Page 1

The local paper for Chelsea TURNER’S HARBOR VIEWS < P 12

WEEK OF MARCH

9-15 2017

HOMELESS STUDENTS SPIKE BY 22 PERCENT EDUCATION More than 1 in 8 in city public schools affected during recent fiveyear period BY MADELEINE THOMPSON

City Council Members Dan Garodnick and Vanessa Gibson (center) introduced legislation requiring increased police transparency. Photo: Michael Garofalo

NEW BILL AIMS TO KEEP TABS ON NYPD SURVEILLANCE LAW ENFORCEMENT Proposed legislation would require police to disclose use of controversial technologies BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

A new bill introduced in the City Council last week would allow for increased transparency on a topic that has long been opaque to elected officials and members of the public: the surveillance activity of the New York City Police Department. The Public Oversight in Surveillance Technology Act, introduced by Council Members Dan Garodnick and Vanessa Gibson, would require the NYPD to publicly disclose sur-

veillance tools it uses or plans to use, outline their capabilities, and issue policies and procedures governing their use. “It forces the NYPD to actually think about privacy before they jump into a new surveillance scheme,” Garodnick said. In the years since the 9/11 attacks, the NYPD secretly adopted various controversial surveillance tactics that later came to light through press reports and court cases brought by civil liberties groups, rather than via disclosure to City Council members tasked with overseeing the department’s operations. For years, the NYPD spied on the city’s Muslim community, eavesdropping on conversations and

CONTINUED ON PAGE 15

The number of students in New York City public schools who experienced homelessness between the 2010-11 and 2014-15 school years is larger than the size of the Boston and Seattle school systems combined. A 2016 study by the Institute for Children, Poverty and Homelessness found that 127,000 of the city’s 1.1 million public school students have been homeless at some point during those five years. These students, which research shows are at a much higher risk for mid-year transfers and chronic absenteeism, are often concentrated in one or two schools in each district, and in some districts much more than others. The institute’s recently released interactive map showed that the Upper West Side’s P.S. 165 Robert E. Simon and Bloomingdale schools have the highest percentages of homeless students, with 23.1 and 22.4 percent, respectively. Liberty High School Academy for Newcomers in Chelsea is the only other school in the Upper West Side, Upper East Side, Chelsea and Lower Manhattan neighborhoods with a student body that is more than 20 percent homeless. Although the number of homeless students dropped somewhat from just over 84,000 during the 2013–14 school year to roughly 82,500 in

VIEW THE INTERACTIVE MAP BY READING THIS ARTICLE ONLINE AT CHELSEANEWSNY.COM

2014–15, there was a 22 percent overall increase in homeless students during the five-year period traced by the institute.

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Crime Watch Voices Out & About City Arts

3 8 10 12

Restaurant ratings Business Real Estate 15 Minutes

14 16 17 19

WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW < CITYARTS, P.14

WHO HAS ACCESS TO A PARKING SPACE IN CHELSEA? NEWS

9-16

MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.18

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

WHAT NEXT FOR CHELSEA GALLERIES?

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up rezoning told us she’d like to would and the mid-2000s May 1 The and running this year, for of West Chelsea. Muas an ombudsman city serve Whitney the of opening Art on small businesses within them clear seum of American means not government, helping It’s new buildings, to get Gansevoort Street c to the traffi through the bureaucracy rising rents, that are even more foot things done. forcing some gallerists area. is that Perhaps even more also The irony, of course, to reconsider their Whitney -importantly, the ombudsman the arrival of the and number neighborhood roots art meccas will tally the type small business one of the city’s the end for of complaints by taken in BY GABRIELLE ALFIERO -- could also spell dealers the actions art owners, long-time policy buildStephen some response, and somefor ways to When gallerists Griffin in the area, as their are sold or recommendations If done well, Haller and Cynthiatheir W. ings increasingly begin to fix things. report would Haller reopened follow- demolished. lease the ombudsman’s 26th Street gallery With their 10-year quantitative afrst fi the rebuild Stephen us give cut short, with ing a five-month flooded abruptly shared taste of what’s wrong ter Hurricane Sandy they and Cynthia, who the city, an the space, small businesses in towards building with their first floor phone their and Tony important first step were still without were Lehmann Maupin they the problem. needed to xing fi of galleries, and Internet. Still, where Shafrazi property by June To really make a difference, the happy in the location, will have to to stay for vacate (Shafrazi is suing course, the advocaterising rents, they expected of 2014. find a way to tackle business’ the Manhattes some time. doltold less the landlord, which remain many While Chin Instead, they were their Group, for $20 million reproblem. vexing that Post most the New York than a year later gauge what to demol- lars, said it’s too early tocould have landlord planned ported). another role the advocate on the ish the building. They shopped for planned for there, more information in the neighbor“We had shows bad thing. We had location to find problem can’t be a with the long periods of time.amount hood but struggled a twoThis step, combinedBorough more than just put in a huge the anything efforts by Manhattan to mediate of money to refurbish“We year lease on a street-level in Chelsaid. President Gale Brewer offer space,” Cynthia space. After 13 years Gallery the rent renewal process, were really shocked.”Gallery sea, Stephen Haller signs tangible and early, Haller some For Stephen small left the neighborhoodStux it, it isn’t riswith of progress. For many can’t come and others like joined forces oor are driving business owners, that in a new sixth-fl ing rents that far new devel- Gallery soon enough. on 57th Street, not Chelsea, Zach Feuer them away. It’s

NEWS

luxury building Robotic garage for board draws fire from community BY ZACH WILLIAMS

at a a robotic garage A proposal for in Chelsea has thrown luxury building into the city’s zoning access to parking debate. proposed for a A high-tech garage W. 28th St. has 520 development at Board 4, which is riled Community arguing that it plan, in opposing the more car usage would only invite while only providthe neighborhood, residents. ing parking to rich a special city perThe garage needs 29 spaces rather mit to accommodate allowed the than the 11 automatically opted to oppose by the city. CB4 1 full board meetpermit at its April Carl a draft letter to ing, stating in Planning City the of Weisbrod, chair city criteria for such Commission, that based on the parking foran exception is ago, when many for stock of a decade spaces were used demer industrial future of parking in anticipation velopment in Chelsea. 40 residential have The project will comsquare feet of alunits and 11,213 the ground floor, mercial space on three parking spaces The lowing eight and the developer, respectively. But wants more for Related Companies, is the New York acthe building, which internationally City debut for Zaha Hadid. (Adjaclaimed architect Line, the build cent to the High

CONTINUED ON PAGE

25

his gallery in After 15 years running to partner with Joel two gallery spaces, (left) leaves the neighborhood team will operate Mesler (right). TheMesler/Feuer, on the Lower East Feuer/Mesler and May 10. Slide, slated to open

Newscheck

2 3

is surging opment, which in part to in Chelsea, thanks High Line the opening of the

City Arts Top 5

12 13

space

CONTINUED ON PAGE

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Greenwich Village, Lower Manhattan and the Upper East Side, as smaller

CONTINUED ON PAGE 15

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THEATERS DISH IT OUT CULINARY ARTS Real food features in a number of productions BY MARK KENNEDY

There’s a new version of the frightful musical “Sweeney Todd” playing in downtown Manhattan that’s undeniably meatier than most. Visitors to the Barrow Street Theatre planning to see the show about a homicidal barber whose victims are ground up into pies are being offered the chance to munch on real meat pies before the curtain goes up. “It adds something very fun, preshow,” says producer Rachel Edwards, who dreamed up the mash-up, which also happens to have real mashed potatoes. “It just gives people a different way in and a different way to experience something that they might not have thought of before.” The meat pies — created by a former White House executive pastry chef — are just part of a new wave of real food invading the world of theater, upping the realism as well as the immersive experience.

Pierogi are tossed to patrons at the Broadway musical “Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812” and real pizza slices are eaten onstage at “A Bronx Tale.” Off-Broadway, the cast members of “Everybody” munch on veggie burgers, actors in “Man From Nebraska” nibble on french fries, ham and oatmeal, and a risotto is attempted at the play “Linda.” More pies — this time, sweet dessert ones — appear in the hit Broadway musical “Waitress ,” where delicious odors waft through the theater thanks to a convection oven in the lobby. Pie consultant Stacy Donnelly creates some 15 real pies a week for the actors to use onstage and up to 1,600 mason jar pies are sold at a concession stand. “We do feel that nowadays people are so consumed with technology and the creators really wanted to make sure people were immersed in the experience,” said Donnelly. “Twitter can’t give you a smell. It can’t give you a feeling. It can’t spark an emotion the way food can.” The use of real food on stages and in auditoriums adds a dash of genuineness to the stagecraft, though theater professionals counsel that it can’t be forced. A few seasons ago, Hugh Jackman gutted and prepared a real raw

Theatergoers to the Barrow Street Theatre’s production of “Sweeney Todd,” above, can partake of meat pies prior to the performance. Food is increasingly playing a role, either on stage or off, at the theater. Photo: Joan Marcus fish with fennel and lemon onstage at “The River.” It made sense — he was playing a fisherman. That year, he was rivaled in culinary onstage skills by Carey Mulligan, who created a spaghetti Bolognese during the first act of the hyper-realistic revival of “Skylight” that left the whiff of sausage lingering deliciously during intermission. Theater creators say audiences paying hundreds of dollars a ticket demand more nowadays. “People expect the realness of something. They don’t want to see a rubber fish. They want you to go the extra mile,” said Donnelly.

