Page 1

The local paper for Chelsea • SPECIAL REPORT •

Healthy

MANHATTAN ◄ P.11

WEEK OF JANUARY

18-24 2018

RECOVERING STOLEN HISTORY LAW ENFORCEMENT Local prosecutors step up efforts to slow illicit antiquities trade BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

Hundreds of protesters, many of them Haitian-Americans, gathered in Times Square on Martin Luther King Jr. Day for an anti-racism rally following reports of President Donald Trump’s disparaging comments about Haiti and other countries. Photo: Michael Garofalo

‘WE’RE NOT GOING TO LET HIM HURT US’ IMMIGRATION Trump’s insults loom large over MLK Day ‘Rally Against Racism’ BY MICHAEL GAROFALO AND DOUGLAS FEIDEN

When President Donald Trump uttered the vulgarity heard ‘round the world, he enraged the 55-nation African Union and outraged scores of other states from the Caribbean and Latin America to Europe and Asia. But his reference to Haiti, El Salvador and unspecified African nations as “shithole countries” had a painful reso-

nance closer to home: roughly 7.5 percent of the city’s 3.32 million foreign-born residents hail from those lands. Hundreds of New Yorkers, natives and immigrants alike, took to the streets of Times Square on Martin Luther King Jr. Day to protest the president’s disparaging comments. A crowd filled two blocks along Broadway south of 42nd Street for the Jan. 15 “Rally Against Racism” organized in the aftermath of the president’s remarks, which he uttered during a Jan. 11 meeting on immigration policy with lawmakers and were widely reported the following day. Despite the anger and sad-

ness felt by many in attendance, the demonstration took on an almost festive atmosphere at times. A band played from the stage between speeches from politicians and activists, as protesters clad in the blue and red of the Haitian flag danced and sang along, as though to defy the spirit of Trump’s words. “We’re here to bring awareness to all the Haitians that have fought to be here to get a better opportunity for all of us,” said Haitian-American demonstrator Sarah Rene. “Trump is trying to bring us down, but we’re here. We’re here to be about something better.”

When one thinks of hotbeds of criminal activity in Manhattan, the tony stretches of the Upper East Side are not the locale that immediately comes to mind. But in recent years, the highend storefronts, venerable museums and multimilliondollar homes of the city’s Silk Stocking District have become the frontlines of a law enforcement crackdown that has prompted coordination between local, federal and international agencies, and, last month, the formation of a specialized unit within the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office. The target of these efforts? Illegal trafficking — not of humans or drugs or stolen consumer goods, but of looted antiquities. The East Side’s concentration of galleries, dealers, auction houses, museums and ultra-wealthy collectors has long made the neighborhood a nexus of the international antiquities trade, a lucrative category of ancient artwork that despite tight regulation has proven susceptible to illegal activity. In the last year, authorities conducted high-profile seizures of a number of illicit antiquities that made their way from far-flung lands to the

A 2,400-year-old marble bull’s head and other artifacts stolen from a Lebanese archaeological site were recovered by the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office and repatriated to the Lebanese government in December. Photo: Manhattan District Attorney’s Office Upper East Side, sometimes after spending decades on the black market and moving illegally across continents through international smuggling networks. Objects targeted by prosecutors have included an ancient Persian limestone relief recovered during an art fair at the Park Avenue Armory, a remnant of mosaic tile that once adorned a ship owned by the Roman emperor Caligula and was found in an antique dealer’s Park Avenue apartment, and, in early January, a number of Greek and Roman artifacts seized from the Fifth Avenue residence of hedge fund billionaire Michael Steinhardt. Looted artworks have even turned up in the city’s most prestigious cultural institu-

CHELSEA NEWSNY.COM @Chelsea_news_NY

CONTINUED ON PAGE 25

CONTINUED ON PAGE 25 Clinton

Chelsea News NY

tions. In July 2017, the Metropolitan Museum of Art surrendered a marble bull’s head dated to 360 B.C. that was on loan to the museum from Steinhardt’s personal collection. According to prosecutors, the bull’s head was excavated from the Temple of Eshmun in Sidon, Lebanon, in 1967, but was subsequently stolen in 1981 by a paramilitary group during the Lebanese Civil War. The artifact was illegally exported from Lebanon at an unknown date and eventually ended up in the hands of private collectors in Colorado who prosecutors say had scant documentation regarding the piece’s prior ownership.

Crime Watch NYC Now Voices City Arts

3 6 8 10

Restaurant Ratings 23 Business 24 15 Minutes 27

WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW < CITYARTS, P.14

WHO HAS ACCESS TO A PARKING SPACE IN CHELSEA? NEWS

9-16

MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.18

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

WHAT NEXT FOR CHELSEA GALLERIES?

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up rezoning told us she’d like to would and the mid-2000s May 1 The and running this year, for of West Chelsea. Muas an ombudsman city serve Whitney the of opening Art on small businesses within them clear seum of American means not government, helping It’s new buildings, to get Gansevoort Street c to the traffi through the bureaucracy rising rents, that are even more foot things done. forcing some gallerists area. is that Perhaps even more also The irony, of course, to reconsider their Whitney -importantly, the ombudsman the arrival of the and number neighborhood roots art meccas will tally the type small business one of the city’s the end for of complaints by taken in BY GABRIELLE ALFIERO -- could also spell dealers the actions art owners, long-time policy buildStephen some response, and somefor ways to When gallerists Griffin in the area, as their are sold or recommendations If done well, Haller and Cynthiatheir W. ings increasingly begin to fix things. report would Haller reopened follow- demolished. lease the ombudsman’s 26th Street gallery With their 10-year quantitative afrst fi the rebuild Stephen us give cut short, with ing a five-month flooded abruptly shared taste of what’s wrong ter Hurricane Sandy they and Cynthia, who the city, an the space, small businesses in towards building with their first floor phone their and Tony important first step were still without were Lehmann Maupin they the problem. needed to xing fi of galleries, and Internet. Still, where Shafrazi property by June To really make a difference, the happy in the location, will have to to stay for vacate (Shafrazi is suing course, the advocaterising rents, they expected of 2014. find a way to tackle business’ the Manhattes some time. doltold less the landlord, which remain many While Chin Instead, they were their Group, for $20 million reproblem. vexing that Post most the New York than a year later gauge what to demol- lars, said it’s too early tocould have landlord planned ported). another role the advocate on the ish the building. They shopped for planned for there, more information in the neighbor“We had shows bad thing. We had location to find problem can’t be a with the long periods of time.amount hood but struggled a twoThis step, combinedBorough more than just put in a huge the anything efforts by Manhattan to mediate of money to refurbish“We year lease on a street-level in Chelsaid. President Gale Brewer offer space,” Cynthia space. After 13 years Gallery the rent renewal process, were really shocked.”Gallery sea, Stephen Haller signs tangible and early, Haller some For Stephen small left the neighborhoodStux it, it isn’t riswith of progress. For many can’t come and others like joined forces oor are driving business owners, that in a new sixth-fl ing rents that far new devel- Gallery soon enough. on 57th Street, not Chelsea, Zach Feuer them away. It’s

NEWS

luxury building Robotic garage for board draws fire from community BY ZACH WILLIAMS

at a a robotic garage A proposal for in Chelsea has thrown luxury building into the city’s zoning access to parking debate. proposed for a A high-tech garage W. 28th St. has 520 development at Board 4, which is riled Community arguing that it plan, in opposing the more car usage would only invite while only providthe neighborhood, residents. ing parking to rich a special city perThe garage needs 29 spaces rather mit to accommodate allowed the than the 11 automatically opted to oppose by the city. CB4 1 full board meetpermit at its April Carl a draft letter to ing, stating in Planning City the of Weisbrod, chair city criteria for such Commission, that based on the parking foran exception is ago, when many for stock of a decade spaces were used demer industrial future of parking in anticipation velopment in Chelsea. 40 residential have The project will comsquare feet of alunits and 11,213 the ground floor, mercial space on three parking spaces The lowing eight and the developer, respectively. But wants more for Related Companies, is the New York acthe building, which internationally City debut for Zaha Hadid. (Adjaclaimed architect Line, the build cent to the High

CONTINUED ON PAGE

25

his gallery in After 15 years running to partner with Joel two gallery spaces, (left) leaves the neighborhood team will operate Mesler (right). TheMesler/Feuer, on the Lower East Feuer/Mesler and May 10. Slide, slated to open

Newscheck

2 3

is surging opment, which in part to in Chelsea, thanks High Line the opening of the

City Arts Top 5

12 13

space

CONTINUED ON PAGE

25

We deliver! Get Chelsea Clinton News sent directly to your mailbox for $ per year. Go to ChelseaNewsNY.com $49 or call 212-868-0190


2

JANUARY 18-24,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

MR. MAYOR: THE TIME TO THIN TRAFFIC IS NOW VIEWPOINT An open letter advocating for congestion pricing BY JOHN H. STEINBERG

Dear Mayor de Blasio: A momentous vote by state legislators on whether to impose traffic congestion pricing for Manhattan below 60th Street is expected in March. The plan, developed by highly respected traffic engineers, is the sure way to prove that “greatest city in the world” stuff is more than bluster. There literally is no rational argument against it. So I was flabbergasted to read that you of all people are the leading opponent. The Move NY Fair Plan stipulates no free rides where demand exceeds supply; everyone has to chip in. It is the only way to speed traffic by 20 percent (for bus riders too), cut pollution and calm an often chaotic street scene. It also solves your biggest headache by raising $15 billion for rebuilding the subway without raising taxes a penny. With respect, we need to cut the political bullshit and talk straight on how congestion actually hurts Upper East Siders on the ground.

Photo: B K, via flickr Upper East Siders (and Upper West Siders, too) suffer from congestion more than other folks in other neighborhoods because we are the (free) gateway to Midtown Manhattan. When the marine transfer station on East 91st and FDR Drive opens it will get worse. Take this example of a recent journey: We stewed on the M79 Select Service (“fast”) bus

through three signal changes to cross Lexington Avenue where we encountered three blocking-the-box violations, all unpunished. The bus driver scowled that he’s never seen a cop issue a summons for similar violations. Then he volunteers he was just blocked for three more signal changes at Park Avenue too! That’s spells stress for 40

riders and the driver induced by GRIDLOCK, a term used around the world, It was conceived right here in Manhattan by the beloved “Gridlock Sam” Schwartz, the internationally renowned traffic engineer. Horrified by his bastard child, he created the Move NY Fair Plan with pioneering thinkers Charles Komanoff and Alex Matthiessen.

Met Council is accepting applications for the waiting list of affordable housing rental apartments in our building located at 332 East 22nd Street, NY. For one person households, applicants must be 62 years old at the time of application; for two person households, the applicant must be 62 and the co-applicant 55 at the time of application.

Met Council is accepting applications for the waiting list of affordable housing rental apartments in our building located at 334 East 92nd Street, NY. For one person households, applicants must be 62 years old at the time of application; for two person households, the applicant must be 62 and the co-applicant 55 at the time of application.

Current Rent Range studio: $1023.81 - $1281 Income Range: $43,152.80 - $53,440 (1 person household)

Current Rent Range studio: $848.47 - $1281 Income Range: $36,138.80- $53,440 (1 person household)

Current Range 1 bedroom: $1073.17 - $1375 Income Range: $45,206.80 - $53,440 (1 person household) $45,206.80 - $61,120 (2 person household)

Current Range 1 bedroom: $962.29 - $1375 Income Range: $40,771.60 - $53,440 (1 person household) $40,771.60 - $61,120 (2 person household)

Monthly rent includes heat, hot water and gas for cooking. Seniors will be required to meet income guidelines and additional selection criteria to qualify. Income guidelines are subject to change. One application per household.

Monthly rent includes heat, hot water and gas for cooking. Seniors will be required to meet income guidelines and additional selection criteria to qualify. Income guidelines are subject to change. One application per household.

Applications may be downloaded from: www.metcouncil.org/housing or requested by mail from Met Council: East 22nd Street Residence 77 Water Street, 7th floor New York, NY 10005

Applications may be downloaded from: www.metcouncil.org/housing or requested by mail from Met Council: East 92nd Street Residence 77 Water Street, 7th floor New York, NY 10005.

Please include a self-addressed envelope. No broker or application fee.

Please include a self-addressed envelope. No broker or application fee.

Let’s face it, Mayor, you’ll never have enough traffic agents to enforce all these violations. There will always be too many vehicles, not enough lanes, stretched red lights and injured pedestrians on the lawless streets of Manhattan when access is free. Like the psychologists say, you gotta pay to get better. It’s open season on Upper East Siders afoot when drivers HONK their frustrations. Then the trucks honk fortissimo three octaves lower if they’re not running red lights to game the gridlock. The city is depriving us of a New Yorker’s most precious commodity: Time. Hardly out the door, we are assaulted by fumes, of anger and combustion. Our disgust already rising and it’s only 8 a.m. Upper East Siders pay among the highest tax rates in the country. We don’t get why for all that money the traffic is so chaotic, the subway is deteriorating, commuting is eating up more of our precious time, and the quality of life is awful. Thank God the economy’s good but when it turns nasty we might just move where taxes are lower, the commute is shorter, and folks are friendly and not always honking at us. The people who suffer most from this scourge, the bus driv-

ers in the Transport Workers Union, are strong supporters. (And they support you.) The opponents? Mostly suburban Republicans (not exactly your crowd). Progress means to move forward. Gridlocked folks don’t move at all. The solution is simply to subordinate the privileges of a few for the welfare of many, a classic progressive reform strategy. Move NY charges drivers who can most afford it (a small group) for the benefit of everyone. Better than bragging about the “world’s greatest city,” plow $15 billion into mass transit and really make our subway among the world’s best. Mr. Mayor, of your policy accomplishments to date, is there one that would make such a revolutionary transformation ... overnight? This is a huge opportunity of national significance. Upper East Siders are holding a spot for you at the head of the Move NY campaign. P.S. Upper East Siders and New Yorkers with commuting stories they would like to share with the mayor can note them at www1.nyc.gov/office-of-themayor/mayor-contact.page John Steinberg lives on East 79th Street.

More neighborhood celebrations? neighborhood opinions? neighborhood ideas? neighborhood feedback? neighborhood concerns?

Email us at news@strausnews.com


JANUARY 18-24,2018

3

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

CRIME WATCH BY JERRY DANZIG MONCLER SNARE

STATS FOR THE WEEK Reported crimes from the 10th district for

It would seem that at least two shoplifters will be staying warm and stylish this winter. At 1:51 p.m. on Friday, January 5, two men entered the Moncler store at 90 Prince St. and took ďŹ ve coats totaling just over $5,000 from racks in the front of the shop before ďŹ&#x201A;eeing the boutique. While one of the men grabbed the goods, the other remained outside the store and held the door closed to block security personnel.

