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The local paper for Chelsea

WEEK OF MARCH A CULT FAVORITE ◄ P.12

7-13 2019

EVEN MORE CONGESTION QUESTIONS

Also inside:

TRAFFIC State lawmakers could pass congestion pricing by the end of the month. What would it mean for Manhattanites?

CUTTING DOWNTON’S TRASH LOAD ▲ P.2

BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

More than half a century after policymakers first proposed congestion pricing as a tool to ease Manhattan’s traffic woes, and after numerous failed attempts to enact a plan in the ensuing decades, 2019 could well be the year congestion pricing finally crosses New York’s legislative goal line. A plan put forth by Governor Andrew Cuomo would impose a toll on vehicles entering a central business district encompassing all of Manhattan south of 61st Street, with the exception of the FDR Drive. The toll, in combination with the recently introduced surcharge on trips below 96th Street in taxis and other for-hire vehicles, would create a new stream of dedicated revenue for the cash-strapped Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Cuomo — whose plan now has the support of Mayor Bill de Blasio, a longtime congestion pricing skeptic — is pressing Albany lawmakers to approve congestion pricing by the April 1 state budget deadline. In addition to funding sorely needed transit improvements, advocates say a congestion toll would serve as a disincentive against unnecessary car trips, turning away drivers who would otherwise clog Manhattan’s most crowded streets, resulting in smoother bus service and reduced travel times. But questions abound.

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GRAYING NEW YORK ▲ P.6

Photo: Shinya Suzuki, via flickr

SOMETHING NEW AT THE HIGH LINE the complete restoration of the original stretch of High Line from the 1930s, a project which the co-founders of the High Line, Joshua David and Robert Hammond, began back in 2003. The entrance to the Spur, at Tenth Ave and West 28th St., sits amid the epicenter of the Hudson Yards development,

CITY SPACES New York’s favorite repurposed railway is bigger and better than ever BY EMILY MASON

The High Line is opening the last stretch of its original expanse this spring with a new space, called The Spur. It marks

A lot of people [originally] thought it was industrial and covered in weeds, an eyesore that needed to go. Joshua David and I fell in love with the weeds.” High Line co-founder Robert Hammond

CONTINUED ON PAGE 15 Clinton

Chelsea News NY

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Crime Watch Voices NYC Now City Arts

3 8 10 12

Restaurant Ratings Business Real Estate 15 Minutes

14 16 17 19

WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW < CITYARTS, P.14

WHO HAS ACCESS TO A PARKING SPACE IN CHELSEA? NEWS

9-16

MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.18

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

WHAT NEXT FOR CHELSEA GALLERIES?

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up rezoning told us she’d like to would and the mid-2000s May 1 The and running this year, for of West Chelsea. Muas an ombudsman city serve Whitney the of opening Art on small businesses within them clear seum of American means not government, helping It’s new buildings, to get Gansevoort Street c to the traffi through the bureaucracy rising rents, that are even more foot things done. forcing some gallerists area. is that Perhaps even more also The irony, of course, to reconsider their Whitney -importantly, the ombudsman the arrival of the and number neighborhood roots art meccas will tally the type small business one of the city’s the end for of complaints by taken in BY GABRIELLE ALFIERO -- could also spell dealers the actions art owners, long-time policy buildStephen some response, and somefor ways to When gallerists Griffin in the area, as their are sold or recommendations If done well, Haller and Cynthiatheir W. ings increasingly begin to fix things. report would Haller reopened follow- demolished. lease the ombudsman’s 26th Street gallery With their 10-year quantitative afrst fi the rebuild Stephen us give cut short, with ing a five-month flooded abruptly shared taste of what’s wrong ter Hurricane Sandy they and Cynthia, who the city, an the space, small businesses in towards building with their first floor phone their and Tony important first step were still without were Lehmann Maupin they the problem. needed to xing fi of galleries, and Internet. Still, where Shafrazi property by June To really make a difference, the happy in the location, will have to to stay for vacate (Shafrazi is suing course, the advocaterising rents, they expected of 2014. find a way to tackle business’ the Manhattes some time. doltold less the landlord, which remain many While Chin Instead, they were their Group, for $20 million reproblem. vexing that Post most the New York than a year later gauge what to demol- lars, said it’s too early tocould have landlord planned ported). another role the advocate on the ish the building. They shopped for planned for there, more information in the neighbor“We had shows bad thing. We had location to find problem can’t be a with the long periods of time.amount hood but struggled a twoThis step, combinedBorough more than just put in a huge the anything efforts by Manhattan to mediate of money to refurbish“We year lease on a street-level in Chelsaid. President Gale Brewer offer space,” Cynthia space. After 13 years Gallery the rent renewal process, were really shocked.”Gallery sea, Stephen Haller signs tangible and early, Haller some For Stephen small left the neighborhoodStux it, it isn’t riswith of progress. For many can’t come and others like joined forces oor are driving business owners, that in a new sixth-fl ing rents that far new devel- Gallery soon enough. on 57th Street, not Chelsea, Zach Feuer them away. It’s

NEWS

luxury building Robotic garage for board draws fire from community BY ZACH WILLIAMS

at a a robotic garage A proposal for in Chelsea has thrown luxury building into the city’s zoning access to parking debate. proposed for a A high-tech garage W. 28th St. has 520 development at Board 4, which is riled Community arguing that it plan, in opposing the more car usage would only invite while only providthe neighborhood, residents. ing parking to rich a special city perThe garage needs 29 spaces rather mit to accommodate allowed the than the 11 automatically opted to oppose by the city. CB4 1 full board meetpermit at its April Carl a draft letter to ing, stating in Planning City the of Weisbrod, chair city criteria for such Commission, that based on the parking foran exception is ago, when many for stock of a decade spaces were used demer industrial future of parking in anticipation velopment in Chelsea. 40 residential have The project will comsquare feet of alunits and 11,213 the ground floor, mercial space on three parking spaces The lowing eight and the developer, respectively. But wants more for Related Companies, is the New York acthe building, which internationally City debut for Zaha Hadid. (Adjaclaimed architect Line, the build cent to the High

CONTINUED ON PAGE

25

his gallery in After 15 years running to partner with Joel two gallery spaces, (left) leaves the neighborhood team will operate Mesler (right). TheMesler/Feuer, on the Lower East Feuer/Mesler and May 10. Slide, slated to open

Newscheck

2 3

is surging opment, which in part to in Chelsea, thanks High Line the opening of the

City Arts Top 5

12 13

space

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‘POTVIN SUCKS!’ RANGERS FANS SAY – FOR 40 YEARS ▲ P.8

‘LINKS OF HOPE’ TO KICK CANCER ▲ P.9

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CUTTING DOWNTOWNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TRASH LOAD STREETS A new report details strategies for reducing the volume of residential waste on Lower Manhattan streets BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a ubiquitous, but most unwelcome feature of the downtown streetscape. Alongside Lower Manhattanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s iconic Belgian block pavers, public art and centuries-spanning mix of architectural styles ... is the sidewalk-clogging mountain of garbage. As Lower Manhattanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population has nearly tripled over the last 20 years, rising from roughly 23,000 pre9/11 residents to over 62,000 today, piles of trash impeding pedestrians on the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest, narrowest streets have become an ever more common sight. â&#x20AC;&#x153;More people living here means more garbage out on the streets, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s become an increasing quality-oflife concern,â&#x20AC;? said Jessica Lappin, the president of Downtown Alliance. A new guide prepared by Downtown Alliance seeks to educate residents, building owners and property managers about best practices and free city resources that can reduce the number of trash bags put out on Lower Man-

hattan sidewalks each night. The guide encourages residential buildings to enroll in the Department of Sanitationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three voluntary waste diversion programs for compostable organics, electronic waste and textiles. Because DSNY collects these materials separately from trash and recycling, enrolling in these programs helps reduce the amount of waste put out at the curb and also has environmental beneďŹ ts. The services are free, but Downtown Alliance found that less than 20 percent of residential buildings are currently participate in one of DSNYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diversion programs. The report cites mechanical balers as a relatively inexpensive toll that can make a signiďŹ cant impact in reducing curbside clutter. These machines, which have a small footprint and can be purchased for as little as $7,500, quickly pack cardboard, plastic and metal into compact bales of uniform size. A volume of waste that would take up 130 square feet of sidewalk space if bagged or bundled by hand takes up just 16 square feet if processed by a baler.

Real-time collection alerts Downtown Alliance highlighted 50 West Street, a 186-unit residential building that opened two years ago, as

a model of thoughtful waste planning. Residents use dedicated waste bins for textiles, organics and electronics, and the building is also equipped with a baler. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a matter of going out of our way to take advantage of every resource the Department of Sanitation provides and work with residents on the education piece so that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s as effective as possible,â&#x20AC;? said Seth Coston, the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s director of condominium operations. The volume of residential waste produced in Lower Manhattan each day is projected to grow as downtownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residential building boom continues. Over 1,300 new residential units opened last year, and another 2,900 units in 19 buildings are currently in development. Downtown Alliance has reached out to the developers of new residential projects to encourage them to participate in DSNYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diversion services and allocate space for balers, compacters and other infrastructure. The residential tower under development at 45 Broad Street, for example, will feature a cardboard baler, an electronic waste bin and a refrigerated trash room to reduce the smell from food scraps and other organics as they await pickup. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easier if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re building new and

Join the Celebration No-Kill Action and Compassion A

P E T

thinking about it proactively than to retroďŹ t some of the buildings that are older,â&#x20AC;? Lappin said. The report recommends policy changes to DSNY, including shortening collection windows to reduce the amount of time trash spends on sidewalks before it is collected. Currently, residential trash can be set at the curb

The local paper for Chelsea

75 Years of

A D O P T

Piles of residential trash awaiting collection are a top quality-of-life concern for downtown residents. Photo: Daniel X. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil, via ďŹ&#x201A;ickr

T O D AY !

on 4 p.m. the day before pickup. Downtown Alliance also suggests DSNY implement real-time collection alerts to automatically notify building staff when trucks are near. Such a system would allow trash to be set out immediately before pickup, further shortening the window of time during which trash sits on the sidewalk.

