you she fell in the bathroom last night at 4 A.M. Now what? Nighttime road work contributes to sound stress. Photo: Billie Grace Ward, via flickr

QUIET, PLEASE! HEALTH How reducing noise can improve your mental and physical health BY ARLINE L. BRONZAFT, PH.D.

Sound starts out as a physical phenomenon: audible pressure waves in the air are converted into nerve impulses as they travel from the ear to the brain. In the brain, sound takes on meaning, and when sound is determined to be unwanted, unpredictable and uncontrollable, it then becomes noise. But loud sounds, even when enjoyable, can harm the ear and lead to impaired hearing. One loud blast of sound near the ear may cause permanent damage, but it is the continuous exposure to loud sounds over time that reduces hearing ability. While hearing impairment is a common problem of aging, national studies have found growing hearing loss among younger people because of overexposure to loud music or vehicles. Noise can also add to stress which, in turn, may raise blood pressure, increase the heart

rate, or make our muscles contract. Sustained stress over time can lead to high blood pressure or insomnia. Scientific literature has found a link between exposure to noise and increased risk for cardiovascular and circulatory disorders. In addition, noise from neighbors, construction sites, or nearby bars that intrudes on our daily activities, especially in our homes, diminishes the quality of life. As the World Health Organization has stated, “Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.” As anyone who lives in a big city can attest, the growing din in our community affects our well-being. In my position on the environmental non-profit organization GrowNYC, overseeing its noise activities, I am frequently called upon by New Yorkers who are impacted by noise. Some of the older callers let me know they are hearing impaired, but then add that they can still hear intrusive noises that are bothersome. Both the hearing-impaired and people with good hearing complain to me that it is difficult to dine in “loud” restaurants

where conversation at the table is virtually impossible. New Yorkers can take an active role in lessening the din in their lives. Diners can ask restaurant personnel to lower loud music, and owners can get information about acoustical treatments that can lessen the decibel levels in their establishments. Residents can let managing agents and landlords know they are entitled to quiet in their apartments under the “warranty of habitability” clause of leases. Local public officials and community board leaders should be enlisted in abating the noises in neighborhoods. Readers can go to www.growNYC.org/noise for more information on the hazards of noise and how to reduce the noise in their lives. If you hear something that is disturbing, then do something to correct the problem. Your health is at stake! Arline L. Bronzaft, Ph.D., Professor Emerita of the City University of New York, serves on the board of GrowNYC. She does research, writes and lectures on the adverse effects of noise on health. She is a co-author of “Why Noise Matters” (2011) and author of the children’s book “Listen to the Raindrops” (illustrated by Steven Parton).

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MAY 11-17,2017

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

More Events. Add Your Own: Go to chelseanewsny.com

Los Sueños del Caribe (Dreams of the Caribbean): People, Land, and Place Saturday, May 13 | Noon–5 pm FREE FOR MEMBERS OR WITH MUSEUM ADMISSION

This Saturday, celebrate the natural and cultural diversity of the Caribbean at a family-friendly festival! Enjoy activities and the premiere of a new work of music and poetry co-developed by students from the Celia Cruz Bronx High School of Music and Cuban-American legend Paquito D’Rivera, a National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master and recipient of the 2005 National Medal of the Arts. Tom McGlynn Decal 22, 2015. Acrylic and gouache on birch panel. 36x48 inches.

Thu 11

Fri 12

Sat 13

‘TREMOLO’ | GALLERY OPENING ▲

FRIDAY NIGHT SH*W

JAZZ FOR KIDS

Magnet Theater 254 West 29th St. 8:30 p.m. $10 Obnoxious strangers, overbearing bosses and unrequited high school crushes, the Friday Night Sh*w invites audience members to anonymously write down their repressed rants, cursing-outs and sultry confessions. 212-244-2400 magnettheater.com

Jazz Standard 116 East 27th St. 2 p.m. Free During school year, students rehearse and workshop before opening the club doors and giving a concert. 212-576-2232 jazzstandard.com

Rick Wester Fine Art, Inc. 526 West 26th St. “Tremolo” features works by ten artists employing widely varied mediums, including neon, video, photography and painting. The shows concept centers on tremulous effects. 212-255-5560 rickwesterfineart.com

BATTLE OF THE BANDS Support for Celebrate Culture programs is provided, in part, by the May and Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, Inc.; the Sidney, Milton and Leoma Simon Foundation; and the family of Frederick H. Leonhardt. Los Sueños del Caribe: People, Land, and Place is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Special thanks: Café Frida and Jazz at Lincoln Center. Photos © AMNH / R. Mickens

Open Daily | Central Park West at 79th St. | 212-769-5100 | amnh.org

Frim Fram Jam 412 Eighth Ave., 4th Fl. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. RSVP. Celebrating 80th anniversary of the battle of the bands between Benny Goodman and Chick Webb at the Savoy Ballroom. DJs play the music of the two Kings of Swing all night long. Thru 5/12. nycbabble.com

‘NEPHEWS’ | BOOK SIGNING Printed Matter, Inc. 231 11th Ave. 6:30-8 p.m. Allen Frame and Fryd Frydendahl in conversation about Frydendahl’s book “Nephews,” the result of a collaboration between the artist and two young boys her sister left behind upon passing. 212-925-0325 printedmatter.org