Week to Date

Year to Date

2017 2016

% Change

2017

2016

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

0

0

n/a

Rape

0

0

n/a

0

0

n/a

Robbery

1

2

-50.0

1

2

-50.0

Felony Assault

1

1

0.0

1

1

0.0

Burglary

4

1

300.0

4

1

300.0

YVES THIEVE

Grand Larceny

8

13

-38.5

8

13

-38.5

Another shoplifter used her own handbag to steal two store handbags. At 10 a.m. on Friday, January 5, a woman entered the Saks Fifth Avenue store at 225 Liberty St. and stuffed two designer handbags in her own black handbag before exiting the location without paying. The items stolen were a charcoal Yves Saint Laurent handbag valued at $1,650, and a pink-and-white Yves Saint Laurent handbag valued at $1,690.

Grand Larceny Auto

0

0

n/a

0

0

n/a

Photo by Tony Webster, via Flickr

CELL KNELL Police arrested a shoplifter who targeted a Target store. At 8:38 p.m. on Saturday, January 6, a man entered the Target location at 255 Greenwich St., removed items of merchandise from a shelf, concealed them in shopping bags, and walked past the registers

toward the storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exit without paying, according to the police account. The man, Rahmond Brown, 28, was arrested shortly afterward on grand larceny charges. He had bagged 9 cell phone screen protectors valued at $450, a Fitbit watch worth $100, and 14 cell phone cases amounting to $1,095.

BACKPACK PICKED

PANTY PLENTY

A pickpocket made a Canadianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visit to the Big Apple even more expensive. At 9 a.m. on Friday, January 5, a 38-year-old man from Tyers, Canada, was taking in the sights downtown, riding the subway, visiting a Dr. Martens shoe store, and visiting the Oculus before he reentered the Trade Center hub, where he discovered that his backpack was open and property missing. He was missing a drone and headphones. The traveler was said to have insurance.

A thief went overboard stealing undergarments. At 1:20 p.m. on Friday, January 5, a man entered the Victoriaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Secret store at 591 Broadway and lifted 72 pairs of panties, valued at a total of $1,188, from a display rack before leaving the location without paying.

www.hunter.cuny.edu/ceprograms

Better YOURSELF. Better Your COMMUNITY. 2 Explore Your Personal And Professional Interests At Continuing Education 2 Perfect And Polish The English Language At The International English Language Institute 2 Learn The Italian Language And Culture At Parliamo Italiano 2 Study On Your Own Time At Cep Online

Enhance Your Skills and Expand Your Possibilities @ CEP at Hunter College. Register TODAY. Follow Our Institutes:

68th Street & Lexington Avenue, East Building, Room E1022 212-650-3850 or 212-772-4292

CU

HUNTER IS N Y

%FBS1BSFOUT :PVBSFDPSEJBMMZJOWJUFEUPBUUFOEPOFPGPVS01&/)064&4 BU:PSL1SFQBSBUPSZ4DIPPM t5VFTEBZ +BOVBSZSE t5VFTEBZ "QSJMUI t5VFTEBZ .BZTU t5VFTEBZ .BZUI

".ČŞ". ".ČŞ". 1.ČŞ1. ".ČŞ".

3471CZSFHJTUFSJOHPOMJOFBUZPSLQSFQPSH "OZGVSUIFSRVFTUJPOT FNBJM,FMTJFJO"ENJTTJPOTBULQBUSJDL!ZPSLQSFQPSH York Prep is a coeducation college preparatory school for grades 6-12


4

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

JANUARY 18-24,2018

Scene in New York

Useful Contacts

PHOTO BY HOWARD CHUA-EOAN

POLICE Howard Chua-Eoan likes to take pictures of food and reflections in puddles. You can follow him on Instagram @hchuaeoan. NYPD 10th Precinct

230 West 20th St.

212-741-8211

150 West 19th St.

311

FIRE FDNY Engine 3/Ladder 12

ELECTED OFFICIALS Councilmember Corey Johnson

224 W. 30th St.

212-564-7757

State Senator Brad Hoylman

322 Eighth Ave. #1700

212-633-8052

Assembly Member Richard Gottfried

242 W. 27th St.

212-807-7900

COMMUNITY BOARD 4

330 W. 42nd St.

212-736-4536

Muhlenberg

209 W. 23rd St.

212-924-1585

Columbus

742 10th Ave.

212-586-5098

Mt. Sinai – Roosevelt

1000 10th Ave.

212-523-4000

New York-Presbyterian

170 William St.

212-312-5110

CON EDISON

4 Irving Place

212-460-4600

TIME WARNER CABLE

605 Sixth Ave.

347-220-8541

Old Chelsea Station

217 W. 18th St.

212-675-0548

US Post Office

421 Eighth Ave.

212-330-3296

US Post Office

76 Ninth Ave.

212-645-0351

LIBRARIES

HOSPITALS

POST OFFICES

HOW TO REACH US:

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:

212-868-0190 nyoffice@strausnews.com chelseanewsny.com

Include your full name, address and day and evening telephone numbers for verification. Letters that cannot be verified will not be published. We reserve the right to edit or condense letters for libel, good taste, grammar and punctuation. Submit your letter at chelseanewsny.com and click submit at the bottom of the page or email it to nyoffice@strausnews.com.

TO SUBSCRIBE: Chelsea News is available for free in Chelsea in select buildings, retail locations and news boxes. To get a copy of Chelsea neighborhood news mailed to you weekly, you may subscribe to the Chelsea Clinton News for just $49 per year. Call 212-868-0190 or go online to StrausNews.com and click on the photo of the paper, or mail a check to Straus Media, 20 West Ave., Chester, NY 10918

BLOG COMMENTS: We invite your comments on stories and issues at chelseanewsny.com. We do not edit those comments. We urge people to keep the discussion civil and the tone reflective of the best we each have to offer.

PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: NEWS ITEMS: To report a news story, call 212-8680190. News releases of general interest must be emailed to our offices by noon the Thursday prior to publication to be considered for the following week. Send to news@strausnews.com.

Call 212-868-0190. Classified ads must be in our office by 12pm the Friday before publication, except on holidays. All classified ads are payable in advance.

PREVIOUS OWNERS: Tom Allon, Isis Ventures, Ed Kayatt, Russ Smith, Bob Trentlyon, Jerry Finkelstein

CALENDAR ITEMS:

ABOUT US:

Information for inclusion in the Out and About section should be emailed to hoodhappenings@strausnews.com no later than two weeks before the event.

Chelsea News is published weekly by Straus Media-Manhattan, LLC. Please send inquiries to 20 West Ave., Chester, NY 10918.

In Central Park, reflection in a puddle on a path between Sheep Meadow and the skating rink, just south of the 65th Street transverse.


JANUARY 18-24,2018

5

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

Hey Chelsea, there’s a new way to bank in your neighborhood.

Visit us at 111 West 26th Street, between 6th and 7th Avenues. Everyone can bank at Bethpage.∞ 855-248-0050 | lovebethpage.com

*APY = Annual Percentage Yield. Rates current as of 1/18/2018 and are subject to change, including after account opening without notice. The Money Market account is a variable rate tiered account with minimum balances required to earn the corresponding APY for each tier: Tier 1 - $500, Tier 2 - $25,000, Tier 3 – 50,000. The current APY is 1.25% for all three tiers. Balances less than $500 will earn the dividend savings account rate, currently 0.20% APY. Tier bands are based on the daily ending balance. Dividends are compounded and credited monthly. Fees could reduce earnings. APY assumes dividends remain in the account. Activity restrictions apply. ∞

$5.00 minimum share account required.

From MONEY® Magazine, November 2017 © 2017 Time Inc. Used under license. MONEY® and Time Inc. are not affiliated with, and do not endorse products or services of, Bethpage Federal Credit Union.

FEDERALLY INSURED BY NCUA


6

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

Tired of Hunting for Chelsea News? Subscribe today to Clinton News of Your Neighborhood that you can’t get anywhere else

Dining Information, plus crime news, real estate prices - all about your part of town

JANUARY 18-24,2018

Discover the world around the corner. Find community events, gallery openings, book launches and much more: Go to nycnow.com

EDITOR’S PICK

Thu 19 THAT WHICH IS FUNDAMENTAL The Kitchen, 512 West 19th St. 212-255-5793 thekitchen.org Julius Eastman’s hybrid compositions — he could fuse contemporary and classical genres in compositions for any number of instruments, including voice — received some renown, and notoriety, during his lifetime. Nearly three decades after his death, The Kitchen is hosting a “largescale and interdisciplinary project” that surveys Eastman’s life, work and influence through Feb. 10. On the 19th, the project’s opening night, Jeremy Toussaint-Baptiste and LaMont Hamilton co-present what they have subtitled “A Five-Part Performance for Julius Eastman.”

Cultural Events in and around where you live (not Brooklyn, not Westchester)

Now get your personal copy delivered by US Mail for just

$

49/Year for 52 issues

To Subscribe : Call 212-868-0190 or go online to chelseanewsny.com and click on subscribe

Photo by gigi_nyc, via Flickr

Thu 18 Fri 19

Sat 20

VERNISSAGE, OUTSIDER ART FAIR

▲ FROM FREIGHT TO FLOWERS

Metropolitan Pavilion 125 West 18th St. 6-9 p.m. $50 A private viewing of selftaught art, art brut and outsider art before the event opens to the public. On exhibit at the fair, in its 26th edition, will be works from 63 galleries, representing 35 cities from 7 countries. Among those will be 10 firsttime exhibitors. www.outsiderartfair.com

FEATHERED FLAGS: A LECTURE BY PAUL CHAAT SMITH

Whitney Museum 99 Gansevoort St. 6:30 p.m. $10; $8 members, students and seniors Smith, a Comanche author and an associate curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, will discuss the permeating imagery that is a “constant and powerful reminder” of the country’s links to a legacy of large-scale and brutal displacement. 212-570-3600 whitney.org/Events

Gansevoort Street entrance, on the High Line at Gansevoort Street. Noon. Free Tour the High Line in winter and get the story behind New York City’s park in the sky. The 45-minute-long tour is led by High Line Docents, knowledgeable volunteer guides who offer an insider’s perspective on the park’s history, design and landscape. Check @highlinenyc on Twitter for updates. 212-500-6035


JANUARY 18-24,2018

7

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

THE PERFECT TURKEY SANDWICH Sun 21 Mon 22 Tue 23 ▲ THE KLEZMATICS

▼ CHARLIE MARS

The Town Hall 123 West 43rd St. 8 p.m. $47-$67 Since their emergence more than 25 years ago, the Grammywinning Klezmatics have raised the bar for Eastern European Jewish and helped to change the face of contemporary Yiddish culture. Often called a Jewish roots band, the Klezmatics have led a popular revival of this ages-old, nearly forgotten art form. thetownhall.org

City Vineyard Pier 26, 233 West St. 4:15 p.m. $25 day of show Be among the few dozen at this close-up performance with Mars, a Mississippi-born and –bred singer-songwriter and guitarist who has built a following opening for the likes of REM, Citizen Cope and Steve Earle. 646-677-8350 www.cityvineyardnyc.com

ALL OF JEWISH HISTORY IN LESS THAN AN HOUR Center for Jewish History 15 West 16th St. 6:30 p.m. $15; $10 CJH/ partner members, seniors, students Love history but short on time? Join CJH president and professor David N. Myers for a fast and fascinating discussion. Author of “Jewish History: A Very Short Introduction,” Myers covers 5778 years in a very short program. Book signing and reception to follow. Book included in price of admission. 212-294-8301 www.cjh.org

Wed 24 HOW BAD IS IT? THE TAX BILL AND NEW YORK CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, 219 West 40th St. 8 a.m.-noon. Free Two panels of experts will assess the federal tax overhaul’s impact on New York and how it could upend the relationship between the federal government and the states. Space is limited. RSVP to lcolacurcio@cbcny.org 646-758-7700 events.cuny.edu Photo by Chawkprodco, via Wikimedia Commons

Keith Cohen, the culinary mastermind behind Orwashers, is bringing his personal touch back to the Art of Food again this year, where he and 30 other top chefs will each be serving up a unique dish based on a piece of artwork. His pairing last year was incredible-both in terms of taste and relation to the artwork. He was assigned Karen Kilimnik’s oil painting “Rich and Poor, Skid Row, the Messenger Boy by Childe Hassam.” As Art of Food ticketholders examined the artwork, they also got to taste Cohen’s unique rendering of the piece: a sourdough bagel (representing the poor) with cream cheese (rich in flavor) and lox (rich in price). He then added additional garnishes to the dish to pull more color from the painting. We still have a few weeks until this year’s Art of Food on February 10. To see and taste the masterpieces, visit www.artoffoodny. com to purchase tickets.

Our Town’s

ART OF FOOD at

Presented by

To hold us over until then, Keith is sharing the recipe for one of Orwashers most popular sandwiches.

ORWASHERS TURKEY SANDWICH: 1. Start with an Orwashers Baguette 2. Cut the baguette open and schmear the inside with dill mayo 3. Add 6 slices of freshly cut organic turkey breast 4. Top with 3 slices of white cheddar cheese, 4 slices of cucumber, one quarter of an avocado and a small handful of alfalfa sprouts


8

JANUARY 18-24,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

Voices

Write to us: To share your thoughts and comments go to chelseanewsNY.com and click on submit a letter to the editor.

AT LAST, A COMMUNITY’S SUCCESS STORY BY BETTE DEWING

Community service is one way to honor Martin Luther King Jr. But we believe Dr. King would now say “Now it’s the communities that must be saved — save and restore the small businesses which meet everyday needs — the neighborhood places so crucial to mental and physical health, those that bring people together and enable community!” And while King would rejoice that Coogan’s, the popular Washington Heights bar and restaurant, has been saved, he’d also be rueful how only its unique history and the outpouring of support kept it from closing.