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CRIME WATCH BY MARIA ROCHA-BUSCHEL PEPPER-SPRAYED IN SUBWAY

WOMAN HARASSED ON WEST 14TH ST.

A 53-year-old man reported that he was pepper-sprayed by an unknown man while waiting for an uptown 1 train inside the 28th St.-Seventh Ave. station on Friday, March 1 at 5 p.m.. The victim told police he was standing on the uptown platform when a man approached him, saying, “What are you looking at?” The victim said the man then sprayed him in the face with pepper spray and fled onto an arriving 1 train. Police searched but were not able to find the suspect. The victim was treated at Bellevue Hospital.

A 22-year-old woman told police she was harassed while in front of 211 West 14th St. on Sunday, March 3 around 4 a.m. She said two unknown women approached her and they got into an argument. One of the women pulled her hair and threw her to the ground, she said. Security personnel at the location separated the women and the two suspects fled in an unknown direction. Witnesses told police that the victim was intoxicated and aggressive towards the two women and police said that the victim was highly uncooperative.

MAN FLEES ACCIDENT SCENE ON TENTH AVE

GONE PHONE

Police said that a man fled the scene of an accident in front of 264 Tenth Avenue on Saturday night, Mar 2. The 34-year-old victim told police that he had merged into traffic from a parking spot when the suspect merged from the adjacent lane, resulting in a collision. The victim said that while he was walking over to police who had arrived at the scene, the suspect checked his vehicle for damage and then drove off without leaving his information. No injuries were reported as a result of the crash.

An employee of Salumeria Biellese inside 378 Eighth Ave. told police that his phone was stolen while he was working at the restaurant on Thursday afternoon, Feb. 28. The victim, 32, said that he was charging his phone on a back table at the restaurant and left it unattended while he went to help two customers. He told police he saw a woman exit the bathroom, grab his cell phone from the table and flee the restaurant, heading south on Eighth Ave. No arrests have been made.

MAN ARRESTED FOR SUBWAY DISTURBANCE, RESISTING ARREST Police arrested a 28-year-old man inside the Hudson Yards subway station at Eleventh Ave. and West 34th St. on Saturday, Mar. 2 at 2:05 a.m. after he became disruptive. Police said the man was yelling and screaming on the subway platform and refused to leave after being directed to do so by officers. When an officer placed his hand on the suspect’s elbow in an attempt to escort him out, the man reportedly attempted to pick up a cart and swing it at the officer. Police pepper-sprayed the suspect and he was taken to the ground so that officers could handcuff him. The man was charged with resisting arrest.

STATS FOR THE WEEK Reported crimes from the 10th precinct for the week ending Feb 24 Week to Date

Year to Date

2019 2018

% Change

2019

2018

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

0

0

n/a

Rape

0

1

-100.0

2

2

0.0

Robbery

2

3

-33.3

12

14

-14.3

Felony Assault

1

1

0.0

10

13

-23.1

Burglary

2

5

-60.0

16

16

0.0

Grand Larceny

8

13

-38.5

94

114

-17.5

Grand Larceny Auto

0

0

n/a

0

0

n/a

SUSPECTS MAY BE WEARING SUNGLASSES Police said two men are responsible for the theft of sunglasses from Economy Best Hearing and Vision at 223 West 14th St. on Thursday, Feb. 28. An employee at the store told the cops that the two suspects asked if they could look at two pair of sunglasses and when the employee was distracted shortly after, the men fled the store without paying for the items.

Photo by Tony Webster, via Flickr

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LESSONS LEARNED AROUND THE CAMPFIRE CAMPING A summer camp director started a podcast to share insights on building lives of meaning for kids. Four key themes that keep coming up: BY COLE KELLY

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been lucky to be a summer camp director for the past seventeen years. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a gift to see our campers (and staff) laugh and learn over time. Most arrive not knowing a soul and leave with friends for life. I see it over and over ... and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a joy every time. In hopes of continuing our learning and spreading the idea of camp, our team has started a podcast. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not about our camp. The CampďŹ re Conversation podcast is all about the insights camp professionals have on raising kids and building lives full of meaning. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve spoken with dozens of camp directors and thought leaders from around the country. While the conversations have covered lots of topics, four themes consistently come up in our conversations: the importance of â&#x20AC;&#x153;near peers,â&#x20AC;? connecting without technology, the change in parents and something interesting about our kids.

The Power of Near Peers As camp directors, we believe you

can have a great camp in a parking lot if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got the right people. In most cases, 19 to 22-year-old staff have an enormously positive impact on the campersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lives. How is that possible? Camp counselors are saying pretty much the same thing as parents back home: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make your bed.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Be kind and respectful.â&#x20AC;? Campers just seem to listen more to these near peers than their parents. Jeff Leikin, a teen psychologist and counselor from California, explains the difference between camp staff and parents as â&#x20AC;&#x153;right message, wrong messenger.â&#x20AC;? Having someone who is older but within the same realm of development makes the message more impactful than even Mom or Dad.

Connection Minus Tech Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all concerned about the rise in anxiety among our young people. One in four children under 18 years old has been diagnosed with some type of anxiety disorder. Bob Ditter, a family therapist and â&#x20AC;&#x153;camp whispererâ&#x20AC;? from Boston, has spent time researching this and found the rise of â&#x20AC;&#x153;curated livesâ&#x20AC;? on social media to be a leading cause of increased anxiety. Our campersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; young brains donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the resources yet to differentiate between what is real and the airbrushed, ďŹ ltered â&#x20AC;&#x153;realityâ&#x20AC;? displayed

online. Running through the comparison trap of social media is truly challenging for our young people. Because most summer camps remove or restrict the use of technology, young people connect and live face-toface and more fully in the present. By disconnecting from tech, campers build greater empathy, independence and happiness. And, relative to their still connected friends, they also develop a superpower: being able to put their phones away.

Parents are Changing Several longtime camp directors mentioned increased anxiety among their camp parents. Parents are having a harder time at the bus pickup spots than their campers. They make anxious calls to the camp office when they havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen photos of their children. Bunk placements are fraught decisions. Wendy Mogel, author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blessings of a Skinned Kneedâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the book most mentioned on the podcast â&#x20AC;&#x201D; tells of parents once dropping their child off at the bus and heading off for a celebratory drink. Now, one of the biggest fears she hears from parents in her clinical practice is allowing their children to go to camp at all. The 24/7 news cycle and attentiongrabbing headlines have our collective lizard-brain going at too a high a rate.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Neer peerâ&#x20AC;? counselors have a positive impact on camperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives. Photo courtesy of Camp Weequahic Rather than seeing the good in the world, we hold our children back from threats we perceive to be imminent rather than what they are: unlikely. I feel it, too. I had a hard time sending our oldest off to his own camp, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been a camp director for 17 years.

Kids are Still Kids Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the really good news: experienced camp directors say kids havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t changed much at all over the years. They want to play, connect, explore, goof off and create. They want to cook sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;mores, tell stories, laugh and learn. They are going to try and wear the same shirt three days in a row, ďŹ&#x201A;ail at telling a joke in the bunk, learn from mistakes and come out of the experience shining in all the right ways.

Parents who say their child â&#x20AC;&#x153;really doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t connect well with othersâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t try anything newâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;will only look at his phoneâ&#x20AC;? are often shocked to see their camper build true friendships and expand their horizons at camp, all without tech. The kids will look back at those weeks without their phone fondly. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m excited to keep learning through the Campfire Conversation podcast and putting the knowledge into play. The positive outcome of the right camp for a child is important. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s help them keep the learning going back home. Cole Kelly is the camp director at Camp Weequahic in Lakewood, PA and host of the CampďŹ re Conversation podcast.

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YOU READ IT HERE FIRST Jan. 10, 2019 8

Jan. 18, 2019 JANUARY 10-16,2019

Our Town|Downtownerotdowntown.com

OUTSIDE COMES IN AT OUTSIDER ART FAIR BY MARY GREGORY

tan Museum’s recent exhibit “History Refused to Die,” featuring Gee’s Bend quilts and major works by Thornton Dial, or the Smithsonian’s current “Between Worlds: The Art of Bill Traylor,” the first major museum exhibition for an artist born into slavery. The Outsider Art Fair includes works by Dial and Traylor. So inside has outside become that even Hollywood stars are gathering at this year’s fair. Actor and comedian Jim Carrey will be exhibiting political drawings, and photographs by Mark Hogancamp, whose life and work are the subject of “Welcome to Marwen,” a film starring Steve Carell, will be presented by 1 Mile Gallery. What brings it all together is the inclusive vision of Wide Open Arts, organizers of the fair. “For outsider art, the fair utilizes the definition of self-taught or non-academic work. We try to be very broad so we can be open to all work that comes our way,” said Becca Hoffman, Outsider Art Fair director. “We start with self-taught, and from there we explore.” Some of art’s most groundbreaking greats, like Vincent van Gogh, Frida Kahlo and Joseph Cornell, were selftaught. So was William Edmondson, who made sculptures so powerful that, in 1937, they earned him the spot as the first African American artist to be given a solo exhibition at MoMA.