PHOTO PARTY DECOR ► Wonder Photo Shop 176 Fifth Ave. 10 a.m.-Noon. RSVP Personalized decor and photo products for children’s parties; create banners, party decor and event stationery using photos. For children ages 5-14, parents and caregivers. 929-239-4262 wonderphotoshopnyc.com


MAY 11-17,2017

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Sun 14 I LOVE YOU, MOM Magnet Theater 254 West 29th St. 7:30 p.m. This Mother’s Day, moms get the coolest present ... an improv show. Comedians perform and moms do or say whatever they like on stage, and “it’s our job to play along, just like in real life.” 212-244-2400 magnettheater.com

THE FELDENKRAIS FESTIVAL Feldenkrais Institute 134 West 26th St., 2nd Fl. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. $53.74 Celebration of life & legacy of Moshe Feldenkrais: “Build Pathways Not Walls.” Pre-festival Mother’s Day celebratory awareness through movement class; talks with Robert Sussuma, Joshua Wolk, Peggi Honig and others. 212-727-1014 feldenkraisinstitute.com

Mon 15 ‘TWO AND TWO: MCSORLEY’S, MY DAD, AND ME’ The Half King 505 West 23rd St. 7-9 p.m. Readings from book about author Rafe Bartholomew’s father’s 45-year career tending bar at McSorley’s Old Ale House, and what it was like to grow up around and eventually work there. 212-462-4300 thehalfking.com

MINGUS BIG BAND Jazz Standard 116 East 27th St. 7:30 p.m. $25 On “Mingus Mondays,” the Mingus bands hold court and pay tribute to the maestro. 212-576-2232 jazzstandard.com

Tue 16 RHÔNE VALLEY DINNER Pierre Loti 258 West 15th St. 7-9 p.m. $70 (inc. tax & tip) Cornas, Condrieu, St. Joseph, Côte-Rôtie — learn about appellations through a winepairing dinner. Christophe Pichon, famed producer of elegant wines from Northern Rhône pairs wines with Pierre Loti menu. 212-645-5684 wineny.com

‘ASSEMBLY LINE’ | SCREENING Art100 555 West 25th St. 6:30-8 p.m. Special screening of

“Assembly Line” by Liao Xiaofei, followed by conversation with Richard Vine, managing editor of Art in America, and the artist. 917-388-3969 artnet.com/galleries/art100

Wed 17 ‘QUEEN OF KATWE’ ▲ Yotel Rooftop Cinema Club, 570 10th Ave. 8:15 p.m. $33-$39 A Ugandan girl sees her world rapidly change after being introduced to the game of chess (2016). 646-449-7700 yotel.com

‘ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST’ The Barrow Group Theatre, 312 West 36th St., 3rd Fl. 7:30 p.m. $30/$35 opening night party NYC’s award-winning and longest-running community theater group presents the Ken Kesey novel written for the stage by Dale Wasserman. 212-378-0248 stbarts.com

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MAY 11-17,2017

THROUGH A LENS, FONDLY Two exhibits showcase the postwar NYC photographs of Todd Webb BY VAL CASTRONOVO

Todd Webb (1905-2000) is one of those figures who achieved a certain degree of fame in his lifetime, then faded from view. He came to New York in November 1945 after being discharged from the Navy, managed to pull off a solo show of his photographs at the Museum of the City of New York in 1946, then followed Georgia O’Keeffe to New Mexico around 1961, photographing her and pretty much flying under the radar before ultimately settling in Maine. Today, he is largely unknown, though in the postwar period he traveled in rarefied circles, hobnobbing with the likes of O’Keeffe, her husband Alfred Stieglitz, Berenice Abbott, Gordon Parks, Walker Evans and Beaumont Newhall, among others. Newhall, head of the photography department at the Museum of Modern Art, recom-

Todd Webb, Under the 3rd Avenue EL, New York, 1946. Courtesy Museum of the City of New York and the Todd Webb Estate.

mended Webb to MCNY and curated his postwar show, “I See A City.” The press release from that exhibit is on display at the museum. “He has seen our city not as a glittering megalopolis, but as a community. He has chosen to focus mainly [on] those blocks where the shops are small and living quarters crowded,” it reads. Indeed, Webb was drawn to people and neighborhoods as much as, if not more than, the city’s landmarks and soaring architecture. The streets of immigrant New York on the Lower East Side and Harlem are pictured with great affection and humanity — even when they are devoid of people. As Bill Shapiro, curator of the show at The Curator Gallery in Chelsea and former editor-in-chief of LIFE, writes in the handout, Inside Todd Webb’s Pictures: “Webb shot both the iconic and the idiosyncratic sides of New York, her sweeping skylines as well as those tiny, fleeting moments that define life in the City.” Stieglitz paid Webb the ultimate compliment when, comparing him to Ansel Adams, he said: “Your photographs have tenderness.” That tenderness is palpable in the 131 vintage prints at the museum and the 33 vintage and modern prints at the gallery, where photographs are for sale. “What you really get to see is what New York was like for a newcomer coming to the city,” MCNY Director Whitney Donhauser said at a preview of the museum’s exhibit. “He used photography to familiarize himself with an unfamiliar setting.” With the encouragement of Stieglitz, who Webb first met in New York in 1942 when he was en route to active duty, he determined to spend one year after the war roaming the streets and photographing what he saw — though one year turned into some 10 years documenting the cityscape. When Webb first moved to New York, he shared an apartment with photographer Harry Callahan and his wife on West 123rd Street near Amsterdam