But this longtime “Save Small Biz” crusader only wishes Coogan’s had been saved a week later, so this, what was a “Coogan’s Closing” column, didn’t have to be rewritten. Still, heaven and others know, this paper and this columnist have tried since the mid 1970’s to get a real “Save Small Biz Movement” going, but with little success. Zoning laws still don’t protect avenue low-rises that house small business. Long overdue is a commercial rent-control law. Coogan’s was saved because an incredible rent hike demand was modified, after, we suspect, the restaurant’s landlord, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospi-

tal, was a little embarrassed by the explosion of protest, including by some local politicians — something, by the way, too often lacking when small businesses in their own backyards are threatened. Of course, Coogan’s history also drew outrage over its announced closure because it was one of the few businesses to open in the neighborhood during a period, the mid 1980s, when Washington Heights had a high-crime rate. The owners knew they somehow had to make their restaurant at 169th and Broadway a hub, where residents, as well as politicos and civic leaders of all backgrounds including law enforcement,

could gather to then work to make the area livable — safe and just. “Where others saw a broken neighborhood and city,” wrote Jim Dwyer in his New York Times column lamenting the restaurant’s then-imminent closure, “they built a sprawling homey space that erased ethnic, class, racial and religious boundaries, fully embracing and embodying the promise of New York.” And while, now, of course, it’s a warm friendly place to break bread, often for those alone, it also hosts a weekly comedy club and so importantly, a monthly Memory Cafe for those with memory loss. Imagine. Ah, respite is so provided by these homey restaurants in general, and we cant afford to lose anymore — not one! Not only did Coogan’s announced

closure spark a media coverage explosion and petitions, but also a protest march headed by Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer and Congressman Adriano Espaillat. Of course, it appropriately coincided with Martin Luther King Jr. Day. And as King was a preacher, I dare to say, “here’s praying” as well as marching, that not only Coogan’s will remain saved, but that an allout movement to save and restore all community-serving small business lifelines gets under way. Ah, and I know you will help, like contacting the pols — often! And shop local, shop brick and mortar to also counteract “the cardboard box tsunami.” Etcetera! Etcetera! Infinitely, much is at stake. dewingbetter@aol.com

MICHAEL WOLFF IS SMIRKING ALL THE WAY TO THE BANK BY JON FRIEDMAN

Since the incendiary book “Fire and Fury” came out early this year, its author Michael Wolff became the world’s newest “It” journalist, celebrated for his uncanny ability to lift the veil on President Donald Trump’s often chaotic White House. As a fellow longtime media-industry journalist who has known Wolff for more than a decade, I have a theory about why he was able to capture Trump in such a revealing way — and how Wolff topped the vaunted hardworking White House press corps. Wolff understands Trump so well because he is so much like him. They are both creatures of Manhattan, not the Beltway. Making money is a prime motivation, if not the end-all and beall, for both of them. They want desperately to make it in New York, to confirm their self-worth. But despite the litany of their considerable successes, neither one has ever been fully embraced in this town. Many of Trump’s fellow billionaires here regard him as being boorish, to put it mildly — remember how former New York Mayor and business leader Michael Bloomberg excoriated Trump at the 2016 Democratic National Convention. Likewise, the Manhattan

Photo: Shakespeare and Co. journalism intellegentsia has always distanced itself from Wolff. They see Wolff as an entertaining fellow, an opportunist who will say just about anything to attract attention to himself. Trump and Wolff act like people who believe there is no such thing as bad publicity, as long as people will remember to spell their names right. Regardless of your political beliefs, you may shake your head in grudging admiration for Trump’s improbable

2016 presidential victory. You may smile in wonderment that Michael Wolff, a diehard Manhattanite, wrote the most successful book about White House intrigue since “All the President’s Men,” which was published more than 40 years ago. And Wolff didn’t have to change cabs three times or hang out in a garage to get his information. In a #MeToo world, Trump’s personal hashtag might as well say #MeFirst.

During the presidential campaign, he appealed to a base that cheered on his rhetoric. What does Trump’s success suggest? And what does Wolff’s success suggest? I suspect that my journalism students will quiz me about whether Wolff is a great journalist. (He isn’t, but he sure is a terrific stylist and packager of information,) Trump has been accused of playing with facts on so many occasions. Wolff has also had to withstand numerous brushfires of criticism over his book’s veracity. Did the scenes that Wolff depicted actually happen — and did they happen as he wrote them? Did Wolff exploit the confidences of the president and Trump’s exiled chief advisor Steve Bannon? Bannon has since been dumped by Breitbart, the right-wing news organization that he headed and made famous. Now Bannon, instead of blowing up establishment politics, will go down in history as the first casualty of “Fire and Fury.” If you’ve watched Wolff alternately defend his reputation and hurl bombs back at the president, you’ve no doubt observed his most expressive and endearing quality: his world-class smirk. If I know Wolff — and I think I do — he is absolutely, positively loving every second of the media circus and

all-round foofaraw. He loves being the center of attention. He loves his new status as the breathless media’s Trump Whisperer. I met Wolff over a decade ago when he was The Big Kahuna on the media industry beat, from high above the fray at his perch at New York magazine. If memory serves, Wolff and I had lunch at his once-familiar hangout, Michael’s, the journalist’s paradise on West 55th Street. Wolff was such a regular, you’d have thought that the joint was named for him, not the founder. Since Michael has become a sensation, I’ve watched in wonder. There is so much I’d want to ask him. Is he amazed and amused, too, at this success? Will we see a “Son of Fire and Fury”? What’s he going to do with all of that money? Is he having as much fun as I expect that he is? On the evening of Jan. 10, I sent Michael a message on Facebook — we are friends — and stressed I was on deadline, in case he wanted to say anything for this piece. But he didn’t get back to me. Jon Friedman, who teaches journalism at universities in the New York area, wrote Jon Friedman’s Media Web column for MarketWatch.com from 1999 to 2013.

President & Publisher, Jeanne Straus nyoffice@strausnews.com

STRAUS MEDIA your neighborhood news source nyoffice@strausnews.com 212-868-0190

Vice President/CFO Otilia Bertolotti Vice President/CRO Vincent A. Gardino advertising@strausnews.com

Associate Publishers Seth L. Miller, Ceil Ainsworth Regional Sales Manager Tania Cade

Account Executives Fred Almonte, David Dallon Director of Partnership Development Barry Lewis

Editor-In-Chief, Alexis Gelber Deputy Editor Richard Khavkine

Senior Reporter Doug Feiden

Director of Digital Pete Pinto

Staff Reporter Michael Garofalo

Director, Arts & Entertainment/ NYCNow Alizah Salario


JANUARY 18-24,2018

9

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

AN A CAPPELLA LOVE LETTER TO NYC MUSIC The King’s Singers from England will celebrate their 50th anniversary with a concert at the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola BY MARC B. BOUCAI

The King’s Singers mid-song, getting ready for their 50th anniversary tour. Photo: Marco Borggreve In the middle of a worldwide tour celebrating their 50th anniversary, The King’s Singers, England’s original a cappella superstars, will arrive on the UES on Sunday, February, 21st for a very special one-timeonly concert at the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola. Part of the church’s “Sacred Music in a Sacred Space” series, the King’s Singers will perform a program that reflects the group’s Christian roots and how these sacred values manifest today. The concert will honor St. Ignatius Church and is a also a love letter to the city of New York. Established in 1968 by a group of six graduates from King’s College Cambridge, the King’s Singers gained attention not only for the clarity of their sound and the complexity of their vocal arrangements, but also for the diversity of their repertoire. The Singers record and arrange everything from religious music from the Middle Ages to Renaissance-era madrigals to contemporary classical and pop music. This diversity of material has kept the group relevant for five decades. Though not always credited, the consistent popularity of the King’s Singers was one of the factors that kept a cappella so popular across American college campuses and helped give birth to the current a cappella boom. From “Glee” to the Pentatonix to the nearly $100 million gross of

“Pitch Perfect 3,” a cappella is truly having a moment in popular culture. One could even think of the King’s Singers as the original boy-band, pairing dashing good looks with perfect harmonies and a deep sense of musical history. Our Town got the chance to chat about the ensemble with the King’s Singers only bass, Johnny Howard. In 2009, Howard was a recent graduate of New College at Oxford with a degree in classics, living in London and working in advertising when he was approached by his predecessor in the group to audition. Since then, Howard says, his life has gone in unexpected directions, bringing him to New York over a dozen times, and allowing him to learn a ton of music, both sacred and secular. Epitomizing this bridging of the modern with the classical, of England with America, is “To Stand in This House,” an original piece commissioned for the King’s Singers by the New York-based contemporary classical composer Nico Muhly, whose opera “Two Boys” premiered at the Met Opera in 2013. The new piece fuses classical texts from medieval England with contemporary texts about modern life by famous alumni of King’s College, including Salman Rushdie and Zadie Smith. Howard even quoted Smith, from her essay

“On Optimism and Despair,” describing the overarching question of the concert as, “how do we as a society strive to be better and make the world a better place?” Howard calls Muhly’s piece “a marriage of optimism from the past and reality in the present” and says that it “marries our sacred beginnings and our reality of the present.” When asked about working with a living composer on an original work, Howard said that the Singers were interested in knowing how they could help a composer to bring his ideas to life. Howard’s journeys around the world have shown him that people of any country or culture want to sing together without accompaniment, because they “love singing regardless of religion — irrespective of personal faith.” Despite a touring schedule that brings them to all parts of the globe, Howard says NYC holds a special place in the group’s hearts. This will be reflected in their concert at St. Ignatius Loyola, where the Singers will highlight New York’s composers, including works by Michael Richie Benner, Howard Arlen and Paul Simon, among others. Howard ended our chat with a shoutout to New York audiences for being people who “really think and engage and say what they feel” and who “want to be challenged.”

Come meet me and my friends !

Petco

Photo By Ellen Dunn

A D O P T A P E T T O D AY !

2 5 D a v i s Av e . , P o r t Wa s h i n g t o n , N Y 1 1 0 5 0 FOLLOW US ON:

ART OF FOOD at

Presented by

YUZU LECHE D’TIGRE SAUCE:

DIRECTIONS:

5 oz of Yuzu juice pinch of salt 1 oz soy sauce 1 oz yuzu kosho 1 oz sugar 1 clove of garlic 1 oz ginger

1. Make crispy sweet potato threads: julienne 1 sweet potato, coat with olive oil, and bake for approximately 25 minutes, until crispy.

4 oz salmon 2 pc shiso leaves 2 tbsp Peruvian choclo 2 tbsp Peruvian cancha 1 tbsp shio knobu 1 tsp Peruvian aji limo 1 tsp cilantro 1 oz crispy sweet potato 1 oz red onion, thinly sliced

860 Broadway @ E. 17th St.rNew York, NY SAT JAN 20 r12 PM - 5 PM SUN JAN 21 r12 PM - 5 PM

animalleague.orgr

Japanese-Peruvian restaurant Sen Sakana will be serving up one-of-a-kind dishes at this year’s Art of Food event at Sotheby’s Saturday, February 10. There, chef Mina Newman will be challenged to create a dish to pair with a piece of artwork curated by Sotheby’s. While we wait to see what Sen Sakana serves up at The Art of Food, their head chef is giving readers a challenge of their own: the recipe to Mina Newman’s Nikkei Ceviche.

CEVICHE INGREDIENTS:

MUDDY PAWS RESCUE, K9 KASTLE & NORTH SHORE ANIMAL LEAGUE AMERICA

4'5%7'r074674'r#&126r'&7%#6' RR006

CHEF MINA NEWMAN’S NIKKEI CEVICHE

2. Combine all ingredients for the leche d’tigre in a blender until becomes pureed. 3. Cut salmon into large chunks, then top with clinatro and aji limo. 4. In a mixing bowl, pour half of leche d’tigre over the salmon and allow to marinate for five minutes. 5. Lay shiso leaves on the plate. Remove salmon from the mixing bowl and place on top of leaves on plate. Place onions in the same mixing bowl and mix in remaining leche d’tigre sauce. Place seasoned onions over the top of salmon. 6. Garnish with choclo, cancha and shio konbu. Top with crispy sweet potato threads.


10

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

JANUARY 18-24,2018

A CURATOR’S DECADE OF PASSION How Carmen Bambach brought the Michelangelo exhibit to the Met BY MICHELE WILLENS

We often hear of artistic projects that take years to create: a Robert Caro biography, for example. A Broadway musical such as “Dear Evan Hansen.” But a museum exhibit taking almost a decade from conception to presentation? Nevertheless, Carmen C. Bambach has achieved what The New York Times called a “curatorial coup” with “Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer” at The Met Fifth Avenue. “It was a dream come true for me,” Bambach says. And it took eight years to come to fruition. The array of 200 works has attracted more than 450,000 visitors since it opened in mid-November. It is on view until Feb. 12. If it were not for the three-month maximum length the drawings can sustain light exposure, it could have been extended forever. The exhibit has drawn raves from experts, and awed responses from regular folks: Could that really have been done when he was 13? Why did he leave so much unfinished? Is that re-

ally a doodle? But also of interest is one woman’s ardent desire to amass the pieces from some 50 collections and institutions: a laborious scheduling and logistical process — a “mountain of practicalities” she says. Most Michelangelo works have “resting periods” after which they can’t be moved for several years. So you do the math. But Bambach was determined to give the full story of the Renaissance man who many of us know primarily from the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel and the iconic David in Florence. Although her field is Italian art, Bambach was born and lived in Chile until she was 14, when the 1973 coup d’etat that deposed President Salvador Allende drove her family to America. It was her mother who first exposed her to the world of art, and from her first exposure to Michelangelo, young Carmen was hooked. She spent 10 years at Yale collecting degrees and it was there, working on a senior thesis, that she made a discovery about one of Michelangelo’s drawings. She was convinced it had been published upside down. Some were skeptical, but two professors supported her idea, as did the director of the 10-year cleaning project of the Sistine ceiling. “We

Michelangelo Buonarroti (Italian, Caprese 1475–1564 Rome). “Archers Shooting at a Herm.” 1530–33. Drawing, red chalk; 8 5/8 x 12 11/16 in. ROYAL COLLECTION TRUST/© HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II 2017. www.royalcollection.org. uk”www.royalcollection.org.uk

Michelangelo Buonarroti (Italian, Caprese 1475–1564 Rome). “Three Labours of Hercules.” 1530–33. Drawing, red chalk; 10 11/16 x 16 5/8 in. ROYAL COLLECTION TRUST/© HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II 2017. www.royalcollection.org.uk”www. royalcollection.org.uk climbed those stairs together and he granted me a lot of access,” she recalls. The goal of this exhibit — the most extensive on the artist ever — was to take us on a journey of the man’s process, through the designs, the drawings, the letters, the poems. “I want them to feel they’ve walked in Michelangelo’s shoes,” she says, “to feel his connection of the hand, the eye and the mind. Michelangelo himself felt the actual way he drew would never be possible to reproduce.” Here she is subtly referencing artists, from Raphael to contemporary ones, who employ others to multiply the original works. “The beauty is in the artist’s hand, not the concept,” she notes. After eight years of planning, her passion paid off. Having her parents, now in their 80s, come to the opening, was immensely gratifying. What does she do for an encore? She points to an enormous stack of papers, research for the Leonardo da Vinci book she is writing for Yale University Press. Meanwhile, as she strolls the galleries, often alone, she says it feels more a religious experience than professional feat. “I am walking on sacred ground,” she says. “I only hope I have humanized a genius, a man who did not want to be misunderstood.” Michelangelo can rest in peace: at least one woman, many centuries later, totally got him.