In 2014, art critic Walter Robinson made a wave (that swelled to a tsunami) in art world circles when he identified a trend in contemporary art he called “Zombie Formalism,” where countless young MFA-wielding painters cranked out innumerable eerily similar works. But you won’t encounter those types of paintings at the 27th annual Outsider Art Fair. What you will find instead are deeply personal, idiosyncratic glimpses into unique personalities with singular visual voices. Art is the soul’s language, and our polyglot culture is richly reflected in the breadth, depth and emotional impact of art that is at times quirky, elegant, boisterous, whimsical, mysterious, touching, unsettling and elevating. Many of the works, presented by some 65 international galleries, stand squarely outside the mainstream. Others, like Morton Bartlett’s photographs of meticulously sculpted, dressed and posed figures (from Julie Saul Gallery), might spark thoughts of James Casebere or Cindy Sherman, though they were created decades earlier. This year’s Outsider Art Fair proves there’s a fine line between the art world’s insiders and outsiders. That fact will resonate with museum-goers who’ve seen the Metropoli-

original exhibitor at the fair, spoke of the artists she championed as ones who made art “not because they might want to but instead because they had to.” (One might, of course, say the same of workaholics like Michelangelo and Picasso.) Ms. Kind, who is honored with a tribute exhibition organized by the critic Edward M. Goméz, certainly did not associate compulsion with lack of aesthetic control. Control is evident at every turn. It’s pinpoint fine in 1940s crayon images of fantasy landscapes by the German artist identified only as Angelika (at Henry Boxer, Surrey, England). It’s coolly stripped-down in drawings of what look like Bauhaus temples by the Senegalese-born street artist Ousseynou Gassama, known as Hassan (at Ricco/Maresca, New York). And control feels explosive in paintings mixing antique Japanese themes and contemporary cartoons by Yuichiro Ukai (at Yukiko Koide Presents, Tokyo). After time spent with Mr. Ukai’s detonations of detail, you may be in need of retinal relief, and you’ll find it in the show’s scattering of abstract art: in biomorphic pastels by Julian Martin (at Fleisher/ Ollman, Philadelphia); in tantric paintings from western India (Galerie Hervé Perdriolle, Paris); and in sewn canvases by Sidival Fila (James Barron Art, Kent, Conn.) With Mr. Fila’s work, outsider shades into the less dramatic category of self-taught work. A Brazilianborn Franciscan monk living in Rome for decades, he began to make art only in 2006. Yet his monochromatic paintings, with their meticulous stitching, have gained a following and earned him some money, most of which goes to paying for the education of children in Africa and elsewhere. Mr. Fila is, in a sense, an outsider by choice, as are — but again, only in a sense — the artists in a special exhibition, “Good Kids: Underground Comics From China,” assembled by Brett Littman, director of the Noguchi Museum, and Yi Zhou, partner and curator of C5 Art Gallery in Beijing.

Jayne County, “See Me in No Special Light,” 2004, mixed media on paper. James Barron Art. Photo courtesy Outsider Art Fair. His work can be seen at the Ricco/ Maresca booth. There are plenty of contemporary artists to discover, as well. Jana Paleckova, represented by Fred Giampietro Gallery, starts with vintage late 19th or early 20th century photographs. She obscures some parts, paints others in, and creates astonishing, complex, surreal imagery that’s at once haunting and elegant. Mary F. Whitfield’s watercolors convey themes of poverty, slavery, survival, love and triumph. Her work, on view at the Phyllis Stigliano Art Projects booth, has been called visionary. And then there is Jayne County. “Jayne County was Punk Rock’s first openly transgender performer, inspired Andy Warhol, David Bowie and participated in the Stonewall uprising,” said Hoffman. “She’s someone that people should know, but might not.” Her technicolor dreamscapes, peopled by mythic figures, are presented by James Barron Gallery Also a highlight for Hoffman are the assemblages of Staten Island artist, John Foxell, whose life and art spilled into one another. “Foxell was an administrative assistant in the Manhattan family courts for a long time. He was also a poet and a preservationist,”

explained Hoffman. His small, saltbox house became so transformed by his art that it’s now a landmark. His eccentric, often humorous tabletop assemblages will be on view at the Norman Brosterman booth. The Outsider Art Fair will also present off-site exhibits at Ace Hotel, including a pop-up Troll Museum, a presentation of Boro textiles from Japan, and a group of short films. A talk titled “Unusual Brains: Neurodiversity and Artistic Creation” will be held at the New Museum, and two curated spaces, one featuring underground comics from China and another dedicated to gallerist Phyllis Kind, will also be part the fair. God’s Love We Deliver will be the beneficiary of a silent auction and part of the opening night’s proceeds. Some things can be taught in art schools, like theory, history, materials and techniques. But art, itself, comes from a deeper place – from the heart, from life lived. “This work speaks from a place of warmth and authenticity,” Hoffman said. “It’s exciting for me to watch people come into the fair and discover something they love. The art dealer will tell them about the story of the artist, and suddenly the visitor will be talking about themselves. It’s a really connected experience.”

Mary F. Whitfield’s “4 Swans in Alabama,” June 2003. Phyllis Stigliano Art Projects. Photo courtesy of Jeanette May.

IF YOU GO What: Outsider Art Fair Where:Metropolitan Pavilion 125 West 18th Street When: Jan. 17-20 www.outsiderartfair.com Outsider Art, which once had fringe cachet, is now pretty well inside the mainstream fold. As a genre, it has developed branding strategies, a collecting base and a marketable canon of (mostly male) stars, with Henry Darger, Martín Ramírez and Bill Traylor leading the list. All three are present, like tutelary deities, in the 27th New York City edition of the show, at the Metropolitan Pavilion. With 66 exhibitors from seven countries, it’s an expansive display of mostly smallish, textured, densely detailed things — modest-size figurative paintings and drawings dominate — but with a good share of stop-and-stare surprises. One comes with a group of large-scale architectural models by the Philadelphia artist Kambel Smith. Born in 1986 and diagnosed with autism as a child, Mr. Smith began painting, and when his family could no longer afford to buy canvas and oil paint, he turned to constructing models from cardboard, with the goal of creating what amount to sculptural portraits of historical Philadelphia buildings. At the fair, the booth of his dealer, Chris Byrne, from Dallas, is all but filled by a model of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, replete with pediment murals. The city’s Betsy Ross House hugs the wall nearby. According to the gallery, Mr. Smith’s work now takes up more than half of his family’s home.

Bill Traylor’s “Man and Cat on Organic Form,” Poster paint and graphite on cardboard, c.1939-42. From California’s Just Folk. Photo courtesy Outsider Art Fair.

And in the house-crowding category, there’s the sculpture of another artist making his solo debut, John Foxell (1944-2016), represented by the East Hampton, N.Y., dealer Norman Brosterman. Mr. Foxell, who lived alone in a snug 1840s house on Staten Island, had post-traumatic stress disorder after witnessing the events of Sept. 11. To relieve anxiety, he used art as therapy and filled his home with tabletop assemblages made from stuff he found in flea markets and on the street — toys, buttons, acorns, bones. The results are funny, erotic and macabre. He’s a consumerist Joseph Cornell. Busy is a word that might be applied to this work. And there’s a good amount of busyness in the fair, which perhaps supports the art-making-as-compulsion narrative by which outsiderness is often defined. The term embraces artists with psychiatric disabilities, like Darger and Ramírez, as well as those like Traylor, who had no conventional art training. The American art dealer Phyllis Kind, an

Feb. 21, 2019

The saga of these “kids” is complicated. It began when a small group of artists, disaffected by mainstream culture, began sharing images online. The group grew in size to become a self-exhibiting and self-publishing enterprise. What didn’t change was its underground status. Participants still operate under government radar. The fact that much of the work deals with officially frowned-on subject matter, including homosexuality, keeps the project marginal even within the contemporary Chinese art world. By contrast, certain other political art in the show delivers an antiauthoritarian message in plain sight; indeed, in the spotlight. Such is the case with a recent series of satirical Trump cartoons by the actor Jim Carrey, brought by Maccarone Gallery of Los Angeles. The drawings have bite, but their over-the-top insult style is now the common language of American culture. To speak it is to take few risks. Mr. Carrey qualifies as an outsider artist by being self-taught. Yet because, he is also a celebrity insider, he has been awarded the kind of critical enthusiasm and (I’m guessing) collecting attention that most of the artists in this fair could only dream of. Maybe true Outsider art, which this is not, really is still far outside after all. Outsider Art Fair Through Sunday. Metropolitan Pavilion, 125 West 18th Street, outsiderartfair.com. Correction: Jan. 18, 2019 An earlier version of this review referred incorrectly to the dealer Phyllis Kind. She was an original exhibitor at the Outsider Art Fair. She was not one of the fair’s founders. Holland Cotter is the co-chief art critic. He writes on a wide range of art, old and new, and he has made extended trips to Africa and China. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism in 2009.

Feb. 24, 2019

THE ETERNAL ORPHANAGE COMMUNITY A Yorkville priest and the head of an elite private school thrash out a plan to memorialize a beloved vestige of a 19th-century chapel — even as its inevitable disappearance looms

I do not doubt that one day, this relic of the past will reemerge to astonish future generations.”

BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

The clock is quickly ticking on the future of the Ghostly Remnant of East 90th Street. But there’s good news, too: Due to a breakthrough deal hammered out in a Feb. 15 meeting, the majestic ruin will be commemorated forever. Construction of a new field house for the Spence School on the block between First and York Avenues is already underway. And as it advances, the beloved fragment that survived from the chapel of the old St. Joseph’s Orphan Asylum will vanish from view. Built in 1898 to serve the orphanage, which was founded in 1857, the neo-Classical, brick-and-stone church has endured, in truncated form, ever since. That won’t change. But late this year or in 2020, the vestige is expected to be obscured, perhaps indefinitely, behind the six-story, 85-foot tall athletic complex that Spence is now building directly to the east. It won’t go quietly: Its fans have been fighting to save it ever since Our Town chronicled its history, status and uncertain future in two articles in January, “The Ghostly Remnant” and “Rallying for a Remnant.” In response, East Side City Council Member Ben Kallos — who once lived in the condo at 402 East 90th St. in which the remnant is spectacularly

CONTINUED ON PAGE 7

City Council Member Ben Kallos

Photo: Steven Strasser

THE GRAYING OF MANHATTAN A seven-story vestige of an old Yorkville chapel, embedded into a neighboring building, stands sentinel over an empty lot where the Spence School is constructing a new field house. The facade will vanish from view when the work is completed, but the chapel will be memorialized both inside and outside the new Spence building. Photo: Sarah Greig Photography / FRIENDS of the Upper East Side Historic Districts

Oct. 19, 2018

TRENDS Nov. 20, 2018

‘GRAMMAR ZEN’ IN VERDI SQUARE COMMUNITY New Yorkers talk tricky tenses, punctuation passions and more at Ellen Jovin’s UWS pop-up table

Surging senior populations are reshaping the Upper West and Upper East Sides — but the under-65 tally is waning on both sides of the park, new data shows BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