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Edwards, founder and producer of the imaginative Tooting Arts Club in London, dreamed up the idea of setting “Sweeney Todd” in a real pie shop and persuaded the 32-seat historic store Harrington’s to host it, giving the show a “pressure cooker, chamber of horrors atmosphere,” she said. Edwards transferred the show to the West End and now has faithfully recreated Harrington’s at the Barrow Theatre, where strangers can break bread together on communal benches before the show. “I think it’s a lovely way to begin a theater experience,” she said. So far, about 75 percent of patrons are pre-ordering pies.

ACTIVITIES FOR THE FERTILE MIND

Adopt A Pet Home of the Mutt-i-gree®

For the new Broadway hit “A Bronx Tale ,” head prop person Mark Wasserman visits a deli near the Longacre Theatre before each performance and buys a ham sandwich, a slice of pepperoni pizza, a cannoli, breadsticks and iced tea (which stands-in for scotch onstage). “I don’t even need to order anymore,” he said, laughing. “They recognize my face and they prepare it.” His food props lend credibility to the story about a young man growing up in the mafia, especially seeing one actor munch on pizza. “It just adds to the character development that he’s actually onstage eating,” Wasserman said.

Turning reading into an act of feminist subversion is one thread of this examination of the overt sexism of On the Road, which may conceal the” potential for radical feminist liberation.” ($20)

FOLLOW US ON Photos By Ellen Dunn

NeuroYoga 2017

SUNDAY, MARCH 12TH, 1:30PM Dharma Yoga Center | 61 W. 23rd St. | 212-889-8160 | comebebrainy.com

Your neighborhood news source

Celebrate Brain Awareness Week 2017 with a yoga session followed by a lecture and discussion of the latest scientific research examining how yoga impacts the nervous system. ($9)

Just Announced | Aesthetics, Ethics, and Hannibal “The Cannibal” Lector’s Kitchen

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29TH, 7:30PM Blue Apron | 40 W. 23rd St. | thinkolio.org Goodness versus hedonism provides a point of division for a talk that will also touch on locavorism and New York restaurant culture. Host Blue Apron provides the beer and wine. ($15)

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CRIME WATCH BY MARIA ROCHA-BUSCHEL MAN ARRESTED AFTER LINCOLN TUNNEL JOYRIDE Police arrested a 26-year-old man after he took a stolen car for a joyride through the Lincoln Tunnel Friday, Feb. 3 at 5:35 p.m. Police said that the suspect used the car he was driving to ram into other vehicles to elude apprehension. At one point, he left the car and fled on foot through the Lincoln Tunnel’s south tube. Police said that he impeded vehicular traffic and ignored commands from police. The suspect, who was not otherwise identified was finally arrested at the southeast corner of Dyer Avenue and West 39th Street Police found a pipe with what they think was crack cocaine residue in the car, was charged with criminal possession of stolen property.

FAKE COPS ARRESTED FOR RESTAURANT DAMAGE Police arrested two men criminal mischief inside HK Restaurant on Ninth Avenue Sunday, Feb. 5. Police said that the two men, aged 25 and 26, intentionally damaged an ATM, a wall, a glass staircase and eight chairs inside the restaurant, causing more than $1,500 in damage at about 5 p.m. that evening. The two men reportedly identified themselves as police officers when the restaurant

STATS FOR THE WEEK Reported crimes from the 10th precinct Week to Date

Year to Date

2017 2016

% Change

2017

2016

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

0

0

n/a

Rape

0

1

-100.0

2

2

0.0

Robbery

2

3

-33.3

12

12

0.0

Felony Assault

1

0

n/a

13

10

30.0

Burglary

2

1

100.0

12

15

-20.0

Grand Larceny

7

17

-58.8

87

89

-2.2

Grand Larceny Auto

1

0

n/a

4

0

n/a

Tony Webster, via flickr

manager attempted to prevent them from causing more damage. One of the suspects also lunged at the manager, causing him to cut his neck. The two men also refused to pay a restaurant bill of $81.54.

DRIVER ARRESTED ON DUI, WEAPONS CHARGES Police arrested a 27-year-old man for criminal possession of a weapon after he was pulled over during a traffic stop at the northeast corner of 11th Avenue and West 25th Street early on Saturday, Feb. 4. Police said that

the suspect was driving west on West 26th Street with his headlights off and failed to signal when turning abruptly onto 11th Avenue. When police pulled him over at 3:45 a.m, he reportedly had a strong odor of alcohol on his breath and watery eyes with dilated pupils. He also admitted to police that he had been drinking and there was an open container of vodka inside the car. A quantity of a controlled substance was also recovered from his vehicle and when he was searched, police found that he was in possession of a gravity knife. When he was given a Breathalyzer three hours later, he had a blood alcohol content of 0.049.

PHONES STOLEN FROM COFFEE SHOP

TAXI DRIVER FLEES ACCIDENT SCENE

A 58-year-old man reported that his two iPhones were stolen while he was inside the Bean at 318 Eighth Avenue Saturday morning, Feb. 4. He told police that he went into the coffee shop to download files from his phone but he fell asleep, and when he woke up, he noticed that the two phones had been taken from the table where he was sitting.

A 26-year-old man reported that he was involved in an accident with a taxi that fled the scene while he was driving east on West 16th Street Saturday, Feb. 4 at 2:30 p.m. The victim told police that he was near the northeast corner of Ninth Avenue and West 16th Street when he was involved in an accident with the cab driver, but the driver fled east on West 16th Street without exchanging information with the victim.

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Useful Contacts POLICE NYPD 10th Precinct

230 West 20th St.

212-741-8211

150 West 19th St.

311

FIRE FDNY Engine 3/Ladder 12

Councilmember Corey Johnson

224 W. 30th St.

212-564-7757

State Senator Brad Hoylman

322 Eighth Ave. #1700

212-633-8052

Assembly Member Richard Gottfried

242 W. 27th St.

212-807-7900

COMMUNITY BOARD 4

330 W. 42nd St.

212-736-4536

Muhlenberg

209 W. 23rd St.

212-924-1585

Columbus

742 10th Ave.

212-586-5098

Mt. Sinai – Roosevelt

1000 10th Ave.

212-523-4000

New York-Presbyterian

170 William St.

212-312-5110

CON EDISON

4 Irving Place

212-460-4600

TIME WARNER CABLE

605 Sixth Ave.

347-220-8541

Old Chelsea Station

217 W. 18th St.

212-675-0548

US Post Office

421 Eighth Ave.

212-330-3296

US Post Office

76 Nineth Ave.

212-645-0351

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MARCH 9-15,2017

WESTY awardees and presenters (left to right): Renee Edelman, Rabbi Joy Levitt, Judith Long, Olive Freud, Robert Long, Rev. Robert Brashear, David A. Tewksbury, emcee Jamie Stelter, Straus News President Jeanne Straus, Kate Wood, Officer Jack Etter, Officer Edward Groger, Capt. Ciro Napolitano, City Council Member Helen Rosenthal, Hector Batista, Scott Parker, Borough President Gale Brewer. Photo: Genia Gould

CELEBRATING THE WESTY AWARDS Local elected officials, community boards, and West Siders joined The Spirit in celebrating the 2017 WESTY Awards at Merkin Concert Hall last Tuesday, Feb. 28. The Spirit hosts the WESTY (West Side Spirit Thanks You) awards every other year to shed light on and honor those working to make the West Side a better place. This year’s awardees were: Hector Batista of Big Broth-

ers Big Sisters; Tom A. Bernstein, Roland W. Betts, and David A. Tewksbury of Chelsea Piers; West Park Presbyterian Church’s Rev. Robert Brashear; Renee Edelman of the Children’s Museum of Manhattan; NYPD 20th Precinct Officers Jack Etter and Edward Groger; Olive Freud of the Committee for Environmentally Safe Development; JCC Manhattan’s Rabbi Joy Levitt; Robert and Judith Long of Long’s Bedding;

FDNY Engine 74 Captain Ciro Napolitano; PS 452’s Principal Scott Parker; New York State Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal; and Kate Wood of Landmark West. Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, Council Member Helen Rosenthal, and the event’s emcee, NY1’s Jamie Stelter, joined Jeanne Straus, President of Straus News, onstage as they took turns presenting awards to this year’s recipients.

Emcee Jamie Stelter of NY1, Brian Stelter of CNN, Straus News CRO Vincent Gardino, Straus News President Jeanne Straus. Photo: Genia Gould


MARCH 9-15,2017

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CONGRATULATIONS to the 2017 WESTY AWARD WINNERS

Officer Jack Etter, Public Advocate Letitia James, Capt. Levon Holley. Photo: Genia Gould

Olive Freud (third from left) with family. Photo: Genia Gould

Rev. Robert Brashear with Susan Sullivan (left) and Melissa Elstein (right)

Vincent Gardino, Straus News CRO, Hector Batista and wife Victoria. Photo: Genia Gould

Public Advocate Letitia James, Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal, Jeanne Straus, Mel Wymore. Photo: Genia Gould

We are proud of our own Renée Edelman for her work on behalf of the Children’s Museum of Manhattan and its mission to serve all of New York City’s children and families.

