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The local paper for Chelsea

WEEK OF JANUARY LEGAL WEED? NOT SO FAST ◄ P.19

3-9 2019

William Wegman’s Weimaraner dogs, Flo and Topper, are new additions to the 23rd Street F and M train station that reopened in November after extensive renovations. Photo: Patrick J. Cashin/Metropolitan Transportation Authority

UNDERGROUND BEAUTY TRANSIT

Dan Kaufman (left), author of “The Fall of Wisconsin,” with Glenn Raucher, curator and host of the Half King reading series. Photo courtesy of Glenn Raucher

Manhattan’s new golden age of subway art

THE HALF KING TO BOW OUT CLOSINGS A Chelsea home to journalists and authors faces the writing on the wall for city restaurants BY JASON COHEN

The Half King has been a staple in the Chelsea community for nearly two decades. But the restaurant that became a home for many journalists and writers will be shuttering its doors later this month. The restaurant, located directly below the High Line on West 23rd Street,

was started in 2000 by journalists Sebastian Junger and Scott Anderson and filmmaker Nanette Burstein, as a neighborhood place that could also serve as a meeting spot for people in the publishing and film industries. “We didn’t know if it would work financially, but it did,” said Junger, author of “The Perfect Storm” and a documentary filmmaker. “Every year we’d look back and wonder how we’re still open.” Junger explained they knew the Chelsea area was not cheap, but in 2000, it was up and coming with art galleries and other new businesses. However, as the galleries closed in the

BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

Ask any New Yorker, and you’ll be told — with varying levels of annoyance, resignation or fury — that service on the city’s subway system leaves much to be desired. But at least there’s something nice to look at while you wait for your train. While 2018 was another year of subway malaise, one silver lining was a continued influx of brilliant station art commissioned by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Straphangers were dazzled by new art in several stations that reopened in 2018 after comprehensive renovations. In September, riders entering the World Trade Center station at

last 10 or 15 years and other restaurants like the Red Cat and Trestle on Tenth shuttered their doors, the writing was on the wall, he said. With high taxes, rent tripling since it opened and minimum wage increasing in 2019, staying open was not sustainable. “This isn’t something where making money was absolutely crucial, but then it got to the point where we weren’t even breaking even,” Junger explained. “I’m very sad it’s closing and I’m also sad for New York that businesses keep closing.” Junger recalled how the first couple

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Crime Watch Voices NYC Now City Arts

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Chelsea News NY

Cortlandt Street for the first time since the 9/11 attacks were met with a poignant reminder of the site’s past in the form Ann Hamilton’s immense yet ethereal marble mosaic “CHORUS,” which features text from the Declaration of Independence and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Further north, playful images of William Wegman’s pet Weimaraners now gaze expectantly upon the 23rd Street platform that reopened in November, as if hopeful each passing commuter will hand over a dog treat. Yoko Ono’s placid blue skies on the walls of the recently renovated B and C train station at 72nd Street and Central Park West implore passengers to “Remember Love.” Along with permanent installations came unexpected delights, like the career-spanning photos of David Bowie that plastered the walls of the Broadway-Lafayette Street station

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Restaurant Ratings Business Real Estate 15 Minutes

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WEEK OF APRIL

SPRING ARTS PREVIEW < CITYARTS, P.14

WHO HAS ACCESS TO A PARKING SPACE IN CHELSEA? NEWS

9-16

MANHATTAN'S APARTMENT BOOM, > PROPERTY, P.18

2015

In Brief MORE HELP FOR SMALL BUSINESS

WHAT NEXT FOR CHELSEA GALLERIES?