Todd Webb, The Battery, New York (Peanut Peddler), 1945. Courtesy Museum of the City of New York and the Todd Webb Estate. Avenue. “He lived off his savings from his military pay — he had no job. He just photographed and explored the city,” MCNY’s curator Sean Corcoran said. He habitually took a streetcar across 125th street to the east side of Manhattan, where he would hop the Third Avenue El to Midtown, the Lower East Side and the Financial District. He captured images from the top of the El and from under the El. His subjects ranged from a peanut peddler at the Battery (1945) to a man in uniform getting his shoes shined on a street corner in Harlem (1946). New Yorkers of a certain age will wax nostalgic at the sight of old-style establishments like McSorley’s in the East Village (1946) and Barbetta in Midtown (1946), not to mention long-defunct Sloppy Louie’s on South Street (1959) and bygone bars and storefronts on Sixth Avenue between 43rd and 44th Streets (1948). Webb was driven. In his gallery handout, Shapiro has paired some of his favorite photos with entries from the lensman’s journal, which he started when he arrived in New York. His dedication and enchantment with the city is expressed in an entry from Feb. 25, 1946: “In spite of the cold and windy weather, I had to go out today. The light was beautiful and I was full of New York.” Work was his passion, but he was not in it for the glory — or the money. “I think I understand now that work, not worry about material things, is the key to happiness for me,” he wrote on Dec. 31, 1946.

In 1949, he went to Paris, where he met his future wife, Lucille Minqueau. u. When the pair, now married, returned ed to New York four years later, they lived ed on St. Luke’s Place in Greenwich Vilillage, where Webb shot snowy street et scenes and bannisters. He nabbed back-to-back Guggennheim fellowships in 1955 and 1956 and nd went on to photograph the UN Genneral Assembly before finally leaving ng New York to pursue his calling in New w Mexico and elsewhere. (Eight of his is portraits of Georgia O’Keeffe in the he Southwest can be seen at the Brooklyn yn Museum in “Living Modern,” through gh July 23.) That first summer in the city was a heady time, though. As he enthused ed in July 1946, “It seems like a very good od life ... I am broke. But what the hell, you ou can’t have everything.”

Todd Webb, Lexington Avenue, Near ar 110th Street, Harlem, 1946. Courtesy sy Museum of the City of New York and the he Todd Webb Estate. te.

IF YOU GO WHAT: “A City Seen: Todd Webb’s Postwar New York 1945-1960” WHERE: Museum of the City of New York, 1220 Fifth Ave., at 103rd Street WHEN: through September 4 www.mcny.org

WHAT: “Down Any Street: Todd Webb’s Photographs of New York, 1945-1960” WHERE: The Curator Gallery/ Chelsea, 520 West 23rd Street WHEN: through May 20 www.thecuratorgallery.com


MAY 11-17,2017

THE AGE OF THE BIKE CONTROVERSY SCOPING OUT MANHATTAN Readers responded vehemently — pro and con — to our “Disrupting the Grid” column

YOU READ IT HERE FIRST The local paper for the Upper West Side

February 9

April 20

RECORD NUMBER OF 311 CALLS MADE IN 2016 BY MADELEINE THOMPSON

Last year saw the largest number of calls ever to city helpline 311, with noise complaints raking in the most of the 19,378,299 total calls. With a population of approximately 8.5 million, that amounts to about 4.2 calls per New Yorker. According to 311 spokesman Bill Reda, the steady increase over the past few years is likely due to the addition of the 311 website in 2009, followed

BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

Bicycles, for better or worse, are swiftly multiplying on the streets of Manhattan. So too, it seems, are the self-referential celebrations mounted by advocates to trumpet their ascension. Did you know May is National Bike Month? Or that Bike to Work Week runs from May 15 to May 19, climaxing with Bike to Work Day on May 19? Of course, the Five Boro Bike Tour on May 7 was inescapable. But perhaps you missed Bike Expo New York on May 5 and 6? It was against backdrop that we turned to readers to ask two simple questions: “Is the bicycle the scourge of the city or a saving grace? Does it diminish our street life and imperil the grid, or does it green Manhattan and make urban life more livable?” The context was a column, “Disrupting the Grid,” that ran in the May 3 issue and proved a bit controversial, in which I argued that the orderly patterns of Manhattan’s street-grid system, which dates to 1811, were being undermined in the Age of the Bicycle. As the signature design for the island’s roadways, the grid bestowed discipline and order with its straight lines, right angles and linear street walls. It was my contention that an untrammeled, unregulated proliferation of bikes, accompanied by an ill-planned, ill-designed grafting of bike lanes and infrastructure onto the grid, sowed disorder, diminished street life and fostered a climate of fear among pedestrians. Reader response came fast, and sometimes furiously. Typically, it was thoughtful. Always, it was interesting. Via emails, phone calls, tweets and online comments, at least 64 people with strong opinions vented. Roughly 40 percent sang the praises of the city’s biking culture; 60 percent demonized it or criticized the pedal commu-

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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