Are you prepositionally challenged? Hesitant around hyphens? Undergoing a comma crisis? Simply enraptured by the beauty of a well-placed ellipsis? Ellen Jovin wants to talk grammar with you. Jovin has become familiar to Upper West Side word lovers in recent weeks as the face and founder of Grammar Table — a public forum for open-ended discussion of all things language. Armed with a folding table and an array of reference books and style guides, Jovin sets up shop near the northern entrance to the 72nd Street subway station on Broadway to d l li ( ih

dole out complimentary (with an “i”) pointers, guidance and emotional support to all comers, from devoted syntacticians to the downright grammar-averse. “Hi, this looks lit,” a young woman said on a recent afternoon as she approached Grammar Table (lately Jovin has been trying out the name without the definite article). The woman introduced herself as

a fifth-gr and soon had found vin. A spi the joys o ensued. A steady paused in hour scru the Gram were wa embolde

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The census of Upper West Side seniors has skyrocketed over the past decade: There are now 41,194 adults north of age 65, a stunning climb of 44 percent. In the same period, between 2007 and 2017, the older population in Chelsea and Hell’s Kitchen shot up 38 percent and the number of Upper East Siders in that age bracket rose 31 percent. Contrast those tallies with the citywide and statewide figures, where the growth in the over-65 set, while still robust, was a much smaller 24 and 26

percent respectively. Another yardstick to gauge the explosive increase in the elderly census is the number of the very old, age 85 and over, which rose 20 percent in the city and 26 percent in the state over 10 years, according to a new report from the Center for an Urban Future, a research institute. But those figures are dwarfed among Upper West Siders: As of 2017, there were 4,898 residents aged 85 and above, up from 3,197 in 2007, a leap of 53 percent, a CUF data analysis of Manhattan neighborhoods prepared at the request of Straus News found. “There are more residents aged 65 and above in Manhattan than there are people under the age of 19 — that is the largest spread of any county in the state, by far,” according to the think tank’s report, “New York’s Older Adult Population is Booming Statewide.” On the other side of the spectrum, the number of residents below age 65 is stagnating

or shrinking. Over the past decade, the city’s non-senior population managed only a two percent increase, while the tally in Manhattan actually declined by 2 percent, the CUF report found. Decreases on both sides of the park were even more dramatic: The under-65 population of the UWS dropped to 165,836 in 2017 from 185,747 in 2007, a steep falloff of 11 percent. During the same period on the UES, it fell to 172,042 from 186,015, a decline of eight percent, the data shows. “New York’s population is rapidly graying,” said Jonathan Bowles, the Center’s executive director. “In every corner of the state, older adults are driving most if not all of the growth.” Added Beth Finkel, the state director of AARP, which helped fund the report, “These eyepopping numbers are a wakeup call to address the needs of our fast-aging population.” invreporter@strausnews.com


MARCH 7-13,2019

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sit service and more New Yorkers opt to ride the subway. Within ďŹ ve to 10 years, said Komanoff, average travel speeds could rise 20 to 23 percent from current levels.

CONGESTION CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 How would the plan impact traffic? Many key details that will determine the ultimate impact of Cuomoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including the tollâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cost, the number and types of drivers who will qualify for medical and other hardship exemptions (such carve-outs are a key pillar of de Blasioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s support), and the share of revenue directed to subways and bus service as opposed to regional rail (to say nothing of how effectively the MTA spends it) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; remain unclear and are subject to ongoing negotiations. But if the legislature approves a plan as robust as the governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stated aims, the results will be immediately tangible, according to Charles Komanoff, a transportation and energy policy analyst who has studied congestion pricing extensively. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The lionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s share of the beneďŹ ts are going to accrue to residents of Manhattan,â&#x20AC;? Komanoff said, adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The number one benefit is driversâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; time savings.â&#x20AC;? Komanoffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s traffic model projects a 12 to 15 percent increase in vehicle travel speeds within the central business district once congestion pricing is implemented, which under Cuomoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan would take place in 2021. Further benefits, he said, will manifest over time as congestion revenue investments translate into improved tran-

How much will the toll cost? Cuomoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan does not specify rates for the congestion toll, which would be variable to provide discounts for drivers entering the zone during offpeak hours. Instead, the congestion toll amounts would be set next year by a new six-member panel. Key details of the panel â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including who would hold responsibility for appointing its members â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are under negotiation. City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, an advocate of congestion pricing, cited an â&#x20AC;&#x153;unaccountable, unnamed panel that will eventually set the pricesâ&#x20AC;? as one reason he opposes the plan supported by the governor and mayor. Johnson also criticized the proposal for its lack of details on the types of MTA capital projects congestion revenue could fund. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m surprised the mayor would sign on to the plan without having a greater level of commitment on how the money was going to be spent,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. The governor has said that his congestion pricing plan would raise $15 billion for the MTAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next capital plan, but he has not speciďŹ ed how much he thinks drivers should be charged. Last

Proponents of congestion pricing say the policy would increase vehicle travel times in Manhattan and raise billions in revenue for the MTA. Photo: Steven Strasser

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Voices

Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to chelseanewsNY.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

SIGNATURES & MAD AVE MADNESS EAST SIDE OBSERVER BY ARLENE KAYATT

Petition prize — Collecting petition signatures to get on the ballot is a daunting task. Rain or shine — well not rain — the mighty signature-getters stand (usually on street corners) and ask registered voters of a political party to sign to get a candidate or candidates on the ballot. Sometimes it gets to be a heady experience. And so it was for a Democrat district leader candidate on the UWS when uber-West Sider and New York’s favorite son, Congressman Jerrold Nadler, was the first to sign his petition. I’m guessing that candidate, Joshua Benjamin Kin-

berg, would want to save and savor the precious petition with Nadler’s signature. But if Kinberg’s in a contested primary and another candidate is seeking the same seat, he’ll need every signature. It’s always possible, of course, that a follow-up Nadler endorsement could scare off a contender. Stay tuned. Reader readback — Some columns ago, I noted the closing of Infirmary, an UES restaurant (and bar) and the incongruity of its name for a NYC bar. Like who knew that “Infirmary” was intended to celebrate New Orleans. I took exception to the restaurant’s not celebrating, or at least making known, its New Orleans origins. Washington Heights reader Judy Hamudy pointed out that

the Infirmary name probably came from the old New Orleans blues/jazz ballad, “St. James Infirmary,” made famous by Louis Armstrong. With all due respect, how many Gothamites would make that connection at a restaurant with no obvious hint of its New Orleans origin? Another reader, Stuy-Towner Hazel Feldman, loved the Billie Ward Grace cat photo that accompanied the column about the missing cat in the Chinese zodiac. Perhaps in these proactive times a campaign may be in order to bring the cat to the calendar. Any takers? Mad(ison) Ave madness — A 13-story building is coming to Madison Ave. between 65th and 66th Streets. Look for 19 apartments

units and commercial space. And keep an eye on the northwest corner of 92nd and Madison where the halfblock building at 1288-1290 stands emptied of residential apartments and commercial space. The once elegant apartment building is an eyesore. One of the businesses, a restaurant, moved around the corner and is now known as Gina’s Italian. It’s been out of the old space for at least four years. However, the name “Gina Mexicana” remains on the door at the old location. Wonder what the landlord/building owner is up to? And when it will happen. MTA skips — News for M15 Select bus riders — you heard it here — the Select no longer stops at 72nd Street and Second Ave.. The stop after 74th

or 75th St. is now 68th St. That nice lady’s voice that announces stops over the bus speaker goes silent every now and then. So unless you’re tuned in to what’s going on in MTA la la land, you would never know that the stop has been taken off the route. No more secrets. Old time mail — Now that the blue box mailboxes that stand on the city streets are set to be redesigned, it was interesting to pass a letterbox mounted on the outside of the residential building at 333 East 68th St.. The shiny gold relic, which once probably accepted letters, is now just a reminder of time gone by. No more mail drop.

‘POTVIN SUCKS!’ RANGERS FANS SAY — FOR 40 YEARS PUBLIC EYE BY JON FRIEDMAN

On Feb. 25, New York Rangers diehards marked a cherished anniversary: the birth of the most notorious rallying cry in New York sports history. It has united Rangers fans of all ages, ethnicities and tax brackets for 40 years: “POTVIN SUCKS!” I know all about it. I was at Madison Square Garden that night, on Feb. 25, 1979, when the chant was first heard. It started in the blue-collar upper reaches of the blue seats and cascaded down to the seats closer to the ice. In a neat bit of symmetry, I was at the Rangers-New Jersey Devils game at MSG as recently as Feb. 23. Sure enough, I heard it once again (several times, in fact). The hubbub all began during a typically intense Rangers-New York Islanders game on that long ago Sunday night, so far back in 1979 that the Iranian “students” hadn’t yet kidnapped Americans at the embassy in Tehran. Bob Dylan hadn’t yet been declared

born again. And it would be about half a year til Yankees catcher Thurman Munson died in a plane crash. The war cry was born at an exciting time. Back on Feb. 25, 1979, the ice hockey stakes were high. The Islanders were on their way to compiling the best record in the National Hockey League and hoping to win the first Stanley Cup in the franchise’s seven-year history. And the Rangers? My Rangers! We figured to be a stone in the Islanders’ shoe on their march to destiny. When it comes to local sports rivalries, this one has no match. Forget Yankees-Red Sox. Compared with Rangers-Islanders circa 1979, Yanks-Sox has all the intensity of a debate about which town serves up the best clam chowder. During the Feb. 25, 1979 game, Islanders captain Denis Potvin smashed Ulf Nilsson, the Rangers’ best player, into the end boards so hard that Nilsson suffered a broken ankle. The Rangers’ home crowd was understandably furious as Ulfie Nilsson limped to the bench and didn’t return to the ice that evening. That the Rangers scored a goal a few feet away at that exact moment — and ultimately won the game

— was little consolation, for Nilsson was never the same speedy skater when he came back from his injury. Since that fateful night, the chant heard ‘round Madison Square Garden became a staple at every Rangers home game. It continued after the Islanders stopped winning championships and became a mediocre team, and even after Potvin himself retired from the NHL (and was eventually inducted into the sport’s hall of fame). You don’t have to be a sociologist to conclude that the rallying cry reflects poorly on Rangers fans. Until the Rangers won their first Stanley Cup in 54 years, in 1994, “Potvin Sucks” was really all the fan base had to hang on to, to feel good about itself. Yelling that nonsense is akin to a poor person ringing Warren Buffett’s doorbell and running away. Big deal. But that won’t stop Rangers fans. They liked their role as New York hockey’s lovable Brooklyn “Dem Bums” Dodgers to the perennial 1980s champion Islanders. They imagined that they had the moral high ground. They embraced their second-class status on the ice. And they always had the chant. And they still do. Just listen.