The effort to help small seems to businesses in the city be gathering steam. Two city councilmembers, Robert Margaret Chin and Cornegy, have introduced create legislation that wouldSmall a new “Office of the within Business Advocate” of Small the city’s Department Business Services. Chin The new post, which have up rezoning told us she’d like to would and the mid-2000s May 1 The and running this year, for of West Chelsea. Muas an ombudsman city serve Whitney the of opening Art on small businesses within them clear seum of American means not government, helping It’s new buildings, to get Gansevoort Street c to the traffi through the bureaucracy rising rents, that are even more foot things done. forcing some gallerists area. is that Perhaps even more also The irony, of course, to reconsider their Whitney -importantly, the ombudsman the arrival of the and number neighborhood roots art meccas will tally the type small business one of the city’s the end for of complaints by taken in BY GABRIELLE ALFIERO -- could also spell dealers the actions art owners, long-time policy buildStephen some response, and somefor ways to When gallerists Griffin in the area, as their are sold or recommendations If done well, Haller and Cynthiatheir W. ings increasingly begin to fix things. report would Haller reopened follow- demolished. lease the ombudsman’s 26th Street gallery With their 10-year quantitative afrst fi the rebuild Stephen us give cut short, with ing a five-month flooded abruptly shared taste of what’s wrong ter Hurricane Sandy they and Cynthia, who the city, an the space, small businesses in towards building with their first floor phone their and Tony important first step were still without were Lehmann Maupin they the problem. needed to xing fi of galleries, and Internet. Still, where Shafrazi property by June To really make a difference, the happy in the location, will have to to stay for vacate (Shafrazi is suing course, the advocaterising rents, they expected of 2014. find a way to tackle business’ the Manhattes some time. doltold less the landlord, which remain many While Chin Instead, they were their Group, for $20 million reproblem. vexing that Post most the New York than a year later gauge what to demol- lars, said it’s too early tocould have landlord planned ported). another role the advocate on the ish the building. They shopped for planned for there, more information in the neighbor“We had shows bad thing. We had location to find problem can’t be a with the long periods of time.amount hood but struggled a twoThis step, combinedBorough more than just put in a huge the anything efforts by Manhattan to mediate of money to refurbish“We year lease on a street-level in Chelsaid. President Gale Brewer offer space,” Cynthia space. After 13 years Gallery the rent renewal process, were really shocked.”Gallery sea, Stephen Haller signs tangible and early, Haller some For Stephen small left the neighborhoodStux it, it isn’t riswith of progress. For many can’t come and others like joined forces oor are driving business owners, that in a new sixth-fl ing rents that far new devel- Gallery soon enough. on 57th Street, not Chelsea, Zach Feuer them away. It’s

NEWS

luxury building Robotic garage for board draws fire from community BY ZACH WILLIAMS

at a a robotic garage A proposal for in Chelsea has thrown luxury building into the city’s zoning access to parking debate. proposed for a A high-tech garage W. 28th St. has 520 development at Board 4, which is riled Community arguing that it plan, in opposing the more car usage would only invite while only providthe neighborhood, residents. ing parking to rich a special city perThe garage needs 29 spaces rather mit to accommodate allowed the than the 11 automatically opted to oppose by the city. CB4 1 full board meetpermit at its April Carl a draft letter to ing, stating in Planning City the of Weisbrod, chair city criteria for such Commission, that based on the parking foran exception is ago, when many for stock of a decade spaces were used demer industrial future of parking in anticipation velopment in Chelsea. 40 residential have The project will comsquare feet of alunits and 11,213 the ground floor, mercial space on three parking spaces The lowing eight and the developer, respectively. But wants more for Related Companies, is the New York acthe building, which internationally City debut for Zaha Hadid. (Adjaclaimed architect Line, the build cent to the High

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his gallery in After 15 years running to partner with Joel two gallery spaces, (left) leaves the neighborhood team will operate Mesler (right). TheMesler/Feuer, on the Lower East Feuer/Mesler and May 10. Slide, slated to open

Newscheck

2 3

is surging opment, which in part to in Chelsea, thanks High Line the opening of the

City Arts Top 5

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space

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JANUARY 3-9,2019

Scene in New York

NOTHING BUT BLUE SKIES What were those flickering blue lights that illuminated the night sky on Thursday, Dec. 27? Manhattan residents might have gone through the usual checklist: fireworks in the East River? Celebrating a pre-New Year’s race in Central Park? The premiere of a hot new action movie? Social media quickly provided the correct answer: a transformer at a Con Edison facility in Astoria had exploded, and the “light was caused by an electrical surge at a substation,” as Mayor Bill de Blasio reported on Twitter. The blast caused power outages and transportation slowdowns — which Con Edison referred to as a “transmission dip in the area” — but there were no injuries. “Confirming incident in #Astoria was result of transformer explosion,” the NYPD’s Twitter feed said. “No injuries, no fire, no evidence of extraterrestrial activity.” That last theme prompted an array of speculation. Tweeted New York Times reporter Liam Stack: “NYC is so expensive when the aliens get here they just go straight to Queens.”