The local paper for the Upper East Side

March 29

On Fifth Avenue. Photo: Doug Davey, via flickr nity’s wayward ways. And yes, my central thesis was subject to some ridicule: “I can’t tell if this article is a joke or a really long satirical Onion-style piece,” wrote a reader identified only as “Alex” in an online comment. “Douglas Feiden, you are either really hilarious in making yourself sound like a backwards fuddyduddy, or have no real connection to reality.” A correspondent named “Vooch” agreed, saying, “It must be satire ... It’s gut-busting funny.” Actually, I can assure Alex and Vooch, the column, however executed, was an attempt at a cri de coeur to alert City Hall to the follies of radically re-engineering Manhattan’s streetscape to accommodate the stampede of scofflaws. “Glad that finally someone is bucking the trend and describing the reality of the bike culture in NYC and its negative impacts,” wrote the landscape architect Edmund Hollander, whose fluency in the grid hails from his designs for streetlevel gardens on Murray and Sullivan Streets and rooftop gardens on Park Avenue and Central Park West. Hollander, whose eponymous firm is based on Park Avenue South, offered a modest proposal: “How about license plates for bikes and registration fees, like cars, to help pay for and support the infrastructure?” It’s a first-rate idea. User fees

are a form of taxation that might put the brakes on oversaturation, give government a means of regulating the market, maybe keep ne’er-do-wells off the streets and even fuel a robust enforcement regimen where none currently exists. “They all should be issued ‘mini-plates’ for their bikes, and when they go thru lights, ticketed!” wrote Sherry Ahimsa, who lives on the Lower East Side. “I’m writing to local officials. Maybe you can also.” The column’s focus was on the impact of bicycles on the street-level, or horizontal, grid. But Upper East Side resident James Mahoney argues they’re also proving detrimental to the vertical grid, meaning the forest of skyscrapers that spring from the intersection of street and avenue. “Bikes are insinuating themselves right into our office buildings,” he said. “I for one do not welcome them.” Mahoney is right. Under the 2009 Bicycle Access to Office Buildings Law, cyclists are permitted to park their bicycles in or near their workplaces. As the city Department of Transportation helpfully notes on its website, many offices have unused “dead space” in their reception areas that can be utilized for bike parking. Funny, I always thought a business had the right to decide how it wants to use its reception area, not the DOT. But that’s a column for another day.

April 20

FIGHTING FOR POCKET PARKS They are hidden between blocks and tucked inside skyscrapers. You might walk through them, or past them, without ever knowing. But not all New Yorkers have forgotten that they are entitled to access the city’s more than 500 privately owned public spaces, or POPS. Last summer, the New York Times noticed that a marble bench in the atrium of Trump Tower, which is a POPS, had gone missing and their reporting resulted in its quiet return. The local paper for the Upper East Side

April 6

April 14

‘CITIZEN JANE’ DOCUMENTARY PROFILES URBAN ACTIVIST PLANNING A timely new film spotlights the groundbreaking author of ‘The Death and Life of Great American Cities’ BY MADELEINE THOMPSON

Jane Jacobs, with her signature oval glasses, began a lifelong dedication to fighting urban renewal when plans emerged to continue Fifth Avenue through Washington Square Park. Critics labeled her a “housewife” who couldn’t possibly be more than a fly in the ointment of the project, but Jacobs had been writing and reporting about cities and architecture long before the park was threatened. Her story and the lessons of her groundbreaking book “The Death and Life of Great American Cities” are the focus

on April 21 at select theaters. Matt Tyrnauer, the film’s director, and producer Robert Hammond, who is also the executive director of Friends of the High Line, got the idea for the documentary several years ago when they realized there had never been a film about Jacobs before. “We thought we’d be introducing this film about a very brilliant woman who was sort of a seer, a visionary in a lot of ways, and politically active, in an atmosphere when we had the first woman president,” Tyrnauer said at a screening last Thursday. “Much to our surprise, it went the other way. There’s some resonances in the film that maybe were unintended but it’s interesting to see how the public has received them.” Hammond described the film as “a playbook for resistance,” and hopes that viewers will be able to learn from Jacobs how best to fight their battles. “What’s interesting now is people getting out in the street — it’s not just

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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

MAY 11-17,2017

RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS APR 22 - 28, 2017 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml. Chickpea

0 Penn Station

A

Mcdonald’s

151 West 34 Street

A

Nick & Stef’s Steakhouse

9 Penn Plaza

A

Madangsui

35 West 35 Street

A

FIT David Dubinsky Student Center

227 West 27 Street

A

Auntie Anne’s Pretzels

2 Penn Station

A

Turntable

314 5 Avenue

A

Dunkin’ Donuts, Hudson News

2 Pennsylvania Plaza

A

Starbucks

100 West 33 Street

A

Pitopia

369 W 34th St

A

Smashburger

10 W 33rd St

A

BBQ Olive Chicken

25 W 32nd St

Not Yet Graded (20) Food not cooled by an approved method whereby the internal product temperature is reduced from 140º F to 70º F or less within 2 hours, and from 70º F to 41º F or less within 4 additional hours. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored. Wiping cloths soiled or not stored in sanitizing solution.

