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The local paper for Chelsea

WEEK OF APRIL VOICES PAST AND PRESENT ◄ P.12

11-17 2019

‘A PERPETUAL WORK IN PROGRESS’

Also inside:

CULTURE Designed with the emphasis on flexibility, the Shed at Hudson Yards is a shape-shifting arts complex intended to meet the ever-changing demands of contemporary — and future — artists from all disciplines BY EMILY MASON

Construction was still rumbling along last Wednesday as Hudson Yards’ newest attraction, the Shed, made its debut. Workers were installing the last section of escalator inside the main building as the press got its first look at the $500 million arts complex. The dream of its creators is that the Shed will fulfill the two goals laid out by Michael Bloomberg at the onset of the project in 2013: that it be an artistic Mecca to keep New York City at the

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MEDS AND MEMORY ▲P.2

A gallery space in the Shed main building. Photo: Emily Mason

SILENT CITY ▲P.8

MAN OF THE MOMENT POLITICS As he takes on the most important role of his political life, U.S. Rep Jerrold Nadler, the ultimate Upper West Sider, follows the neighborhood principles that have guided him throughout his career BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

Forty-five years after Watergate, the nation is once again engulfed in Constitutional turmoil, and history has chosen as the man of the moment an urban progressive, beloved in his dis-

trict, who sees his mission, in no small part, as the defense of democracy. U.S. Rep. Jerrold Nadler, universally known as “Jerry,” the Brooklyn-born, yeshiva-educated, son of a failed New Jersey chicken farmer, has been a household name on the Upper West Side since his student-activist days at Columbia University in the late 1960s. He’s served 26 years in Congress, wins elections by landslides, assumed the helm of the House Judiciary Committee only in January, and has forged a reputation for patience, judiciousness – and unflinching firmness. And unlike New Jersey congressman Peter Rodino, who led the same com-

I’m in the right place at the right time. And it’s a place I wanted, it’s a place I think I’m well trained for.” Rep. Jerrold Nadler, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee mittee during Watergate and never stopped asking himself, “Why me?”, Nadler embraces the role. “If we’re going to have a Constitutional crisis, then we need someone to defend against it, and I’m just happy to be in that position,” Nadler said dur-

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Photo: Steven Strasser Clinton

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Crime Watch Voices NYC Now City Arts

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Restaurant Ratings Business Real Estate 15 Minutes

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NOTHING STOPS THESE ATHLETES ▲P.9

WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW < CITYARTS, P.14

WHO HAS ACCESS TO A PARKING SPACE IN CHELSEA? NEWS

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MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.18

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

WHAT NEXT FOR CHELSEA GALLERIES?

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up rezoning told us she’d like to would and the mid-2000s May 1 The and running this year, for of West Chelsea. Muas an ombudsman city serve Whitney the of opening Art on small businesses within them clear seum of American means not government, helping It’s new buildings, to get Gansevoort Street c to the traffi through the bureaucracy rising rents, that are even more foot things done. forcing some gallerists area. is that Perhaps even more also The irony, of course, to reconsider their Whitney -importantly, the ombudsman the arrival of the and number neighborhood roots art meccas will tally the type small business one of the city’s the end for of complaints by taken in BY GABRIELLE ALFIERO -- could also spell dealers the actions art owners, long-time policy buildStephen some response, and somefor ways to When gallerists Griffin in the area, as their are sold or recommendations If done well, Haller and Cynthiatheir W. ings increasingly begin to fix things. report would Haller reopened follow- demolished. lease the ombudsman’s 26th Street gallery With their 10-year quantitative afrst fi the rebuild Stephen us give cut short, with ing a five-month flooded abruptly shared taste of what’s wrong ter Hurricane Sandy they and Cynthia, who the city, an the space, small businesses in towards building with their first floor phone their and Tony important first step were still without were Lehmann Maupin they the problem. needed to xing fi of galleries, and Internet. Still, where Shafrazi property by June To really make a difference, the happy in the location, will have to to stay for vacate (Shafrazi is suing course, the advocaterising rents, they expected of 2014. find a way to tackle business’ the Manhattes some time. doltold less the landlord, which remain many While Chin Instead, they were their Group, for $20 million reproblem. vexing that Post most the New York than a year later gauge what to demol- lars, said it’s too early tocould have landlord planned ported). another role the advocate on the ish the building. They shopped for planned for there, more information in the neighbor“We had shows bad thing. We had location to find problem can’t be a with the long periods of time.amount hood but struggled a twoThis step, combinedBorough more than just put in a huge the anything efforts by Manhattan to mediate of money to refurbish“We year lease on a street-level in Chelsaid. President Gale Brewer offer space,” Cynthia space. After 13 years Gallery the rent renewal process, were really shocked.”Gallery sea, Stephen Haller signs tangible and early, Haller some For Stephen small left the neighborhoodStux it, it isn’t riswith of progress. For many can’t come and others like joined forces oor are driving business owners, that in a new sixth-fl ing rents that far new devel- Gallery soon enough. on 57th Street, not Chelsea, Zach Feuer them away. It’s

NEWS

luxury building Robotic garage for board draws fire from community BY ZACH WILLIAMS

at a a robotic garage A proposal for in Chelsea has thrown luxury building into the city’s zoning access to parking debate. proposed for a A high-tech garage W. 28th St. has 520 development at Board 4, which is riled Community arguing that it plan, in opposing the more car usage would only invite while only providthe neighborhood, residents. ing parking to rich a special city perThe garage needs 29 spaces rather mit to accommodate allowed the than the 11 automatically opted to oppose by the city. CB4 1 full board meetpermit at its April Carl a draft letter to ing, stating in Planning City the of Weisbrod, chair city criteria for such Commission, that based on the parking foran exception is ago, when many for stock of a decade spaces were used demer industrial future of parking in anticipation velopment in Chelsea. 40 residential have The project will comsquare feet of alunits and 11,213 the ground floor, mercial space on three parking spaces The lowing eight and the developer, respectively. But wants more for Related Companies, is the New York acthe building, which internationally City debut for Zaha Hadid. (Adjaclaimed architect Line, the build cent to the High

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his gallery in After 15 years running to partner with Joel two gallery spaces, (left) leaves the neighborhood team will operate Mesler (right). TheMesler/Feuer, on the Lower East Feuer/Mesler and May 10. Slide, slated to open

Newscheck

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is surging opment, which in part to in Chelsea, thanks High Line the opening of the

City Arts Top 5

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space

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STRENGTH IN NUMBERS ▲P.16

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REMEMBER THIS HEALTH Some drugs that heal the body can mess with the brain BY CAROL ANN RINZLER

Where are they? Vital process, complicated detail.

Quick: Where are your keys? Not sure? No surprise. Remembering that small but vital detail is a complicated process that involves both the part of your brain that enables you to think and the parts associated with emotion. It’s a process that seems to slow with age. The old news was that after a certain age, perhaps around 30, your brain began to shrink until over the years it shriveled into nothing. taking your memory along with it. The new news is that scientists who have actually taken the time to sit down and count brain cells find practically no age-related loss of cells responsible for thinking and remembering. There may, however, be less activity in your synapses, the pathways between brain cells that allow you to access what you’re stored in your brain, so it can take a little lon-

ger to find those keys, especially if you take your medicine as directed, because the newest news is that some meds that heal the body can mess with the brain. This can happen at any age, but it’s more common among older folk who may be taking multiple prescriptions to treat multiple problems. In fact, it’s so common that AARP, the champion of all aging, has compiled a list of the drugs most likely to do the dirty. First up are anti-anxiety meds such as Xanax and Valium and sleep aids such Ambien which can slow your brain’s ability to transfer what you see and learn from short term memory (something you just saw) to long term memory (something you saw a few years ago). Statins such as Lipitor and Zocor reduce the amount of arteryclogging cholesterol in your blood, but they also reduce the levels of cholesterol in your brain. That matters because your brain, which contains 25 percent of all the cholesterol in your body, uses the fatty substance when forming links between nerve cells that create memory. Happily, there are substitutes for some medical memory busters. For

APRIL 11-17,2019

MEMORY-BUSTING MEDS: AARP’S LIST example, “first generation” antihistamines such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl) or chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton) and tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil) may block the action of chemical messengers in your memory and learning centers. Newer ones such as loratadine (Claritin) cetirizine (Zyrtec) and SSRI antidepressants such as paroxetine (Paxil) don’t seem to. You don’t need a memory doctor to tell you that lifestyle choices such as alcohol and drug abuse or problems such as insomnia can also impact memory. On the other hand, curiosity may have killed the cat, but it can keep your brain and your memory zipping along at relative speed even into old age. As Richard C. Mohs, the chief science officer for the Global Alzheimer’s Platform (GAP) Foundation, writes, “Evidence from animal studies suggests that stimulating the brain can stop cells from shrinking and even increase brain size in some cases.” Which means that learning a new language or visiting a museum is not only fun, in the long run it may also help you find those darned keys which the last time you saw them were ... where?