View from East River Drive. Photo: Amanda Brainerd

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CRIME WATCH BY MARIA ROCHA-BUSCHEL AMMO STOLEN FROM FBI CAR

STATS FOR THE WEEK Reported crimes from the 10th precinct for the week ending Dec 23

Three magazines for a Glock 22 and 150 rounds of ammunition were among the items stolen from an FBI vehicle parked at the corner of Tenth Ave. and West 15th St. on Friday, Dec. 28.. An FBI employee told police that he parked the department-issued vehicle around 3 p.m. and when he returned around 10 p.m. he noticed that the rear driver’s side window had been broken. In addition to ammo, the stolen items included a backpack and a flashlight.

Week to Date

Year to Date

2018 2017

% Change

2018

2017

% Change

Murder

0

0

n/a

1

0

n/a

Rape

0

0

n/a

18

18

0.0

Robbery

2

2

0.0

79

89

-11.2

Felony Assault

0

2

-100.0

95

101

-5.9

ASSAULT ON 10TH AVENUE 1

Burglary

0

0

n/a

77

80

-3.8

A 26-year-old woman reported that she was assaulted at the corner of Tenth Ave. and West 17th St. on the afternoon of Saturday, December 29. She told police that an unknown man punched her in the face while she was walking on the sidewalk, causing cut on her left cheek. The suspect fled and police searched, but no arrest was made. east on West 16th Street. The victim was treated at Lenox Hill Healthplex.

Grand Larceny

8

15

-46.7

721

645 11.8

Grand Larceny Auto

0

0

n/a

25

33

MASTURBATING TRESPASSER ARRESTED

ASSAULT ON 10TH AVENUE 2 A 41-year-old cab driver told police a man punched him in the face while he was waiting to pick up a fare in front of the Marquee nightclub, at 289 Tenth Ave. The incident occurred at 4 a.m. on Thursday, Dec. 27 at 4 a.m. The victim suffered minor injuries to his nose, The suspect fled the scene.

Photo by Tony Webster, via Flickr

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Police arrested a 29-year-old man for trespassing inside 420 West 19th Street after they found him masturbating there on Saturday afternoon, Dec. 29. According to police, the suspect was caught in the act on the roof landing, with his underwear and pants down. When the suspect was searched at the precinct, police found what appeared to be a small bag of marijuana and an oxycodone pill.

THE BAD SAMARITAN An 18-year-old man reported that $400 in cash was stolen from him while he was in front of 213 West 23rd Street on Wednesday, Dec. 26. The victim told police that he helped tenants from the building where he works get into a taxi, and shortly after noticed that the money was missing. Police said a Department of Buildings employee approached him and asked what he was looking for. According to police, the victim didn’t find the money, but later reviewed video footage and

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Useful Contacts

JANUARY 3-9,2019

Drawing Board BY MARC BILGREY

POLICE NYPD 10th Precinct

230 West 20th St.

212-741-8211

150 West 19th St.

311

FIRE FDNY Engine 3/Ladder 12

ELECTED OFFICIALS Councilmember Corey Johnson

224 W. 30th St.

212-564-7757

State Senator Brad Hoylman

322 Eighth Ave. #1700

212-633-8052

Assembly Member Richard Gottfried

242 W. 27th St.

212-807-7900

COMMUNITY BOARD 4

330 W. 42nd St.

212-736-4536

Muhlenberg

209 W. 23rd St.

212-924-1585

Columbus

742 10th Ave.

212-586-5098

Mt. Sinai – Roosevelt

1000 10th Ave.