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‘LINKS OF HOPE’ TO KICK CANCER ACTIVISM At NYU, student health activists raise awareness to “tell people that you’re not in this fight alone” BY TEDDY SON

On February 21, a large group congregated in front of the Washington Square arch. Boxes of coffee and hot chocolate were offered to keep passersby and participants warm while marveling at a large violet paper-link chain lying on the park’s cobblestones. This event, held by the Coalition Against Cancer New York University Club (CACNYU), drew quite a crowd. Called “Links of Hope,” the gathering has been held every year for the past few years, or at least as long as current co-presidents Josie Iadiccico and Margaret Arabpour have been running the club. The event mainly revolves around writing reasons why people hate cancer, and ways to raise awareness, on strips of paper in NYU’s color which are then linked together to make the chain, or “cancer ribbon.” According to club member Paul Roessling, the students collected a whopping 308 paper strips to make the ribbon. “The mission is to show that everyone is affected by cancer in one way or another,” said Iadiccico, and to “tell people that you’re not in this fight alone.” Some people wrote general messages, such as “we hate cancer because it shortens people’s lives, because it hurts people,” whereas others shared more personal stories about friends and family. “I lost a friend to cancer last summer,” said Roessling, “so I was like, fuck cancer, you know?” “I have witnessed people that I love go through it, I have lost family members that I will never get to meet from it,” added Arabpour. “I have lost family, I have family that has gone through it, I have gone through it [as a caregiver],” said Iadiccico. “It changes people’s lives, and we have the power to inform people about this.” CACNYU has been a promi-

Margaret Arabpour and Josie Iadiccico, co-presidents of CACNYU, stand at a kiosk for an on-campus Halloween event. Photo courtesy of CACNYU nent example of college health activism for almost fifteen years. Originally the acronym stood for Colleges Against Cancer, working with the American Cancer Society, but the club branched out in 2017 to become its own independent group. The aims of the club have not changed much, though as Arabpour puts it: “We all want to see an end to cancer and have our part in this fight.”

A Focus on Caregivers In its early days, CACNYU used to hold one large event (called “Relay For Life”) during the semester. Now the group is aiming to do smaller-scale, more frequent events as well as the occasional big event, “to get more involved during the school year,” Arabpour explained. Beyond “Links of Hope,” CACNYU has participated in multiple fundraisers, including the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk in Central Park, sponsored by the American Cancer Society. CACNYU has conducted events with organizations such as Ronald McDonald Houses and Hope Lodges, while also working with the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. “We try to get involved on campus as much as possible, raising awareness among our fellow students,” said Iadiccico, “and we also do awareness around the city.” The aims of the club are clear: to raise cancer awareness in NYU and its surrounding community. According to Roessling, “if every person was able to put his or her hand in the

fight against cancer, whether it be awareness, getting money to research cancer, we’d find that it’s a much more hopeful outlook.” He added that because of the country’s “medical literacy problem,” it is important to educate people about cancer and familiarize them with it. Arabpour said that a huge part of cancer awareness is early detection. “It’s an important step in fighting cancer because it can prevent later detection before it’s more detrimental to cure,” she said. “Awareness is that first step that anyone can take — you don’t need a medical degree.” Iadiccico emphasized the impact of cancer on not just patients, but the patients’ loved ones as well. “Caregivers are people we also try to care for, and also highlight how hard that can be as well,” she said. “Not only [can cancer] take the life of the person who is fighting, but it can destroy the lives of the people caring for them. If we can get ahead of that, if we can make people aware of that pain, it can just widen people’s understanding, and it just comes back to the fact that we’re all in this together.” Such motives have united these young college students in the ongoing fight against the ultimate disease. CACNYU is now is now prepping for its big endof-semester fundraising event in May, and future aims may entail getting more directly involved with cancer patients. Above all, the students hope to educate at least one more person about a disease that may seem so alien at first, but resides closer than one would expect.

9


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MARCH 7-13,2019

Discover the world around the corner. Find community events, gallery openings, book launches and much more: Go to nycnow.com

EDITOR’S PICK

Sun 10 LLOYD NIGHT SubCulture 45 Bleecker St 7:00 p.m. $7 subculturenewyork.com 212-533-5470

Inspired Music of Women Composers and Poets

Thursday, March 14 at 7:30pm The Marble Choir in Concert directed by Kenneth Dake

Admission: $20 at door | $15, seniors Save $5 by ordering in advance online at MarbleChurch.org

Event listings brought to you by Marble Collegiate Church. 1 West 29th Street / New York, New York 10001 212 686 2770 / MarbleChurch.org Download the Marble Church App on iPhone or Android

Come see longform improv from NYC’s top up-and-coming improv stars. At the show, three Lloyd Teams will perform Harolds, a 30 minute improv structure pioneered by Del Close.

The funny side of physic : or, The mysteries of medicine, presenting the humorous and serious sides of medical practice. An exposé of medical humbugs, quacks, and charlatans in all ages and all countries, by Crabtre, A. D.(Addison Darre), 1874. Photo: Internet Archive Book Images, via Flickr

Thu 7

Fri 8

Sat 9

▲ THE DIRECTOR SERIES: UNWRITTEN HISTORY

MORLEY: NAKED SOUL

IDENTITY: FREEDOM

The Rubin Museum 150 West 17th St 7:00 p.m. $30 Singer, composer, and producer Morley weaves the threads of jazz, soul, and folk traditions into a singular tapestry of vocal and acoustic splendor — the sound wave of a life lived with uncommon devotion to human rights and environmental justice. Come down and listen to his beautiful work. rubinmuseum.org 212-620-5000

The Kitchen 512 West 19th St 8:00 p.m. $25 This project declares liberation in both selfpossession and movement. “Identity: Freedom” is presented as part of ‘Representation/ Occupation’ taking place at The Kitchen in 2019. thekitchen.org 212-255-5793

The Magnet Theater 254 West 29th St 10:00 p.m. $7 In this brand new show, historically insignificant events that didn’t make the history books (but should have) will inspire an hour of never-beforeseen comedy. magnettheater.com 212-244-8824


MARCH 7-13,2019

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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

HEALTHY HEROIN ABUSERS (Men and women, ages 21-59) who drink alcohol regularly are needed for an 8-week inpatient study investigating medication effects at the NY State Psychiatric Institute. Earn approximately $6550-$7350.

Call the Substance Use Research Center at (646) 774-6243

Sun 10 Mon 11 Tue 12 NYC FEMINIST FILM WEEK 2019: CLOSING NIGHT: THE DAUGHTERS OF FIRE Anthology Film Archives 32 Second Ave 8:30 p.m. Free Directed by Albertina Carri, one of the key figures of Nuevo Cine Argentino (New Argentinian Cinema), “The Daughters of Fire” is a queer road movie exploring the political and aesthetic possibilities of three women freeing themselves sexually. anthologyfilmarchives.org 212-505-518

▲ INDIE SKETCH SHOWCASE

WHEEL OF PROV

UCB Hell’s Kitchen 555 West 42nd St 10:30 p.m. $9 The NYC sketch comedy scene is filled with teams of hilarious, original writers and performers. The Indie Sketch Showcase is an opportunity to highlight some of the best up-and-coming sketch comedy talents New York City has to offer. Hosted by sketch team Kiss on the Lips! ucbtheatre.com 212-366-9176

The PIT Loft 154 West 29th St 8:00 p.m. $8.00 Join the Sinclair Siblings (Randall Miller and Kathryn Marie) for the taping of another episode of Wheel of ‘Prov, including show runner Todd Bozelstein (Joey Rotter) and cameraman Timmy Radakowski (Ty Turley) This revolutionary game show has improvisers spinning a wheel to determine the form with which their team has to compete for a special prize! thepit-nyc.com 212-563-7488

Your neighborhood news source ChelseaNewsNY.com ACTIVITIES FOR THE FERTILE MIND

thoughtgallery.org NEW YORK CITY

Sebastian Junger + Dr. Hector A. Garcia: Sex, Power, and Partisanship

SATURDAY, MARCH 9TH, 3PM Rubin Museum of Art | 150 W. 17th St. | 212-620-5000 | rmanyc.org

Wed 13 ◄ NAJWA ZEBIAN: SPARKS OF PHOENIX The Strand 828 Broadway 7:00 p.m. $15 As the phoenix emerges from its ashes, Zebian emerges ablaze in these pages, not only as a survivor of abuse, but as a teacher and healer for all those who have struggled to understand, reclaim, and rise above a history of pain. Join as Najwa shares her intriguing book. strandbooks.com 212-473-1452

We are a tribal species. Will it prove fatal? Clinical psychologist Dr. Hector A. Garcia (Sex, Power, and Partisanship: How Evolutionary Science Makes Sense of Our Political Divide) speaks about our legacy of violent male competition and its impact on issues like climate and equality ($28).

Why Read Hannah Arendt Now: Book Launch and Movie Screening

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13TH, 6PM The New School | 6 E. 16th St. | 212-229-5108 | newschool.edu Vera List Professor of Philosophy Richard J. Bernstein presents his 2018 book on Hannah Arendt, Why Read Hannah Arendt Now, followed by a screening of the 2015 documentary portrait Vita Activa: The Spirit of Hannah Arendt (free).

Just Announced | Michael Ondaatje Discusses Warlight

TUESDAY, MAY 7TH, 7:30PM Brooklyn Library | 10 Grand Army Pl. | 718-230-2100 | bklynlibrary.org The best-selling author of The English Patient visits Brooklyn in support of Warlight, his 2018 novel, which is set amid a dense web of secrecy in the years after World War II. A book signing will follow (free, registration required).

For more information about lectures, readings and other intellectually stimulating events throughout NYC,

sign up for the weekly Thought Gallery newsletter at thoughtgallery.org.