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MARCH 9-15,2017

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Voices

Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to chelseanewsNY.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

FORESTS AND TREES BY MELITTA ANDERMAN

Remember the old fashioned adage, “you can’t see the forest for the trees”? A lot of interpretations can be read into those few words: not being appreciated for lack of real insight, too many available choices that mar the clarity of what’s in sight, or flitting like a butterfly from one activity to another. At this time and place I am surrounded by countless choices that plow down the trees without allowing me to find my personal forest. My forest of choices consists of books, films and theater. (To say nothing of politics.) They are all trampling my well-trod path. Books are a big part of my life. I like the shape and feel of each book, especially the end papers which can be

a work of art. There is a book store in London called Persephone that caters to women writers from the 20th century, and they promote artistic endpapers. You can surmise that I’m a reader who needs to hold a book in hand, but books can be listened to, or read on a Kindle. I love going to movies in the city, especially now that reclining seats are available. I take a shawl, wrap myself in a cocoon and pretend I’m on a plane awaiting my little bag of chips. I can also go to a movie with regular squashed seats, and pay a tiny fortune to see half a dozen previews of movies scheduled for openings next year. Or I can go to Netflix where I have hundreds of choices in all genres, and where it will take me half a night to make a choice. When I

Photo: Nova, via flickr think I’m ready to settle in and start watching, I find the foreign language film I’ve selected has no English subtitles. Choosing a theater production in New York is also a cause for chaos. I belong to a number of organizations where for an annual fee you get loads of choices and the entrance price is

nominal. You have to be alert and check several times a day what show pops up and hastily reserve seats. Then you have to know what password you posted to get into the site, so you need a place to save these vital facts. Sometimes all this effort is worth the price of admission, but often it’s easier just to call a marketing

FOOD FOR THOUGHT EAST SIDE OBSERVER BY ARLENE KAYATT

Church and a state of mind — Standing on Lex near 89th waiting for a local bus. Construction worker in a hard hat walks out of the convenience store. Standing in the portal of the store, he crosses himself. Couldn’t understand why he would do that. There was a church on the next corner, but he wouldn’t see it until he exited the store. Noticed that he was holding something in his hand. Lifting it to his lips, he kissed it. A stack of lottery tickets. Kisses and crosses. Hoping they worked. The whole world’s in their hands — Whole Foods is taking over the city. UES, LES, crosstown, Uptown. Everywhere. The latest encounter I’ve had with the behemoth is the newly opened Bryant Park location. Looks spiffy, but as you enter the verticalhorizontal sprawl mid-block between 42nd and 43rd Streets on Sixth Ave, it

feels like you’re in maybe Grand Central Station, Penn Station or Union Station. Off to the right is News Agency — love the name and its promise of maybe a newspaper (they do carry The New York Times) — a coffee hub with pastries, pre-made, packaged sandwiches, salads. To the left is the entrance to the world of produce, dairy. In the middle are stairs and escalators leading to the food court. Unlike any other Whole Foods stores I’ve been to or am aware of, this one has vendors and kiosks and a food hall where you can eat-in, take-out, or sitdown and dine. As I recall, the Whole Foods in Columbus Circle had a wine shop at one point. No more. Well at Bryant Park location, there’s Harbor Bar where you can have cocktails, and Frankie’s Spuntino’s where you can have wine. Seems that Frankie’s also may be taking over the town. In addition to their several Court Street locations in that outer borough, they have a Hudson Street restaurant. We’re in a Whole Foods evolving world. Post haste — The promise of haste —

service, pay the grossly over-the-top price and call it a day. Right now I will call it a night and remove these weighty choices from my overloaded mind. Maybe I can find Dorothy’s yellow brick road and get back home.

he (the man) would start all over at the counter. “No, it’s being mailed. Can’t do anything about it.” Until the manager had second thoughts and hurried the man over to the counter. Had the mailing recalled. The man started all over again which meant that the postal worker behind the counter had to remove the labels and replace them with new ones. A surgical procedure to be sure, but a huge success. Nodding his head in disbelief and looking at his watch, the man’s parting words to those still on line, “Wait. Wait your turn. No shortcuts, trust me.”

Photo: Andrij Bulba, via flickr Don’t even think about it at the post office — Post-lunchtime on a Tuesday afternoon. Man standing on line holding two overnight “priority” envelopes in his hand at the FDR Post Office on Third Avenue and 54th-55th Streets. Medium to long line. He was standing, tapping his foot. Obviously in a hurry. A smile crossed his face when a postal worker looking to shorten the line said to him, “Come with me. You’ll be out in no time.” She escorted him over to the side. Took out her phone with all of

the accoutrements to input information for the mailing label and to accept credit card payment in “1-2-3,” she said, and we’re done. As luck would have it, life intervened. The ZIP code wasn’t matching. The label wasn’t printing. Tried again. Same thing. Along came a manager. Similar problem until he said “OK, it went through” — “IT” meant the two envelopes the man was holding, and IT was taken to the counter for mailing as the man implored the manager to recall it and

Dems not the only ones — Seems Manhattan Republicans are feeling the heat of the Trump presidency. The Metropolitan Republican Club on East 83rd Street, which has tripled its membership in the last two years, is having its own internecine battles. Seems former executive committee members who supported Trump weren’t re-nominated to the executive committee and they’re blaming it on their support of the president. The club’s saying that there are other “valid reasons” for their not being voted in. And that new blood keeps them (the Met Club) “vibrant.” Out with the old. In with the new. Nothing new about that. But when it happens, it’s real, not fake, news.

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MARCH 9-15,2017

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

9

FOURTH MAN IN THE ROOM PROFILE ormer state Senator Seymour Lachman details Albany’s disfunction BY LEIDA SNOW

Few city dwellers realize that decisions made in Albany determine tax rates, infrastructure repair schedules, economic development subsidies, even air and drinking water quality. In fact, the recent opening of the initial phase of the Second Avenue subway was probably the first time many realized that the city’s subways and busses are run by a state agency, the Metropolitan Transit Authority. Seymour Lachman, the former state senator from Brooklyn, now an Up-

per Eastsider, says he loves the new Q train line, and luxuriates in its location just blocks from the rental apartment in the East 60s that he shares with his wife of more than 50 years, Susan. But nobody knows as well as Lachman does just how difficult it is to get anything done in Albany. After serving five terms as a state senator, Lachman penned an exposé of bribery, kickbacks, embezzlement and general malfeasance in Albany, called “Three Men In a Room,” published in 2006. Not much has changed since then: “Over the prior 15 years,” he said, “33 Democratic and Republican legislators in the Assembly and State Senate have been forced to leave office due to criminal charges, ethical lapses, or alleged wrongdoing.” When Lachman, 83, launches into what’s wrong with state government,

Seymour Lachman’s “Failed State” will be released next month. Photo courtesy of SUNY Press.

...the legislature lacks an internal democratic process. Members cannot do anything on their own. The leaders have ironclad control. No bill gets through the legislature without the support of the leaders” Seymour Lachman

he speaks in a voice loaded with authority, vividly describing his disillusionment with the pay-to-play culture of Albany. He has now expanded and revised his book, once again with his colleague, Robert Polner. “Failed State: Dysfunction and Corruption in an American Statehouse” will be published in April. Born in the Bronx, Lachman’s family moved to Brooklyn when he was young. He became active in community affairs early in life, and by 34 was selected to head the New York City Board of Education. “I was teaching then at the City University of New York,” he chuckled. “They wanted someone who could bring people together, but also, somebody no one had heard of so no one would object.” He was subsequently elected president of the board, and sponsored the first Holocaust studies curriculum, which was replicated by school systems throughout the country. A Democrat, he was elected to the New York State Senate in 1996, and served five terms. He also served as president of the National Association of Jewish legislators. In his book, Lachman meticulously explains how the wheels turn in Albany, where those who go along get plum committee assignments and extra money for their districts. He is adamant that “individual legislators are powerless.” Decisions about budget, agenda and legislation, are made in secret meetings between the Assembly speaker, the Senate majority leader and the governor – the legendary Three Men in A Room – he said The juicy details are all there — how Lachman was told in no uncertain terms that he could receive tens of thousands of dollars more in members’ items if he agreed to vote with the leadership on major issues. A negative response would doom his senate career. “I wouldn’t go along,” he says. According to Lachman, “the legislature lacks an internal democratic

Seymour Lachman. Photo: Wagner College

Seymour Lachman will be reading and discussing “Failed State: Dysfunction and Corruption in an American Statehouse” at 5:30 p.m. on March 8 at the 67th Street Library, 328 East 67th St., and at 6:30 p.m. on March 15 at Shakespeare & Co., 939 Lexington Ave. (RSVP at events@shakeandco.com).

process. Members cannot do anything on their own. The leaders have ironclad control. No bill gets through the legislature without the support of the leaders.” Lachman’s bursting resumé also includes a long stint as distinguished university professor of government at the Hugh L. Carey Institute for Government Reform at Wagner College on Staten Island, where he was a founding director and dean emeritus. He is also the former chair of the Greater New York Conference on Soviet Jewry. In 1993 he co-authored “One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society, which was an alternate selection for the Book of the Month Club. Among his other books are “The Man Who Saved New York: Hugh Carey and the Great Fiscal Crisis of 1975” and “Mr. New York, Lew Rudin and His Love of the City.” As long as Lachman served in the State Senate, Brooklyn remained

home until three years ago, when he and Susan decided to move into Manhattan. “Both our children are grown and we have 11 grandchildren,” he said. “I’m free now — to lecture, write, do whatever I like. Susan loves Manhattan,” he continued. “She has a doctorate in sociology and recently retired from teaching. Now she runs to lectures, concerts and the theater, and we both walk everywhere.” To solve the issues in Albany, Lachman’s prescription calls on New Yorkers to vote for a Constitutional Convention (ConCon) in the fall. By law, the referendum is on the ballot every 20 years. Most news these days is Trumped, but Lachman says he’s “hoping that readers of Our Town and others who are concerned, will wake up to the dangers of continuing the status quo.” Lachman acknowledges that successful disruption doesn’t guarantee something better will emerge, “but if we don’t take this risk, we’ll face another 20 years of dazzling dysfunction.”