212-523-4000

New York-Presbyterian

170 William St.

212-312-5110

CON EDISON

4 Irving Place

212-460-4600

TIME WARNER CABLE

605 Sixth Ave.

347-220-8541

Old Chelsea Station

217 W. 18th St.

212-675-0548

US Post Office

421 Eighth Ave.

212-330-3296

US Post Office

76 Ninth Ave.

212-645-0351

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ANGELâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S STORY: THERE IS LIFE AFTER PRISON COMMUNITY The former executive director of Goddard Riverside reflects on his long connection to Angel Soler, a Westsider who faced the trauma of incarceration BY STEPHAN RUSSO

I ďŹ rst met Angelo â&#x20AC;&#x153;Angelâ&#x20AC;? Soler in the summer of 1976, when I worked the streets of the West Side, trying to reach kids hanging out in the neighborhood. I was part of what was then called a â&#x20AC;&#x153;delinquency preventionâ&#x20AC;? program operated by Goddard Riverside Community Center. Today, you would never get away with such an anachronistic way of describing young people who need help. Back then, Angel, who grew up in the housing projects along Columbus Avenue, hung out on Columbus and 93rd Street with a group of ruffians who called themselves â&#x20AC;&#x153;La Familiaâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; an incipient gang that donned black jackets with their symbol (of a Latin American Indian chief) on the back and red bandanas. Angel was a tall, lanky 14-year old who was in perpetual motion. He and his â&#x20AC;&#x153;pandillaâ&#x20AC;? were convinced that I, along with my outreach partner, worked for the police department and were trying to bust them for loitering on the corner. In one of my ďŹ rst interactions with him, Angel explained to me that he lost a lung when a gun he was holding accidentally misďŹ red. Angelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother was caring and concerned, but she had her own struggles with drug use. His father was known in the community for his domino playing and a penchant for â&#x20AC;&#x153;el tragoâ&#x20AC;? (drinking). One of my missions with Angel, early on, was to help him get a new set of dentures since he was without his front teeth from the age of eight, when he was playing in an abandoned building and got hit in the mouth with a shovel. For months, I would go to his house, drag him from under his bed and take him, arm in arm, to the local dental health clinic. It took over a year but, Angel had a new set of teeth that have lasted to this day. That summer of 1976 began a relationship that has endured over 40 years. Today, Angel is

Angel Soler (left) and Stephan Russo shopping for clothes the day Soler was released from prison. Photo: Susan Souder 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;4â&#x20AC;? and a teddy-bear-like 300 pounds. He is one of those forgotten individuals who have experienced the trauma of prison life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I went to school up to the eighth grade,â&#x20AC;? Angel reminisced when we got together recently. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The teacher was terriďŹ ed because I was in a street gang. They passed me from class to class, but never taught me how to read or write, which is a problem for me to this day. Neither my mother nor sister ever learned how to read or write. My mother was too busy getting high to make sure I went to school.â&#x20AC;? Despite problems with his anger, Angel has an engaging personality and a compelling streak of kindness and sensitivity. The community center has always been his anchor. I spent those 40 years working at the center and kept in regular touch with Angel. He lived in one of the agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residences and supported himself with the occasional part-time job â&#x20AC;&#x201D; as a kitchen worker at Goddard Riversideâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residential camp or security guard at one of the neighborhoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s run-down SROs. One day nearly two decades ago, I was sitting in my office (I had recently become Goddard Riversideâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s executive director) when two detectives from the 20th Precinct appeared. They wanted to talk to me about Angel. I knew that Angel had struggled with his drug use. The local news reported on a

series of â&#x20AC;&#x153;shakedownsâ&#x20AC;? of food deliverers that had become a neighborhood concern. Angel had been arrested. I said it couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be him. But they had the evidence and, for Angel, there was no escaping. He could not overcome the difficulties of his early years. Angel spent the next 13 years in prison. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life in jail was a daily struggle,â&#x20AC;? Angel told me. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Only the strong survive. One of the hardest things to do on Christmas day was to wait for someone to open your cell so you could go to the mess hall where they would only give you two pieces of turkey, a soda, and ice cream. When you went back to your cell, there was a candy bar waiting for you as a special Christmas treat. It was one of the saddest days of the year.â&#x20AC;? When Angel was imprisoned, his natural family all but abandoned him. He lost contact with his two daughters and had no one on the outside to turn to. Almost by default, our family had become his surrogate family. My wife and I made regular trips to the Green Haven, Eastern and Wallkill correctional facilities where he was serving his â&#x20AC;&#x153;bid,â&#x20AC;? as the people in prison call their time locked up. I wrote weekly letters and periodically mailed him money orders so he could purchase basic necessities at the commissary. Angel would have his cellmate Jaime read my letters to him and write his responses. We also regularly sent packages ďŹ lled with sealed