Carmen Bambach, curator of “Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer.” Photo: Michele Willens


• SPECIAL REPORT •

Healthy

MANHATTAN CHELSEANEWSNY.COM

What’s Inside • 2018 Health Calendar • Keeping City Kids Healthy • Teens and Smoking • A Picture of Health • 9 Tweaks to Improve Nutrition • City Calorie Counts • Downward Dog for Expecting Moms • Chair Yoga for Seniors • Where to Get Your Zen On


12

JANUARY 18-24,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

The best way to guarantee a long and healthy life is to choose your parents carefully. Second best?

A HEALTH CALENDAR

12 SENSIBLE SUGGESTIONS to keep you humming month after month, right through 2018.

BY CAROL ANN RINZLER

JANUARY PICK A PERFECT DOCTOR. Okay, nobody’s perfect, but the New York State Department of Health thinks the person who oversees your health should come pretty close. To that end, DOH maintains a Physician Profile site listing the educational history, board certification, teaching responsibilities, publications, professional and community service activities, and any disciplinary actions for every doctor licensed to practice in New York. It’s at www.nydoctorprofile.com.

MARCH OPEN THE WINDOW. A Dutch study in which some volunteers went to bed with a window open and others didn’t concludes that open-window sleepers get a better night’s rest. It may be in our genes. Steven Feinsilver M.D., who runs the Center for Sleep Medicine at Lenox Hill Hospital, explains that “humans are designed to sleep in caves, so, cool, dark and quiet are all good for sleep.” Extra blankets optional.

JUNE EVALUATE BREAKFAST. Want to lose a few pounds before swimsuit season? How you start the day matters. For some, eating breakfast holds hunger at bay and can prevent random snacking later on. For others, a Cornell University study shows that passing on breakfast didn’t mean overeating later. In fact, a careful calorie count showed that the non-breakfast-ers consumed about 400 fewer a day than did the breakfast crowd. Conclusion? Every single body is different. Solution? Try it both ways and see what works for you.

APRIL CLEAN THE HOUSE. When Michael LaMonte, a research associate professor of epidemiology and environmental health at the University at Buffalo, surveyed more than 6,000 American women, ages 63 to 99, he found that “doing something is better than doing nothing.” In short, women doing 30 minutes of light physical activity a day, including such mundane tasks as folding clothes, sweeping or washing windows, had a 12 percent lower risk of death than inactive women. Feel free to assume the benefits apply to younger women and men, too.

FEBRUARY APPRECIATE AN ANIMAL. It’s Valentine’s Day and, alas! you’re alone this year: No cards, no candy, no romantic tryst. What to do? Consider adopting a dog. Scientists at Uppsala University (Sweden) report that singles who own a pup are 33 percent less likely than dog-less ones to die from cardiovascular complications. No surprise, says Yaron Schmid DVM, Director of Shelter Medicine at the Humane Society of New York. “Petting an animal lowers blood pressure and reduces production of stress related hormones while raising the level of relaxing ones.” (Yes, listening to a cat purr is also restorative and sitting in front of a fish tank can be conducive to pure bliss.)

MAY ENJOY YOUR JAVA. Coffee can make your heart beat faster; it may also help it beat longer. A 2017 British review of more than 200 previous studies confirms that moderate coffee consumption reduces the risk of heart disease, diabetes, gallstones, gout, cirrhosis of the liver, some forms of cancer and premature death from all causes. Robin Poole, Southhampton University (England) Specialty Registrar in Public Health, says the most protective “dose” appears to be three to four cups a day, adding that’s an observation, not a prescription, More does not increase the benefits. Caution: If even a half cup of coffee makes you jumpy, this study is not your cup of tea.

JULY BRUSH AND FLOSS. Never mind that piece of spinach stuck in your front teeth. Worry instead about resident oral bacteria. Tracking 122,000 Americans for 10 years, researchers at NYU Langone and Northwell Health identified some bugs whose presence may be linked to a more than 20 percent increases in your risk of an esophageal tumor. Cause and effect remains to be proven, but brushing and flossing to reduce the bacterial build-up in plaque may be beneficial — as long as you don’t go at it so enthusiastically that you make your gums bleed. Which is another story.


JANUARY 18-24,2018

13

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

AUGUST FOCUS ON FACTS.

NOVEMBER MODERATE YOUR

Enjoy light summer reading at the beach, perhaps a novel in which a super hero scientist saves all mankind from an horrific new disease snaking across the planet. But remember: Not even Wonder Woman M.D. can save you from a website offering magic medical advice. For reliable info, stick with the online experts at Medscape, Science Daily, The U.S. National Library of Medicine and WebMD.

WINE GLASS.

SEPTEMBER EXERCISE YOUR BRAIN. A University of Geneva analysis of the impact of action video games on your human brain says that players stay smarter longer. Leigh Charvet, Ph.D., director of MS research at the NYU Langone Multiple Sclerosis Comprehensive Care Center, agrees: “Games that adjust in real time to engage the user with increasingly challenging tasks build and expand basic skills like attention and information processing that then generalize to improved ability in other areas like memory.” While we need more research to show exactly what games should be played and for how long, she says, as with any learning process, consistent playing over time is more effective than binging.

Photo: Steven Strasser

OCTOBER TAKE A HIKE. Thanks to the Commissioners’ Plan of 1811, Manhattan is a walker’s paradise. Their 200-year old grid — 20 North/ South blocks or five East/West to a mile — makes it a cinch to count off steps as you go briskly by for the two hours twice a week reputed to lower your risk of heart disease and diabetes, keep you slim and trim, and even lift your spirits. “There are few exercises that offer so many benefits with only minimal stress to the ligaments and weight bearing joints,” says Metro Sports Physical Therapy’s Paul Kelly MSPT. “Add in some post-walk stretching and you have a good, well rounded workout.”

Surprised by the intoxicating effect of a single cabernet or chardonnay? Check the glass. Comparing 411 old and new wine glasses, English scientists saw a seven-fold increase in capacity from 66 ml (2.3 ounces) in 1700 to 449 ml (15 ounces) today. On this side of the Atlantic, the glasses may be even bigger. The National Institutes of Health says a “standard” wine serving is five ounces, but at your local Bed Bath & Beyond you can skip right past Riedel’s sensible eightounce stems to the Wine Enthusiast’s ginormous 22ounce goblet. Or not.

DECEMBER GIVE THE GIFT OF LIFE. As the year ends, celebrate your own good health by helping others. Donate blood at the New York Blood Center (310 East 67th Street) or your local hospital. Then register as an organ donor so that once you pass into The Great Beyond the body parts you no longer need may give as many as eight others a second chance at life. The online form at https://donatelife.ny.gov/register/ lets you choose which organs you wish to donate and how your wish them to be used: Transplants and research, transplants only, research only. Happy Holidays. Carol Ann Rinzler is the author of more than 20 books on health, including “Nutrition for Dummies.”

Do you or someone you love have diabetes? Join us for a FREE seminar next month

Mini-Med School for Women

The Link Between Diabetes & Your Heart

Learn how to lower your risk for heart disease and live a healthy life.

Register at crf.org/whhi or call 646-434-4608.

February 7, 2018 5:30 PM-7:00 PM Pryor Cashman 7 Times Square • New York, NY 10036

Brought to you by


14

JANUARY 18-24,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

KEEPING CITY KIDS HEALTHY AND HAPPY A pediatrician on what Manhattan parents need to know about childhood asthma, cyberbullying and the “Three B’s”

What are a few things parents can do to promote good health in their children?

BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

Dr. Alok Patel, a pediatrician with NewYork-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital and Columbia University Irving Medical Center, spoke with Straus News about what Manhattan parents can do to foster healthy habits in their kids. The conversation that follows has been edited and condensed.

What is a health topic that is particularly important to keep in mind for Manhattan parents? Asthma has been on my mind lately. Thousands of New York children with asthma will have asthma attacks, visit ERs or get hospitalized, and this is all preventable. Asthmatic children are at risk here because it’s a crowded city and there are a lot of triggers. Parents need to be on top of their children’s medications, doctor visits, and have emergency plans ready. Also, it’s especially important to take note of your child’s triggers and to keep living areas clean. Cleaning up dust, pet dander, carpets and avoiding smoke — these small steps can all prevent an asthma attack.

Dr. Alok Patel, pediatrician, NewYork-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital and Columbia University Irving Medical Center. Photo courtesy of Dr. Patel

How do you address parents who are concerned about vaccinating their children? I get a lot of vaccine questions from parents in New York City from all cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. I generally avoid the term “anti-vaccine” and instead use “vaccine-hesitant.” While we do have a small portion of people who are truly anti-vaccine, because they come to us and say “absolutely not,” many are simply vaccine-hesitant, meaning they want to do what’s best for the child but they really want to have a dialogue. They’ve heard rumors on the internet and

they come in questioning vaccines. They raise questions about vaccines’ ingredients, safety and efficacy. Pediatricians know that vaccines save lives but we can’t fault a parent that’s been scared by an article and has a question or two. One of the most important things to get out is that it’s OK to have an open conversation with parents that are vaccine-hesitant. It’s not OK to label them or avoid the conversation. The minute we break down that providerpatient communication, we’re leaving people to their own information source. With vaccinations, we want to be that source. We want to be the ones that are getting the vaccine-hesitant parents, sitting them down, and saying, “What is your concern? Let me tell you what I know. Let’s do this together.” Because at the end of the day we’re all in it for the same reason, and that’s the child’s health.

We are still seeing an increase in overweight teens and adolescents and childhood obesity, and we don’t seem to be doing the best that we can to get on top of this issue. Right now, about one in three American kids or teens are overweight or obese. Eating healthy and getting kids more active is key. Doctors recommend that all kids get at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise a day. When I say that to an adult it sounds like a tough workout plan, but if you think about being a child it could be playing in a park, playing a sport or riding a bike with parents. Parents have to set a good example and create an environment in which your kid is excited to go out and play with you. Another topic that we have to bring up is sleep. Over the last decade, more and more scientific studies are proving the importance of sleep. Not getting enough sleep is more detrimental to childhood development than previously thought, and an alarming number of American teens — studies state as much as 90 percent — don’t get the recommended nine hours per night. There are a lot of culprits for this. An important thing to do would be to first, look at how much sleep your own children get. If they’re not getting enough sleep, take a step back and ask what the reason is. Are we keeping them up too late with schoolwork? Are they overloaded on activities? Are they using their smartphone in bed? Knowing your teen’s bedtime patterns, or “sleep hygiene,” is crucial when it comes to helping them get quality sleep. For young kids, keep it simple: brush, book, bed. The three B’s. Brush your teeth, read a book and then get to bed. Make sleep time a little more systematic, at the same time every day. Remember to be a positive role model for young ones — good habits start early!

Do you have any recommendations for helping kids deal with bullying? One large issue that we have is cyberbullying, which we see on such a large basis that it’s almost unavoidable, especially with some of our teenagers. The thing that’s tough about this is that, as far as I know, there’s not a great way to prevent it. So what I do is try to reiterate that cyberbullying is not a personal reflection and that these bullies

are insecure. It may be hard for a teenager to accept that, but listening to their concerns and giving them a safe place to speak can make feel empowered. It helps to remind patients to focus on their strengths and to avoid acknowledging cyberbullying — to just ignore it, it’s noise on the internet! If they feel unsafe from the bullying — meaning they’re being assaulted at school — that’s a completely separate issue that needs to be raised immediately with administrators to protect our children. Also, if a child is getting psychologically affected, we want to make sure we get them the right support.


JANUARY 18-24,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

TEENS AND SMOKING: LOOKING BEYOND THE CIGARETTE

KARPOFF AFFILIATES 4FOJPS.PWF.BOBHFSt3FBM&TUBUF#SPLFS

A Columbia University mental health researcher offers a new perspective for parents of adolescents BY ARDESHEER TALATI, PH.D.

If you are a parent whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recently discovered that your adolescent has been smoking cigarettes, chances are youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not thrilled. Will he get lung cancer? Has she been mixing with the wrong crowd? Will smoking be a gateway to something worse? But one thing you may not have thought about amid this mind-swirl is your teenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mental health. That may be something to not overlook, and hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why: we and others have shown that young smokers today are more likely to also have other mental health and substance use problems than smokers from their parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and grandparentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; generations. In fact, about 40 percent of all cigarettes consumed today are done so by individuals with an identiďŹ able mental disorder. Some key points:

While the dropping numbers of American smokers is something to be celebrated, the percentage of smokers who have a mental health issue is on the rise. Why might this be? To understand the increasing mental health problems in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s young smokers, one needs to look back at the history of smoking itself, which has changed strikingly over the last several decades. In the ďŹ rst half of the 20th century, before risks of the cigarette were widely recognized, smoking was socially acceptable â&#x20AC;&#x201D; even glamorized. Things began to change in the mid-1960s, once reports began to ďŹ rmly link smoking to lung cancer and a host of other diseases. Since then, not only did the number of smokers decrease, but the very reputation of smoking also shifted to that of being an undesirable and risky behavior. Where social cachet had once wooed new smokers, more negative forces such as vulnerability to risky behaviors or adverse peer pressure took over as the drivers of new smokers. If you need a visual illustration of this shift, just look at Hollywood: once a musthave accessory of starlets in every black-andwhite ďŹ lm, cigarettes are now largely relegated to a character in distress or one whose life needs turning around.

If you have an adolescent who has been smoking, what might this mean for you? First, try and look beyond the smoking itself to consider what else might be going on in their lives. Ask about problems or stresses they may be undergoing in school or with friends that might be contributing to their smoking. Ask how they picked up the habit, and what their ďŹ rst experiences were like. As a society, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve become increasingly punitive about smoking, and the knee-jerk response may be to clamp down. But sitting down and ingesting their view of their experience could be a ďŹ rst step to helping them. If your teen is open to the idea, suggest keeping a daily online mood chart or journal. Or keep one as an observer on their behalf. And remember, teenagers spend a large chunk of their day in school. Teacher reports can be extremely illuminating about behavior, because adolescents frequently behave differently at school than they do at home, and some problems

KARPOFF AFFILIATES JTZPVSTJOHMFTUPQGPS TFOJPSMJGFUSBOTJUJPOTBOESFBMFTUBUFCSPLFSBHF OFFET Photo: Amanjeev, via ďŹ&#x201A;ickr that are related to their smoking (learning problems or disruptive behaviors, for example) show up more prominently in classroom settings. If you think that your child might be having emotional or behavioral problems, ask for a fuller evaluation by a mental health specialist.