Bombay Sandwich Co

224 W 35th St

Not Yet Graded (14) Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Pinch Food Design

545 West 27 Street

A

NY Gyro Xpress

154 8th Ave

A

Hawa

247 8th Ave

A

Pecorino

197 7th Ave

Not Yet Graded (0)

Birch Coffee

56 7 Avenue

A

Five Guys Famous Burgers And Fries

56 W 14th St

A

Shu Han Ju Authentic Chinese Cuisine

465 6th Ave

Grade Pending (20) Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, crosscontaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored. Wiping cloths soiled or not stored in sanitizing solution.

Shorty Tang Noodle Shop

98 8th Ave

Grade Pending (5) Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Cafe Grumpy

224 West 20 Street

A

Anago Sushi/ Royal Siam Thai

240 8 Avenue

A

Middle Eats

171 W 23rd St

A

VISIT OUR WEBSITE! at CHELSEANEWSNY.COM

Warren Wechsler, chair of the New York City Book Awards jury, with Roxane Orgill, co-author of “Jazz Day.” Photo: Karen Smul

SOCIETY LIBRARY AWARDS CITY-CENTRIC BOOKS NY READER The New York City Book Awards emphasize storytelling that touches on some current political themes BY MADELEINE THOMPSON

In a cozily furnished room on the second floor of the city’s oldest library, one could easily imagine curling up with a winner of this year’s New York City Book Awards. Last Wednesday, the New York Society Library presented four books with the award, which honors “books of literary quality or historical importance that … evoke the spirit or enhance appreciation of New York City.” The 2016-2017 w inners are Tyler Anbiner’s “City of Dreams: The 400-Year Epic History of Immigrant New York,” David Oshinsky’s “Bellevue: Three Centuries of Medicine & Mayhem at America’s Most Storied Hospital,” Roxane Orgill and Francis Vallejo’s “Jazz Day: The Making of a Famous Photograph” and Corey Pegues’ “Once a Cop: The Street, The Law, Two Worlds, One Man.” In their brief acceptance speeches, the authors touched on the writing process and the reasons they felt compelled to bring their stories to life. Ellen Iseman, a trustee of the Society Library and sponsor

of the awards, emphasized the importance of storytelling. “When times are as unsettling as they are today, with headlines about chemical warfare and new nuclear missile tests in Asia, getting lost in an intentionally escapist way ... is the best salve one could wish for,” she said. “Good libraries like this one also hold books and periodicals that can provide a truth or close to it, when the notion of alternative facts and fake news has been accepted by millions of people.” But the books awarded by the Society Library can’t be entirely separated from the current political landscape. “City of Dreams” highlights the contributions of immigrants from Alexander Hamilton to Oscar de la Renta, some of whom would might not have made it here had they attempted to make the journey today. “The theme of the book is basically that immigrants throughout the centuries have not changed very much,” Anbinder said. “People come to the United States for the same reasons, they’re treated as outcasts when they get here, they have to fight for respect, and yet they persevere.” Oshinsky, too, touched on the politically relevant aspects of “Bellevue,” which chronicles the history of the city’s oldest hospital. “New York City, to its everlasting credit, is the only place where the indigent get

medical care free of charge, and Bellevue is the flagship hospital that provides that,” he said. Pegues’s “Once Upon A Cop,” about the author’s rise from teenage drug dealer to deputy inspector in the NYPD, also brings to light problems the city and the country as a whole continue to struggle with. “Jazz Day,” a beautifully illustrated collection of poems, provides the purest escapism of the four winners. The book was inspired by Art Kane’s famous photograph “A Great Day in Harlem,” which features 57 notable jazz musicians, dressed in their Sunday best, on the steps of a Harlem brownstone. “It was 10 o’clock in the morning,” Orgill said of the story behind the picture. “A lovely time to take a photograph, but not for jazz musicians. [Kane] didn’t know if anyone would show.” In addition to facts and fictions, Pegues reminded the audience why it’s important to find a personal connection with any book. “What I want people to get out of the book is ‘don’t let your past define your future,’” he said. “The kid on the back of that book — you’d never have known that he would be this guy in the front of the book.” Madeleine Thompson can be reached at newsreporter@ strausnews.com


MAY 11-17,2017

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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

MOTHER’S DAY WITH DONATELLA ARPAIA Food Network star shares holiday memories and recipes

spring pea & mascarpone risotto Ingredients: 1 lb. Arborio rice 1 oz. butter 1 medium onion 1 glass dry white wine 1 qt. vegetable or chicken broth Salt and pepper to taste Spring peas (2 cups) 4 tbsp. of grated parmesan 3 tbsp. of mascarpone cheese (optional) Bunch of spring pea shoots (garnish)

Like all Manhattan mothers, Donatella Arpaia is an expert at multitasking. She has run awardwinning restaurants — Davidburke & Donatella, Anthos, and Kefi — and last fall launched her latest venture, Prova Pizzabar in Grand Central Station. She writes cookbooks and guest-stars on The Today Show. And when you flip on The Food Network after a long day, there she is performing as a judge on Iron Chef America. Her success in the culinary world all ties back to the summers spent at her family’s olive oil farm where she spent her days jarring homemade sauce and learning family recipes from Mama Maria as she stood on a stool and Donatella Arpaia peeked up at the stove. “My mom was the cook in the family when I was growing up and she really steered me out of the kitchen! But on Mother’s Day, I always got up extra early to make her coffee in bed. She loved espresso and I would use the old-fashion espresso maker on the stove top — not a machine,” says Donatella. “I would always give her a homemade Mother’s Day card, which she still has saved to this day.” Now she’s the one getting homemade cards and breakfast in bed, courtesy of her husband and her 5-year-old son, Alessandro. “We spend Mother’s Day at our weekend home and have made a tradition of breakfast in bed, followed by packing a picnic and going on a family hike,” she says. “We end the night with a sunset cruise on the lake with wine, cheese, and snacks as we look at the stars — what’s better than that?”