processed meats, cakes, cookies, candies and toiletries â&#x20AC;&#x201D; no more than 35 pounds or any trace of alcohol in the food content, per strict prison rules. Any time weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d consider not sending him so many unhealthy sweets, our perceptive daughter would say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Angel is in prison and has no freedom. Get him anything he wants!â&#x20AC;? Angel celebrated his 56th birthday in December and is completing his fourth year of probation. He is one of the lucky ones. When he was released, we were able to ďŹ nd him housing at the Goddard Riverside residence where he used to live. The building had just undergone a major renovation and Angel had his own bathroom. He initially kept his door open at night so he could experience what it was like to walk out whenever wanted. He was tired of being locked in. Angel spends his days attending his treatment program and volunteering at a local food pantry. He came to our house for Thanksgiving and spent time with us over Christmas. He occasionally sees his daughters, but the pain of their disappearance during his time away has not dissipated. Angel continues to fight the demons of his previous drug abuse, loneliness and isolation, along with the trauma of prison life. (He once spent nearly 300 days in solitary conďŹ nement.) Yet Angel has persevered. He will be off probation next year and truly free. He continues to resist the daily temptations of the street life. His strength and determination have carried him forward. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am thankful this Christmas that I am able to walk outside and go wherever I want,â&#x20AC;? Angel said before the holidays. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope my story will help other people who have spent time in jail know that it is possible to come back to the community. If I can do it, with all the defects I have had in my life, others can too.â&#x20AC;? In a recent op-ed, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fighting the Spiritual Void,â&#x20AC;? New York Times columnist David Brooks suggested that our failure to address how one recovers from trauma stems from the lack of a â&#x20AC;&#x153;communitywide rite of passage for people coming out of prison, for forgiveness for a personal wrong, for people who felt they had come out the other side of trauma and abuse.â&#x20AC;? Angelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s experience shows how it is possible to create a culture

to help alleviate the pain of trauma. Still, how many more Angels are out there, and do we have the moral courage, as Brooks implores, to help those re-entering to become whole again and participate as full citizens of our community? This holiday season, I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help but think of Brooksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s call for a moral and community response to those who experience the trauma of a long period of incarceration, people like my friend Angel Soler. The national statistics are staggering. There are over 2.2 million incarcerated adults in U.S. federal and state prisons â&#x20AC;&#x201D; more than 25 percent of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prison population. Every year,

650,000 Americans are released from incarceration â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a number larger than the entire population of Wyoming and Vermont. But there are positive signs as well, like the passage of the bipartisan criminal justice reform bill, signed by President Trump a few days before Christmas; the successful Florida referendum that will allow ex-felons to vote; and the push to eliminate the â&#x20AC;&#x153;criminal recordâ&#x20AC;? box on school and job applications. Together, they shine a much-needed spotlight a critical issue we face today â&#x20AC;&#x201D; how to help those who have paid their debt to society and now live amongst us.