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Come Experience Auctions at Showplace! First-Time Bidders Welcome! Fine and decorative art, jewelry and furniture for a fraction of retail cost! No reserves!

MARCH 9-15,2017

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Sunday, March 19, at 11am! Preview: March 6 – March 19 8:30am – 5:30pm weekends & 10am – 6pm weekdays Absentee and phone bids accepted! Complimentary lunch after the auction! View the catalogue at www.nyshowplace.com! Showplace Antique + Design Center | 40 West 25th Street auctions@nyshowplace.com | 212-633-6063 ext. 808

We buy estates! ‡Entire or partial contents ‡Immediate payment ‡Professional and discreet

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Advertise with Chelsea News today! Call Vincent Gardino at 212-868-0190

Photo by Jordi Carrasco via Flickr

Thu 9

Fri 10

Sat 11

LITERATI ART

SUMMER MOUNTAINS

CAT CAMP

Art100 New York, 555 West 25th St. 6-8 p.m. INK studio, a Beijing-based art gallery presents its inaugural group exhibition in the US: “China Now: New Literati Art” during Asia Week. 917-388-3969. artnet.com/ galleries/art100

German Lutheran Church of St. Paul, 312 West 22nd St. 8:30-11:30 p.m. $25 Concert features the world premiere performance of “Summer Mountains” by Danny Gray and the works of Dvorak, Boyman and Haines. 212-929-1955. stpaulny.org

Metropolitan Pavilion Events, 125 West 18th St. 8 a.m. $20-$185 Feline-focused conference and adoption extravaganza during the weekend of March 11-12. Jackson Galaxy is keynote speaker on Sunday. 212-463-0071. metropolitanevents.com

IMPOSSIBLE FEATS

ChelseaNewsNY.com

Fantasma Magic, 421 Seventh Ave., 3rd floor 7:30-10 p.m. $15 Two renowned magicians show their audiences how to do seemingly impossible feats, and to open their minds “to think outside the box.” 212-244-3633. fantasmamagic.com

GHOST HUNT▲ Big Apple Convention, 401 Seventh Ave. 6:30-7:30 p.m. $25-$50 Comic Book Marketplace teams up with Ghosts of N.Y. Tour Company, for first-ever tour of the Hotel Pennsylvania, claimed haunted by most who stay there. nycbm-com.

CIVIL TRAINING The Kitchen, 512 West 19th St. 1 p.m. Free. Pre-register. Workshops cover targeted giving, upstander training and first amendment rights, among other civil engagement tools, featuring Debjani Roy and Hollaback. 212-255-5793. thekitchen.org


MARCH 9-15,2017

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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

TEEN POETRY Jefferson Market Library, 425 Sixth Ave. 6-8 p.m. Free Support voices of the next generation, as they take the stage for poetry slam. Poets must be 13-19 years old. To particpate, teens sign up or show up. 212-243-4334. urbanwordnyc.org

Wed 15 CELEBRATING WOMEN▼ Ceres Gallery, 547 West 27th St. 7-9 p.m. Nai-Ni Chen and fellow women choreographers perform in conjunction with “The Women’s Caucus for Art Work, No Boundaries,” by Ruth Bauer Neustadter. 212-947-6100. ceresgallery. org

Sun 12

“Fallen Glory: The Life and Deaths of History’s Greatest Buildings.” 212-759-2424. rizzoliusa. com

READING | ‘EMBERS’ Workshop Theater, 312 West 36th St. 6 p.m. Free When fire destroys a couple’s home and sends the wife into a coma, the husband faces fear, fights for his marriage, sanity and future. 212-695-4173. workshoptheater.org

SYDNEY DANCE CO. ▲ The Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Ave. 2 p.m. $26-$56 A triple bill featuring three choreographers “who push the possibilities of movement.” 212-242-0800. joyce.org

Mon 13 GREAT BUILDINGS Rizzoli Bookstore, 31 West 57th St. 7 p.m. Free Author James Crawford discusses and signs his book,

TWO-WOMEN READING School of Visual Arts Theatre, 333 West 23rd St. 7 p.m. Free Authors Laura Larson (“Hidden Mother”) and Mark Alice Durant (“27 Contexts: An Anecdotal History in Photography”) read from their works. 212-592-2980. sva.edu

Tue 14 ‘QUEER AS IN F@*K YOU’ New York Live Arts, 219 West 19th St. 7 p.m. $15. Conversation about the transformative powers of punk through the lens of Homocore/ Queercore, moderated by Kenny Mellman of Kiki & Herb and others. 212-691-6500. newyorklivearts.org

Everything you like about Chelsea News is now available to be delivered to your mailbox every week in Chelsea Clinton News From the very local news of your neighborhood to information about upcoming events and activities, the new home delivered edition of Chelsea Clinton News will keep you in-the-know.

WHITE NOISE Rubin Museum of Art, 150 West 17th St. 7-8:30 p.m. $20 After temporary loss of hearing, Peter Silberman’s brain filled silence with static. He demonstrates affect on his music with a hearing science specialist. 212-620-5000. rmanyc.org

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MARCH 9-15,2017

TURNER’S HARBOR VIEWS MUSEUMS The Frick showcases a trio of early 19th century port paintings by the “Cockney poet” BY VAL CASTRONOVO

Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775-1851), master of luminous landand seascapes, is making waves in New York this winter with a focused show at the Frick, “Modern and Ancient Ports: Passages Through Time.” Two monumental oils from the museum’s West Gallery, “Harbor of Dieppe: Changement de Domicile” (exhibited 1825) and “Cologne, the Arrival of a Packet-Boat: Evening” (exhibited 1826), now hang in the Oval Room alongside a third, unfinished work, “The Harbor of Brest: The Quayside and Château” (1826-28), on loan from Tate Britain. The three port scenes comprise a series and are being shown together for the first time, along with some 30 oils, watercolors and prints. Henry Clay Frick purchased the West Gallery’s mainstays “Dieppe” and “Cologne” more than a century ago. The painting of Brest’s harbor in Brittany was discovered by accident in 1943 in the basement of London’s National Gallery by then-director Kenneth Clark, who was looking for space for bomb shelters. More than 50 years later, Ian Warrell, a Turner specialist and one of the show’s curators, identified the subject. The canvas, part of the Turner Bequest to the nation in 1856, had never been exhibited or sold because it was unfinished. Here it serves to illuminate the painter’s process. The three radiant harbor views are paradigms of Turner’s mid-career style, with color, light and atmospherics the central features. Widely heralded as Britain’s greatest painter, this son of a barber and wig maker from Covent Garden was obsessed with light. He has been dubbed the “painter

J.M.W. Turner. “Harbor of Dieppe: Changement de Domicile,” exhibited 1825 but subsequently dated 1826. Oil on canvas, 68 3/8 x 88 3/4 inches. The Frick Collection, New York. Photo: Michael Bodycomb of light” for his shining vistas, a feat he achieved by priming his canvases with white grounds and using newly invented pigments such as chrome yellow and chrome orange. Turner’s sunny style was undoubtedly influenced by a trip to Italy in 1819. But critics faulted him for painting northern European ports in such light tones. The new hues, in fact, were deemed unnatural. His penchant for yellow prompted one reviewer to gibe he suffered from yellow fever. The interest in ports derives in part from the border closures (sound familiar?) during the Napoleonic Wars, when Britons were banned from crossing the English Channel until the emperor’s defeat at Waterloo in 1815. Once the restrictions were lifted, Turner, an obsessive traveler, joined the throngs who streamed across the Channel to the Continent. He made two trips to Dieppe, in 1821 and 1824, sketchbook in hand (one is on display). He drew in situ and returned to his London studio to commence painting — from the sketches, from memory

IF YOU GO WHAT: “Turner’s Modern and Ancient Ports: Passages Through Time” WHERE: The Frick Collection, 1 East 70th St. WHEN: Through May 14 www.frick.org and from his wild imagination. As the Frick’s director, Ian Wardropper, remarked at a preview, ports in the post-Napoleonic era became “symbols of trade, travel and commerce.” They represented freedom, and with the lifting of the ban, Turner was free to wander and continue the shift from naturalism to a more atmospheric and abstract style. Call it modern. The Frick’s senior curator, Susan Grace Galassi, who had the idea for the exhibit, analyzed the two principle works, “Dieppe” and “Cologne.” Dieppe on the Normandy coast was a centuries-old fishing village. To an

England that was undergoing industrialization, the picturesque port felt “very foreign and exotic, like landing on the moon,” she said. Viewers of the canvas have the sense of “gliding in on a boat with Turner. It’s a scene of massive sky, a painting about light with the city as a frame.” Beautifully detailed architecture appears to the right, betraying Turner’s early apprenticeship as an architectural draftsman. The picture is monumental in scale, a size normally reserved for history paintings — but here the subject is “the quotidian,” Galassi said with reference to a buzzy open-air market and a couple unloading (loading?) household items from two boats. Eyes are directed back to the dome and tower of the parish church St. Jacques, which “gives a spiritual quality to the light,” the curator said. The composition shows the influence of French landscape painter Claude Lorrain (1604/5-1682), who worked in Italy and used the device of a central distant sun.