1. Antianxiety drugs such as alprazolam (Xanax) and diazepam (Valium) 2. Cholesterol lowering drugs (statins) such as atorvastatin (Lipitor) and simivastatin (Zocor) 3. Antiseizure drugs such as gabapentin (Neurontin) 4. Tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil) 5. Narcotic painkillers such as fentanyl (Duragesic) and hydrocodone (Norco, Vicodin) 6. Parkinson’s drugs such as apomorphine (Apokyn) 7. Hypertension drugs such as metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol) and propranolol (Inderal) 8. Sleep aids such as zolpidem (Ambien) 9. Incontinence drugs such as oxybutynin (Ditropan XL, Gelnique, Oxytrol) 10. First-generation antihistamines such as chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton) and diphenhydramine (Benadryl) CAUTION: Do not stop or reduce the dosage of any of these meds without first checking with your doctor, the person best qualified to evaluate your memory.

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APRIL 11-17,2019

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CRIME WATCH BY MARIA ROCHA-BUSCHEL SCHOOL SHOOTING SCARE AT FIT Police arrested 22-year-old Noah Lee for criminal possession of a weapon inside the Fashion Institute of Technology at 227 West 27th St. on Friday, Apr. 5 at 5:35 p.m. after he allegedly threatened a school shooting. Police said that Lee made an Instagram live video while on the school grounds of FIT. In the video, he was allegedly holding a black-colored firearm with a gold-colored slide, waving it around and pointing it at at the camera. At the end of the video, police said that writing appeared on the screen stating, “School shooting thank god it’s Friday.” The New York Post reported on Saturday that the video prompted a lockdown at the school until police were able to track down Lee and arrest him inside the Union Square Barnes and Noble at 33 East 17th St. Other news outlets reported that Lee was allegedly in possession of a pellet gun when he was arrested.

HIT AND RUN IN CHELSEA No arrests have been made after a 30-year-old man reported that he was hit by a car at the corner of Ninth Ave. and West 16th St. on Wednesday, April 3 at 5:25 p.m. The victim told police that he was crossing the street

from the northwest corner to the northeast corner of West 16th St., in the crosswalk but against the light. When the victim reached the northeast corner, the driver reportedly went through a red signal to make a left turn from Ninth Ave. onto East 16th St. The victim said that he put his hands out and was thrown onto the hood of the vehicle. When the car didn’t stop, he pushed himself off the hood, injuring his hand. The victim told police that the vehicle left the scene without stopping but he saw that the driver was female.

MAN ARRESTED FOR DRUNK DRIVING A 48-year-old man was arrested and charged with drunk driving after he was involved in a motor vehicle accident at the corner of Ninth Ave. and West 42nd St. on Saturday, Apr. 6 at 1:53 a.m. When police arrived at the scene, they found that the suspect had bloodshot, watery eyes and an odor of alcohol on his breath. He reportedly blew a .122 in a preliminary breath test at the scene. The passenger of the other vehicle complained of back and neck pain but refused medical attention at the scene.

CYCLIST HIT BY CAR, DRIVER FLEES

hit by a car at the northwest corner of Tenth Ave. and West 35th St. on Thursday, Mar. 28 at 10:30 p.m. The 25-year-old victim told police that he was riding north on Tenth Ave. when an unknown driver cut him off while merging into the far right lane, causing him to hit the vehicle. The victim complained of pain in his left leg and arm but refused medical attention at the scene. Police said that the driver fled north on Tenth Ave. without stopping.

PHONE, PASSPORT STOLEN AT PLAYGROUND A 21-year-old man reported that his passport and phone were stolen while he was playing basketball inside the Gertrude Kelly playground at 317 West 16th St. on Wednesday, Apr. 3 between 11:15 and 11:35 a.m. The victim told police that he left his phone, passport and keys unattended while he played and when he went to retrieve them, they were gone. He said the person who stole his phone appeared to have taken numerous selfies that were uploaded to the victim’s iCloud. The victim told police that a school safety officer who was at the playground recognized the person in the selfies but would not provide his information.

A cyclist was injured after he was

STATS FOR THE WEEK Reported crimes from the 10th precinct for the week ending Mar 31 Week to Date

Year to Date

2019 2018

% Change

2019

2018

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

0

0

n/a

Rape

1

1

0.0

3

4

-25.0

Robbery

5

1

400.0

21

17

23.5

Felony Assault

3

3

0.0

14

26

-46.2

Burglary

2

1

100.0

24

29

-17.2

Grand Larceny

18

13

38.5

163

176

-7.4

Grand Larceny Auto

0

1

-100.0

1

2

-50.0

Photo by Tony Webster, via Flickr

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APRIL 11-17,2019


APRIL 11-17,2019

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MAN OF THE MOMENT CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 ing a 98-minute interview with The West Side Spirit. His mood was relaxed, his manner contemplative. He was formidable, to be sure, but didn’t lack a sense of humor either. He showed flashes of outrage. And above all, a consequential sense of duty to nation and founding Constitutional principles. “Why me?” he repeats. “I don’t think so — I’m in the right place at the right time. And it’s a place I wanted, it’s a place I think I’m well trained for, it’s a place I think I’m well suited for ... “My original motive in politics, from the time I was probably 12 years old, was civil rights and civil liberties and due process,” he adds. “I have always concentrated on them, and that has never changed.” What has changed? “I now have a lot of responsibility, which I didn’t have, and a lot of power, which I didn’t have, and I’m in the middle of a lot of things I care very deeply about as chairman of the Judiciary Committee, and people look to me for leadership and guidance by virtue of this position,” Nadler says.

The Picture in the Lobby The 71-year-old, lower West 70s resident was seated in his Manhattan district office at 201 Varick St., a 12-story, 1929 Art Deco federal office building that members of the public cannot enter without walking past a grinning, governmentissue color photo of President Donald Trump. Not that Nadler needs any reminders: “We have now under President Trump the most sustained attack on our democratic values and our democratic norms and the rule of law since the Civil War,” he said. “And that we have to defend against by making sure our fundamental liberties are intact, our Constitutional structure is intact, and the rule of law itself is intact.” It was the afternoon of March 21 – exactly 24 hours before the Mueller Report dropped, with less of a bang and more of a whimper – and Nadler was elucidating the personal, political, historical, intellectual, sociological and Constitutional context to his half-century-plus of public service. In two interview sessions, sandwiched around a brief meeting with the Australian consul general, he also described the character and moral principles of a neighborhood he’s embodied since his time as

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com a young political reformer who bucked, and vanquished, the entrenched Democratic political establishment back in 1969. “I would define it as liberal and generous, believing that government should be open and activist and help people who need help,” he said. “Those are the quintessential West Side values,” he said. Of course, there were national phenomena that the local body politic despised: “The West Side hated McCarthyism ... hated our endless, unnecessary wars in Vietnam and Iraq,” Nadler said.