Angel Soler with his grandchildren. Photo courtesy of Angel Soler NOTICE OF A JOINT PUBLIC HEARING of the Franchise and Concession Review Com-mittee and the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation to be held on Monday, January 7, 2019 at 2 Lafayette Street, 14th Floor Auditorium, Borough of Manhattan, com-mencing at 2:30 p.m. relative to: INTENT TO AWARD as a concession for the renovation, operation and PDLQWHQDQFHRIDVQDFNEDUDWWKH+HFNVFKHU%DOOÂżHOGVLQ&HQWUDO3DUN0DQKDWWDQ1HZ<RUNIRUDQLQH  \HDUWHUPZLWK DVL[  PRQWKUHQHZDORSWLRQH[HUFLVDEOHDW3DUNVÂśVROHGLVFUHWLRQWR3DQGD%XEEOH7HD&3//&&RPSHQVDWLRQWRWKH City will be as follows: for each oper-ating year of the license, Panda Bubble Tea CP LLC shall pay the City a fee consist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wheelchairs or other mobility devices. For fur-ther information on accessibility or to make a request for accommodations, such DVVLJQODQJXDJHLQWHUSUHWDWLRQVHUYLFHVSOHDVHFRQWDFWWKH0D\RUÂśV2IÂżFHRI&RQWUDFW6HUYLFHV 02&6 YLDHPDLODW 'LVDELOLW\$IIDLUV#PRFVQ\FJRYRUYLDSKRQHDW  $Q\SHUVRQUHTXLULQJUHDVRQDEOHDFFRPPRGDWLRQIRU WKHSXEOLFKHDULQJVKRXOGFRQWDFW02&6DWOHDVWWKUHH  EXVLQHVVGD\VLQDGYDQFHRIWKHKHDULQJWRHQVXUHDYDLODELOLW\ TELECOMMUNICATION DEVICE FOR THE DEAF (TDD) 212-504-4115


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JANUARY 3-9,2019

NOTES OF A POOL ROOM JUNKIE HISTORY Remembering the legendary NYC places that attracted the best players and hustlers from all over the country

Sign of the times. Photo courtesy of Harmon Rangell

BY HARMON RANGELL

The first pool room I walked into was in Queens Village, New York, across from the LIRR railroad station on Springfield Boulevard just south of Jamaica Avenue. It was up a long flight of stairs and I think the reason I went there in the first place was because I heard they would serve you a beer even if you didn’t have a draft card. The drinking age was eighteen then and a draft card, issued by selective service on your 18th birthday, was the right of passage. Anyway, I was about sixteen, and sure enough when I nervously asked, a beer slid across the bar. The room was an old-fashioned room, dark if no one was playing. The Tiffany-type lamps that hung over each table lit only if the table was being paid for, switched on by the houseman at the desk when he punched the clock. I think I was immediately hooked. There was a sort of mystery, an underlying sense of danger, for I immediately knew not to challenge anyone there even simply by making eye contact. These were people you didn’t fool around with. In this darkened smoky room the hushed sounds were interrupted only by the clicking noise of the balls hitting each other. Little dramas were being played out at each island of light. There were the hustlers and their “pigeons” — lesser

Julian’s Billiard Academy was over a Horn & Hardart Automat. Photo courtesy of Harmon Rangell players sometimes referred to as “fish” — and if you simply watched for a while, you immediately knew who was who. I really don’t remember how many times I returned there, but I’ve been a pool room junkie ever since. I was never to become a good player. More than fifty years ago I ran forty-eight balls when I was in the U.S. Army in Germany, and before my game collapsed I ran nine a few times in three cushion billiards. But I never graduated from pigeon to player. In the 1960s and 70s there were pool rooms in New York City that attracted the best players and hustlers from all over the country. The most notorious of these was Ames. Located on 44th Street just off Seventh Avenue, it was open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. It was upstairs and when you got to the top of the stairs you were right in the middle of the room. You walked up and you were enveloped by

the sights and sounds of this unique place. In the classic film “The Hustler,” which was partially filmed there, Paul Newman’s character, “Fast Eddie” Felson, walks up to the houseman and asks if they play straight pool there. The houseman, who was the real houseman in a cameo role, replies flatly: “Mister, this is Ames.” Pool hustlers from all over the country would show up at Ames. It was like a magnet. They were like gladiators coming to do battle, always looking to “make a game.” They included Jersey Red, Johnny Ervolino, Boston Shorty, Irving “The Preacher” Crane and Luther “Wimpy” Lassiter, to name a few. I watched them all, smooth and balletic, their cues moving with grace and fluidity. They were the descendants of Hoppe, Mosconi and Rudolph Wandereone, otherwise known as “Minnesota Fats.” It was during these years that I became intrigued with threecushion billiards. Comparing