The honey-toned “Cologne” is similarly monumental and similarly luminous, but this Rhine River harbor scene is set in the evening and refers back to 17th century Dutch marine painters, with a large boat blocking the deep space that is the hallmark of “Dieppe.” Once again there is a distant church with a tower, in this case Gross St. Martin. Stray figures on the shoreline appear to be laboring into the sunset; a tourist boat, meanwhile, sweeps by the medieval buildings and telegraphs the themes of leisure travel and passages through time. The hazy “Harbor of Brest” was included as “an interesting example of work arrested at a certain stage,” Galassi said. It’s “in a molten state [showing] chaos before creation.” Indeed, as Simon Schama relates in the BBC’s “Power of Art” about the artist he calls the “Cockney poet”: “One critic despaired that Turner delights in abstractions that go back to the first chaos of the world.”


MARCH 9-15,2017

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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

RECHARGE THIS WEEK AT THE RUBIN MUSEUM Hamilton signature. Image courtesy Seth Kaller, Inc.

HAMILTON, UP CLOSE HISTORY Rare original documents on display at the Antiquarian Book Fair BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

In a development sure to delight history buffs and fans of the musical â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hamiltonâ&#x20AC;? alike, a collection of original letters and documents offering a rare glimpse into the life of founding father Alexander Hamilton will be displayed for the first time at this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s New York Antiquarian Book Fair at the Park Avenue Armory. The collection, assembled by historic document dealers Seth Kaller and John Reznikoff, consists of over 1,000 items relating to Hamilton and the founding of the United States, including original letters handwritten by Hamilton, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, James Madison, and Benjamin Franklin. The asking price for the collection is $2.3 million. Among the highlights is a 1780 love letter from Hamilton to his future wife Eliza Schuyler, sent from the ďŹ eld during the Revolutionary War in the midst of their courtship. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You are certainly a little sorceress and have bewitched me,â&#x20AC;? Hamilton writes, continuing, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love you more than I ought.â&#x20AC;? Later in the letter, he teases Eliza and shows a bit of his famous ego, writing, â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is again an age since I have heard from you. I write you at least three letters for your one, though I am immersed in public business and you have nothing to do but to think of me.â&#x20AC;? Hamilton even jokes to Eliza about ďŹ nding â&#x20AC;&#x153;a new mistressâ&#x20AC;? while he is away, before assuring her that to do so would only cause him disquiet and â&#x20AC;&#x153;make me return to you with redoubled tenderness.â&#x20AC;?

Photograph by Filip Wolak

FEATURED EXHIBITIONS Sacred Spaces: Himalayan Wind and the Tibetan Buddhist Shrine Room Transport yourself to the high Himalayas through an immersive sound experience by Soundwalk Collective. Hear the ZKLVWOHRIVWURQJZLQGVWKHĂ DSSLQJRI SUD\HUĂ DJVDQGWKHFKDQWLQJRIEOHVV ings at some of the highest Buddhist monasteries in the world.

OM Lab: Offer Your Voice Are you ready to OM? Offer your voice in the OM Lab, a new interactive space. Learn about this sacred syllable, record your OM in the soundbooth, and then hear your voice mixed with thousands of others in the June exhibition The World Is Sound.

Alexander Hamilton portrait by John Trumbull, 1806. Image from Wikimedia Commons â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure a couple of decades later he wished he hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t acted on that,â&#x20AC;? Kaller said with a laugh. Years later, Hamilton became embroiled in a sordid blackmail scheme that has been called the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ rst sex scandal, and publicly admitted carrying on an extramarital affair in a document known as the Reynolds Pamphlet. An 1800 printing of the pamphlet is included in the collection. Other notable pieces include a 1788 ďŹ rst edition of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Federalist,â&#x20AC;? Hamiltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s collected essays advocating for the ratiďŹ cation of the Constitution, and a lock of Hamiltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hair, kept by his descendants for generations. The collection also includes dozens of letters and documents from other notable ďŹ gures of the period that provide additional context about contemporary culture and politics. While the average â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hamiltonâ&#x20AC;? fan wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be in the market

to purchase the collection, a number of the most impressive items will be on display for all visitors to the Antiquarian Book Fair. In contrast to the formality of a museum setting, the book fair offers visitors the opportunity to get an intimate look at original documents and, in many cases, hold history in their hands. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re used to people getting much closer to the documents,â&#x20AC;? Kaller said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can really get up close and personal.â&#x20AC;? Other highlights of this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s show include a book adaptation of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Snow White and the Seven Dwarvesâ&#x20AC;? signed by Walt Disney and 51 of the ďŹ lmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s animators and a first edition of Charles Dickensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oliver Twist.â&#x20AC;? The New York Antiquarian Book Fair runs March 9-12 at the Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Avenue. Daily admission is $25.

MEDITATION PROGRAMS Awakening Practice Morning Mindfulness in the Shrine Room March 11 11:30 AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;12:15 PM

Can Meditation Change the World? A talk with Khentrul Thokmeth Rinpoche + GaĂŤlle Desbordes March 12 6:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7:30 PM

TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE AT RUBINMUSEUM.ORG Sacred Spaces and Himalayan Wind are made possible through the generous support of Audio-Technica. Additional support has been provided by Christopher J. Fussner, The Hoch 2009 Charitable Lead Trust, and Rasika and Girish Reddy, as well as Bob and Lois Baylis, Ashwini and Anita Gupta, Preethi Krishna and Ram Sundaram, William and Pamela Michaelcheck, Tulku Tsultrim Pelgyi, Manoj and Rita Singh, Venkat and Pratima Srinivasan, the Zakaria Family Foundation, and contributors to the 2015/2016 Exhibitions Funds. OM Lab is made possible through the generosity of HARMAN. Additional support provided by contributors to the 2017 Exhibitions Fund.

THE RUBIN MUSEUM OF ART 150 WEST 17TH STREET NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10011 RUBINMUSEUM.ORG

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SAT/SUN

11:00 AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:00 PM CLOSED 11:00 AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:00 PM 11:00 AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:00 PM 11:00 AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:00 PM 11:00 AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:00 PM


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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS FEB 22 - MAR 1, 2017 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml.

Whitmans

500 W 30Th St

A

Maru

11 W 32Nd St

A

Subway

35 West 33 Street

A

Sweetgreen

1164 Broadway

A

Hot N Juicy Crawfish

243 W 14Th St

Not Yet Graded (12) Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Excellent Dumpling House

165 W 23Rd St

Not Yet Graded (26) Tobacco use, eating, or drinking from open container in food preparation, food storage or dishwashing area observed. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored. Wiping cloths soiled or not stored in sanitizing solution.

Brooklyn Bagel & Coffee Company

286 8 Avenue

A

Mukeunji Ii

34 West 32 Street

Grade Pending (32) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food worker does not use proper utensil to eliminate bare hand contact with food that will not receive adequate additional heat treatment. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored. A

Cambria Hotels & Suites New York-Chelsea

123 W 28Th St

A

E-Mo Kimbab

2 W 32Nd St

A

Between The Bread

609 W 27Th St

A

Starbucks

510 6 Avenue

A

Red Mango

266 W 23Rd St

A

something

have

Do

us to

?

into

151 West 34 Street

SPRAYING SERENITY ART & CRAFT New York artist creates mist to quell emotional disturbances BY CLAIRE WANG

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MARCH 9-15,2017

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Since Feb. 17, an unfurnished storefront on the ground floor of a luxury SoHo condo has been transformed into a laboratory of sorts, an interactive DIY installation revolving around an organic spray its creator says fosters emotional resilience. Trigger Spray is an innovative aromatherapy mist designed by New York-based artist Elana Langer. Swarming with lavender, mandarin, tarragon and hemlock, the potion elevates you to a Zen state by soothing the nervous system. At least momentarily, it imparts a peace of mind that enables one to think through an emotional stimulus rather than impulsively react to it. “I was fighting with the people I loved,” Langer said. “This product comes from a desire to help people get along.” Curated by Chashama, a nonprofit organization that supports local artists by turning unused property into art spaces, the Trigger Spray PopUp Shop is a hybrid of an art installation and a boutique store. Merging art, philosophy and commerce has been the central theme of Langer’s projects. “It’s a store, but I’m not just selling a product,” she said. “I’m also selling a message, and that’s the art.” The product costs $20, but the message is free. The building’s spartan aesthetic stands in stark contrast to purpose of the gallery within. Its glass walls are bare but for a baby-pink, Pop Artinspired “Trigger Spray” logo stamped near the gallery door. A trio of bold, catchy verbs written on paper dangles below: “Stop,” “Spray,” “Breathe.” Each has a corresponding, roughly sketched emoticon. “The most important tool is our awareness,” reads a sign propped up on a sheet music stand inside. The maxim expresses Langer’s philosophy on feelings. Aromatherapy, she said, prescribes certain characteristics to one of the four elements: earth, fire, water and air. Earth, for example,

Visitors to New York artist Elana Langer’s SoHo installation jotted down people or incidents that elicit negative emotional reactions from themselves. Photo: Claire Wang represents the “cool” and the “life-giving,” while air embodies the adventurous. Each emotion has an antidote in smell: grapefruit mist neutralizes anger, laurel mist lifts up melancholy. The theory offers people a more artful, positive way of analyzing fiery emotions. “Instead of saying, ‘Oh you have a lot of anger in you,’ you say, “Oh, you have lot of fire in fire,” Langer explained. The studio splits into a pair of installations. In the forewing is nestled the “emotional body,” a ribbon-riddled cave-like space enclosed by black velvet curtains. Inspired by the animated movie “Inside Out,” the body is a physical demonstration of the way triggers are formed. Like conflicting feelings, ribbons and yarn swerve and snake into inextricable knots that can be freed only through thorough examination. Building the emotional body was a cathartic, interactive exercise involving half dozen participants. During the first 10 days of the exhibit, Langer invited visitors to chart their thoughts on the web of emotions. They draped and yanked strings over her original design, creating knots and tangles that represented triggers, or points of conflict in their private lives. Some jotted down

their feelings on notebook paper and hung them in batches on a string. They dangle from the ceiling like handcrafted chandeliers. Langer compared emotional unrest to a scratch on a vinyl record, a blemish that can be easily be mended given a little time and patience. “I wanted to show people what it’s like to sit and walk around in something that’s bigger than you,” she said. “Order may be desirable but it’s tenuous; we all have to learn to control chaos.” The back-wing of the studio consists of a Trigger School– a miniature model of a high school classroom complete with a whiteboard, notebooks, and tablet-arm desks where visitors can write and talk about their “trigger topics” – of memories, whether traced to persons or incidents, that elicit overwhelming emotion, be it grief or bliss. This can be the recollection of the death of a parent, of a devastating breakup, or of an inconsiderate fellow subway rider, Langer said. “Coming to an understanding of your emotions takes time,” she said, “so it’s important to remember to give yourself space — to stop and breathe — before you react.” The exhibit closes today, March 9.