An Early Close Encounter And it also didn’t cotton to a 150-story tower – hyped as the “tallest building in the history of the world” and the centerpiece of the “biggest project in the history of New York” – that an audacious developer named Donald J. Trump was proposing to erect along the old Hudson River rail yards between West 59th and 72nd Streets. It was the mid-1980s, and the stage was set for the first showdown between Nadler, then a state Assembly member, and Trump, who was reveling in the 1983 success of Trump Tower – and out to conquer a broad swath of the West Side. Score it as a knockout victory for Nadler.

There he was at a recent local meeting in Hell’s Kitchen ... He didn’t have to be there. He’s right in the middle of all these huge national issues. But he still shows up.” Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer

The complex was initially dubbed “Television City” because NBC was a target tenant. But the network dropped out, and it was inevitably rebranded “Trump City,” and Nadler was invited to view the models. There it was, a 150-floor monstrosity, surrounded by what he describes as a bunch of “75-story Chrysler buildings,” and, as he tells the story, “I thought it was grotesque…But I was too polite to say that.” So he asked about the tower’s residential component, and suddenly, Trump was getting animated as he riffed on highrise living, and Nadler quotes him asking, “Did you know,

did you know, that the people living on the top stories, before they go out in the morning, have to call down to the concierge to find out what the weather is like because they can’t see it because they’re above the clouds?” “I’m thinking, ‘What a drag,’” Nadler recalls. “But he’s getting more and more excited, and I realized that he’s living on the 68th floor at the top of the Trump Tower, and all of a sudden, I got it, and I asked if he would be living on the 150th floor, and he said, ‘Yeah.’” His conclusion? “Trump wanted to be the highest person in the highest apartment in the world,” he said. It didn’t happen. Nadler rallied the opposition. The project’s grandiosity vanished. It withered in size, scope and density. By 1991, a compromise was thrashed out, though Nadler still opposed it because it precluded the continuing operation of the railyards. Bottom line: Trump City was dead. A much smaller Riverside South rose in its stead. Six more modestly sized buildings bore the name “Trump Place.”

we graduate from college,” he said. “This sounded wonderful to me.”

The Boys Who Wore Neckties

The Columbia Crucible

Highly selective Stuyvesant High School, which Nadler entered in 1961, was an incubator for political prodigies. Here, he joined the debating team, launched his first five campaigns for electoral office, all of them successful, and mastered the fine art of constituent service and trust-building. He quickly came under the tutelage of two other precocious political dynamos, each a year ahead of him at Stuyvesant – Dick Gottfried, who went on to become the state’s longest serving Assembly member, and Dick Morris, who became reelection campaign strategist for President Bill Clinton in 1996 and has since drifted over to right-wing fringe politics. Nadler got a boost from Gottfried, who wrote his campaign literature, and Morris, who served as campaign manager, for school electoral triumphs, including student government president. Gottfried said: “If you look in the yearbook, we’re the only kids wearing neckties…We were all nerds back then, maybe we still are, and our nerdiness has served us well over time.” Nadler graduated Stuy, as everyone called it, in 1965, and Morris had already devised a plan for his future: “Dick said we ought to recruit a bunch of bright young liberal kids to go to Columbia and go into politics together on the West Side and not wait until

The idea was to establish a group and attract a political following, “like the Kennedy brothers,” Nadler said. Thus was born the “West Side Kids,” or “those damned kids,” as they were sometimes branded. Between 1965 and 1967, drawing from Columbia, NYU and Stuyvesant and Hunter High Schools, they organized roughly 200 to 300 students who campaigned for liberal, antiwar candidates, delivering the vote via canvassing and phone banks. “Very old-fashioned political work,” he said. Established politicians took note. In 1967, when Nadler was only 20 years old, Percy Sutton, then the Manhattan Borough President, appointed him to Community Board 7. Meanwhile, Columbia University was exploding, the Students for a Democratic Society began occupying buildings, and Nadler stayed away: “I thought it was an invasion of the civil liberties of students and faculty who wanted to attend classes to forcibly prevent them from doing so,” he said. After an initial police bust radicalized the campus, he got involved – as leader of the “right wing of the strike committee,” so called because it favored negotiations and didn’t believe, as the SDS did, that anyone trying to cross a picket line should be “physically stopped by whatever means necessary,” he recalled.

Rep. Jerrold Nadler with his granddaughter at the Community Free Democrats political club on Sunday, March 7. Photo: Emiily Goodman “I thought they were crazy,” Nadler said of the SDS extremists. “Haven’t you ever heard of civil liberties?” he demanded. “Have you forgotten that you’re on strike against the university’s use of coercive tactics?” By the time Nadler graduated from Columbia in 1969, the West Side Kids were ready to take on the “Adults,” as the reformers referred to the older, cautious established Democratic power structure that had dithered as the Dump Johnson bandwagon picked up steam. So Nadler, 21, and Gottfried, 22, and five like-minded outsiders ran for Democratic district leader posts against seven organization incumbents – and upset every single one. Their rallying cry? “Harass your local politician!” The coup was completed that year. Nadler founded a new reform club, Community Free Democrats. Other clubhouses were either taken over from the old clique or created anew. His faction now held sway over most of the political universe of the Upper West Side and ushered in a more representative, egalitarian and left-of-center Democratic Party.

“Most Important Person” The Kids came of age pretty fast. But their values and belief systems did not bend. Nadler served seven years as district leader, then was elected to the state Assembly in 1976, following Gottfried, who got there in 1970. He prevailed in a seven-way Democratic primary race, beating the other frontrunner by a

APRIL 11-17,2019 mere 73 votes. That candidate was another household name on the UWS, Ruth Messinger, the future borough president of Manhattan and Democratic mayoral nominee who lost to Rudy Giuliani in 1997. “I’ve been telling people that once upon a time, I lost an election to Jerry Nadler – and the good news is that I lost to the most important person or one of the most important people in the United States,” Messinger said in a phone interview. From 1977 to 1992, Nadler served in the Assembly, helping to write state law on transportation, housing and consumer protection policy and passing a package of landmark legislation on domestic violence and enforcement of child support payments. Nadler’s political life may be charmed, but there were two stinging defeats along the way. In 1985, he ran for Manhattan Borough President, and got clobbered by David Dinkins, and in 1989, he ran for comptroller, ran out of money and was bested by Elizabeth Holtzman. Holtzman, former Congress member who sat on Rodino’s Judiciary Committee as it passed the articles of impeachment against Nixon, has remained a friend, and in the current crisis, Nadler says, he often turns to her for counsel.

National Clamor, Local Focus After 16 years in the Assembly, Nadler suddenly had a chance to move up in 1992 when U.S. Rep. Ted Weiss, who for 15 years held the West Side Congressional seat, died suddenly on the day before the primary, which he won handily anyway. That paved the way to nominate a candidate to run in his place. Five contenders surfaced, including Bella Abzug, along with the two old buddies from Stuy, Nadler and Gottfried. There was a bit of tension between the two men. It lasted barely a week as the backroom politicking played out. “Jerry had it wrapped up from Day One,” Gottfried recalls. For years, he had cultivated relationship with local pols and clubhouses, and now, it would pay off. “He is a superb one-onone politician. Ultimately, it was a tidal wave,” he added. In Congress, Nadler worked to secure federal dollars for mass transit, harbor dredging and other transportation and infrastructure projects. He supported gays in the military, introduced legislation to permit gays to sponsor their permanent partners for immigration, fought to repeal the Defense of Marriage Act and


APRIL 11-17,2019

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campaigned for equal treatment for all married couples. And in 1998, he coined and popularized a phrase that Trump-defenders in the GOP might well adopt politically should his Judiciary Committee eventually decide to pursue impeachment proceedings against the president: “Partisan coup d’état.” With those three words – in impassioned defense of Bill Clinton, and in ardent opposition to impeachment managers seeking to bring him down – Nadler vaulted to the national stage for the first time. An impeachable offense is an abuse of presidential power that undermines the function of government, he argued then, saying the framers of the Constitution didn’t intend impeachment to punish mere wrongdoing. “Rather they saw it as a protection of constitutional liberties and of the structure of the government they were establishing against a president who might seek to become a tyrant,” he said in 1998. Nadler was just a junior minority member of the committee in his sixth year in the House. But so seriously did he take his duties that he found himself reading the works of Sir

William Blackstone, an 18thcentury British judge and legal scholar who wrote about impeachment in English law. “I still think that the best summary of what is an impeachable offense is the majority staff report of the Judiciary Committee written ironically in February of 1974 by Hillary Rodham as a young former Yale student,” he said in the interview with The Spirit.