Anti-smoking treatments may not work as well if thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a mental disorder along for the ride. But never hesitate to be proactive. The advantage of identifying problems early is that any subsequent treatment plan can be tailored in a way that recognizes and addresses both the smoking and any associated mental health problems. For those with mental health issues, solutions that focus only on the smoking-cessation component (nicotine patches, Nicorette or Chantix) are likely to be less effective. Parents may also face a potential conundrum when the smoking appears to be serving a beneďŹ cial purpose. For teenagers with chronic anxiety or stress, for instance, the nicotine in cigarettes can actually help calm and reduce symptoms. Similarly, for those with attentional problems, smoking can aid focus. If smoking seems to help my child, one could ask, should I really be encouraging them to quit? But the answer is still a yes. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because there are other treatments available (medications, evidence-based psychotherapies) that can help with related symptoms of anxiety, depression, and inattention that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the addictive or carcinogenic properties of a cigarette.

t*GZPVPSZPVSGBNJMZNFNCFSOFFETUPSFOPWBUFUIFJSFYJTUJOH IPNFUPBMMPXUIFNUPBHFJOQMBDF PSBSFMPPLJOHUPEPXOTJ[F  XFDBOIFMQ t*GZPVXBOUUPNPWF XFDBOTFMMZPVSIPNF BTTJTUXJUI QBDLJOH PWFSTFFQSPGFTTJPOBMNPWFST BOEQSPWJEFTVQQPSUUP SFEVDFTUSFTT8FXJMMNPWFZPVPVUPGTUBUFPSCBDLUP/FX :PSL*GZPVBSFMPPLJOHGPSBOBTTJTUFEMJWJOHSFTJEFODF XFDBO IFMQ t*GZPVIBWFMPTUTPNFPOF XFXJMMPSHBOJ[FBOEBTTFTTJUFNTMFGU JOUIFIPNFBOEmOEBCVZFSGPSUIFSFTJEFODF JOPSEFSUPMFTTFO UIFIBSETIJQEVSJOHUIJTEJGmDVMUUJNF t,BSQPGG"GmMJBUFTDSFBUFEUIFTJHOBUVSFTFSWJDF Moving On /:$ UPBEESFTTUIFTFOFFET8FIFMQNBOBHFFWFSZEFUBJM  DPOOFDUJOHXJUIBUUPSOFZT FTUBUFHVBSEJBOT TPDJBMXPSLFSTBOE DBSFHJWFST:PVXJMMEFBMXJUIPOFQFSTPOGSPNTUBSUUPmOJTI

8FQSPWJEFQFBDFPGNJOEBOEFOTVSFUIBUFBDIQSPKFDU JTIBOEMFEXJUISFTQFDUBOEJOUFHSJUZ

The bottom line: If you have a teenager who is smoking, look beyond the smoke. Adolescent mental health problems arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always visible on the surface, and can be easily missed by a parent or by a clinician if not actively probed for. Smoking, on the other hand, is an external behavior, one that is easier to see (and smell too). If teenage smoking can serve as a ďŹ&#x201A;ag that helps bring attention to other behavioral and mental health problems lying under the surface, the cigarette may be serving a useful purpose after all. Talati is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology and Sackler Investigator at Columbia University Department of Psychiatry and New York State Psychiatric Institute. For more information, contact Talati at adi.talati@nyspi. columbia.edu

Compassionate Senior Move Manager & Expert Real Estate Broker Marilyn Karpoff XXX,BSQPGG"GmMJBUFTDPN]NLBSQPGG!LBSQPGGBGmMJBUFTDPN ]5IJSE"WFOVF 4UF$ /:$

15


16

JANUARY 18-24,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

A PICTURE OF HEALTH

MONTHLY

Compiled statistics from NYC Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene

ADULTS WITH HEALTH INSURANCE

BICYCLE USE

89.6% Manhattan

(AT LEAST ONCE PER MONTH IN THE LAST YEAR)

of adult residents have health insurance

87.3%

of adult Citywide residents have health insurance

SUGARY DRINKS CONSUMED 17.3% 23.7% of Manhattan residents consume 1 or more sugary drinks per day

of Citywide residents consume 1 or more sugary drinks per day

LIFE EXPECTANCY years

Downtown (CD1)

85.8 years

Upper West Side (CD7)

ADULTS REPORTING

Manhattan

Citywide

Downtown

22.7%

16.3%

16.3%

Chelsea/ Hell’s Kitchen

23.1%

25.5%

EXERCISE Manhattan

Citywide

22.7%

22.7%

New York City

81.2

UNINTENTIONAL DRUG OVERDOSE DEATHS There were 1,374 unintentional drug overdose deaths in New York City in 2016, an average of nearly 4 per day. Of those overdose deaths, 82% involved an opioid. From 2010 to 2016, the overdose death rate increased by 143%.

Chelsea/ Hell’s Kitchen

22.7%

Upper West Side: Upper East Side/Gramercy: Chelsea/Hell’s Kitchen: Downtown:

Upper West Side

22.7%

years

23%

78.6

Upper East Side/Gramercy

22.7%

Citywide:

2.3 %

2.9 %

4.2 %

6.9 %

years

OVERDOSE DEATHS IN MANHATTAN 2013: 2014: 2015: 2016:

EXPERIENCED DEPRESSION IN THE LAST TWO WEEKS 22.7%

83.1

years

United States

(IN THE PAST 30 DAYS)

Downtown

84.7

years

Chelsea/Hell’s Kitchen (CD4)

Upper East Side/Gramercy

Upper West Side

85.9

Upper East Side (CD8)

191 184 187 332

ADULTS WITH ASTHMA

3.7% of adult Citywide residents have asthma (in the past twelve months)

4.2% of adult Manhattan residents have asthma (in the past twelve months)

8.9 % Graphics: Heather Roland-Blanco and Christina Scotti


JANUARY 18-24,2018

17

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

CIGARETTE SMOKING AMONG ADULTS Downtown: 17.7 %

'RQ·W/HW+HDULQJ/RVV /HDYH<RX2XW

Citywide: 14.4 % CChelsea/Hell’s helse Kitchen: 13.6 % Manhattan: 12.9 %

+DYLQJWURXEOHIROORZLQJFRQYHUVDWLRQV" 'RSHRSOHVHHPWRPXPEOHZKHQ\RXDUHVSHDNLQJZLWKWKHP"

Upper West Side: 12.3 %

,WPD\EHWLPHWRJHW\RXUKHDULQJFKHFNHG

Uppper East Eas Side/Gramercy: 9.4 % Upper

Let us help you! Schedule your appointment during the month of January and receive: ‡)5((+($5,1*6&5((1,1*

CIGARETTE SMOKING AMONG HIGH SCHOOLERS

8SWR

2))

DSDLURISUHPLXP KHDULQJDLGV 2IIHUH[SLUHV 1/31/18

‡/,9('(021675$7,212)7+( 1(::,'(;%(<21'7(&+12/2*<

Citywide: 5.8 % Manhattan: 5.3 % Man

3$5.$9(18(

&2/80%86&,5&/(

&+(/6($0$5.(7

6&$56'$/(

1036 Park Ave. Ste. 1B (SW Corner of 86th St) New York, NY 10028

426 W. 58th St. Between 9th & 10th Ave. New York, NY 10019

314 W. 14th St. 2nd Floor (b/w 8th & 9th) New York, NY 10014

688-A White Plains Rd. Lord & Taylor Plaza Scarsdale, NY 10583

6SDFHLVOLPLWHG&DOO(888) 471-0544WRGD\WRVFKHGXOH\RXUDSSRLQWPHQW ZZZ0\+HDULQJ([SHUWFRP

MENTAL HEALTH

8% of adult New Yorkers experience depression symptoms each year. 20% of adult New Yorkers are likely to experience a mental health disorder in a given year. 41 % of adult New Yorkers with a serious mental illness said they needed treatment at some point in the last year but did not receive or

STEP OFF THE FAST TRACK AT 30TH & MADISON

delayed getting treatment.

OVERWEIGHT OR OBESE ADULTS

The New York Open Center offers holistically-based educational programs to create positive transformation in individuals and the world Health & Wellness * Spiritual Inquiry * Psychology & Personal Development * Art of Dying * Creative Expression Professional Development

Workshops | Classes | Lectures Professional Trainings Register online for all classes (except for trainings) by 2/18 and save 15% by using the code HEALTH18

33.8% 39.4% 43.8% Lower Manhattan

Chelsea/ Hell’s Kitchen

Upper East Side/Gramercy

44.5%

47.3%

57.3%

Upper West Side

Manhattan

Citywide

www.opencenter.org


18

JANUARY 18-24,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

9 EASY TWEAKS TO IMPROVE YOUR NUTRITION A Manhattan nutritionist offers her top healthy food and drink tips for the city’s busy residents

4. FIND HEALTHY TAKEOUT OPTIONS FOR DINNER. NER. Most New Yorkers don’t spend pend a lot of time in the kitchen. So instead nstead of dialing for pizza, find a few ew healthy options in your neighborhood. Good choices include: Japanese (edemame, sushi, sashimi), Turkish (kabobs, chopped salads, grilled vegetables, and moderate portion of rice, brown if possible), Chinesee (steamed protein plus vegetables with brown rice, e, sauce on the side ... boring but healthy!), and rotisserie chicken with vegetables and baked potato.

BY MARTHA MCKITTRICK

The hustle and bustle of living in NYC can take a toll on your health. We work long hours, eat on the run, are stressed to the max and live in the city that never sleeps. This can lead to poor energy levels in the short term and increased risk of chronic diseases like diabetes, obesity, heart disease and cancer in the long term. But with our hectic schedules, who has time to think about what we can do to change this? As a registered dietitian in NYC with over 20 years’ experience, I’ve listened to thousands of stories from my clients. While everyone is unique, there are commonalities in the lifestyles of many New Yorkers. I’ve put together my top 9 nutrition tips to help you improve your health in 2018. And don’t forget about adequate sleep, stress management and regular exercise!

Chicken stir-fry. Photo: U.S. Department of Agriculture, via flickr

5. BOOZE CONTROL. Whether it’s meeting friends for drinks, having beers while watching the game or unwinding with a glass of wine, alcohol is a common denominator for many New Yorkers. While alcohol in moderation may have health benefits, too much of it will interfere with your sleep, and impact your weight and overall health.

1. EAT MORE VEGETABLES. Eighty-four percent of Americans don’t meet the recommendations of four servings or two cups per day. Vegetables provide essential vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, phytonutrients and fiber to aid in weight management and gut health, and to help fight chronic diseases, including cancer, stroke and perhaps other cardiovascular diseases. Try adding more veggies to salads, sandwiches and grain bowls and snacks. Take advantage of frozen or prewashed, chopped and spiralized veggies in supermarkets.

2. FIND HEALTHY LUNCH CHOICES NEAR YOUR WORKPLACE. Lunches on the run are often loaded with calories, carbs and/or sodium. The good news is that there are numerous healthy options including salads, sandwiches, sandwich/soup combos, and bowls. Take advantage of the online nutritional content listed for many of these lunch spots and plan about 5 healthy choices near your office or home.

3. PLAN HEALTHY SNACKS.

Steamed edamame with sea salt. Photo: Lou Stejskal, via flickr

6. EAT BREAKFAST AT HOME OR PACK IT TO BRING TO WORK.

Whether you raid the vending machine at work or the kitchen at night, planning healthy snacks is key in helping you stay on track. Some of my favorite snacks include: nuts, fruit, string cheese or Babybel cheese, healthy jerky, nut butter on an apple or whole grain cracker, hummus or guacamole with veggies. Keep tempting not-so-healthy foods out of your environment as much as possible.

Most breakfast on the run choices are loaded with carbs and calories. Studies have shown that a high protein breakfast can help control cravings later in the day. Some healthy choices include: eggs, nut butter on whole grain toast, plain Greek yogurt with chia seeds and berries.

7. EAT FOR GUT HEALTH. We all have about five pounds of bacteria living in and on us. Studies have shown the types and diversity of this bacteria have a profound effect on our health — including our immune system, body weight, mental health and risk of heart disease and diabetes. Our diet plays an important role in keeping our gut bacteria in balance. Foods good for the gut include a variety of plant foods, especially leafy greens, legumes (beans, peas, lentils), whole grains, onions, chicory, garlic, leeks, bananas, fruit, soy beans, burdock root, asparagus, eggplant and green tea — as well as foods rich in probiotics including fermented vegetables, kefir and yogurt. Limit red meat and other high-fat animal products and artificial sweeteners, which may have a negative effect on the gut.

8. TRY INTERMITTENT FASTING — OR TIMERESTRICTED EATING. Research is suggesting that limiting the number of hours you eat in a day may have numerous health benefits. While there are several types of intermittent fasting, I find the easiest one to start with is to try to eat within a 12 hour window. For example, breakfast at 8 a.m. and dinner (or last snack) by 8 p.m. Once you’ve mastered that, aim to eat within a 10- or 8-hour window.

9. WRITE A WEEKLY GOAL LIST. It’s not easy to make changes in your diet or lifestyle, but it can be done. Pick 1-3 goals to work on each week. The trick will be to analyze your current work/life/eating situation and come up with a plan. We problem-solve in many other areas in our lives — why not this one!

Martha McKittrick, RD, CDE, CHWC is a registered dietitian, certified diabetes educator and certified health and wellness coach. Check out Martha’s website Martha McKittrick Nutrition as well as her nutrition blog, City Girl Bites.


JANUARY 18-24,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

CITY CALORIE COUNTS BY LIZ HARDAWAY

With the holidays long-gone, and that turkey and gravy still resting in everyone’s bellies, most people take advantage of the “new year, new me” mentality to try to shed some pounds. Some purchase expensive gym memberships that they rarely use come February, while others opt for rigorous but trendy spin classes. In New York, people find ways to exercise all around their neighborhoods (without busting the bank account). Here are a few ways New Yorkers can get their sweat on, just around the corner:

JOG AROUND THE JACQUELINE KENNEDY ONASSIS RESERVOIR IN CENTRAL PARK Breathe in that fresh air with the abundance of beautiful trees in Central Park. At just over 1.5 miles at a 2-degree slope, the average person can burn 178 calories.

BIKE ALONG THE WEST SIDE HIGHWAY FROM THE BOAT BASIN TO THE GEORGE WASHINGTON BRIDGE Take in the beautiful Hudson River! At 5.2 miles, this bike path lets the average person burn 249.6 calories.

TACKLE THE CLIMBING WALL AT CHELSEA PIERS Get the exercise of climbing a mountain with the modern luxury of air conditioning. Conquor the indoor rock walls at Chelsea Piers, where on average, a person can burn 374 calories per hour of climbing.

SWIM LAPS AT ASPHALT GREEN FOR HALF AN HOUR With a 25-yard pool at both locations (Battery Park and the Upper East Side), a person weighing between 150-180 pounds can burn 300-400 calories. The Upper East Side location even has an Olympic-sized pool if you want to channel your inner-Michael Phelps!

A place you can call home at a price you can afford. GOURMET MEALS, DAILY HOUSEKEEPING, UTILITIES, CABLE TV, SOCIAL CLUBS, LIBRARY, GAME ROOM, COMPUTER LOUNGE, & MOVIE THEATER

ALL INCLUDED IN ONE PRICE!