MARCH 9-15,2017

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

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HOMELESS STUDENTS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 neighborhoods, have fewer schools and fewer homeless students. Jennifer Erb-Downward, the institute’s principal policy analyst, also noted that the generally higher-earning makeup of those four areas likely contributes to their smaller concentration of homeless students. “What I think is important to think about, too, is while School District Two has a low percent of students who are homeless, it actually has a very large number of students who are homeless,” she said. District Two stretches from the tip of Manhattan to 100th Street, excluding the Upper West and Lower East Sides. School District Three, which encompasses the Upper West Side, is one of only two throughout the city that enrolls more homeless students than would be expected based on the percentage of homeless kindergarten and first-grade students enrolled in their district. In other words, it is one of two districts doing more than its share to educate homeless children. Chronic absenteeism — defined as missing 20 or more days of school — and multiple school transfers are crucial barriers homeless students face that many of their peers do not. “Once you have high school students who were chronically absent at some point during school, only 20 percent of them were graduating,” Erb-Downward said of her research. “Homeless students are two times more likely to transfer schools, and every school transfer has been estimated to set a child back up to six months academically.” Heidi Burkhart, a philanthropist and founder of the Dane Real Estate affordable housing firm, sees the symptoms of these challenges in the youth she works with at the nonprofit Covenant

Heidi Burkhart, an affordable housing broker and philanthropist, top row center, at a Chelsea Piers fitness event she organized for homeless youth from Covenant House. Photo: Ritchie Colon for Dane Real Estate House. “I think the biggest difference [between housed and homeless students] is the support system and people that can mentor them and show them the next steps,” she said. According to the Politico news site, which earlier this month analyzed data pertaining to homeless students, the city has recently added 360 new bus routes to ease the often hours-long commutes these students face. Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration last year announced $30 million to support students in shelters for

programs such as in-school health centers and literacy coaches, but $10 million of it was absent from the mayor’s most recent budget. Toya Holness, a Department of Education spokeswoman, told Politico that the education department is “evaluating the impact of these programs to determine how best to allocate additional resources in the future.” In a statement to Our Town, she added that homeless students and those in temporary housing “are among our most vulnerable populations” and said the

SURVEILLANCE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 infiltrating mosques with informers in a longrunning program that, according to NYPD officials in court testimony first reported by the Associated Press, never resulted in a terrorism investigation or even a single lead. The NYPD is currently engaged in discussions to resolve two lawsuits relating to the program, and recently agreed to a proposed settlement that would subject the department to increased civilian oversight. Technologies implemented by the NYPD without public input include Stingrays, which allow police to track the location of cellphone users and, in some cases, intercept their communications, and x-ray vans known as “backscatters” that can see through walls and vehicles, and which critics say may expose bystanders to harmful radiation. The department also uses a platform known as the Domain Awareness System that aggregates data from various sources, including license plate readers, MetroCard swipes, and thousands of publicly and privately owned surveillance cameras, enabling police to track the movement of individuals throughout the city. “Once we started hearing about the Stingrays and the backscatters and the technology that was brought to light by the NYCLU and Brennan Center [for Justice] and others, it left some of us scratching our heads, because we don’t really understand how it’s being used and we probably should,” Garodnick said.

NYPD Commissioner James P. O’Neill said a proposed police surveillance oversight bill “would not be helpful to anyone in New York City.” Photo: Ed Reed/Mayoral Photography Office In addition to its disclosure requirements, the bill would require the department to detail whether outside agencies within the state or federal government have access to information collected by the NYPD. Gibson said that the bill was not drafted in response to recent actions taken by President Donald Trump to step up federal immigration enforcement, but Garodnick said the measure takes on increased significance in light of the current political climate. “This reinforces our commitment to being a real sanctuary city, and makes it clear to every New Yorker whether data collected by our own surveillance tools can be shared, or even is shared, with the federal government,” he said. The bill does not require the NYPD to provide

an accounting of surveillance tools or tactics utilized in the past that are no longer employed, nor does it provide a mechanism for the City Council to prevent the adoption of controversial new technologies by the NYPD. Gibson and Garodnick said that the bill will not impinge on the NYPD’s ability to keep New Yorkers safe, since it does not restrict the department’s use of technologies or require disclosure of operational details. Despite those assurances, police officials were quick to push back against the proposed oversight measures. “This bill would not be helpful to anyone in New York City,” NYPD Commissioner James P. O’Neill said at a press conference on crime statistics after the legislation was announced.

department was coordinating with other city agencies to secure resources for them. In de Blasio’s most recent 128-page plan to fight homelessness, which he unveiled in a speech last week, the struggles of homeless students are mentioned once in reference to the $30 million the mayor pledged last year. Madeleine Thompson can be reached at newsreporter@ strausnews.com

Lawrence Byrne, the NYPD’s deputy commissioner for legal matters, called the bill “misguided” and said that the department “strongly” opposes it. Byrne invoked the name of a jihadist publication to make his point, saying, “If we had to comply with this bill, the next issue of Inspire Magazine that came out after it would be devoted to: ‘Here are all the technologies the NYPD uses to prevent terrorist attacks.’” Byrne said that he knows of no police department in the country that is subject to requirements like those laid out in the bill. But Michael Price, counsel at the Brennan Center’s Liberty & National Security Program, which helped to draft the bill, explained that surveillance oversight legislation has been passed or is pending in several cities and counties across the country, including Seattle, San Francisco, Oakland, and Santa Clara County, California. “We certainly looked at those bills when we were drafting this,” he said. “There are differences, but that legislation coming out of California and Washington really sort of gave us the inspiration to do it here.” Price said that while other laws have given local legislatures the power to approve or deny the use of police technologies, the New York City bill is strictly an oversight and transparency measure. The bill’s authors say that it will help to foster trust between citizens and the NYPD. “Let’s face it. People learn about police surveillance tools, eventually,” Garodnick said. “This bill gives a chance for the public to understand it, not just by hearing it leaked out in dribs and drabs.”


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Business

AUSSIE CAFÉ VIBE PERCOLATES IN THE CITY TRENDS Artisanal confections, Wi-Fi-free spaces replicate Down Under’s coffee culture BY LILY HAIGHT AND CLAIRE WANG

February’s blizzard might have been the most fortuitous occurrence for a pair of Australian baristas launching their new coffee venture in Greenwich Village. While the storm raged, New York Fashion Week attendees found shelter amid fresh plants and bamboo walls. Banter, a quaint Sullivan Street space awash in pastel hues, is the brainchild of Nick Duckworth and Josh Evans, two beanie-sporting, 20-something down-to-earth dudes from Down Under. It is one of three new Australian cafés that opened up shop last month, attesting to New Yorkers’ growing affinity for Aussie coffee culture, which has slowly come to permeate life in the city. Since 2015, roughly 10 independently owned Aussie coffeehouses have opened in Manhattan and Brooklyn. Bluestone Lane, now a franchise with multiple storefronts from Greenwich Village to Wall Street, and Two Hands, which opened a second location, in Tribeca, in 2016, were some of the first Aussie shops to open. Centered around the idea that a café is not just a fuel stop to grab your daily fix of caffeine, but also a sanctuary of sorts where one can relax and catch up with friends, Australian-style coffee shops are a sharp contrast to corporate-owned chains like Starbucks and Peet’s. Australia’s burgeoning coffee culture owes its roots to a post-World War II immigration boom, when Italian and Greek immigrants established a massive and enduring espresso hub on Lygon Street, an iconic thoroughfare in Melbourne. Since the 1990s, coffee aficionados in Melbourne and other Australian cities have fostered a third-wave espresso culture, cultivating coffee’s artisanal properties and favoring smaller, wellprepared drinks rather than the large, milky ones popular in the U.S. “I don’t think that the Aussie thirdwave espresso category is ever going to supplant or replace the Starbucks [culture], but it’s definitely shown that there’s a subset of consumers who

seek that more thoughtful preparation.” said Eddy Buckingham, owner of The Good Sort, an Aussie-style café that opened on Doyers Street in Chinatown in February. “There are categories of restaurants that are prevalent and really established in the U.S.A. If you go to a French bistro, you know exactly what you’re going to get,” he added. “What we’re seeing now is the idea of this Australian café category.” To Evans and Duckworth, Banter offers coffee devotees, local residents and college students a quiet alternative to Downtown’s boisterous nightlife: caffeine instead of liquor, a gentle breeze instead of blinding LED lights. “We shouldn’t have to be out at night drinking just to catch up with friends,” Evans said. “Doing it over coffee in the daylight can be just as fun and much healthier.” The menu at Banter is an eclectic bag of international flavors. Novelty items like the golden turmeric latte are as popular with early morning customers as the long black — a double shot of espresso with extra hot water — or flat white — a less milky, more espressolaced latte. Aussie favorites like the avocado toast and the bacon-and-egg roll tango with modernized Asian classics such as soba noodle salad and pulled pork baguette, a spinoff of the bánh mì. Evans hopes to soon add an American classic, a chicken and waffle plate, to the collection. Not every Aussie café in New York is owned by Australians. After spending three years backpacking through Queensland and working in Melbourne, native New Yorker Arthur Rangini opened St. Kilda Coffee, an Aussie-style café in Midtown West, in November. “Melbourne is a really artsy city, very modern ... I wanted to bring that here,” Rangini said, sitting at the café counter in St. Kilda’s, which looks out on a colorful graffiti-painted wall that spells out the word “coffee.” “There’s a lot of love in the things [Melbournians] do, especially when it comes to coffee.” Rangini set up shop in Midtown to bring quality Aussie coffee outside of the typical areas of SoHo and the Village to a place where chain coffeehouses are prevalent. “It’s the reputation that Aussie coffee shops carry. If you go to an Aussie coffee shop you know you’re going to get a solid flat white, a solid cappuccino,” he said.