Photos courtesy of Donatella Arpaia

Ingredients: 2 parts chilled Brut Champagne 1 part orange juice Method: Pour orange juice into flute glass. Top with Martini Asti and garnish with strawberry.

fettuccine with salmon in a lemon cream sauce Ingredients: 1 lb. fettuccine 4 tbsp. unsalted butter 1 pint heavy cream Zest and juice of 2 lemons 2 garlic cloves, minced 2 tsp. tarragon, chopped 8 oz. flaked salmon (grilled or baked) Salt and pepper, to taste

Method: Saute chopped onions in olive oil and butter until golden brown Add rice and stir for 2 minutes Add wine and stir until it evaporates Add warm broth untiil rice is covered Let simmer and cook and stir adding broth every time broth is almost completely absorbed by the rice Add in bag of peas and let cook When rice is cooked and broth is almost completely absorbed, remove from the heat Add some grated cheese Stir until the risotto reaches a creamy consisteny Garnish with pea shoots Variation: Add 3-4 slices of bacon, saute for 2 minutes before adding broth for added flavor

the ‘mom-osa’

Donatella and her son, Alessandro

Method: 1. Cook the pasta until al dente. Reserve 1 cup of pasta water. Draine, rinse, and set aside. 2. In a large skillet, melt the butter, then add garlic and cook until fragrant. Pour in the heavy cream and stir untili mixture thickens. Add lemon zest, 1 Tbsp. lemon juice and 1 tsp. tarragon. Season with salt and pepper. 3. Add the pasta to the cream sauce and toss. If too thick, add some pasta water to the pan. 4. Add the salmon and 1 tsp. tarragon. 5. Serve immediately.


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MAY 11-17,2017

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

Business JUST THE RIGHT AMOUNT OF BRIGHT The bespoke lampshade shop Blanche Field has been customizing light for more than a century BY LAURA HANRAHAN

Anyone walking into the East 56th Street office of Blanche Field is immediately immersed in the littleknown world of couture lampshades. Every surface in the part-showroom, part-factory, part-design studio and overflowing with wire frames, ribbon spools, lamp bases and shades. “As much as this looks like grandma’s attic, we kind of know where everything is,” said Lisa Simkin, Blanche Field’s head designer and New York director. “It’s organized mayhem.” Blanche Field is an old-school business, having been in operation in Manhattan for more than a century. Everything, including the filing system, is still paper-based, with email being the only task done online. Near the store’s entrance, between Third and Lexington Avenues, a team of six women quietly sit at a long table, sewing intricate patterns onto the custom, handmade lampshades on which Blanche Field has built its 112-year reputation. Meanwhile, in the back, Manuella, the electrician, works on converting just about any object you can imagine into a light fixture.

Lisa Simkin, Blanche Field’s head designer, in the East 56th Street store. Photo: Laura Hanrahan Most of Blanche Field’s customers are New York City-based interior designers looking for pieces for their client’s homes. But Blanche Field has also

designed lamps for the SoHo House hotel and club, Chanel stores and the Campbell Apartment in Grand Central.

When it comes to creating a new custom design, Simkin emphasizes the need to find the perfect size for each individual lamp. To do this, she has her clients bring in to the shop the base they want to use. “Because I have so many molds and samples here, it’s like trying on hats for your head,” said Simkin, who has been with Blanche Field 17 years. “You don’t know what’s going to fit until you try it.” Once the size and shape are chosen, a wire frame is created. “We have a frame maker who hand-makes every single frame,” she said. “It comes back to the shop, and then the ladies start to work on them.” Choosing the exact material and style for the shade’s fabric, however, might feel like an almost impossible feat to someone unacquainted with the craft. Pleated or laminate? Colorful or neutral? Patterned or simple? The options are seemingly endless. Like an interior-design matchmaker, Simkin says she likes to pair the shade’s style to the client’s personality. “How do we make it yours? Who are you? Who’s the personality that you’re designing for? Even the lampshade has to have a personality,” she said. “You can have a classical lampshade and totally make it whimsical with some little detail, and that to me is the

fun part.” Simkin has seen a Remington statue and even a cowboy boot turned into a lamp. “I always tell people you can take the most inexpensive object, like from West Elm, or a candlestick, and convert it into a lamp,” she said. “You can buy something in a flea market, but put a great shade on it and it becomes a great lamp.” She mainly works with silks and handkerchief linens, but has created lampshades with Hermes scarves, a silk blouse and even a Levi’s shirt with snaps on it. “I always tell people bring me a shirt, bring me a good old shirt, because the cottons in shirts are beautiful,” she said. With the extra care and personalized detail that goes in to each piece, there is a price tag to match. Small chandelier shades start at $165, while larger shades average around $450. Each day brings its creative challenges, which keeps the office fun and the passion flowing. “I’m still amazed, I can look at something after 17 years when it’s in my workshop and go ‘oh my god that’s so beautiful,’” she said. “It might not even be my taste or in my home, but I can just appreciate how beautiful it is. Maybe just because I know the work that goes in, the handwork that goes in behind it.”