A Historic Showdown Nadler is preparing once again, reading “To End a Presidency: The Power of Impeachment,” by Harvard law professor Laurence Tribe, whose message can be summed up in two words: Tread carefully. “The first half of the book is the terrible fate that would befall the republic if you don’t impeach a president when you should,” he said. “The second half of the book is the terrible fate that would befall the republic if you do impeach a president when you shouldn’t.” He also polished off “How Democracies Die” by two Harvard political scientists. “Very frightening,” Nadler said. “[The book] goes through Peron and Mussolini and various strongmen in other countries, and you see a lot of this in Trump – he really checks all the

boxes. “Attacking the press and the judiciary, threatening violence against reporters and others, casting doubt on the legitimacy of the election, even when he won the election, delegitimizing the electoral process,” he said. “We have better institutional safeguards – we hope – than some of these other countries, but they don’t operate automatically.” So Nadler these days has his hands full as he presses Attorney General William Barr to release a complete copy of the Mueller Report and all its supporting documentation under threat of subpoena. …And yet, as Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer tells the story, “There he was at a recent local meeting about a New York City Housing Authority infill site in Community Board 4 in Hell’s Kitchen.” “I’ve never seen anything like this,” she marveled. “He didn’t have to be there. He’s right in the middle of all these huge national issues. But he still shows up at all the meetings.” What motivates him? “It’s all about keeping a local focus on local issues and local housing and local concerns, and that has never changed,” Brewer said. invreporter@strausnews.com

“No judgment to fit in or be the same…. As soon as I came to Oakwood I felt welcome. The seniors talk to the freshmen, and this sense of community creates an environment in which we are encouraged to push ourselves and try new things. I learned right away that Oakwood would give me the help and attention with my classes that other schools could not. Oakwood has challenged me and expanded my view of what is possible and I am becoming a more confident learner each day!” Liza E., Hopewell Junction, NY

On a picturesque coed campus, infused with nature, Oakwood Friends School, guided by Quaker principles, prepares students for lives of achievement, accomplishment, compassion and conscience. Upper School Day & Boarding Programs (5 and 7-day) Middle School Day Program Middle and Upper Schools Open House Student-led campus tours and meetings with faculty and Head of School Sat/Sun April 27 & 28 at Noon Sat/Sun May 4 & 5 at Noon For more info or to join us, write or call: admissions@oakwoodfriends.org • (845) 462-4200 22 Spackenkill Road, Poughkeepsie, NY

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Voices

Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to chelseanewsNY.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

BUILDING HOSPITAL CARE! BY BETTE DEWING

So how was your hospital experience? Hope you didn’t have one, but if so, you likely received a hospital questionnaire posing that question. Mine is filled out with my often out-of-the-box thoughts on how the experience could be better — much better. Stay tuned.

Ask the Patients I also think patients should be consulted about Lenox Hill Hospital’s massive renovation plans. Those who live in the neighborhood will surely object to the sky-high physical expansion, and astute patients in general might say the expansion needed is the number of on-hands

medical care — doctors, nurses and aides. Now, they report, you may wait for hours between any such inperson visits, and isolation is very unhealthy. And while the hospital’s plan to shift to single rooms surely has merit — to be “family-centric” they explain, and no noisy roommates to impede the healing. Ah, but family need should always be stressed, regardless of room size, when it exists along with the need for quiet rooms. As for expanding hospital empathy, all medical personnel need lessons from Dr. Sarah Flannery, who said on my recent visit to Lenox Hill Hospital, “I am really sorry this accident happened to you.” Ah, and expand empathetic and compas-

sionate response teaching not only in medical schools, but in every school, starting from pre-K on out. So many societal ills would be prevented. And don’t we need that.

Change The Lights And this former patient would love to see Lenox Hill and all medical places have sunny-colored rooms and hallways. Forget all that white white. And no super-bright lights except in operating rooms. Ah, incandescent light is surely the healthiest kind, but let the energyefficients they’re obliged to use be the warm-white, not the cold-white kind. Ironically, policymakers have not done their homework on LED lights, which can interfere with

sleep cycles and do visual as well as other potential physical harm. Spea k in g of t h in gs wh ich shouldn’t have been invented — do a search. A search also finds it’s not simplistic for infinitely more smiling, not only in hospitals. Smiling is contagious — and it makes us feel better as well as look better — can’t say that too often. What else do hospitals need? Well for the growing elder population — personnel who speak loudly and distinctly enough. Is that too much to ask, or to be stressed in medical schools what with an aging population and patients whose English is not proficient? Ah, and it surely helps the quality of care if patients commend exceptionally caring hospital personnel. I did that, but unfortunately did not report a disrespectful aide; a potential problem with all personnel in need of more discussion and reporting.

How About a Chapel?

Oh, and volunteers couldn’t be more needed, especially for patients without family or other caring people around. More attention must be paid for the care patients need later at home, not only the “hired help” but the community and the neighborly kind. So in need of a mighty revival is Hubert Humphrey’s great belief that “The impersonal hand of government can never replace the caring hand and of a neighbor,” if enough Include it in Easter and Passover sermons and prayers. And how could I forget — the hospital sure needs a chapel, yes. even for non-believers who need a serene and quiet place to rest and yes, to meditate. Meditation also needs a great revival to prevent illness and expand the caring. Expand the caring — that’s what we need most. And it can be done if enough of us try ... if enough of us try ... dewingbetter@aol.com

SILENT CITY

most of the sightseers away, and you can watch the pond by the Dakota in silence. If you saunter in far enough, the sounds of the city slowly dissipate until all you can hear are your shoes beating against the asphalt. The skeletal trees stand tall in the wind, their disfigured branches reaching up to touch the gray sky. There is only the soft rustle of their fingers brushing together to keep you company. You walk for as long as it takes to catch up with yourself again. Seclusion can be found in the darkest corner of the Museum of Natural History. Past the Hall of Biodiversity is the Hall of Ocean Life. Though there are school field trips being led in single file lines, and toddlers running amok around the carpeted floor, all noise disappears as you stand and stare at the behemoth of an exhibit in front of you. The giant sperm whale seems to be swimming right out of the wall. He is satisfied, a smug grin on his mammoth face as he clamps down on the red squid resting in his mouth. The kids stay away from this corner — in the dim light of the room, the squid and the whale are terrifying monsters lurking in the dark. It is quiet enough that you can finally hear yourself think. You ponder how small we truly

BY CARLY TAGEN-DYE

You are quiet, and you know that. It has been pointed out to you more times than you can count, often by teachers irritated by the fact you don’t participate in class, or by peers who act surprised you can even talk at all. New York City might not be the best place to move if you are anxious and introverted. To you, however, it is the only place big enough to swallow a person whole. So you go. Despite the cabs honking at all hours of the night and the ever-present sounds of rush hour traffic — despite the crowds, the congestion, and the chaos — New York is not as loud as you anticipated it would be. This city can be silent when you want it to. You can make it as peaceful as you need. There is an abundance of serenity right in the middle of Manhattan. Take the C train to West 72nd Street, and enter Central Park through Strawberry Fields. Make sure to go on a Sunday morning in January, though, when the bitter cold is enough to keep