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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

MARCH 7-13,2019

A CULT FAVORITE Moroni, a little known Italian Renaissance painter, is having a big moment at The Frick Collection BY VAL CASTRONOVO

There’s a Lady in Red and a Man in Pink in the Oval Room at the Frick, part of an opulent new show of 23 portraits by Albino-born Giovanni Battista Moroni (1520/24-1579/80), the first major exhibit of this regional artist’s oeuvre in North America. Moroni is better known in his native Italy and in England, which possesses the largest number of Moronis outside the painter’s homeland and hosted a comprehensive show at the Royal Academy of Arts, London, in 2014. As Ian Wardropper, director of the Frick, noted at a recent preview: “He’s

IF YOU GO WHAT: “Moroni: The Riches of Renaissance Portraiture” WHERE: The Frick Collection, 1 East 70th Street WHEN: Through June 2, 2019 a little bit of a cult favorite. I think people who love Old Master pictures have known about Moroni.” A contemporary of Titian and Bronzino, this painter worked mainly outside the major artistic hubs — Venice, Florence and Rome — confining himself for the most part to Albino and nearby Bergamo, in the Lombardy region of northern Italy. He kept it local. That may be why Giorgio Vasari didn’t include Moroni in his famous compendium of artist biographies,

“The Tailor” (ca. 1570), seen here in the East Gallery with a pair of 16th century shears, is Moroni’s most famous painting. Photo: Michael Bodycomb

“Portrait of a Young Woman” (ca. 1575) shows Moroni’s genius for “capturing that person exactly as she was,” said the Frick’s associate curator Aimee Ng. Private collection. Photo: Michael Bodycomb

“Lives of the Most Eminent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects” (1550; 1568). Renaissance art historian Bernard Berenson (1865-1959) also slighted him, writing him off as a “mere portrait painter,” who “gives us sitters no doubt as they looked.” There was not enough “art” in his art, apparently. But a reputation rehab has been underway for decades, with one scholar lauding the painter’s diligent likenesses, claiming they anticipated the realism of Caravaggio. Still, as the press release for the show states, “Moroni’s characterization as an artist who faithfully recorded the world around him — whether understood as a positive quality or a weakness — has obscured his creativity and innovation as a portraitist.” At the Frick, Moroni is presented as an artist more artful and interesting than he’s been given credit for. Take the full-length picture of “Isotta Brembati” (ca. 1555-1556) in the Oval Room. A poet from an aristocratic family, Brembati wears a gown patterned with a motif that grows larger and larger as it travels down the length of the garment, most likely an embellishment rather than something real. “It seems as if he had a dress, and he’s fictionalized part of it to create a more impressive visual effect,” co-curator Aimee Ng said. “We don’t really notice it, because it’s painted so naturalistically.” More than anything else, Isotta was a woman who knew how to accessorize

— and show her money. She holds a gold-or-gilt-bronze-handled fan with feathers, usually mistaken for a purse, and has a fur wrap, with a jeweled marten’s head, hanging around her neck. We wouldn’t necessarily notice the fur if an actual pelt was not on display in a case nearby, along with other luxe accessories that resemble the items in the painting. The period swag is a window into Moroni’s “material world,” in Ng’s words, what he really saw when he painted. As Wardropper put it, the objects sprinkled throughout the Oval Room and the East Gallery “underscore the theme of the riches of Renaissance portraiture.” The marten’s head (ca. 1550-1559), in gold with rubies and pearls, is one of the most eye-catching items on view. “It’s so great that it has survived from the Renaissance,” Ng said of the loan from the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, which is shown with a modern pelt. “If you had one, you had a lot of wealth, and people knew it.” Moroni admired beauty, but he did not make his subjects conform to Renaissance ideals of beauty. In “Portrait of a Young Woman” (ca. 1575), he demonstrates his genius for “capturing that person exactly as she was ... There’s nothing generic about that expression. I would not want to get on the bad side of this woman,” said Ng. The artist painted the material world

at the same time that he painted the spiritual world. He is credited with inventing a new genre, “sacred portraits,” a mix of contemporary donor portraits and devotional imagery. Three such paintings survive, all displayed here. In these, the contemporary figures practice a type of meditative prayer popularized by books such as St. Ignatius of Loyola’s “Spiritual Exercises” (1548), a rare copy of which is part of the exhibit. As Ng explained: “Just as you have to work out your body, through running or walking, you work out your prayer as well. It’s a four-week program,” involving imagining the sight, sound, smell, touch and taste of heavenly beings. Amen. Moroni, it seems, could move seamlessly from the sacred to the mundane, from patricians to tradesmen. Be sure to see his most famous painting, “The Tailor” (ca. 1570), in the East Gallery. The curator called it “the gateway drug to Moroni” for its genre-bending depiction of a prosperous tailor on the verge of cutting a piece of cloth — it’s a cross between a portrait and a genre painting. A pair of shears, pictured in the foreground, is the gateway to the tailor’s material world. A vitrine showcases the real thing from the 16th century. Said Ng: “Only by having them here [can you] imagine your hand in there, the weight of that ... I kind of understood why he’s resting them on the table. They are so heavy.”


MARCH 7-13,2019

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MARCH 7-13,2019

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS FEB 20 - 26, 2018 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml. Starbucks

370 7 Avenue

A

Frame Gourmet Eatery

424 West 33 Street

A

B&W Deli Grocery

373 West 34th St

Grade Pending (26) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food worker does not wash hands thoroughly after using the toilet, coughing, sneezing, smoking, eating, preparing raw foods or otherwise contaminating hands. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

Tous Les Jours

31 W 32nd St

A

Tir Na Nog

254 W 31st St

Grade Pending (24) Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, crosscontaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan. Live roaches present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

Abiko Curry

2 W 32nd St

A

The Joyce Theater

175 Eighth Avenue

A

Good Stuff Diner

109 West 14 Street

A

Brine

106 8th Ave

A

1 Oak

453 West 17 Street

A

Yakiniku Futago

37 W 17th St

A

The Mezz (Google)

75 9th Ave

A

Muscle Maker Grill

70 7th Ave

Grade Pending (27) Food not cooled by an approved method whereby the internal product temperature is reduced from 140º F to 70º F or less within 2 hours, and from 70º F to 41º F or less within 4 additional hours. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Hand washing facility not provided in or near food preparation area and toilet room. Hot and cold running water at adequate pressure to enable cleanliness of employees not provided at facility. Soap and an acceptable hand-drying device not provided.

Philippe By Philippe Chow

355 W 16th St

Not Yet Graded (24) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food not cooled by an approved method whereby the internal product temperature is reduced from 140º F to 70º F or less within 2 hours, and from 70º F to 41º F or less within 4 additional hours. Personal cleanliness inadequate. Outer garment soiled with possible contaminant. Effective hair restraint not worn in an area where food is prepared. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Naturopathica Chelsea

127 W 26th St

A

Pinkberry

7 W 32nd St

A

$1 Pizza

832 6th Ave

A

Market Crates

224 W 35th St

A

Cho Dang Gol

55 West 35 Street

A

Taco Bell / Pizza Hut Express

390 8 Avenue

A

Alt - A Little Taste

148 W 28th St

A

7 Grams Caffe

275 7th Ave

A

Idea Coffee

246 5th Ave

A

Pelicana Chicken

11 W 32nd St

A

Tick Tock Diner

481 8 Avenue

A

Starbucks

510 6 Avenue

A

T.G.I. Friday’s

211 W 34th St

A

Chipotle Mexican Grill

504 6th Ave

A

Juniper

237 W 35th St

A

Davidovich Bakery

75 9th Ave

A

Sam Won Garden

37 W 32nd St

Grade Pending (24) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Evidence of rats or live rats present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Filth flies or food/ refuse/sewage-associated (FRSA) flies present in facility’s food and/ or non-food areas. Filth flies include house flies, little house flies, blow flies, bottle flies and flesh flies. Food/refuse/sewage-associated flies include fruit flies, drain flies and Phorid flies.

Mansions Cater

80 5 Avenue

A

Cafe Champignon

200 7 Avenue

A

Le Zie Trattoria

172 7 Avenue

A

Golden Krust Caribbean Bakery & Grill

47 West 14 Street

Grade Pending (2)

Starbucks

229 Seventh Avenue

A

Chinese Fast Wok

230 7 Avenue

Grade Pending (23) Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Wiping cloths soiled or not stored in sanitizing solution.

City Perk

15 Penn Plaza

A

Brgr

287 7 Avenue

A

Chipotle Mexican Grill

234 5th Ave

A

Dunkin’ Donuts

818 6th Ave

A

Juice Press

100 10th Ave

Grade Pending

Subway

250 10th Ave

A

Excellent Dumpling House

165 W 23rd St

A

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MARCH 7-13,2019

CONGESTION CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 year, a commission formed by the governor recommended a peak-hour charge of $11.52, which would correspond to the two-way E-ZPass toll rate for the Queens-Midtown and Hugh L. Carey Tunnels. As of March 31, those toll rates will rise to $12.24. The plan would not â&#x20AC;&#x153;double tollâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; drivers who already pay a toll to enter the congestion zone from the East River tunnels, the Holland and Lincoln Tunnels or the Henry Hudson Bridge at the northern tip of Manhattan. Drivers paying a toll to enter Manhattan from the Hugh L. Carey Tunnel, for example, would have the cost of that toll offset from the full congestion charge, so that they would pay the same effective toll rate as a driver using the Brooklyn Bridge. On the East River, this would have the effect of reducing congestion caused by the â&#x20AC;&#x153;bridge shoppingâ&#x20AC;? incentivized under the current system of tolled tunnels and untolled bridges. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You want to harmonize the tolls so it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter which crossing you choose,â&#x20AC;? said Alex Matthiessen, the founder of the inďŹ&#x201A;uential congestion pricing advocacy campaign Move NY. But on the West Side, the peak-hour E-ZPass toll rate for

HIGH LINE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 The Friends of the High Line organization had some trouble securing this ďŹ nal section. The land the High Line is on was originally owned by the MTA and was used to park trains. The bid for the land included an option to either keep or destroy this section of High Line. But following a rigorous campaign to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Save the Spur,â&#x20AC;? the developer who purchased the land agreed that is could become the next focal point of the now-famous High Line park. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of people [originally] thought it was industrial and covered in weeds, an eyesore that needed to go,â&#x20AC;? Hammond said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Joshua David and I fell in love with the weeds.â&#x20AC;?