Arthur Rangini opened St. Kilda Coffee, on West 44th Street, in November. Photo: Lily Haight

St. Kilda is one of about 15 Aussie-style cafés to open up in the city since 2013. Photo: Lily Haight

To the owners of Southern Cross Coffee, an Australian and Argentine café that opened up on East Fifth Street in late February, roasting high-quality coffee is a way to preserve the kindred connection they have to their home countries. Founded by Adam Sobol, an Australian, and Sergio D’Auria, an Argentinian, the café serves only Italian-

based espresso drinks (“We don’t like drip!” Sobol said) with a small selection of pastries, which are made with premium, local ingredients. Sobol and D’Auria, both of whom quit corporate America to offer an authentic taste of their rich cultures to New Yorkers, hire only highly experienced baristas and source beans from roasters in

Brooklyn and Upstate. With a more selective vetting process for barista and ingredient, an Aussie coffee — espresso or drip — is more aromatic and consistent in flavor than its American counterpart. “When I go to a chain coffeeshop like Starbucks or The Bean, I don’t know if the latte or Americano I order will be too watered down or too bitter,” said New York University senior Ann Park, a regular at Aussie cafés Downtown. “At a local place like Southern Cross, you know they’ll always put in the time and effort to make a decent cup of coffee.” Aside from the stellar brew, Park also enjoys detoxing from social media to chat with both friends and strangers. Two years ago at Toby’s Estate, one of many Wi-Fi-free Aussie cafés, she struck up a conversation with an elderly couple visiting from London, with whom she would exchange contact information and reunite when she studied in their city a year later. “America is so schedule-oriented, and coffee is always on-the-go,” D’Auria said. “A hole-in-the-wall is at odds with our cultures and our concept of a conversation-friendly space.” Besides, he added, the café’s combination of small black tables, pink and blue backless chairs, and, of course, lack of Wi-Fi service makes face-toface interaction inevitable. For Rangini, St. Kilda’s is a personal passion project. Not only does he work there seven days a week, but he also completely gutted and refurbished the shop, adding his own touch to the interior design. The café’s simple white walls and black floors give it a minimalistic vibe. On one wall, a triangular bookshelf holds a book exchange library. Interior design is an important aspect of the carefully cultivated vibes of Aussie cafés. Australian designers Xavier Bartolomeo and Claire Weller concocted Banter’s logo and interior layout using a mixture of Scandinavian and Australian aesthetics. A light color palate fuses with minimalist designs to soothe nerves and inspire conversation. Bold artworks from Australian painters spill patches of blues and reds on nude walls. All the components, Evans explained, are part of a larger puzzle to enhance the urban living experience for busy New Yorkers. “We want to create an intimate relationship with customers,” he said. “Banter, after all, means to chat.”


MARCH 9-15,2017

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Follow Chelsea News on SWASTIKAS CARVED INTO DOOR OF Facebook and Twitter UPPER WEST SIDE CHURCH HATE CRIMES

The Fourth Universalist Society, a progressive house of worship, discovered the symbols amid a rise in antiSemitic acts BY RAZI SYED

Clinton NOTICE TO PERSONS WHO MAY HAVE SUFFERED FROM INADEQUATE ACCESSIBILITY AT THE VERDESIAN, THE VANGUARD CHELSEA AND THE SOLAIRE On February 13, 2017, the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York entered a consent decree resolving a lawsuit brought by the United States Department of Justice against certain builders and developers alleging that they failed to include certain accessible features for persons with disabilities required by the Fair Housing Act, 42 U.S.C. § 3604(f)(3)(c), in the design and construction of The Verdesian, The Vanguard Chelsea, and The Solaire. Under this consent decree, a person may be entitled to receive monetary relief if he or she: • WAS DISCOURAGED FROM LIVING AT THIS PROPERTY BECAUSE OF THE LACK OF ACCESSIBLE FEATURES; • HAS BEEN HURT IN ANYWAY BY THE LACK OF ACCESSIBLE FEATURES AT THIS PROPERTY; • PAID TO HAVE AN APARTMENT AT THIS PROPERTY MADE MORE ACCESSIBLE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES; OR • WAS OTHERWISE DISCRIMINATED AGAINST ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY AT THIS PROPERTY AS A RESULT OF THE INACESSIBLE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION. If you wish to make a claim for discrimination on the basis of disability, or if you have any information about persons who may have such a claim, please contact the United States Attorney's Office, Southern District of New York at 212-637-2800. You may also fax us at 212-637-2702 or write to:

United States Attorney's Office Southern District of New York Attn: Civil Rights Unit 86 Chambers Street New York, New York 10007 NOTE: You must call or write no later than February 13, 2020.

In the midst of a national and citywide spike in antiSemitic acts, an Upper West Side church, which recently announced its status as a sanctuary for the undocumented, discovered a series of swastikas carved into its front door. The Fourth Universalist Society, a Unitarian Universalist church, learned of the vandalism on the morning of Feb. 28. “Our building engineer arrived at church and saw it carved on the front doors, facing Central Park West,” the Rev. Schuyler Vogel said. “We suspect it happened sometime that night before; our building closed at 10 p.m. — sometime between that and 9 a.m.” The church reported the damage to law enforcement that morning. While Fourth Universalist did not have a security camera, camera footage from two of the church’s neighbors was viewed but no suspect was found, Vogel said. The congregation is considering installing its own security system. Unitarian Universalism has Christian roots but evolved into a progressive institution without a specific required set of beliefs, Vogel said, explaining that atheists, agnostics, Christians, Jews and followers of other religious philosophies belong to his congregation. The vandalism, which is being investigated by New York Police Department’s Hate Crime Task Force, came in the midst of a 55 percent year-to-date increase in hate crimes from Jan. 1 to Feb. 26 compared to last year, according to the NYPD. During that same period, antiSemitic crimes increased 94 percent. Nationally, the Anti-Defamation League has recorded a sharp rise in anti-Semitic acts, said Etzion Neuer, director of community service and policy. Since the start of the year, around 100 threats have been called into Jewish community centers and other Jewish institutions, including the ADL

Two swastikas and the word “race office” on the front door of the Fourth Universalist Society on the Upper West Side. Photo: Rev. Schuyler Vogel midtown Manhattan office. On March 3, a Missouri man was arrested for calling threats into the ADL office as well as seven other Jewish institutions. Vogel said he believes the national political climate has contributed to the increase in hate crimes. “I think there has been a lot of abdication of leadership, particularly at the national level, around denouncing rhetoric that encourages racial divide, racial tension,” Vogel said. “The idea that certain people belong here and certain people don’t — that we’ve heard a lot of on the national level — is really harmful.” Neuer said that while swastikas will always represent hate and the Nazi Party for Jews, they have also been used to attack and intimidate non-Jewish groups. “It’s not unheard of to see them as a generic symbol of hate,” he said. In addition to the swastikas, the words “race office” were carved into the doors . “None of us knew what that meant, so we Googled it,” Vogel said. “It turns out that it is a reference to a department within the Nazi Party during the Third Reich that focused on enforcing racial hierarchies and political propaganda. So whoever did it, we surmise, is not simply just a casual passerby but someone with some familiarity and knowledge of fascism and the ideology attached to it.” To cover up the damage before the doors can be permanently repaired, the Fourth Universalist Society sanded down the door and applied lacquer over the affected area. The congregation has Jewish members, including one who fled Europe as the Nazi Party came to power, Vogel said. Fourth Universalist congre-

gation member Jim Saslow, who was raised Jewish and still considers himself culturally Jewish, spoke about his reaction to the carvings. “I was very upset when they carved that stuff into the door because, as a Jew, you’re raised from childhood knowing that your group have been victims of oppression, hatred, murder, pogroms, and the Holocaust for thousands of years,” Saslow said. “You grow up knowing that it has always happened and always thinking, it could happen again.” Vogel said he was happy to see widespread support in the midst of the vandalism. “We’ve got emails from people across the country offering their support,” Vogel said. “We’ve been in conversations with our denomination, the Unitarian Universalist Association ... and they have been really wonderful. As well as our neighboring churches.” Fourth Universalist is holding an interfaith event on March 10 at 5:30 p.m. to rededicate the building. In addition to Vogel, speakers include journalist and former White House Press Secretary Bill Moyers, West End Synagogue Rabbi Marc Margolius, Faith in New York executive director Onleilove Alston and Jonathan Soto, senior community liaison with the mayor’s office. The assailant’s motive remains unclear. “We don’t know why someone decided to target us,” Vogel said, adding that perhaps the publicity around the sanctuary status or a “Black Lives Matter” sign in front of the building could have been the cause. Vogel noted “the seriousness of social justice work.” “This is just a small threat,” he said. “It’s a slippery slope from that to something far worse.”