it to pool was like comparing checkers to chess. The author Robert James Waller once wrote: “There is a beauty about billiards that’s hard to explain if you have never played. It’s like watching a ballet or listening to Bach. It contains within it pure form, point and counterpoint, fugue-like movement and a sense of a small universe into which one can plunge forever ... It is a different place from the cacophony of the pool tables only a few feet away. A place of silence, of concentration, of men who knew what they were doing.” During those years there were many other “rooms” in NYC: There was Julian’s, located on 14th Street just West of Third Avenue. Julian’s was an upstairs room like Ames in that

you walked up into the middle of the room. It was next door to the Academy of Music. There was McGirr’s, a downstairs room at Eighth Avenue and 45th Street. McGirr’s always seemed to me to be the most dangerous. There’s no question the room was filled with gangsters and you wouldn’t want to cross anyone there. There was Executive Billiards on Sixth Avenue about 32nd Street. Just a block or so below Gimbels, it was up a double flight of stairs and was frequented mostly by garment center salesman. There were many quality three-cushion players there at that time, several of whom I would meet again years later. But the room where I spent the most time during those years was O’Brien’s. Located downstairs on 23rd Street just east of Broadway, it was right across the street from Madison Square Park, and only a short walk from my office on 23rd between Sixth and Seventh. It was what a pool room should be, with Tiffany-type lamps, not fluorescents, hanging over each table. Leo J O’Brien owned the room. He was a tall balding retired cop. Many of the lunchtime crowd worked for Met Life whose headquarters building was right across the park on

Your neighborhood news source ChelseaNewsNY.com Julian’s was one of the prime destinations. Photo courtesy of Harmon Rangell

Madison Avenue. There was a short, balding fellow named Sam and a young intense player named Mel who would hunch low over his cue with his face kept at almost table level. I can envision their faces clearly even after all these years. It’s been more than sixty years since I first climbed the stairs of that pool room in Queens Village. Sixty years of feeling a sort of comfort when I would walk into one of those darkened rooms. Sixty years of people whose last names I never knew, knowing them only as ”Brooklyn Jack,” “Cadillac Bob,” “Joe the Cab” and “Frank the Plumber.” None of the NYC poolrooms exist today but I think of them often. The pool room subculture is a relatively small one. We all recognize each other and when a face appears that seems familiar, a face not necessarily known by name, that face might nod — a silent hello, from one junkie to another. Harmon Rangell, 77, has been married to the same good woman for 56 years. He is a father, grandfather, retired businessman, writer, parttime musician, collector of Bonsai trees and self described “Pool Room Junkie.” His novel “Jake’s Tale” is available at Amazon.com. He can be reached at killebrew99@yahoo.com


JANUARY 3-9,2019

7

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

UNDERGROUND CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 for several weeks last spring, or the fans who spontaneously and illicitly renamed Franklin Street station to “Aretha” Franklin Street following the soul singer’s death in August. (The MTA erased the graffiti, but later added a permanent banner to the platform walls reading “Respect” in tribute to Franklin.) These works built upon on the artistic momentum of 2017, which saw the debut of large-scale pieces in each of

the new Second Avenue subway stations — carrying on New York’s proud tradition of public art in public transit. MTA Arts & Design commissions site-specific works in new and newly restored stations through a competitive selection process judged by panels of arts and design professionals. The agency is now in the process of selecting finalists to design proposals for new art in the First Avenue and Bedford Avenue L train stations, which will close for 15 months beginning this spring to repair damage caused by Hurricane Sandy.

View the full image gallery online at CHELSEANEWSNY.COM

The World Trade Center 1 train station at Cortlandt Street reopened in September, 17 years after it was damaged in the 9/11 attacks. “CHORUS” by the artist Ann Hamilton is a marble mosaic of words from the Declaration of Independence and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that rise from the walls. Photo: Patrick J. Cashin/Metropolitan Transportation Authority

In April, a David Bowie photo installation took over the Broadway-Lafayette Street station, near the late musician’s longtime SoHo apartment. Photo: Mark Nimar Yoko Ono contributed a 973-square-foot ceramic mosaic titled “SKY” to the recently overhauled 72nd Street B and C train stop below her residence at the Dakota. Photo: Patrick J. Cashin/Metropolitan Transportation Authority