Photo: Andres Alvarado via Flickr

are when there are creatures of this size roaming the depths of the ocean. All other sounds fade. Silence comes in the first snowfall you’ve seen all season. It starts slowly, a single flake flurrying to the ground, until its friends follow suit. They twist and twirl, like delicate dancers performing a routine. The world is coated in white; peaceful, for a few swift seconds. People push past you on the sidewalk, in a hurry to get to their apartments, offices, or nearest subway stations to escape the biting cold. Within minutes, the sidewalks are much emptier. For a moment, you feel as if you are the only person on earth, caught up in the sudden storm. The trees, bare branches dusted by frost, look like the ones outside your childhood bedroom window. For a split second, you are back in the town you grew up in; ever-silent and still. The snow reminds you of home. Through these gentle glimpses, you begin to see New York as home too. You are quiet, and you know that. Perhaps this city is just like you. Carly Tagen-Dye is a freshman in the Writing B.F.A. Program at Pratt Institute

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a hydraulic fuel leak,â&#x20AC;? Lou Chinal heard in his helmet radio. His colonel, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d seen the fluid coming out of Louâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Navy jet while ďŹ&#x201A;ying nearby, continued, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need to jettison.â&#x20AC;? I assumed parachutes were

parked on a jet pilotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s back, and up and out theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d go. I was wrong, as Lou explained on a recent morning. The Martin Baker (MB) is an ejection seat kit. When you deploy your MB, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Keep your elbows in,â&#x20AC;? Lou told me. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t keep them in, when you eject youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll either lose â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;em or break â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;em.â&#x20AC;? Lou showed me the correct way to eject from a jet. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reach your arms up overhead, like this,â&#x20AC;? he said, looking like he was doing a tight pull up from a seated position. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Elbows in, then pull down.â&#x20AC;? The ejection seat kits come with an inďŹ&#x201A;atable life raft, and oxygen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three different

kinds of oxygen on an aircraft carrier,â&#x20AC;? Lou told me. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pilots get the one thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s completely dry, no moisture, so it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t freeze up in high altitude.â&#x20AC;? During ejection, the clear canopy over the cockpit blows off and the pilot is ďŹ&#x201A;ung into the air. Louâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s canopy came off, his parachute unfurled, but, twisting, got caught in its own lines. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was a partial open,â&#x20AC;? he explained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;How far did you fall?â&#x20AC;? I asked. People nearby had been semi-ignoring us. At this point, all pretense was dropped. They leaned in.

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APRIL 11-17,2019

Discover the world around the corner. Find community events, gallery openings, book launches and much more: Go to nycnow.com

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April 11 - Nov 24 THE PLAY THAT GOES WRONG New World Stages 340 West 50th St 2:00 p.m., 7:00 p.m, and 8:00 p.m. $75 newworldstages.com 646-871-1730 This Olivier Award-winning comedy is a hilarious hybrid of Monty Python and Sherlock Holmes. Welcome to opening night of The Murder at Haversham Manor where things are quickly going from bad to utterly disastrous.

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▲ HOW IT ENDS: GAME OF THRONES

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The Magnet Theater 254 West 29th St 7:00 p.m. $7 We’re finally here, the series finale of the epic story, “Game of Thrones.” But how will it end? Find out and be ahead of the game with this sneak peak at the series finale of one of the greatest shows of all time! magnettheater.com 212-244-8824

The Kitchen 512 West 19th St 8:00 p.m. $25 MATA returns for its 21st annual Festival of New Music, the latest installment of “the city’s leading showcase for fresh international talent” (The New Yorker). Curated from the submissions of more than 1100 early career composers from across the globe, MATA provides an unparalleled glimpse at what composers and musicians are exploring today. thekitchen.org 212-255-5793

Anthology Film Archives 32 Second Ave 6:45 p.m. Free In 1986, during a decade that was nostalgic for the so-called innocence of 1950s America, Stephen King directed his only feature, an unfairly overlooked film that parodies the hubristic naiveté of American consumer culture by showing what might happen if all the machines that service us suddenly gained emotions and agency. anthologyfilmarchives.org 212-505-5181


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Sun 14 Mon 15 Tue 16 KIMBERLY FRIEDMUTTER & DR. GUY MONTGOMERY: THE POWER OF THE SUBCONSCIOUS The Rubin Museum 150 West 17th St 4:00 p.m. $30 Celebrity hypnotist Kimberly Friedmutter believes that the power to change the dynamics of life lies within us, in our subconscious mind. She joins in conversation with Dr. Guy Montgomery, a faculty member of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. The two speakers will compare notes and experiences on the mind-body connection and the use of hypnosis to help improve individualsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; well-being and quality of life. rubinmuseum.org 212-620-5000

â&#x2013;˛ AURA PHOTOGRAPHY BY RADIANT HUMAN The Whitney 99 Gansevoort St 12:00 p.m $40 Inspired by the exploration and celebration of color in the current exhibition â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spilling Over: Painting Color in the 1960s,â&#x20AC;? the Whitney Shop has invited Radiant Human, the portrait practice of visual artist Christina Lonsdale, to create photographs of shop patrons and their auras. whitney.org 212-570-3600

TEACHER FEATURE UCB Hellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kitchen 555 West 42nd St 9:30 p.m. $7 UCBTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top improv teachers join forces in this improv show that features teachers for this weekly all-star improv explosion. ucbtheatre.com 212-366-9176

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Portrait of a woman holding a spindle and distaff and flanked by lion handles (c. 120 A.D.) came from Palmyra, and is on loan from Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen. Photo: Adel Gorgy

A startlingly modern looking face on a stele from Southwestern Arabia (early first century) is on loan from the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. Photo: Adel Gorgy.

VOICES PAST AND PRESENT Art and objects from the ancient Middle East embody both the fleeting nature of time and the enduring impact of long-ago cultures BY MARY GREGORY

Even goddesses can be hard to recognize. This alabaster statuette has been identified by curators as an image of Ishtar. Photo: Adel Gorgy

Entering the Metropolitan Museum’s exhibition, “The World between Empires: Art and Identity in the Ancient Middle East,” filled with images of deities, war paraphernalia, funerary objects, coins, and relics of everyday life, one feels the presence of two millennia filled with history, spirituality, culture and conflict. Names and borders are different, but the timeless gazes of portraits and the surprisingly familiar aesthetic of the works remind us that the more things change, the more they stay the same. Close to 200 works, including many important international loans, come together to give a sense of ancient places like Petra, Mesopotamia, and Palmyra, and of cultures like the Nabataeans and Phoenicians. Separate sections of the exhibition focus on areas of the Middle East, stretching from Yemen to Syria, from 100 B.C. to 250 A.D. Along with art and artifacts are photographs, maps, and video bringing the

past and present together. “In focusing on an area of the world that has been deeply affected by recent conflicts and the destruction of sites, monuments, and objects, this show also engages with complex questions about the preservation of cultural heritage,” stated Max Hollein, director of The Met.

A Ruby-Eyed, Alabaster Beauty The exhibition organizers, Michael Seymour and Blair Fowlkes-Childs, highlight a three-century long contest between the powerful Roman and Parthian empires for control of the trade routes of the ancient Middle East, and the ways that local cultures evaded their influences. Distinct societies and diverse religions flourished. The diminutive work that opens the exhibition is stunning and challenging. It’s a small alabaster statuette, about the size of a hand, on loan from the Louvre. Delicately modeled, with articulating arms, the female figure wears a gold necklace, earrings and crown and has inlaid rubies in her eyes and navel. FowlkesChilds remarks in the audio accompanying the work that the sculpture came from a grave in ancient Mesopotamia. While the portrayal might seem simi-

lar to Aphrodite or Venus, she says “these questions of divine identity are not always easy to solve.” Seymour later adds that they believe the statue depicts Ishtar of Babylon. But, he points out, “She is being represented in new ways.” Among the highlights is a beautiful wall plaque of a cheetah with charming incised circles indicating its spotted fur, from Palmyra in the third century. In the gallery featuring works from southwestern Arabia, the vivid realism of an elegant bronze horse contrasts with an extraordinarily modern-looking, abstracted face carved in a stele of stone, though they come from about the same place and time (first to second century).