TAKE A HIP-HOP DANCE CLASS AT ALVIN AILEY EXTENSION DIVISION Every half hour of busting rigorous moves at the Alvin Ailey can burn up to 300 calories. Considering the classes are an hour and a half, they also include times for stretching and warming up in the beginning and cooling down at the end.

WALK BRISKLY FROM COLUMBUS CIRCLE TO COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY At 2.9 miles, you can go from shopping to studying while burning 231 calories.

WALK FROM THE APPLE STORE ON FIFTH AVE. TO THE MUSEUM OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK Get your cracked screen fixed, and then look at some art! This 2.3 mile walk will burn 183 calories. Sources: www.centralpark.com, www.playbook.chelseapiers.com, Asphalt Green, www.city-academy.com

The Value of Independence 519 West 49th Street, New York, NY 10019 (212) 586-4546 | RiverviewNYC.org

CALL TODAY TO LEARN MORE!

19


20

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

JANUARY 18-24,2018

DOWNWARD DOG FOR EXPECTING MOMS A West Village studio focuses on prenatal yoga and classes for new parents BY CARSON KESSLER

In a dimly lit room, six pregnant women folded themselves into a downward-facing dog pose. With hands and feet planted on the purple yoga mat, the women formed bridges with their bodies, hips rose upward and swollen bellies hung below. At the front of the pre-natal yoga class stood instructor Neelu Shruti, 33, a petite woman from Hyderabad, India. As her soft voice instructed the class to move into a reverse warrior pose, Shruti radiated equanimity. Shruti learned about maintaining her calm composure at an early age. A student at Rishi Valley, an alternative boarding school founded by philosopher J. Krishnamurti, Shruti recalls her exposure to yoga through a curriculum valuing “no-competition among children” and classes “among the trees.” From her small high school northeast of Bangalore, Shruti traveled to Texas to pursue a degree in architecture at the University of Texas at Austin in 2003. In 2007, she moved to New York City to work in the architecture field. Shruti continued to practice and teach yoga on the side as a prenatal

Love Child is a collective, supportive space for women on their reproductive journeys. Photo courtesy of Love Child yoga instructor, a certification which took her about 285 hours to complete. Among other titles and certifications, she is a fully trained doula, certified breast-feeding counselor and midwifery assistant. “I noticed that most of the time when you think about being pregnant, you think about sitting back and eating for two,” she explained, recounting the first prenatal yoga class she observed during her training. “But what motivated me was seeing pregnant women actually be active and sweat and how integrated that is to birth.” After realizing the disparity between prenatal yoga studios and convenient class times for women with jobs, Shruti mustered up the courage

to pursue her passion, leave her desk job, and create Love Child in the West Village in 2015. Tom O’Keefe, 32, watched his wife’s vision become a successful business. “She’s created both a physical and emotional space for people to experience birth differently,” he said. “She’s giving space, vocabulary and support so that people no longer feel ‘other’ or marginal.” A collective space, Love Child provides services for both expecting and new parents, hosting everything from the prenatal yoga classes to acupunc-

ture to new- parent circles. “I’d always think somehow, somebody, somewhere delivers your baby. We need to consider the fact that the woman is the person giving birth,” Shruti said. “She needs to be ready for that physical, emotional, and mental challenge.” Amy Konen, 40, a Love Child client, believes Shruti and her classes prepared her for the birth of her son, Dino. “I have no doubt that the work [Neelu] did at Love Child helped me stay strong and calm throughout a 34hour labor,” she said. “I knew exactly what muscles to engage for pushing because of Neelu’s guidance in class.” But it’s the friendly, open, and empowering space that continues to bring Shruti’s clients back ... often with a plus-one. “Neelu has created a wonderful community,” said Konen. “I have made friends, and so has Dino.” Mhyra Oneglia, the mother of a 16-month old, recalled a time during her pregnancy where she was shocked at how unhelpful and unsupportive her doctor was after she expressed some discomfort. “Neelu asked me questions and actually listened!” she ex-

claimed. “Neelu definitely fills a wonderful void for women that’s lacking in the medical world and helps turn what can be an overwhelming time into a time where women can feel empowered and positive.” Empowerment is exactly what Shruti hopes her clients will take away from her classes. “In the reproductive spectrum, women aren’t really being supported in their choices,” she said. “Birth is another one of those choices where a lot of women find they aren’t being supported in the choices they want, so this is another way of empowering them to do that.” As for Shruti’s own future, she remains unsure about becoming a mother. “It’s tough because I see exactly what it takes to have a kid,” she said. “There is not the support system that there should be for parents, in any way, shape, or form.” But for now, Shruti is content creating a support system for others, one downward-facing dog at a time.

CHAIR YOGA FOR SENIORS How instructor Marci Rubin stumbled into teaching older adults BY CARSON KESSLER

The newest population of yogis on the Upper West Side? 70- and 80-year olds. With the help of a chair and yoga instructor Marci Rubin, around 30 seniors stretch, bend, and twist at the West Side Y every Monday and Friday during the hour-long chair yoga sessions. Rubin, 36, stumbled into teaching chair yoga after the West Side Y needed a quick replacement instructor. “I knew nothing about it,” Rubin said of her initial hesitance about shifting from teaching alignment-based vinyasa to chair yoga. “Vinyasa requires a lot of up and down and for older people, that’s just not feasible. I had to get creative with how to adapt a yoga practice for older adults using a chair for stability.” Chair yoga is a practice that modifies yoga poses for older adults. Aside from

seated work in the chair, much of the session consists of utilizing the chair for support as students complete a sequence of side and shoulder stretches, standing twists, and resistance training with therabands. “It’s all about how I can help this population move their spines and bodies in all of the ways [they are] capable of moving,” Rubin said. “The chair is simply a tool to do that.” After noticing the high numbers of older women attending her classes, Rubin began researching osteoporosis, a bone condition that primarily affects post-menopausal women. Osteoporosis causes bones to become weak and brittle, increasing susceptibility to fracture. Rubin emphasizes spinal health in her sessions to eliminate pressures on the spine, which often increase fracture risks. “On a physical level, it’s a lot about strength and balance, combined with maintaining a healthy range of motion,” Rubin explained of her osteoporosis-tailored sessions. “But the completely natural piece that comes along

with yoga and keeps people coming back is the mindfulness. dfulness. You feel more calm, relaxed and nd clear.” In addition to o her bi-weekly group classes at the West Side Y, Rubin teaches one-on-one n-one sessions. Rubin describes these e at-home sessions as “individualized” d” and “specialized.” Each private class ss is tailored to the client to maximize e the benefits of specific yoga posturess for that individual’s condition.

“It’s fun for me to work with older people because I have to be so creative and problem-solve in my sequencing and thinking, which really lends itself to growing more in my work life,” Rubin said. For more information on Rubin and her classes, visit www.marcirubinyoga.com

Rubin wants to “help this population move their spines and bodies in all the ways [they are] capable of moving.” Photo courtesy of Marci Rubin


JANUARY 18-24,2018

21

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

WHERE TO GET YOUR ZEN ON A guide to the city’s free and inexpensive meditation centers BY LIZ RICHARDS

ACTIVITIES FOR THE FERTILE MIND

thoughtgallery.org NEW YORK CITY

For most of us, January is spent focused on new healthy eating plans and exercise regimes. But we often are so worried about healthier bodies that we forget how important it is to practice mindfulness. Meditation and working the muscle of the mind are just as fruitful and important as exercising our physical selves. Luckily, the city is full of free and inexpensive meditation centers that make it easy to focus on calming our minds. Here are a few accessible meditation centers that are good for pros and beginners alike:

Inventing the Past

MONDAY, JANUARY 22ND, 7PM The Cooper Union | 41 Cooper Sq. | 212-353-4100 | cooper.edu Tinashe Mushakavanhu, born and raised in Harare, Zimbabwe, speaks on the absences of history in his mother country, the legacy of its colonial past, and memory and erasure as they’ve been reflected in representations of Zimbabwe (free).

Bill Chats: Salman Rushdie

MONDAY, JANUARY 22ND, 7PM New York Live Arts | 219 W. 19th St. | 212-691-6500 | newyorklivearts.org Bridge the worlds between literature and dance in this conversation between choreographer Bill T. Jones and author Salman Rushdie ($10).

Just Announced | Muldoon’s Picnic with Maggie Gyllenhaal & More

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 12TH, 7:30PM Irish Arts Center | 553 W. 51st St. | 212-757-3318 | irishartscenter.org Still Mind Zendo

37 West 17th St. #6W New York, NY 10011 Still Mind Zendo is a Zen meditation center that has been around since 1994. The establishment was formed by Roshi Janet Jiryu Abels in the lineage of Zen Master Taizan Maezumi Roshi and the White Plum Asanga and offers a wide range of daily activities and programs. For beginners looking to dip their toes into guided meditation, Meetup.com hosts a group called Wake Up New York — Meditation and Mindfulness that hosts a weekly guided meditation at Still Mind Zendo on Friday nights called Arrive in the Present Moment. This is a donation-based class with a structured schedule — 20 minute seated meditation, 10 minute walking or deep relaxation meditation, 30 minute sharing circle — that helps beginners ease into traditional meditation and reflect on their thoughts. After the session, visitors are invited to stay and get to know one another. This is a social and relaxed approach to meditation.

day, invented thousands of years ago. Reinvented in 2011.” Their whole mission statement and information can be found at their website www.imeditateny.org/about-us/. I Meditate NY offers free guided mediation classes every Monday and Friday night from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. and are open to everyone.

5 East 3rd St. New York, NY 10003

Shambhala Meditation Center of New York

118 West 22nd St. New York, NY 10011

Inscape

I Meditate NY

286 Fifth Ave. New York, NY 10001 I Meditate NY identifies itself as “a movement empowering New Yorkers to do more of the things they love by recharging through meditation, a practical way to refresh every

For more information about lectures, readings and other intellectually stimulating events throughout NYC,

sign up for the weekly Thought Gallery newsletter at thoughtgallery.org.

Three Jewels Three Jewels is a great space. It’s actually a yoga studio that offers free meditation classes, which makes it a great resource for mind and body. The studio offers courses in yoga, meditation and dharma. Among their meditation programming are seven different guided meditation courses, each with a different focus. Membership is available for $50 per month. All meditation classes are included in membership, but you don’t have to be a member to join in. Three Jewels’ website suggests a $15 donation for non-members participating in guided meditation classes, and all are welcome to join.

The Shambhala Meditation Center is an inviting space near Flatiron. The monthly calendar is full of programs that include introductory meditation, stress-reduction courses, classes about meditation and sessions about daily life and beyond. Think of it as a one-stop shop for everything related to meditation. They even have a book club! The Shambhala Meditation Center functions primarily based on dues and donations from their memberships. Members support the center, but the Center does offer free and donation-based classes.

Maggie Gyllenhaal headlines the opener of the eighth season of Muldoon’s Picnic. Pulitzer Prizewinning Irish poet Paul Muldoon will host the jamboree, with live music, Irish Times columnist Fintan O’Toole, and John Vanderslice, author of The Last Days of Oscar Wilde ($40).

The local paper for Chelsea

Advertise with Chelsea News today! Call Vincent Gardino at 212-868-0190

45 West 21st St. New York, NY 10010 Inscape is the perfect place for the modern meditator. It offers cool lighting and edgy designs. Although the space is definitely modern and fun, it’s also a relaxing environment. At Inscape, each session starts with a specific intention: productivity, calm, creativity, radiance, happiness and strength. Relaxation Meditation Sessions are also available in the categories of deep sound, deep rest, and deep breath. Inscape is not free or donationbased, but their set prices are decent. Prices for a single session range from $22 to $29 depending on the length of the session — 35 to 70 minutes — and both packages and unlimited memberships are available to lessen the cost. For those looking to set an intention and receive guided meditation in a beautiful modern space, Inscape is a really nice treat.

ChelseaNewsNY.com


22

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

JANUARY 18-24,2018

Start 2018 off right! Get on track for your ďŹ ttest year yet. JOIN TODAY, get the rest of the month FREE with $0 initiation. Plus, work out six times in February, and get March FREE too!

UPPER EAST SIDE

555 E. 90th St.

212.369.8890 x2081

BATTERY PARK CITY

212 North End Ave.

212.298.2900 x2910

asphaltgreen.org /asphaltgrn

@asphaltgreen

@asphaltgreen


JANUARY 18-24,2018

23

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

MUSIC SCHOOL MIGRATES SOUTH

RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS JAN 2 - 9, 2017

EXCLUSIVE

The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml.

After 93 years in Turtle Bay, big change is afoot as institution hires a new executive director and prepares to sell its building, purchase a new space and launch an early-childhood school BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

The Turtle Bay Music School was founded in 1925 and has been offering high-quality music education to all ages, skill sets and incomes levels at its current home at 244 East 52nd Street off Second Avenue since 1935. Now, the community music school is finalizing plans to pull up stakes and move into another community: It will soon be making music and minting musicians 14 blocks to the south, Straus News has learned. TBMS has historically embraced what it calls the “transformative power of music” and its “integral role in daily life.” But rarely in its 93 years as a non-profit has the school itself faced such a dramatic transformation. Among the changes on tap, according to real estate sources, neighbors and a recruitment document posted online by the school’s executive search firm: • TBMS is in the process of selling its three-story, double townhouse, an 1865 building with a beige-stone base, redbrick top and Romanesque arches that originally housed the German-American School Society. • The school is also in the “final stages” of buying a new home near East 38th Street and First Avenue. It will then execute renovation plans “with a goal of occupying the new space by fall 2018 with limited downtime.” • Once the school’s relocation has taken place, it will launch a “music-centric preschool” for up to 64 children. The early-childhood initiative will provide a major new revenue stream for TBMS, which has a nine-person staff and $2 million-plus budget, and “create a feeder” for the school’s programs. • Meanwhile, British-born soprano and arts administrator Lorna Jane Norris, vice president of education at the South Shore Conservatory near Bos-

The longtime home of The Turtle Bay Music School at 244 East 52nd Street. The community music school plans to move later this year to a new space at 38th Street and First Avenue. Photo: Douglas Feiden ton, was tapped as executive director of TBMS on January 12th. She’ll start in mid-March, and her charge is to lead the school into the new facility, while honoring its traditional programming, which reaches more than 5,000 New Yorkers a year through classes, lessons, concerts and grassroots engagement with public schools and senior centers. The TBMS community is “deeply committed to ensuring that the transformative power of music is accessible to everyone,” Norris said in a statement. “We need it now more than ever.” Helene Blieberg, the school’s interim executive director, declined to comment on any prospective move. “The Turtle Bay Music School is a vibrant institution that is always looking for ways to best serve our community,” she said. Blieberg has been serving in an interim capacity since last October, after Julie Rulyak Steinberg, the previous executive director and self-described “head turtle,” left to take the helm of the Community Music Center in San Francisco. The details of the school’s real estate play, and the rationale for it, were spelled out in recruitment materials prepared by PBR Executive Search, the firm tasked with helping the school land a new executive director, a hunt that just concluded with the hiring of Norris. “As it approaches its 100th anniversary, TBMS finds itself at an inflection point,” PBR wrote. “Having outlived its current space, the organization is in the final stages of acquiring a brand-new home.” The new location, “in a dense residential community” near the NYU Langone medical center, “will give TBMS a vibrant on-street presence, spacious new offices, bright classrooms, a state-of-the art auditorium,

and room to launch the preschool,” the PBR posting said. “The move is a project well underway ...” A responsibility of the “ideal” executive director, PBR said, will be to help guide the sale of the current location and the purchase and timely renovation of the new space for a projected fall move-in. The status of the planned sale wasn’t immediately clear. Nor was the identity of a would-be purchaser. A closing on the 52nd Street property doesn’t appear to have taken place yet, though there is often a delay in filing real estate transfer records. And there is another uncertainty on the block: What happens to the site when TBMS moves out? The school occupies 50 feet of street frontage, its footprint is 100-feet deep, and if a developer is able to create an assemblage with two or three of the adjoining low-lying properties to the east, a residential tower stretching toward Second Avenue could possibly be constructed. “Our biggest concern is what it might do to our neighborhood,” said Sylvain Michaelis, a graphic designer who lives around the corner at 251 East 51st Street with his wife Irene, giving them a northern view of the rear of the building from his sixth-floor apartment windows. “The school was always a great anchor for the neighborhood, and that charming old building added a certain hominess and neighborliness to the area,” he said. Most of all, he will miss the sound of music. “When I open my windows in the summer, I can hear the playing of the piano and the practicing of the violin, and it adds some real ambiance to the neighborhood,” Michaelis said.