ON THE SIDE STREETS OF NEW YORK JOANNE ARTMAN GALLERY — 511 WEST 22ND STREET JoAnne Artman has been showcasing the work of culturally diverse artists in her Laguna Beach, California gallery since 2007. Self-described as “artsy,” Joanne loved painting in elementary school, drawing cartoon strips in middle school, and then eventually found photography, which she has been practicing all of her adult life. Over the thirty years that she was living out west, she would often put on private art shows in her home. As she so eloquently says, “Art is an investment in your soul.” In 2015 she finally opened a gallery in Manhattan. The colorful Suzanne Heinz was one of the first artists featured in the New York gallery space. To read more, visit Manhattan Sideways (sideways.nyc), created by Betsy Bober Polivy.

Artist Suzanne Heinz beneath her artwork. Photo: Tom Arena, Manhattan Sideways.


MAY 11-17,2017

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

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MAY 11-17,2017

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

YOUR 15 MINUTES

To read about other people who have had their “15 Minutes” go to chelseanewsNY.com/15 minutes

POLAR PURPOSE A talk with conservation photographer Paul Nicklen on his new SoHo gallery BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

You might not know Paul Nicklen by name, but you probably know him by his photographs. Nicklen’s images of the world’s polar regions — stark Arctic landscapes and intimate portraits of the creatures inhabiting them — have reached the eyes of millions from the pages of National Geographic magazine and through his popular Instagram account. Nicklen, a tireless conservation advocate, views his work as a call to action — a tool for inspiring and mobilizing people to preserve imperiled ecosystems and fight the effects of climate change. The latest step in the Canadian photographer’s conservation efforts is an eponymous SoHo gallery, which launched last month on West Broadway and features large-format prints of his photos. Half of Nicklen’s proceeds from the venture support Sea Legacy, the nonprofit he started to highlight threats to marine ecosystems. Nicklen spoke with Our Town last week via telephone during a rare stint at home in British Columbia.

How often are you on the road? Probably 10 months a year, I’d say. I’m always fighting to spend some time at

home, but it’s really hard. I could be on the road 360 days a year if I let it. So many people write me every day saying “Oh my gosh, I must have your job, just to travel the world and take pictures,” and they don’t realize what it means to be living in hotels and tents and airports all year long. So I love getting home, but I also love telling these stories.

Why did you decide to open a gallery in New York? Especially in a place like New York, I just see the disconnect that people have from the environment and nature. It’s a fantastic city full of great people who are passionate and care, but they have no idea about the urgency of how quickly these ecosystems are changing. As a journalist and a storyteller, by shooting all these images, it allows me to have a microphone. I really did not want another gallery saying, “Here’s a pretty picture of a bear. I hope you like it, I hope you buy it. Thanks.” It’s a gallery to convene people to start a conversation about conservation. It’s a gallery about the urgency of our changing world. It’s a gallery that will bring in other talented artists, other photographers who can come in with their bodies of work and tell their story. And a large part of these proceeds go back to our nonprofit called Sea Legacy, which allows us to have the autonomy to go do our work. It’s a convening place. It’s a place

“Home Ice Advantage.” Juvenile chinstrap penguins on a large iceberg along the Antarctic Peninsula. Photo: Paul Nicklen where people can come and learn and become aware. They can also get a feeling of hope. It was amazing at the gallery opening, with 2,000 or 3,000 people coming through — people are looking for leadership. They’re looking for guidance. They’re scared, they’re worried, and they need someone to give them some direction.

How have recent political developments affected your outlook? With Obama — or if it had been Hillary or definitely Bernie — you think, OK, politicians kind of have our backs. We’re gonna wait and see what they do. But the silver lining with Trump is that he makes it very clear that he does not care about anything to do with the environment. He’s blowing up the EPA and the environment is his least concern. So I think that people have actually woken up and realized that nobody’s got their back now. That’s what excites me about being in New York. We all need to sort of start this movement together and we’re not going to be able to rely on any government figure or program or initiative to have our back, because they don’t. Now the people sort of have to rise up and take this into their own hands.

The experience of seeing a wall-sized photograph in the gallery is quite different from viewing the same image on a smartphone. What’s it like to see your work at that scale?

“Face to Face.” A polar bear peeks into a cabin in Svalbard, Norway. Photo: Paul Nicklen

I love to see my work big. With every image I shoot, I’m trying to find that cross-section of art, science and conservation. I want that image to be beautiful and transport people, whether it’s into a magazine or into their phone or — hopefully, definitely — into a really large, 60-inch by 90-inch print on the wall. You are transported into that world with that animal. I want people to look at these animals in the eye and feel themselves as a part of that ecosystem, and I think the fine art imagery creates that sen-

sation. It’s almost like a 3-D experience of being there with these animals.