The Push and Pull of Time Some of the things in the exhibition are startling because we know them, but never imagined we’d see them, like the humble unglazed pottery jar that once held the Dead Sea Scrolls. Others are astonishing because of their anonymity. Who knew that two extremely rare early paintings of Jesus on view here belong to the collection of nearby Yale University? Still others are compelling because, despite the 2,000 years that have passed, they seem so

familiar, like glasses and jars from Tyre and Sidon. The cities, the wall texts explain, had particularly fine sand for glassmaking, and became famous for their glassware. There’s a constant sense of the push and pull of time as one passes through the galleries. At one moment it all seems so distant, at another, so near. And that seems to be part of the point. Wall texts throughout the exhibition discuss the destruction of cultural heritage so problematic today. A group of experts appear in videos discussing the tragic losses of artworks across the region. But they also present ideas for the future, offering hope. A particularly poignant carved wall plaque remains in memory after walking among treasures from cultures enduring and long forgotten. It’s an altar, praising the goodness, mercy and power of god, but leaving that god unnamed.

IF YOU GO WHAT: The World between Empires: Art and Identity in the Ancient Middle East WHERE: The Met 1000 Fifth Avenue, Gallery 899 WHEN: Through June 23, 2019


APRIL 11-17,2019

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RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS MAR 27 - APR 2, 2018 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml.

Bouchon Bakery

20 Hudson Yards

A

Fuku

20 Hudson Yards

A

Starbucks

494 8 Avenue

A

Starbucks

875 6 Avenue

A

Cafe 31

220 West 31 Street

A

Chelsea Deli

301 10 Avenue

A

Bottino

248 10 Avenue

A

Hee Korean BBQ Grill

793 6th Ave

A

The Eagle

554 West 28 Street

A

McDonald’s

809 6th Ave

A

Five Guys Famous Burgers and Fries

316 West 34 Street

A

L’amico / The Vine

839 6th Ave

A

RGA Cafe & Coffee Bar

450 W 33rd St

A

Anytime Soju

23 W 32nd St

My Cooking Party

130 W 29th St

A

Good Seed

213 W 35th St

A

Best Bagel & Coffee

225 W 35th St

A

Spot Dessert Bar

11 W 32nd St

A

Kawi / Peach Mart

500 W 33rd St

A

Pisillo Italian Panini

124 W 25th St

A

Pizza NY Patina

151 W 34th St

A

Herald Square Cafe

151 W 34th St

A

Uncle Jack’s Steakhouse

440 9 Avenue

A

The Gastro Bar

345 W 35th St

A

PN Wood Fired Pizza

246 5th Ave

A

& Pizza

15 W 28th St

A

Stick To My Pot

224 W 35th St

A

Da Umberto Restaurant

107 West 17 Street

A

Stumptown Coffee Roasters

30 West 8 Street

A

Six Pans / Creamline

180 7th Ave

A

Ancolie

58 W 8th St

A

Miznon

75 9th Ave

A

Hampton Inn Chelsea

108 West 24 Street

A

Ushiwakamaru

362 W 23rd St

CLOSED (47) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Insufficient or no refrigerated or hot holding equipment to keep potentially hazardous foods at required temperatures. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Vip Club

20 West 20 Street

A

Juban

207 10th Ave

A

Gogi Grill

599 6th Ave

A

Teak Tearoom

500 W 33rd St

Not Yet Graded (66) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food not cooled by an approved method whereby the internal product temperature is reduced from 140º F to 70º F or less within 2 hours, and from 70º F to 41º F or less within 4 additional hours. Hand washing facility not provided in or near food preparation area and toilet room. Hot and cold running water at adequate pressure to enable cleanliness of employees not provided at facility. Soap and an acceptable hand-drying device not provided. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored. HACCP plan not approved or approved HACCP plan not maintained on premises. Not Yet Graded (69) Food contact surface improperly constructed or located. Unacceptable material used. Hand washing facility not provided in or near food preparation area and toilet room. Hot and cold running water at adequate pressure to enable cleanliness of employees not provided at facility. Soap and an acceptable hand-drying device not provided. Personal cleanliness inadequate. Outer garment soiled with possible contaminant. Effective hair restraint not worn in an area where food is prepared. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Brother Jimmy’s

416 8th Ave

A

Juicology

115 W 30th St

Not Yet Graded (20) Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, crosscontaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Belcampo Meat Company Belcampo Ru401b

500 W 33rd St

Not Yet Graded (34) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food worker does not use proper utensil to eliminate bare hand contact with food that will not receive adequate additional heat treatment. Personal cleanliness inadequate. Outer garment soiled with possible contaminant. Effective hair restraint not worn in an area where food is prepared. Tobacco use, eating, or drinking from open container in food preparation, food storage or dishwashing area observed.

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING YOU’D LIKE US TO LOOK INTO? DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING YOU’D LIKE US TO LOOK INTO? DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING YOU’D LIKE US TO LOOK INTO? Email us at NEWS@STRAUSNEWS.COM


APRIL 11-17,2019

WORK IN PROGRESS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 cutting edge of culture, and that it be different from anything else in the city. The Shedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s board answered this call by putting ďŹ&#x201A;exibility at the core of their project. Chairman and President of the Shed, Daniel L. Doctoroff, explained the rationale behind this design priority. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We kept hearing similar things from everybody, which is that in this era of the internet which gives people the capacity to communicate and collaborate, the cultural ecosystem was beginning to shift,â&#x20AC;? Doctoroff said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artists were producing work that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fit into traditional institutions. And out of that idea was the notion of extreme flexibility and adaptability.â&#x20AC;?

The Magic of the McCourt One of the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s architects, Elizabeth Diller, discussed how the design was created to embody this ideal of ďŹ&#x201A;exibility. The main building contains a theater, galleries, and an impressive top ďŹ&#x201A;oor with skylights and a large dance floor offering a view of Hudson Yardsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; other main attraction, the Vessel. But it is the McCourt that is the most versatile space in the design.

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We want to be able to accommodate artists, but also to inspire artists to do things they otherwise might not be able to do.â&#x20AC;? Daniel L. Doctoroff, chairman and president of the Shed

â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a perpetual work in progress, always getting smarter, always more agile,â&#x20AC;? Diller said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This building will respond in real time to the challenges brought to it by artists, and hopefully it will challenge artists back.â&#x20AC;? The other motivation for creating a space that can adapt to different types of installations is to ensure that the Shed will be able to stand the test of time as art continues to evolve.

With the Future in Mind The McCourt is created when the large latticed-steel and plastic polymer shell that surrounds the eight-floor main building is rolled back on its six giant wheels. This forms an enormous, adaptable space with moveable walls and seemingly unlimited possible combinations of seating, staging and lighting, allowing artists to use the space in a variety of ways. At the press preview, the expansive venue of the McCourt smelled of the fresh wood used to construct the tiered levels for attendees. It felt a little chilly, as well, after the warmth of the well-heated main building. And one could see the grooves on the interior of the walls which allow them to morph and change the shape of the space.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what art is going to be or what artists are going to produce in two years, or ten years, or 100 years,â&#x20AC;? Doctoroff said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to be able to accommodate artists, but also to inspire artists to do things they otherwise might not be able to do.â&#x20AC;? Alex Poots, the founding chief and artistic director of the Shed discussed some of the opening events, which feature an eclectic mix of works including a fiveday African American concert series, a concert by Bjork, and even a kung fu musical from the screenwriters of Kung Fu Panda that features songs by Sia. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This shows the range of artistry that is welcome and that can be present at the Shed,â&#x20AC;? Poots said.