Gigi Cafe

307 7 Avenue

A

Smithfield Hall

138 W 25th St

A

Dunkin’ Donuts

391 8th Ave

A

Barilla Restaurants

108 W 32nd St

A

Playwright Tavern

27 West 35 Street

A

Harrington’s Bar & Grill

370 7 Avenue

A

Ilili Restaurant

236 5 Avenue

A

Luna

121 W 29th St

A

Hanamichi

28 W 32nd St

A

Gourmet Deli

341 7th Ave

A

BBQ Olive Chicken

25 W 32nd St

A

Cafeteria

119 7 Avenue

A

Hana Sushi

211 7 Avenue

A

Empire Cake

112 8 Avenue

A

L’arte Del Gelato

75 9th Ave

A

Just Salad

140 8th Ave

A

Yakiniku Futago

37 W 17th St

A

Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen

252 8th Ave

A

Sports Center At Chelsea Piers (Sushi Bar)

Pier 60 West Side Highway

A

One 7 Karaoke

29 West 17 Street

A

Le Pain Quotidien

52 9 Avenue

A

City Cakes

251 West 18 Street

A

Rubin Museum-Gabriel Vega

150 W 17th St

A

Bareburger

153 8 Avenue

A

Fika

155 7th Ave

A

Subway

300 W 17th St

A

The Pho 2

273 8th Ave

Not Yet Graded (24) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Dallas Bbq

261 8 Avenue

A

Cafe Grumpy

224 West 20 Street

A

The Ringside Cafe

28 W 20th St

A

VISIT OUR WEBSITE! at CHELSEANEWSNY.COM


24

JANUARY 18-24,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

Real Estate Ask a Broker BY ANDREW KRAMER

My friends tell me that broker commissions are negotiable and I shouldn’t have to pay the full 6 percent. Is there any truth to this? Funny, in almost 15 years in this business I’ve never been asked this question. Believe that and I have a bridge to sell you! The short answer is yes there is some truth to this. However, like everything in life, there is a price. Keep in mind that one of the top reasons you’re hiring a broker in the first place is to get the maximum exposure for your property. To achieve that goal, it takes a lot of resources — daily inclusion on the most highly trafficked real estate websites, print advertising, polished printed and digital marketing and collateral materials along and the willingness to share your listing with the greater brokerage community. Add to that, professional photography, floorplan renderings, virtual staging, etc. There are many firms that pride themselves on offering discounted commission. However what services are they eliminating to do this? It’s one thing to pay a 5 percent commission and work with a seasoned professional from a top tier firm whose going to take advantage of their powerful infrastructure to get the word out and it’s another to pay the same 5 percent to a firm that either doesn’t share/co-broke their listings and/or does limited, if any, marketing. Additionally, a reduced commission can easily discourage brokers from showing your property to their buyers. Marketing conditions and the specifics of your home also pay a big role in this equation. If there’s an abundance of cookie-cutter apartments like yours on the market at the same time you’re selling or your home has “an issue” (high maintenance, new building rising next door that will affect your views, etc.), you don’t have the same leverage with commission as someone selling a truly unique one-of-a-kind property with little or no competition. If you’re set on paying a reduced fee, inquire to see if your broker would be willing to collect a lower commission if they are able to sell your home to a direct buyer, who is not working with another agent. The best of all worlds is to align yourself with a broker from a leading firm that’s willing to shave only their portion of the commission (taking 2 percent vs. 3 percent on the selling side) and pay the full 3 percent to the broker who brings the buyer. Now that’s having your cake, with fewer calories, and eating it too! Andrew Kramer is a licensed associate real estate broker with Brown Harris Stevens Residential Sales

Photo: Steven Strasser

LEADERSHIP RESOLUTIONS Accomplishing more, alone and together BY FREDERICK W. PETERS

It’s 2018! How will this year differ from 2017, and all the years which preceded it? What will each of us do differently and, hopefully, better? Here’s my list of ways I hope to be a better leader and example, along with one resolution for our residential industry as a whole: I will be more responsive. I will respond to every meaningful email and text within 24 hours, hopefully far faster if I receive the communication during business hours. There are solicitation emails to which I never plan to respond, although I am increasingly attempting to respond with a simple “No, thanks.” I try to clean up my email every evening before I leave the office to make sure I haven’t missed anything; my goal is to have an inbox with no more than

25 items in it (and those are usually left there to remind me about something.) If however I receive an email or text AFTER business hours, I reserve the right not to respond until the next day. I will be less responsive. Yes, I know I am contradicting myself. But I am increasingly aware of how compulsively attuned to my mobile device I am. So now I try to take some time off both evenings and weekends. I leave my phone in the other room, or I turn off the ringer. It’s amazing how much personal interacting, reading, music listening and thinking I can get done when I am not checking my phone every 30 seconds. Nothing, it turns out, is SO important that it cannot wait a while during off hours. I will finish what I start. A challenge of my job (and probably everyone’s job) is chronic interruption. Emails appear in the corner of my computer screen. The phone rings. People come to my door. Distraction

is the enemy of efficiency. So in 2018 I will finish what I start before I turn to something else. The email, the phone call, the person at the door: they can almost always wait until I finish. Then I can turn to them with a clear head. I will encourage a real exchange of ideas. I don’t much like having people disagree with me. But it’s the only way to craft a better organization. I need to hear from my people when they think we are not making the best choice. Much as I hate to acknowledge it, I don’t know everything. Having smart people around me only helps the company if I listen to what they say, maybe especially when it suggests that we have not yet come up with the best solution. And this one applies to the whole residential industry here in New York: We may be competitors, but we accomplish more by working together. Our residential industry has undergone radical change during the past

five years. Technology has both accelerated the pace of interaction and created the perception (often false) of greater efficiency. Aggressive recruiting calls pepper the days of every good agent at every company. In this environment, it has become easier and easier to regard the competitor companies as enemies. But we wield real power as a collective. Whether it relates to sharing listings, pushing back against outside forces attempting to undermine or monetize our business model, or seeking the best business technology, we are stronger together. Every new year begins filled with possibility. 2018 will have its own triumphs and disappointments, but each of those represents an opportunity to do my job as both a leader and a colleague better. I will try to rise to each of those occasions. And you? Frederick W. Peters is chief executive officer of Warburg Realty Partnership


JANUARY 18-24,2018

IMMIGRATION CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 The crowd’s size and diversity conveyed the broad swaths of New York’s immigrant population born in the nations Trump referenced as he questioned why the U.S. would accept more immigrants from “shithole countries.” The city’s Haitianborn population of 91,595 makes up 2.8 percent of its foreignborn tally, for instance, while the 31,624 Salvadoran-born immigrants living here comprise about 1 percent, a January 2017 report by city Comptroller Scott Stringer found. Meanwhile, around 4.6 percent of New Yorkers born abroad – some 145,000 people – come from at least 15 countries in Africa, according to the survey. “We’re not going to let him hurt us,” said demonstrator Nicole Vanible, who came from Harlem to attend to protest with her Haitian-born husband. “I cried for two days after I heard. I was so happy to come out here today.” Mayor Bill de Blasio implored the crowd to consider their forebears experiences in coming to the United States. “Some came willingly, some did not. But we all came from a different place,” de Blasio said, adding, “Let’s live with the dignity of treating the new generation of immigrants just as we wish our fathers and grandfathers and great-grandfathers were treated.” Newly elected City Council

25

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com Speaker Corey Johnson had a simple reaction to Trump’s words. “He’s a racist,” Johnson said. “That’s it.” “The silver lining is that he has awoken a sleeping giant, and that is the people,” Johnson added. “That is immigrants and women and the undocumented and LGBT people and people of color and poor people and union members. We are in this struggle together.” During the rally, Trump took to Twitter to claim that Sen. Dick Durbin, who attended the meeting and subsequently criticized the president’s remarks as “vile and racist,” had “totally misrepresented what was said” at the meeting. The words and legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. were invoked often by speakers at the Times Square protest, who included Reps. Hakeem Jeffries and Nydia Velazquez, Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul and New York City Public Advocate Letitia James, among others. “There comes a time when silence is betrayal,” read one King quote on a sign waved by a protester. Before the rally, tweets from pols, advocates and commentators responding to Trump’s politically toxic remarks came fast and furious: • Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer: “The borough I represent includes Liberty and Ellis Island. In case you didn’t know, #45’s comments are not who we are as New Yorkers or as Americans. These islands remind

us of what our country has always been about. Our diversity makes us strong. #HereToStay” • Abe Foxman, former head of the Anti-Defamation League: “POTUS, it matters not what countries we came from to America. The sum total of our contributions made and make America great!” • Conservative polemicist Bill Kristol, the editor-at-large of The Weekly Standard: “Two weeks ago, a 26-year old soldier raced repeatedly into a burning Bronx apartment building, saving four people before he died in the flames. His name was Pvt. Emmanuel Mensah and he immigrated from Ghana, a country Donald Trump apparently thinks produces very subpar immigrants.” • City Comptroller Scott Stringer: “This is outrageous, sad, xenophobic, heartbreaking... And it’s yet another reminder about why we need to fight back against hate and discrimination everywhere ... starting with our own White House.” • U.S. Rep Nydia Velázquez, whose Brooklyn district includes hundreds of Salvadorans: “@realDonaldTrump’s comments in the Oval Office lay bare the ugly truth of his disgraceful, small-minded, coldhearted vision for America. Such shameful statements are completely unbefitting of the office of the President. We are a better nation than this”

Protesters in Times Square on Martin Luther King Jr. Day (here and below, left) for an anti-racism rally following reports of President Donald Trump’s disparaging comments about Haiti and other countries. Photos: Michael Garofalo

HISTORY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Steinhardt, a prominent patron of the Met for whom an ancient Greek gallery in the museum is named, purchased the piece from the Coloradobased collectors in 2010 for $700,000 and loaned it to the museum. Soon after, Met officials alerted the Lebanese government that they had come to believe that the bull’s head was looted from the Temple of Eshmun site, starting a process that culminated in a ceremony last month marking the repatriation to Lebanon of the bull’s head and two other statues from the same site valued at over $5 million total. “These pieces followed the same path that many pieces follow,” Assistant District Attorney Matthew Bogdanos said at the ceremony. “They leave a war-torn area or an area that is undergoing civil war or civil strife, they get in the hands of dealers who are less than scrupulous in determining its origin, and then they make their way through auction houses and other dealers to New York.”

Bogdanos, a classics expert who is a key figure in the office’s antiquities enforcement efforts, gained first-hand knowledge of the opportunities conflicts present to traffickers as a colonel in the Marine Corps during the Iraq War, when he worked to recover artifacts looted from the country’s national museum in Baghdad during the 2003 U.S. invasion. Though there have been no criminal charges filed against Steinhardt, and Bogdanos noted that no one suggests the Met acted improperly, prosecutors have criticized behavior on the part of collectors that amounts to willful ignorance of some objects’ hazy provenance. “No longer may those who deal in antiquities — whether they are dealers, collectors, museums, or auction houses — turn a blind eye to the rampant looting of the world’s cultural heritage,” Bogdanos wrote in one recent court filing. “In New York, at least, they are legally required to engage in a reasonable inquiry into the true ownership history and provenance of antiquities.”

The Manhattan District Attorney’s office says it has recovered thousands of illicit antiquities with a market value exceeding $150 million since 2012, many of which have since been returned to the countries in which they were unearthed. In December, Man hattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance announced the formation of a dedicated antiquities trafficking unit that will work with federal prosecutors and specialized teams within the FBI and Department of Homeland Security to recover illicit antiquities. “The volume and pace of our work in this area has increased to the point where we actually need a unit fully staffed with investigators, analysts and lawyers to make sure that when we understand that trafficked, looted and stolen items are in our jurisdiction we can bring all of the resources of this office to bear to make sure that they can be returned,” Vance said. Michael Garofalo: reporter@ strausnews.com


26

JANUARY 18-24,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

Your Neighborhood News Source

BEYOND BROADWAY - CHELSEA The #1 online community for NYC theater:

www.show-score.com

NOW PLAYING IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD FROM $40

FROM $49

FROM $37

MILES FOR MARY

20TH CENTURY BLUES

AFTERGLOW

19 REVIEWS ENDS FEB 4

184 REVIEWS ENDS JAN 28

165 REVIEWS ENDS MAR 18

ž

ž

ž

75

85

73

A bittersweet elegy to the camcorder 1980s, girls’ track and field, and the consecrated American high school.

Four women. Forty years of friendship. One afternoon that could end it all in this new drama.

A drama exploring the complexities of polyamory in a gay relationship.

PLAYWRIGHT’S HORIZON - 416 W 42ND ST

ALICE GRIFFIN JEWEL BOX THEATER - 480 W 42ND ST

THE DAVENPORT THEATER / THE LOFT - 354 W 45TH ST

WHAT’S TRENDING ACROSS NYC

COMING SOON

FROM $55

FROM $85

HINDLE WAKES

JERRY SPRINGER THE OPERA

35 REVIEWS ENDS FEB 17

PREVIEWS START JAN 23

ž

A gleefully profane musical about the infamous talk show. An outrageous celebration of our national ritual of humiliation and redemption.