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Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

If you want to strangle congestion pricing in the cradle, go ahead and insist on Manhattan resident carve-outs.â&#x20AC;? Charles Komanoff, transportation and energy policy analyst the Lincoln and Holland Tunnels is $12.50 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; meaning that if the congestion toll isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t greater than $12.50, New Jersey drivers using these crossings to enter the congestion zone would see no change in the cost of their daily commute. Komanoff said it might be worth exploring an added congestion toll on the Hudson River tunnels â&#x20AC;&#x153;to grab additional revenue and deal with the trafďŹ c disaster that is the West Side of Manhattan.â&#x20AC;?

What about Manhattan residents? The lack of a further disincentive for out-of-state commuters would not sit well with some Manhattan drivers. who argue that they should receive relief or exemptions from the congestion toll, akin to exist-

In homage to the shrubbery that initially made David and Hammond dedicate themselves to the abandoned railway, green space is a key component of every section of the High Line, and the Spur will be no exception. The space will contain the most dense greenery of the High Line, in stark contrast to its commercial surroundings. Preceding the archway that leads into the Spur space is a narrow walkway enclosed on one side by a screen of advertisements for the soon-to-be shopping mall towering over this section. Feet away is the site of the Shed, the arts center project, and ahead one can spot the cranes working the massive development that is Hudson Yards. Communications Director for the High Line, Melissa Parsoff, works on

ing toll discount programs for residents of Staten Island and the Rockaways. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you want to strangle congestion pricing in the cradle, go ahead and insist on Manhattan resident carve-outs,â&#x20AC;? Komanoff said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If that drum is beaten loudly enough, then outer-borough and suburban legislators are going to fold their cards and say to hell with the whole thing.â&#x20AC;? Another concern cited by some Upper West Side and Upper East Side residents is that congestion pricing will cause their neighborhoodsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; streets to become crowded with the parked cars of commuters who formerly drove into the congestion zone but will instead park outside the boundary and transfer to the subway to avoid paying the toll. A bill sponsored by Manhattan City Council Members Mark Levine, Helen Rosenthal, Keith Powers and Diana Ayala would create a residential permit system to give locals parking priority. But to dwell on â&#x20AC;&#x153;secondorderâ&#x20AC;? details that could be tweaked later is to risk missing the forest for the trees, according to Komanoff. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope that New Yorkers can look at the big picture here,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a generational chance to pull the subways out of catastrophe and finally, after 100 years of streets ruled by traffic, to grab the solution.â&#x20AC;?

occasion with the surrounding projects. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We call this the crossroads because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where all of these different organizations meet,â&#x20AC;? Parsoff said. The Spur is where visitors will ďŹ nd the High Lineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other newest attraction, the Plinth, where sculptures and art will be on display, changing every 18 months. The ďŹ rst piece to be featured is a sculpture called â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Brick Houseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; by Simone Leigh. The High Line aims to include artwork from around the world, in part to ensure that everybody can ďŹ nd something to connect with on the High Line. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a public space doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean everybody feels welcome,â&#x20AC;? Hammond said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to bring the best contemporary art and make it reďŹ&#x201A;ect [different] cultures and demographics.â&#x20AC;?

NEIGHBORHOODâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BEST To place an ad in this directory, Call Douglas at 212-868-0190 ext. 352.

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Neighborhood Scrapbook

MARCH 7-13,2019

Business Photo courtesy of Modern Bread and Bagel

LOOKING FOR A KOSHER, GLUTEN-FREE BABKA? RESTAURANTS Photo courtesy of Canine Retreat by AKC

‘SMOOCH YOUR POOCH’ In honor of National Love Your Pet Day recently, dog owners stopped by to “Smooch Your Pooch” at the East 60th Street location of Canine Retreat by AKC. The doggy kissing booth drew an array of canine friends, accompanied by clients new and old.

Photo courtesy of Canine Retreat by AKC

“There are so many ways to show love for your dog including nutrition, training, grooming, the time spent together and much more,” said James Tysseling, COO of AKC Canine Retreat. “Our ‘Smooch Your Pooch’ event was a fun way to show appreciation to dog lovers’ best friend.”

Modern Bread and Bagel, a new brunch spot, opens on the Upper West Side BY JASON COHEN

A new brunch spot featuring chocolate chip scones, rugalach, babka, cinnamon buns, bagels and pancakes recently opened on the UWS. Oh, it also happens to be kosher and gluten-free. Modern Bread and Bagel, located at 472 Columbus Avenue, between 82nd and 83rd Streets, is the brainchild of baker Orly Gottesman, 32. Gottesman, along with her husband Josh, 33, opened their first restaurant on Feb. 24. “Our whole thing is we wanted to introduce [the restaurant] to not only the Jewish world, but the Upper West Side community,” Gottesman said. “It’s a time when kosher people on the UWS are dying for a place like this.” Her husband’s work as an entrepreneur took them to other countries, which is where Gottesman discovered her interest in food. They lived in Paris from August 2010 to December 2011. During that time, she took an apprenticeship at a pastry shop. She quickly immersed herself in baking, and from 2011 to 2012, when the couple

were in Australia, she studied at the Cordon Bleu Culinary Arts Institute in Sydney. In addition to Gottesman’s passion for baking, her husband has celiac disease, so she was intrigued by gluten-free food. Gottesman decided to pursue an independent study on gluten-free baking and worked closely with the school’s head pastry chef to figure out how different flour blends work for different products. After several years of research, she came up with various glutenfree recipes for baked goods, breads and pastries using ancient grains, rather than traditional flour. Ultimately, this spawned the creation of Blends by Orly in 2014. “Each blend is formulated for a specific purpose,” Gottesman said.

Food and Service After living in Sydney until March 2017, and splitting time between Las Vegas and New Jersey, the couple finally settled down in Gottesman’s hometown of Englewood, N.J. The duo, who keep kosher, realized it was the right time to open their first restaurant. “For us, we saw a real void in good gluten-free,” she said. Gottesman noted that it was important for them to be known for quality food and service, not just being gluten-free. “It [gluten-free] really scares

people away,” she stressed. “It turns them off.” According to Gottesman, not only do many people come to the restaurant not aware that it is gluten-free, but they may not be Jewish, either. She stressed they do not say it is gluten-free unless someone asks. “We’re doing crazy things that gluten-free people can’t find anywhere,” she exclaimed. “People are excited to have an awesome brunch place on the UWS regardless of it being gluten free or kosher. We knew if we only opened as a bagel shop, we wouldn’t make it.” In addition to serving breakfast and lunch Sunday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m., the plan is to turn the location into a restaurant at night called Arba. In the evening, the seating will expand from 34 to 50 and the menu will feature Mediterranean food, changing every week and season. However, it will not open until they obtain a beer and liquor license. Gottesman said the plan is to have the biggest selection of kosher wines in the country, with 200 by the bottle and 20 by glass. Looking ahead, she is nervous, but sees great things for the restaurant in the UWS community. “Everything happens for a reason,” Gottesman said. “I think this was my purpose. At the very least, I know people are really excited about us.”


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DEPRESSION IN SENIORS: ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SUBTLE AGING Identifying older adults with the disorder can be challenging BY ARDESHEER TALATI

â&#x20AC;&#x153;He says heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s depressedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just getting old,â&#x20AC;? a friend recently said to me about her father-in-law, who had just turned 80. The perils of disagreeing with a parent-in-law aside, my friend did inadvertently hit on something important: the difficulties we face in differentiating depression in later life from everything else happening to our bodies and minds as we age. Major depression is a chronic, debilitating disorder projected to be the biggest contributor to global disease burden by 2030 in Western countries. It usually ďŹ rst appears in early adulthood, though adolescent depression (particularly among females) is not uncommon. But that does not mean that depression doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t occur in later life. Indeed, up to ďŹ ve per-

cent of seniors are estimated to suffer from clinical depression at any given time. For some, it may be recurrences of a depression that started earlier in life; for others, it may be new. In either case, treating these depressions is important because studies show that untreated depression can worsen outcomes for cardiovascular disease, stroke, pain, and certain dementias. It can also shorten lifespan. Not surprisingly, the National Institute of Health has classiďŹ ed depression in adults 65 and over as a major public health problem. Unfortunately, several subtleties can complicate the diagnosis of depression as we get older. Here are some worth thinking about. 1. Even though the criteria for the disorder are the same across ages, depression at older ages doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always follow the textbook. For example, while depression at younger ages is more common among females, the gender imbalance is much less in later life. Also, while

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The advantages of recognizing and treating depression early are myriad.â&#x20AC;? Ardesheer Talati

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depression in adolescence and early adulthood tends to run in families, late-life depression doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. So the â&#x20AC;&#x153;my mother had depression, will I get it too?â&#x20AC;? sleuthing doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work. And whereas earlier-life depression typically comes and goes in episodes, later-life depression tends to be more chronic. What this all means is that population-level patterns are less reliable guideposts when it comes to diagnosing depression among older individuals. 2. As reďŹ&#x201A;ected by my friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s comment, symptoms can be difficult to disentangle from the ups-and-downs of daily living. As we age, we invariably develop more chronic diseases, use more medications, and have reduced memory and mobility. To be sure, these can sometimes themselves lead to depression. But they also add a layer of fog that clouds the ability to pick up on true depressive symptoms. Is she sleeping less because of depression or because of that new thyroid medication? Is he irritable because he is depressed or because they wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t renew his driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license? The answer can vary by person and by situation, and it takes time and an experienced clinician to differentiate between these scenarios. 3. Even though low mood is a

hallmark symptom, many older patients may experience other symptoms ďŹ rst. These can include insomnia, agitation, gastrointestinal problems, and loss of sexual interest. Mood changes may not emerge until later. This can make screening for depression challenging, for if our spotlights are so focused on mood disturbances, we may miss some of the other early warning signs. 4. Older adults may underreport mood symptoms even when they do occur. Some may believe that their symptoms are part of the natural course of aging. But there is also stigma about mental illness, which studies show to be greater in older populations. Sharing may be quite the norm for millennials, who grew up on social media, but those who came of age before conversations about mental illness became common may still be unable to channel the right language to express their symptoms. And this is truer still for some minority populations, where having a mental illness may be viewed as a dishonor.