The enormous interior volume of the McCourt space make humans look small. Photo: Emily Mason

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STRENGTH IN NUMBERS NYC fitness studios are adding new training classes just for women BY MICHELLE NAIM

What could be better than a gym membership on-the-go for the fitnessclass junkies among us? Welcome to ClassPass. In 2013, the small start-up hit the App Store and online markets, allowing users to choose from a crowd of boutique studios and fitness classes. Members gain access to a wide range of classes — boxing or cycling class if they’re looking for something fastpaced and intense or, they can opt for a slow-paced yoga class to get a nice stretch in — all for a monthly fee. With all of these options, ClassPass is allow-

ing women to break into the world of strength training, an exercise routine that was once largely the domain of men until recently. “I think there’s such a stigma around strength being for men and only for men,” said Heather Gunn-Rivera, coowner of Grassroots Fitness Project on the Upper West Side. In the middle of her passionate reply, the clock hit 9:29 a.m. (the women’s strength training class begins at 9:30am), “Let’s go,” she said. The studio only added an allwomen’s strength training class to its schedule a year-and-a-half ago. A Flatiron women’s-only studio called Uplift Studio, has begun to introduce strength training classes to their class schedules as well. “Strength is our signature class and

Weight training with instructor Heather Gunn-Rivera of Grassroots Fitness Project. Photo courtesy of Jesse Herndon

APRIL 11-17,2019

Business

the most popular,” said Leanne Shear, the studio owner. She initially branded herself as a women-only trainer from the start of her career. “When one of our early group classes got rained out in Central Park, instead of canceling, we herded everyone across the street to a bar to hang out. For hours, women who had never met before were sipping wine, networking, hanging out, and becoming friends and workout buddies. Men have historically created these opportunities (and advantages) for themselves, while until recently, women have not. I saw that and ran with it in the creation of Uplift.”

Empowerment within classes Shear has also recently begun a #MeToo workshop to serve the community of trainers and instructors on how best to deal with sexual harassment from clients along with Megan Eiss-Proctor, a New York attorney and founder of Heddy Consulting, The workshop is also geared towards male instructors who have wanted to step in to the aid of their female colleagues but didn’t know how. Neither of the studios would ever think about adding on a men’s-only class, saying that would defeat their entire purpose. Right now, Uplift holds all of their classes in an all-women’s setting although Shear said her trainers would be willing to work with men at special events. And, for GunnRivera, “It’s not just about bringing

Class at Grassroots Fitness Project on the Upper West Side. Photo courtesy of Jesse Herndon women together ... because we want to say no-males. It’s about giving the women a safe place to figure out what [strength is] for women — how are we going to define that?” Gunn-Rivera added that the empowerment within the classes is different than classes which have both men and women, “The way they lead, the way they support each other has a different attitude, has a different air, has a different feeling, you know. It’s so new to everybody. Were in such a time now where the confidence of women has grown.” The beginning of an ordinary allwomen’s strength class at The Grassroots Project feels like a therapy session. It’s a vulnerable space and is almost like a support group getting together to talk about their insecurities. Topics of conversation include questions Gunn-Rivera asks like, “When were times in your life when you lost

and gained your strength?” Gunn-Rivera said teaching women has been personally eye-opening to her, “It’s learning how to coach women in a strength environment because the wording is different, the language is different ... we’re not allowed to make disclaimers in the class: ‘Oh I can’t do it.’ You hear the disclaimers come out all the time and I just stop it in its tracks ... because we become what we say. We become what we think.” She continued, “I feel like I have to become somebody in order to teach a male [but] I don’t have to become [anybody] ... to teach a female.” Shear, on the other hand, does not believe there is any substantial difference between the way women and men are taught: “Women are incredibly strong and train incredibly smart. A good instructor ... is going to bring the best out of any student/client no matter who they are!”

THE IDEAL AGES FOR FINANCIAL MILESTONES A new study shows consensus about the right time to open credit card accounts, buy a home — and retire When it comes to money, life is a series of financial milestones. Opening your first credit card account, buying your first home and retiring (no more paychecks!) all feel like very significant events — and they are. But what age is the right age to reach each of these milestones? Of course, it depends on who you ask. But according to a new study from Bankrate. com, there’s some consensus among people on the ideal age for life’s major financial events. What does this mean for you? The results of this study could help you adjust your expectations or reconsider your plans for reaching wa-

tershed financial moments depending on where you are in life.

reality, the median first-time home buyer in the U.S. is 32 years old.

Most people agree on the ideal age to become a home owner. The study,

Young Americans are warming up to credit cards. All respondents across all

which consisted of interviews with about 1,000 respondents, showed that most people think 28 is the right age to buy a home for the first time. In fact, a majority of every age group cited age 28 except for the Silent Generation — people born between 1925 and 1942 — and their most common answer was similar, age 26. Of course, it’s not uncommon for the concept of “ideal” to conflict with realities on the ground. For example, there is consensus among Americans who make less than $30,000 a year, as well as those who live in expensive regions such as the Northeast, that it’s best to wait to buy a home until you’re at least 30. In

age groups agreed that 21 is the ideal age to buy or lease your first car, but there was no such consensus when it comes to opening your first credit card account. The most commonly cited ideal age for that financial milestone was 22, but millennials, who have historically shunned taking on credit card debt, are now largely in favor of paying with plastic as early as possible. About 53 percent of millennials cited 18 to 20 as the ideal age to get your first credit card. It’s important to note that the Credit Card Act of 2009 made 21 the minimum age to acquire a credit card without a cosigner or verifiable proof of enough income to

pay debts. What does this mean for you? If you have college-age kids, keep in mind that it’s now probable that they’re nearly twice as likely as you or your parents to think it’s a good idea to open a credit card account as soon as they reach adulthood.

The young want to retire earlier than those at retirement age. The survey’s younger respondents think the ideal retirement age is in one’s very early 60s — ages 61 and 60 for millennials and Gen Xers, respectively. That optimism, however, often collides with learned reality for older adults who are at or near retirement age. Half of baby boomers think it’s best to wait until at least age 65, and nearly one in five respondents age 73 or older believe that waiting until age 70 or older is better. What’s actually happening?

The average age of new retirees in the U.S. is about 63, although that varies by state, with four states in New England plus New Jersey averaging 65, the oldest average. If you’re a Gen Xer who has lofty goals of early retirement, or you’re the parent of an optimistic millennial, keep in mind that there’s a direct correlation between getting an early jump on aggressively saving for retirement, as well as limiting debt, and actually being able to retire early. Source: A Bankrate.com survey, conducted by SSRS on its Omnibus platform, of 1,001 respondents. The data were weighted to ensure accuracy. Date: August 8, 2018 Publication: Bottom Line Personal Copyright © 2018 by Bottom Line Inc., 3 Landmark Square, Suite 201, Stamford, Connecticut 06901. www.BottomLineInc. com


APRIL 11-17,2019

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ATHLETES CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9 “About 13-5,” Lou replied, then clarified, “13,500 feet. “If you’re in that situation,” he told me, “inflate your life raft between your legs and use it as a cushion.” It was a hard landing, cushion notwithstanding. After nine weeks in an induced coma, followed by three years in a nursing home, Lou walked out. A retired Naval Air Reservist, Lou continues to walk — he doesn’t even use a cane — with Achilles International, a non-profit organization that provides support to athletes with disabilities.