MARCH 9-15,2017

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YOUR 15 MINUTES

To read about other people who have had their “15 Minutes” go to chelseanewsNY.com/15 minutes

PUTTING HER HEART INTO CARE Hospice nurse with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York on her dedication to her patients BY ANGELA BARBUTI

While earning her nursing degree, Claudia Paul knew she wanted to focus on geriatrics. Now, as a hospice nurse for the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, she is certain of her career path. “With the geriatrics population, you learn a lot. It helps you grow as a person,” she said. “I’ve learned to love the relationships that are being built, the stories that I’ve heard and the people who I’ve helped. Even if it is cooking that one boiled egg or sitting down or playing a game of spades.” A Haitian native, she came to the States United in 1985 at nine years old and settled in Brooklyn. Paul began her career as a home health aide at the suggestion of her mother, who worked as a home health aide as well. She explained that her role was always centered on building relationships and trust with her patients. One of her first assignments was caring for New

Yorkers with AIDS. When asked how she maintains her composure around terminally ill patients, she said it’s important to be confident and not bring any fear or stress into the environment for the patient as well as the family. “And even if we don’t have all the answers, maybe just your presence is enough,” she added. Your mom was also a home health aide. How did you get your start in the profession? She had suggested that I get into the field, so I wouldn’t be too dependent on them. I was about 22, going to John Jay. She had referred me to her agency and I did attend the class and get the certification. And my first patient — I was not as confident as I should have been — was able to help me build my confidence by practicing on her what I would be doing.

What was your experience like as a home health aide? Basically, what I’ve encountered were relationships that were being built around trust. Because we are going into these patients’ homes. They are not knowing our background,

criminal background, yes, but personally, they don’t have a clue of who’s coming into their house, but they have to trust this person to come in and take care of them. And I’ve been able to provide that at a pretty young age. And I’ve moved forward to get my nursing degree. I was working at the VNSNY Lombardi Program, making home visits as well, again, building relationships and trust. We were able to teach medication compliance. If they are forgetting their medications, we will pre-pour the meds for them, do injections if needed and provide wound care.

Tell us a story about a patient you had a special connection with. There was one patient in particular at the Haven [VNSNY Haven Hospice Specialty Unit]. Her daughter and I went to EMT school and we lost the connection. She happened to see me when I was giving birth to my twins and she was also pregnant with her twins. But the last time I saw her was when her mom was being admitted at hospice and that’s how we reconnected. I lost my twins, but her twins were 11 years old and seeing them I’m picturing my boys would have been that age. I’m seeing what could have been. But, in the end, her mom always requested, “Claudia, come in. Claudia has to do this. She does it better.” It was not that I did it better. It was just a familiar face of comfort, a connection, not only with her, but her daughter. And when her mom died, it was very emotional. I did not know her mom until she got to the Haven, but I knew her daughter. When she was leaving that day, her statement was, “I hope we meet again, but not under these circumstances.” And then she thanked us and said that her mom couldn’t have been taken better care of. Her mom died peacefully and comfortable. It’s a small world, the circumstances that bring us back.

You worked with New Yorkers living with AIDS. What do you want people to know about the disease?

Visiting Nurse Service of New Yor hospice nurse Claudia Paul checks in on a patient. Photo courtesy VNSNY

One thing I learned from my early experience was that the side effects of the medication can be a factor in noncompliance. In my experience, most patients were non-compliant with meds because they were not aware of the potential side effects like distended stomach, loss of appetite, and so on, and how to manage these conditions. If people could be taught what to expect before they start the regime, I think they would have been more compliant. However, I think with antiretroviral therapy and new treatments things have grown tremendously. Now, instead of 14 or more pills, many patients are on only three or four. And also, with the internet, people have

Claudia Paul, standing. Photo: Bernard White, Visiting Nurse Service of New York easier access to information about medications and side effects. However, if a trusted primary physician, nurse or case worker had sat down and said, “This is what to expect from this medication when you take it,” I think that would have made it easier back then for compliance.

When did you start working for the VNSNY? How have they supported you throughout your career? In the city, back in 2012, but I’m with Visiting Nurse Service of New York since 2008. I’ve been very lucky that I’ve had managers who knew my potential and acknowledged my work. As a LPN in Lombardi, my manager Yveline Louis-Champagne has always pushed me forward to continue my education and get my RN degree. And my manager at the Haven, Theresa Feeney, who is my director right now, has acknowledged my dedication to my work in pushing me forward to not just stop here, but continue with education because, like I said, the health field is moving and we have to keep up with the changes that are taking place, so we can better serve our patients and our clients.

Tell us about the VNSNY Goodman Brown Hospice Residence located on the Upper East Side and your role there. I am the manager here. For these patients, home is no longer an option.

Sometimes, safety is of concern at home, the patient might be falling a lot. Sometimes they are relocating to be closer to family members who work or live around the area. Our residence consists of eight beds. I oversee five LPNs and five HHAs. I coordinate the care with our team, which consists of our doctor, social worker and our spiritual care counselor. The goal of care while the patient is here is discussed. If they wish to remain here or go home, then we will discuss and plan that. Also, because it’s a home setting, we assist the family, and they can spend the night. It’s 24 hours and we provide a pull-out couch for family members to spend the night with their loved ones.

What are your future plans? To obtain my master’s in health education and public health. To continue teaching, because as I get older, I’m hoping to leave a generation that has the care and passion that I have. And if I’m able to teach that, I think my generation will be taken care of as well.

Know somebody who deserves their 15 Minutes of fame? Go to chelseanewsNY.com and click on submit a press release or announcement.


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Across 1. Fab Four drummer 6. Hip-hop 9. Old time Dad’s 12. No-no 13. Capitalize 14. Coffee holder 15. S. American cassava plant 16. Gas guzzle rate 17. Can be open or choppy 18. Swindle 20. Fellow 21. Behave affectedly 24. Beeper 27. Dry red wine 30. First act 34. Some reality show winners 35. Butterfly 36. Hindu festival 38. Perfume base 39. “Get your ___ running.....” Steppenwolf 41. Keats creation 42. Finale 45. “___ show time!” 47. Bother

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Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9X9 grid that has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3X3 squares. To solve the puzzle each row, column and box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9. Puzzles come in three grades: easy, medium and difficult.

P

21

19

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SUDOKU by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan

N O

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CROSSWORD by Myles Mellor

55

Clinton 1

MARCH 9-15,2017

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

58

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MARCH 9-15,2017

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

PUBLIC NOTICES

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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

PUBLIC NOTICES

MARCH 9-15,2017


MARCH 9-15,2017

CLASSIFIEDS PUBLIC NOTICES

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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

PUBLIC NOTICES

HELP WANTED

Telephone: 212-868-0190 Fax: 212-868-0198 Email: classified2@strausnews.com

POLICY NOTICE: We make every eďŹ&#x20AC;ort to avoid mistakes in your classiďŹ ed ads. Check your ad the ďŹ rst week it runs. The publication will only accept responsibility for the ďŹ rst incorrect insertion. The publication assumes no ďŹ nancial responsibility for errors or omissions. We reserve the right to edit, reject, or re-classify any ad. Contact your sales rep directly for any copy changes. All classiďŹ ed ads are pre-paid.

MASSAGE

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

Directory of Business & Services To advertise in this directory Call #BSSZ (212)-868-0190 ext.4 CBSSZMFXJT@strausnews.com

Antique, Flea & Farmers Market SINCE 1979

East 67th Street Market (between First & York Avenues)

Open EVERY Saturday 6am-5pm Rain or Shine

REAL ESTATE - RENT

Indoor & Outdoor FREE Admission Questions? Bob 718.897.5992 Proceeds BeneďŹ t PS 183

OFFICE SPACE

AVAILABLE IN MANHATTAN

HELP WANTED

300 to 20,000 square feet

Elliot Forest, :HDUHDSURXGPHPEHURIWKH $VVRFLDWHG3UHVVDQGWKH 1DWLRQDO1HZVSDSHU$VVRFLDWLRQ

Licensed RE. Broker

212 -447-5400 abfebf@aol.com

Antiques Wanted TOP PRICES PAID t1SFDJPVT $PTUVNF+FXFMSZ (PMEt4JMWFS 1BJOUJOHTt.PEFSOt&UD Entire Estates Purchased

212.751.0009

NEED TO RUN A LEGAL NOTICE? Quick | Easy | Economical

Call Barry Lewis today at:

212-868-0190

SOHO LT MFG

462 Broadway MFG No Retail/Food +/- 9,000 SF Ground Floor - $90 psf +/- 16,000 SF Cellar - $75 psf Divisible Call David @ Meringoff Properties 212-645-7575 VRC has helped New Yorkers find great volunteer opportunities for 28 years!


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MARCH 9-15,2017

OSCAR® AND TWO -TIME TONY ® WINNER

KEVIN KLINE

ALSO STARRING

Photo by Brigitte Lacombe

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MORITZ VON STUELPNAGEL 16 WEEKS ONLY • NOW IN PREVIEWS ST. JAMES THEATRE • Ticketmaster.com 877-250-2929 • LaughterOnBroadway.com

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