How to Help What can we do to help? As we live longer, medical schools are devoting increasing training on the speciďŹ cities and subtle-

ties of disease management at older ages. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good thing. But meanwhile, what might my friend have done differently? Perhaps the next time her father-in-law says heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been feeling down, she shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t assume heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just getting old. Moods come in many flavors, and yes, sometimes an older family member may just be having a bad day. But the takehome message is to not jump to that conclusion reflexively. Instead, ask them about what is going on, why they might be feeling that way, or if anything has changed recently. Keep a track of their daily activities â&#x20AC;&#x201D; eating, sleeping, walking, talking, even complaining â&#x20AC;&#x201D; so that changes from their normal baseline become easier to identify. And try not to dismiss symptoms that seem esoteric or donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ďŹ t neatly together (e.g., too much sleep one day, too little the next). When possible, invite them to consult a professional with experience in later-life mental health. This could be their general practitioner, or a psychiatrist or psychologist. The good news is that there are effective medications for depression â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and although side-effects need to be managed more carefully in older populations, they still work. The advantages of recognizing and treating depression early are myriad. As mentioned, leaving depression untreated can increase the risk for other adverse medical outcomes and death. But there is broader advantage, too. Improving mood increases hope. And hope increases motivation to seek treatment. Thus, successfully treating depression can have a spillover effect, with the potential to improve treatment outcomes and quality of life for just about every other medical problem. Ardesheer Talati, Ph.D. is an assistant professor of clinical neurobiology (in psychiatry) at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians & Surgeons, and a research scientist at New York State Psychiatric Institute. For more information, contact adi.talati@ nyspi.columbia.edu


MARCH 7-13,2019

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YOUR 15 MINUTES

To read about other people who have had their “15 Minutes” go to chelseanewsNY.com/15 minutes

AN ‘ACCIDENTAL ACTIVIST’ The co-founder of Tenants United Fighting for Lower East Side (TUFF-LES) is taking action against the proposal to build four super-tall towers in the Two Bridges neighborhood BY CULLEN MONROE ORMOND

Trever Holland is tired. He has been thrust into the public eye — a position he’s not entirely comfortable with — which forces him to participate in several interviews. So many interviews that it takes him a while to remember which journalist he had an interview with during our specified time. But his popularity is understandable. The 52-year-old former attorney and resident of the Two Bridges neighborhood has been integral to the opposition against the proposal to build four super-tall (over 700 feet) towers on one block. The mitigations proved to be controversial as residents feared gentrification and another lengthy construction period. The Extell building, otherwise known as One Manhattan Square, an 80-story, luxury apartment behemoth already took five years to complete. Holland, co-founder of Tenants United Fighting for Lower East Side (TUFFLES), has been waging a re-zoning war with the City Planning Commission. He was recently rewarded with a small victory when the proposed mitigations were halted because of impending litigation. The next court date is March 28, where the judge could lift, modify or continue the hold on the construction of the towers.

Where do you live? I live at 82 Rutgers Slip, which is in the center of all the Two Bridges development. It’s very close to the water and also right next to the Extell building that’s 80 stories and is currently in its completion phase.

Did you raise a family in Two Bridges? No, but I have family in the area. Including across the street, my wife’s aunt and her cousins. Most of the family live across the street or right across the bridge.

And how did you come to be a founder of TUFF-LES? This was to make sure the people who lived along the waterfront, which we knew was prime real estate and a prospective area, had a voice in what was going to happen. So, we got together all the tenant leaders who lived on the waterfront. I was one of the co-founders, I use that term loosely because it was really a collaborative effort of folks who lived in the area.

Why do you oppose these buildings? When you look out your window, you’ll see that large finger sticking out of the ground, that 80 story thing that is completely out of scale. I don’t know one single community planner or anyone who follows architecture can say that it’s appropriate for the area. It’s an immediate transformation of the neighborhood because it’s mostly luxury apartments. This is primarily a low-income neighborhood and the city has decided to target this particular area, one block, for putting, what they say, is the greatest amount of affordable housing in the city. It’s not appro-

priate, it’s out of scale, it destroys the skyline as we see it.

What was it like when the Extell building was being constructed? The construction nightmare we experienced with the Extell building, those five years out of my life that I will never recover from. It was extremely hell-ish. I can’t imagine them building four buildings essentially on one block and just because we’re in an area that doesn’t have appropriate zoning and the developers knew that.

How does having a family in the neighborhood heighten your opposition to the proposal? I mean it’s not just me who is impacted directly as a resident. We are a family that have different socio-economic conditions, so some may not be able to recover or are not as able to be as mobile or handle changes in the neighborhood as I can. A lot of my family cannot do the same.

I read online too that along with the affordable units that would be coming they said they were going to put $4.5 billion into the neighborhood. Isn’t that a benefit of it? The mitigations were not discussed with the community, it was made by city planning. The recommendations that we gave, none of them were followed. None of the parks that they proposed for re-doing were in the Two Bridges direct impact area.

Do you have an example? To give you an example, we recommend that the Allen Street Mall, which borders Two Bridges into Chinatown, into a particularly poor immigrant neighborhood, that area has been neglected, we recommended improving that. They did nothing for that. If these buildings do not happen, we’re perfectly fine. What we’ve said all along is, “give us the supermarket,” because that’s what we lost, and we’ll be fine. But there isn’t anything that they’re proposing that we’re going to be sad about if it doesn’t happen. Not one single thing.

Have you always been an activist? I’m an accidental activist. I just consider myself a resident to the neighborhood that is concerned in keeping the neighborhood as is. If these towers go up this neighborhood is done. It will never be the same and if we don’t do something right now, history is going to look back and say, “what were you guys doing? How did you let this happen?”

Trever Holland at a Halloween event in his community room. Photo courtesy of Trever Holland

Trever Holland and Mayor Bill de Blasio discuss zoning for Two Bridges and a push for a ULURP in September 2017 at Joseph Sauer Park. Photo courtesy of Trever Holland if you put upwards of 10,000 people on one block in a neighborhood, 80 percent of them affluent, the smaller apartment buildings are going to raise their rents. The same thing is going to happen with the rent of the shops. I’ll go the next the day to the deli and they’ll be selling artisanal mustard. I’m not kidding. Rents of the surrounding areas will go up and anyone that says it won’t doesn’t know anything about economics and city planning. There’ll be a Starbucks on the corner, like it or don’t like it, but the dynamics of the entire neighborhood will change. All the local places that you used to go that you could get something that was affordable will change and people will be forced out. No one heard of Two Bridges until two years ago. Now, it’s becoming the “it” neighborhood.

How will the effects of these buildings trickle into surrounding neighborhoods such as Chinatown?

If the proposed towers are built, will you stay in the neighborhood?

All it takes is common sense to think

I threaten that I’m going to leave but

we all know that it’s tough to find places to live in New York City. I’ve been in this neighborhood for 22 years and saying that I would leave would just be out of frustration, but I as of right now I fully intend to stay in my neighborhood.

What is one thing that you would like people to know? We just need other torchbearers who know what they’re doing to navigate this process because it’s large plan and a big neighborhood with lots of different opinions. I’m waiting for Apple to create a time machine, so I can go take a peek at what’s going to happen.

Know somebody who deserves their 15 Minutes of fame? Go to chelseanewsNY.com and click on submit a press release or announcement.


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SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK --COUNTY OF NEW YORK - Index No. 310492/2018 - Date Purchased: November 5, 2018 - SUMMONS WITH NOTICE - Plaintiff designates New York County as the place of trial-- Basis of venue: is CPLR 509. -HENRRY LATCHMAN, Plaintiff, against LASHAWN T. HARRIS, Defendant -- ACTION FOR DIVORCE -- To the above named Defendant: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to serve a notice of appearance on the Plaintiff's attorneys within thirty (30) days after the service of this summons is complete and in case of your failure to appear,

judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the notice set forth below. Dated: November 5, 2018, Queens, New York. Law Offices of Donald Mastrodomenico By: Donald Mastrodomenico, Esq. Plaintiff's Attorney 107-19 71st Ave. Forest Hills, N.Y. 11375 (718) 268-8111 - NOTICE: The nature of this action is to dissolve the marriage between the parties, on the grounds: DRL section 170 subd. (7) - the relationship between the Plaintiff and Defendant has broken down irretrievably for a period of at least six months. The relief sought is a judgment of absolute divorce in favor of the Plaintiff dissolving the marriage between the parties this action. The nature of any ancillary or additional relief demanded is: That the parties do not require maintenance and no claim will be made by either party for maintenance. That both parties may resume the use of any prior surname. That the Court grant such other and further relief as the Court may deem fit and proper. The parties have divided up the marital property, and no claim will be made by either party under equitable distribution. NOTICE OF AUTOMATIC ORDERS PURSUANT TO DOMESTIC RELATIONS LAW SECTION 236 PART B, SECTION 2, THE PARTIES ARE BOUND BY CERTAIN AUTOMATIC ORDERS WHICH SHALL REMAIN IN FULL FORCE AND EFFECT DURING THE PENDENCY OF THE ACTION. NOTICE OF GUIDELINE MAINTENANCE You are hereby given that under the Maintenance Guidelines Law (Chapter 269, Laws of 2015), there is an obligation to award the guideline amount of maintenance on income up to $178,000 to be paid by the party with the higher income to the party with the lower income according to a formula, unless the parties agree otherwise or waive this right. Depending on the income of the parties, the obligation might fall on either the Plaintiff or the Defendant in the action. FOR FURTHER DETAILS YOU SHOULD CONTACT THE CLERK OF THE MATRIMONIAL PART, SUPREME COURT, 60 CENTRE STREET, NEW YORK, N.Y. 10007 TEL (646) 386-3010. DRL 255 Notice. Please be advised that once the judgment of divorce is signed in this action, both parties must be aware that he or she will no longer be covered by the other party's health insurance plan and that each party shall be responsible for his or her own health insurance coverage, and may be entitled to purchased health insurance on his or her own through a COBRA option, if available.

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