Your nonprofit helps fund nature photographers covering climate change and threatened ecosystems. Why do you view visual storytelling as so important in promoting conservation? Science is crucial — we need science — but it has failed to drive any change whatsoever, really, in the emotional connection that we have to these habitats and these species. When science is saying polar bears are going to disappear within the next hundred years, it sucks, but you feel kind of helpless and you kind of forget about it. But all of a sudden you start to show pictures of polar bears dying and starving to death and it slaps you in the face. I’m there to sort of be a massive wake-up call to everybody. I’m there to break down the walls of apathy and to really connect people to the polar regions that are warming twice as fast as anywhere else on earth. I can honestly tell you: it sucks to care. It really does. It’s emotionally gut-wrenching. It’s a bit draining. I wish I didn’t care so much. But once you start caring, it’s really hard to go back. Portions of this interview have been edited and condensed for clarity.

Know somebody who deserves their 15 Minutes of fame? Go to chelseanewsNY.com and click on submit a press release or announcement.


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The puzzle contains 15 words relating to vacation. They may be diagonal, across, or up and down in the grid in any direction.

L A I R P O R T B A Y N I M A

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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

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MAY 11-17,2017


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PUBLIC NOTICES

MAY 27th & 28TH THIS IS A RAIN OR SHINE EVENT

Columbia Co. Fairgrounds, Chatham, NY

AWARD-WINNING WINERIES, DISTILLERIES AND CIDERIES FROM NY AND MA From South Beach to the Berkshires. Special Weekend Events Include Wine, Beer & Cider Seminars, Food Pairings & More!

Information & tickets available on-line at:

www.hudsonberkshirewinefestival.com

MAY 11-17,2017


MAY 11-17,2017

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

PUBLIC NOTICES

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PUBLIC NOTICES

MAY 11-17,2017


MAY 11-17,2017

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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

CLASSIFIEDS HEALTH SERVICES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

Telephone: 212-868-0190 Fax: 212-868-0198 Email: classified2@strausnews.com

POLICY NOTICE: We make every eďŹ&#x20AC;ort to avoid mistakes in your classiďŹ ed ads. Check your ad the ďŹ rst week it runs. The publication will only accept responsibility for the ďŹ rst incorrect insertion. The publication assumes no ďŹ nancial responsibility for errors or omissions. We reserve the right to edit, reject, or re-classify any ad. Contact your sales rep directly for any copy changes. All classiďŹ ed ads are pre-paid.

SOHO LT MFG

462 Broadway MFG No Retail/Food +/- 9,000 SF Ground Floor - $90 psf +/- 16,000 SF Cellar - $75 psf Divisible Call David @ Meringoff Properties 212-645-7575

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

SITUATION WANTED

Volunteering is Ageless

MASSAGE

Remember to: Recycle and Reuse

Learn why organizations want you and how to get started!

Volunteers of All Ages Needed

Thursday, May 18, 2017 3:00pm²4:30pm Rutgers Presbyterian Church 236 West 73rd Street (Subway 1, 2, 3 to 72nd St; one block norh) (Bus²FURVVWRZQ0WR%¶ZD\RQHEORFNQRUWK

Admission is FREE! Light Refreshments

RSVP to reserve your place 212 889-4805 or www.volunteer-referral.org

Directory of Business & Services To advertise in this directory Call #BSSZ (212)-868-0190 ext.4 CBSSZMFXJT@strausnews.com

Antiques Wanted TOP PRICES PAID t1SFDJPVT $PTUVNF+FXFMSZ (PMEt4JMWFS 1BJOUJOHTt.PEFSOt&UD Entire Estates Purchased

212.751.0009 Antique, Flea & Farmers Market SINCE 1979

East 67th Street Market (between First & York Avenues)

Open EVERY Saturday 6am-5pm Rain or Shine Indoor & Outdoor FREE Admission Questions? Bob 718.897.5992 Proceeds BeneďŹ t PS 183

BE THE SOMEONE

WHO HELPS A KID BE THE FIRST IN HER FAMILY TO GO TO COLLEGE.

OFFICE SPACE

AVAILABLE IN MANHATTAN

300 to 20,000 square feet

Elliot Forest, Licensed RE. Broker

212 -447-5400 abfebf@aol.com

NEED TO RUN A LEGAL NOTICE? Quick | Easy | Economical

Call Barry Lewis today at:

212-868-0190

I CAN SELL YOUR HOME OR APARTMENT QUICKLY!

N e s t S e e ke r s I N T E R N A T I O N A L

Real Estate Sales, 10+ Years Experience 587 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10017 0GmDFt0UIFS Email: DavidL@NestSeekers.com Social Media davelopeznynj

CALL ME NOW AND GET RESULTS!

DAVID - 917.510.6457

Katherine J. Brewster, CSYT The ATMA Center of Yoga and Healing

Find Inner Peace, Quiet & Harmony

ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NEVER TOO EARLY

TO INVEST IN A GOOD THING. Introducing Better Futures â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a whole new kind of investment with a greater return than money. When you invest, it helps kids go to college. Because a mind is a terrible thing to waste but a wonderful thing to invest in. TM

TM

Š2013 UNCF

Invest in Better Futures at UNCF.ORG/INVEST

newyorkcares.org

SvaroopaÂŽ Yoga Classes Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapy, EmbodymentÂŽ, Reiki Stress Reduction Courses & Empowerment Workshops XXXBUNBDFOUFSOZDDPNt


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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

MAY 11-17,2017

Got an EVENT? FESTIVAL CONCERT GALLERY OPENING PLAY GET THE WORD OUT! Add Your Event for FREE

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Chelsea News - May 11, 2017  
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