Inspiration and Determination It was Saturday morning and I was at the group’s weekly walkrun workout, which meets at Central Park’s Engineer’s Gate at 10 a.m. in the spring. Over one hundred people had gathered, all shapes, ages, and abilities. There were also volunteers on hand who would be divvied up among the runners who needed guides. “I used to always start my weekend workout from Engineer’s Gate,” one young volunteer told me. “I was so inspired

Runners and guides (the folks in the neon yellow shirts) gather in Central Park before a weekly run organized by Achilles International. Photo: Meredith Kurz to see everyone out here every Saturday morning, I just joined up!” I met Dave, who’s volunteered with Achilles for four years, and helps out with the guide dogs that many visually impaired runners rely on. When they run, they leave their dogs with volunteers like Dave, and are tethered to volunteers who run with them. Nishat is a New York Cares volunteer who discovered the Achilles program, and brought her friend Madeleine. Michael Anderson, Achilles’ New York director, had to

stand on a bench and throw his voice so all could hear. There were upcoming activities to announce, not only through Achilles, but with the Marlene Meyerson JCC, on Amsterdam Avenue between 75th and 76th Streets, which has been hosting Achilles events for over ten years. The next big Achilles event is the 17th Annual Hope and Possibility 4 Mile, to be held on Sunday, June 23rd. (For more info and to sign up or donate go here: www.achillesinternational.org/hope-possibility)

The run, the largest of its kind, brings together “athletes with disabilities and able-bodied athletes in a celebration of running.” There will be prizes, free t-shirts for kids and of course, lots of competition. There are several categories, including handcycles, push-rim wheelchairs and the Achilles Freedom Team.

A Variety of Programs Achilles Freedom Team brings “running and marathon opportunities to veterans who suffered trauma while serving

in a branch of the United States military, predominantly those who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.” Stefan LeRoy a Freedom Team runner, recently made news running a 5K, 10K, halfmarathon and a marathon in one weekend, running with, among others, Achilles guide David Cordani. Here’s the link: www.achillesinternational. org/freedom-team Achilles Kids has been helping kids with disabilities for over 23 years to exercise regularly and “compete with other runners, helping them become stronger and healthier.” They offer two weekend programs in NYC. www.achillesinternational.org/achilles-kids or call 212-354-0300 x305. Tri Achilles Team is for athletes with disabilities interested in multi-sport competitions. There is a wide range of experience and abilities for the competitors, and they receive training and coaching in swimming, biking, and running. www.achillesinternational. org/paratriathlon-team The Handcycle Program was started by Dick Traum, who, after knee surgery, discovered handcycling was not only a great alternative exercise, handcycles could be used to compete. Achilles presented

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APRIL 11-17,2019 the idea of handcycling to wounded veterans who lost limbs in conflicts. The program became the Achilles Freedom Team of Wounded Veterans. Achilles was able to offer “wounded military personnel a seemingly ‘impossible’ goal of completing marathons because they could use a handcycle.” To learn more about the handcycle program contact Joe Traum (Dick’s son), director of operations and wheelchair logistics at jtraum@achillesinternational.org. Marlene Meyerson JCC also offers exercise opportunities in their facilities on the Upper West Side. The Jack and Shirley Silver Center for Special Needs offers aquatics and gymnastic programming for children. The Edmond J. Safra Parkinson’s Wellness Program offers “exercise, support groups, and events designed to keep those impacted by Parkinson’s and their families active, connected, and empowered.” For these and other programs, go to www.jccmanhattan.org The Achilles guides, in their neon yellow shirts headed over to the reservoir track with their athletic partners. As I watched Lou walking with his comrades, all I could think was, 13-5.


APRIL 11-17,2019

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ART AND MIGRATION ISSUES An UES exhibition of work by undocumented immigrants explores themes of place and culture BY JASON COHEN

A nonprofit that turns real estate into spaces for artists unveiled an exhibit on the Upper East Side featuring work by two undocumented immigrants. “Esperanza de Otro Mundo Posible/ Hope of Another Possible World,” focuses on work by artists Francisco Donoso and Maria De Los Angeles and runs at 340 East 64th St. through April 18. The nonprofit group Chashama supports artists by partnering with property owners to transform unused real estate into exhibition spaces. In the last year, the organization awarded $8.6 million worth of empty space to artists and gave 150 artists free space to present their work. The artists presenting at East 64th St. are part of Chashama’s Space to Connect program, which provides free community public art classes and is funded in part through a Cultural Immigrant Initiative grant from Councilman Ben Kallos. “To me, art is simple, it is filling a space with something beautiful,” Kallos said in a statement. “And that is exactly what Chashama has once again managed to do here; display great artwork for people to see ... The Upper East Side welcomes the installation and appreciates the dedication it took for the artists to complete it.” Chashama was founded in 1995 by

Anita Durst, and its initial focus was on the production and presentation of new theater. Since then, it has expanded from midtown Manhattan to all five boroughs and beyond. Currently, it holds 150 events a year, has workspaces for 120 artists and has developed 80 workshops in underserved communities. “We’re thrilled to present the works of these diverse artists,” said Durst. “This gallery is a beautiful example of what happens when we elevate and celebrate the art of the immigrants who live in our city.” Donoso and De Los Angeles were born in Ecuador and Mexico respectively and both are DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) recipients. Their work explores ideas of place, migration and the experience of being an undocumented immigrant in the United States. Through their work as artists and educators, they investigate the problems with immigration, touching on how conversations surrounding this issue are often intertwined with racism, xenophobia and colonialism. De Los Angeles, 30, teaches art at the Pratt Institute and lives in Jersey City. She immigrated from Mexico to California at the age of 12 with her family, and in 2011, came to New York City to study at Pratt Institute. She recalled that she was shy growing up and often a had a book with her where she would draw. In 2006, a high school teacher of hers encouraged her to do art and helped her develop her passion. “I really like painting and drawing,” she said. “My first love was to make pictures and draw things.”

Francisco Donoso, “Release Me Into Orbit,” installation/mixed media, 2019 .

Maria de Los Angeles, from “En El Jardín,” Acrylic or Gouache on wall. Photos courtesy of Chashama

Maria de Los Angeles, “En el Jardín de Las Rosas,” acrylic on canvas, 2019. In 2013 she received a bachelor’s in fine art in painting from Pratt Institute, and in 2015 she obtained her master’s in fine arts in painting and printmaking from Yale School of Art. Looking back on how far she has come from being a young girl in Mexico to a successful artist in New York

City, she is humbled and proud. It has been a long road for her family, but it was worth it. “My work kind of blends who I am culturally,” she said. Donoso, 30, who lives in Inwood, was born in Quito, Ecuador and immigrated to Miami as a five-year-old. He moved to New York City in 2011, where he obtained his bachelor’s in fine arts from the School of Art+Design at Purchase College. Although he is undocumented, he has spent most of his life in America. “The transition to the U.S. was not difficult for me,” he said. “It was more difficult for my parents. I have always known the U.S. as my home. I have

sense of connection to my culture and the country where I was born, Ecuador, but I also have a deep sense of connection to this country.” He recalled how he found his passion for art at a young age. At the age of four, he received an Etch a Sketch for Christmas and became obsessed with drawing Ursula from the Little Mermaid on it. As he got older, he began to hone his craft. He attended specialized schools for art in elementary, middle and high school. “I think it’s something I’ve always been drawn to,” he said. When he graduated from college, he realized he could make a career in art, though he knew it would not be easy. Donoso works in abstract art and uses mixed media and installations to tell stories. In mixed media, he combines acrylic painting with spray paint and cartography. “As an immigrant, there are things where you are constantly oscillating between spaces and those spaces can be between mental, physical or financial,” he said. “The sense of back and forth of movement in between spaces is what guides my work.” This is the first of four shows that will run through mid-July featuring the work of immigrant artists. The next three shows, at the same location, will include performances, workshops and screenings.

Francisco Donoso, “Otro Mundo” mixed media collages, 2019. Photos courtesy of Chashama


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