85

PERSHING SQUARE SIGNATURE CENTER - 480 W 42ND ST.

Stanley Houghton’s slyly comic effervescent 1910 morality tale returns to NYC for the first time in 95 years. FROM $39 THEATER ROW / CLURMAN THEATER - 410 W 42ND ST

[PORTO] PREVIEWS START JAN 28

FROM $39

A surreal play about the patrons of a local bar in a gentrifying neighborhood where a regular’s routine is disrupted by a handsome stranger.

CRUEL INTENTIONS 85 REVIEWS ENDS FEB 19 ž

MCGINN/CAZALE THEATER, 4TH FLR - 2162 BROADWAY

80 FROM $30

EDWARD ALBEE’S AT HOME AT THE ZOO

A jukebox musical based on the classic ‘Les Liaisons Dangereuses,’ and the sexy 90s teen drama.

PREVIEWS START JAN 30

LE POISSON ROUGE - 158 BLEECKER STREET

A revision of Albee’s two-act drama ‘The Zoo Story,’ from 1959. Starring Tony Award-winners Katie Finneran and Robert Sean Leonard.

FROM $51

PERSHING SQUARE SIGNATURE CENTER - 480 W 42ND ST.

FRIENDS! THE MUSICAL PARODY 50 REVIEWS ENDS MAR 31 ž

FROM $49

AMY AND THE ORPHANS

77

PREVIEWS START FEB 1

Three siblings reunite for a road trip after their father’s death. Why is Amy, who has Down syndrome, the only one of them who knows her own mind?

A new unauthorized musical parody of the beloved sitcom about the antics of six young New Yorkers.

LAURA PELS THEATER - 111 W 46TH ST ST LUKE’S THEATER - 308 W 46TH ST

Content provided by

KEY:


JANUARY 18-24,2018

27

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

YOUR 15 MINUTES

To read about other people who have had their “15 Minutes” go to chelseanewsNY.com/15 minutes

A THEATRICAL LEGACY Tom Oppenheim on his role as artistic director of his grandmother Stella Adler’s Studio of Acting BY ANGELA BARBUTI

When Tom Oppenheim took over as artistic director of the Stella Adler Studio of Acting in 1995, he asked himself, “What does it mean to be the Stella Adler Studio of Acting today?” Part of honoring his grandmother’s legacy meant ensuring that the studio is rooted in her belief that growth as an actor and a human being are synonymous. Since then, Oppenheim, 58, has worked to create an environment that nurtures theater artists — they train 500 at a time — so that they value themselves as well as others. His initiatives have included launching the Harold Clurman Laboratory Theater Company, which is named after Adler’s second husband, and starting an outreach component that gives free actor training to low-income New York City public school students as well as at Rikers Island. The Manhattan native, who studied at the National Shakespeare Conservatory and with his grandmother, lives in Washington Heights with his wife, Nina Capelli, the studio’s director of cultural programming, and their two children.

Tell us about your grandmother and what legacy you hope to continue with the studio now. She was a grand woman. But we called her Stella; we didn’t call her grandma. She was a unique grandmother in that way, but a great woman, teacher of acting and theater person. Central to her legacy, I’ve built on and hope to continue to build on her technique of growth as an actor and human being. All of her techniques and everything she wrote and said, that was the energy underneath it.

How do you try to retain its original mission? I was primarily committed to making sure the studio didn’t degenerate into a wax museum devoted to Stella’s memory, but a living, breathing expression of her spirit. So I was focusing on examining the past and the tradition that preceded Stella. It began with her father, Jacob Adler, who was a great actor and producer. He came from Odessa [in what is now Ukraine], and was born in 1853. The tsar outlawed Jewish theater in 1883 and he left first to London and then seven years later, in 1889, came to New York City and built the theater [Union Theatre, a Yiddish-language theater]. So it was the matching of that history to the future and making the studio remain as relevant and impactful today and tomorrow as it did with Stella.

Tom Oppenheim with his his grandmother, Stella Adler. Photo: Stella Adler Studio

What aspects did you change? Part of it was relinquishing dogma, so we weren’t tied to engaging faculty that had studied with Stella, but finding teachers who harmonized with the insight that growth as an actor and growth as a human being are synonymous. That freed us and there was curricular restructuring that we did. And really, continue to do, because it’s always a kind of a work-in-progress. In addition to that, the environmental aspect of the mission was to create

artistic and cultural events beyond the theater. We did these in honor of Harold Clurman who was Stella’s second husband and created the Group Theatre [a 1930s theater collective that produced plays relevant to that era]. It began with a lecture but then evolved to include a poetry reading series and a concert series, which was renamed after my father, David, who was an important New York figure. He was a great classical clarinetist. He played with Igor Stravinsky and the Budapest String Quartet, but then made films and worked in television. Then became the dean of the School of the Arts at NYU and it was under him that that school became Tisch School of the Arts.

Tell us about your outreach program. It includes a free afterschool program for high school students. They all live under the poverty level. The mission is to bring free actor training to people who can’t afford tuition. We plugged into middle schools and high schools in the South Bronx, all low income schools that don’t have access to the arts. And then we have a very developed program on Rikers Island; we’re there every day of the week training all the populationsadult women, adult men, teens, young adults, transgender. All those are aspects that come from Stella that we’ve taken and evolved.

Explain your current show, “One Drop of Love,” and what your mission is with that project. It came out of another show we presented through our playwright division. Part of the division is identifying a playwright in residence, so a few years ago we reached out to playwrights that identified as play-

Tom Oppenheim, artistic director of the Stella Adler Studio of Acting. Photo: Stella Adler Studio

wrights of color. We read 150 to 200 plays and lowered that down to five. One of the five plays was written by Beto O’Byrne, who is half Mexican and half Irish. And he wrote a play called “Loving and Loving,” about the Lovings [an interracial couple whose marriage was deemed illegal in Virginia in the ‘60s and became a Supreme Court case], written before the movie. In relation to that play, we wanted to engage in a conversation about being mixed race, and racially diverse couples and families. Fanshen Cox DiGiovanni, who wrote and performs “One Drop of Love,” was one of the people who engaged in that conversation. She was so interesting and compelling that wanted to continue that conversation, and are bringing her show to the studio later this month.

What are your future plans? My dream is to formalize the transformation of the Stella Adler Studio of Acting into the Stella Adler Center for the Arts. We would still use the nomenclature of the Stella Adler Studio backstage in relation to young people who want to study, but create a bigger title that better describes who we are. And to one day find a real estate opportunity that facilitates it. And to raise money to be able to build each of those centers. To have someone in charge of the music, poetry, and so on. stellaadler.com

Know somebody who deserves their 15 Minutes of fame? Go to chelseanewsNY.com and click on submit a press release or announcement.


28

CROSSWORD

Clinton

19 23

42

2 1

6

4

3

4

43

7 9

7 8

7

Level: Medium

2

6

1

46

M S R S L E E T S P A W P I E

F H L A R Q M V Z I H O I T C

R U M M I I J F L I J I D F I

U J E I V N V G T S B W S U P

D X U I R P J E W T V S E A I

Y M Y S D L W T R A L G C Z T

H R N T L A F F G A A Z D G A

G V F R T O K J K O C E A N T

M W M E W A T E R F A L L Z I

B L R A D J U M I S T R V Z O

The puzzle contains 15 water related words. They may be diagonal, across, or up and down in the grid in any direction.

I T D M L N H Z D J Z T W W N

Hail Irrigate Lake Mist Ocean Precipitation Rain Rapids River Seas Sleet Snow Stream Waterfall Whitewater

ANSWERS I

N

54 47

48

T

G H

U

C

49

44

N

I

I

A

T

X

I

F

A

S

U

T

M A

P

U

40 36 32 27 20

21

S

I

J P

T

O S E

T

P

S

P E

H

2

3

4

R

E

A L

L

O

16

P

I

13 5

M

50

K

6

V

M 7

E

E

51

E

52

T

53

E D

D

43

E

E

39

L

L

34

Y 23

A

I

S 30

E

19

S

E

E O

A

P

12

H

U 29

A M M O

15

R A

46

42

T

28

56

A

38 33

22

A C

45

U

41

L

37 18

1

55

35

T

I

31

T

I

E

O

24

E R O N S

25

R A G G E

26

R

P

I

17

E

P

O

14 8

S

9

T

S P U

10

T E B

11

U J E I V N V G T S B W S U P

D X U I R P J E W T V S E A I

Y M Y S D L W T R A L G C Z T

H R N T L A F F G A A Z D G A

G V F R T O K J K O C E A N T

M W M E W A T E R F A L L Z I

B L R A D J U M I S T R V Z O

I T D M L N H Z D J Z T W W N

4 2

1 9 8

6

4 5

8 3

2

7

7 6

9 1 5

3

3 7 5 6 9 1 8 4 2

6 4 2 5 7 9 1 3 8

7 8 1 3 6 4 5 2 9

9 5 3 2 1 8 6 7 4

2 6 4 7 8 5 3 9 1

5 3 9 1 4 6 2 8 7

8 1 7 9 2 3 4 5 6

24 Lubricated 25 Night time racket 26 Variety of moth 29 Dishonest scheme (3 words) 30 Volcanic spew 34 Plumbing problem 37 Rock cover 41 Egyptian boy king 43 Retire from military service 45 Mafia chief 46 Affectedly creative 47 Modern 48 Intense anger 49 Govt.dept. 51 Piece of corn 52 In-flight info, for short 53 Possessive thou

E L I R R I G A T E T H A T R

R U M M I I J F L I J I D F I

47 Greyish brown bird 50 ___ halfway, in negotiating 54 Irish offshoot 55 Decide 56 Sworn declaration 57 Withdraw gradually 58 “Whew!” 59 Donkey noise Down 1 Fortune 2 Kiwi comparable 3 Babysitter’s handful 4 Criticize in no uncertain terms 5 No difficulty 6 Earlier stringed instrument 7 Worker 8 Élan 9 Little piggy 10 Fedex competitor 11 Put your chips in 17 Most preferred 19 Cancún coin 20 Muslim scholar 21 Lebanese, e.g. 22 Cabs

P D F B A J E W C L E K R W P

F H L A R Q M V Z I H O I T C

59

E S K O U S I U Z W W S N O W

M S R S L E E T S P A W P I E

58

K T K J T I S D B V W R X T B

E L I R R I G A T E T H A T R

57

WORD SEARCH by Myles Mellor

P D F B A J E W C L E K R W P

56

53

E S K O U S I U Z W W S N O W

55

52

K T K J T I S D B V W R X T B

54

51

Y

50

H

49

Across 1 Next in line? 5 Adam’s madam 8 Check record 12 Mil. supplies 13 Ability to hit a target 14 Holy Father 15 Stage in the life cycle of a moth 16 Cheesiest 18 Bee contestant 20 Certain print 23 Slothful 27 World power (abbr.) 28 Fix 31 Make a ringing sound 32 Quandary 33 Blackbird 35 Record 36 ____ gate 38 Pronoun 39 Pitching stat 40 At its original position (2 words) 42 Venomous snake 44 It’s baked in a muffin tin

5

T

48

45

5

A

44

4

8

39

41

9

8

A

40

2 6 9

35

38

3

R

37

34

7

6

4

B

36

31

5

O

33

30

26

1

59

32

29

25

9

T

28

24

2

Y

22

27

47

17

5

P

21

14

Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9X9 grid that has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3X3 squares. To solve the puzzle each row, column and box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9. Puzzles come in three grades: easy, medium and difficult.

B O

20

11

O

18

10

58

16

9

E

15

8

N

13

7

A

12

6

S

5

R

4

E

3

W E

2

SUDOKU by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan

by Myles Mellor

57

1

JANUARY 18-24,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com


JANUARY 18-24,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

PUBLIC NOTICES

29


30

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

PUBLIC NOTICES

JANUARY 18-24,2018


JANUARY 18-24,2018

CLASSIFIEDS CAMPS/SCHOOLS

31

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

Telephone: 212-868-0190 Fax: 212-868-0198 Email: classified2@strausnews.com

POLICY NOTICE: We make every eďŹ&#x20AC;ort to avoid mistakes in your classiďŹ ed ads. Check your ad the ďŹ rst week it runs. The publication will only accept responsibility for the ďŹ rst incorrect insertion. The publication assumes no ďŹ nancial responsibility for errors or omissions. We reserve the right to edit, reject, or re-classify any ad. Contact your sales rep directly for any copy changes. All classiďŹ ed ads are pre-paid.

PUBLIC NOTICES

HELP WANTED

Directory of Business & Services To advertise in this directory Call #BSSZ (212)-868-0190 ext.4 CBSSZMFXJT@strausnews.com

I CAN SELL YOUR HOME OR APARTMENT QUICKLY!

N e s t S e e ke r s I N T E R N A T I O N A L

Real Estate Sales, 10+ Years Experience

Volunteering in the Arts Come listen to our panel of volunteer experts Learn about a broad range of opportunities in the arts capital of the world Talk with interviewers and sign up to volunteer!

Tuesday, January 2, 20 6:00pm²8:00pm All Stars Project 543 West 42nd Street (Subway A, C, & E to 42nd Street) Admission is FREE! | Light Refreshments

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

MASSAGE

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

RSVP to reserve your place 212 889-4805 or www.volunteer-referral.org

BE THE SOMEONE

WHO HELPS A KID BE THE FIRST IN HER FAMILY TO GO TO COLLEGE.

REAL ESTATE - RENT

newyorkcares.org

587 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10017 0GmDFt0UIFS Email: DavidL@NestSeekers.com Social Media davelopeznynj

CALL ME NOW AND GET RESULTS!

DAVID - 917.510.6457


32

JANUARY 18-24,2018

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

Our Town’s

ART OF FOOD

LIMITED TICKETS LEFT DON’T MISS OUT:

at

artoffoodny.com

Presented by

Saturday, February 10 “The food was top notch! I think almost everything I tried was new to me. Amazing food! I can't rave about it enough.”

Here’s What People Said Last Year…

-Yanill P. “The quick: such an interesting concept. Amazing chefs create dishes inspired by famous artwork by legends such as Andy Warhol.” -Alexandra L.

“This was an amazing event-Warhol's and Lichenstein's I had never seen paired with incredibly innovate food! There were so many interesting combinations I never would have dreamed of putting together…It was fun to see favorite restaurants doing new things and exciting to try dishes from places I've never been to.” -Maddy G.

“Its amazing what each chef could put together based off of the work of art hanging beside them.” -Tyler F.

Chelsea News - January 18, 2018  
Chelsea News - January 18, 2018  
Advertisement