Renovations to the 163rd Street-Amsterdam Avenue Station, which reopened in September 2018, included the installation of artist Firelei Báez’s glass moscaic “Ciguapa Antellana, me llamo sueño de la madrugada. (who more sci-fi than us).” Photo: Marc A. Hermann / MTA New York City Transit

“Subway Portraits” by Chuck Close at the Second Avenue subway’s 86th Street station. Photo: Steven Strasser


8

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THE MYSTERY OF ‘MISTER WINDOW’ BY DEBORAH FENKER

Mister Window is up late. Again. Actually, I do not know this. Frankly, I don’t even know if “Mister Window” is a mister, or if anyone lives there at all. So let me back up a bit: there is a window which I can see by looking out from my own bedroom window, out to the Chelsea building that looms behind mine. It is a large, not particularly distinct apartment complex, neither old nor new. But it’s been around long enough so that all its original

windows have long been updated to newer, presumably more energyefficient ones. Newer, that is, than the one that catches my eye, that last remaining vestige of the originals, the one that I can see from my room. This window is a classic wooden frame, with multiple rectangular panes in a black painted grid. I imagine it is atrocious to open and close, making an awful screech, which may be why I have never seen that happen, except for perhaps a few-inches crack during the hot-

test of New York summer nights. There is no air conditioner in this window, the only one without; I am not even sure that the ancient frame could support one. It stands out, though, not just for being the final holdout of modernization, but for its categorically nocturnal hours of operation it showcases, so to speak. It is more difficult to tell, during the day, whether or not the lights are one. But I can say at least observationally, unfailingly, if I awaken late, late at night, or arise in the preposterously wee hours

of the morning, Mister Window’s lights are on. I have never seen a face, not a silhouette, not even shadows of movement. I once tried leaving a message with the doorman of the building, who was nice enough to try and help me determine which tenant it might be, and I can only hope that he passed it on. But whether he did, whether Mister Window got the note, or if he just elected not to respond, I will never know. The doorman did seem to know to whom I was referring after a bit of forensics. Specifying the floor and counting the number of windows over from the far right and ultimately snapping a picture from the rooftop of my own build-

ing to show him, we homed in on a suspect. This makes me think Mister Window pre-dates the current doorman, since no one was readily aware of the one remaining apartment with the antiquated, original window treatment. He certainly predates me, as I’ve observed the nighttime glow emanating from the window ever since I moved in. One day, a day to which I’m sure I am not looking forward, the window will most likely be upgraded to match all of its brethren. I suppose there are two occasions upon which this might occur. Either Mister Window joins the 21st century and allows renovation, or Mister Window will have turned out the lights, forever.

TALKING TRASH ... AND RATS BY MEREDITH KURZ

I think my 221,000 nearest neighbors would agree: the Upper West Side is the best place to live, not only in New York City, but on the planet. We’ve got bookstores, store stores, seven subway lines, three crosstown buses, the American Museum of Natural History and the Beacon Theatre. And we have food. We grab groceries at Gristedes, Fairway, Zingones (a tiny grocer that has fresh fruit and veggies and necessities and there’s always a grandchild behind the counter after school, doing their homework), 24-hour bodegas, Citarellas (the fish!), Trader Joe’s, Pioneer Supermarket, Zabars and Barney Greengrass, with its retro chrome and just enough banter to shmear on your bagel. We are the food mecca of Manhattan. We have the best and the most restaurants, outdoor cafés, bakeries (I mean, Levains, come on!), coffee shops, and late night bars. Food carts line Central Park West and dot the inner streets. We’re flanked by the largest city parks, so you can grab a nosh and head to nature.

There’s an overabundance of wonderul things to eat: and this is true whether you’re a human, or a rat. All this food generates a Mount Everest of garbage. Of course, the Department of Sanitation realizes this and provides us with the optimum amount of trash bins, right? Wrong. While we have more restaurants and markets, the Upper West side trash district has fewer trash cans than the Upper East side. In response to his squeaky wheel constituents, East Side Counci Member Ban Kallos used discretionary funds to purchase 284 “High-End Litter Baskets,” with narrow apertures to discourage large trash bag dumping. Similar squeaky wheels made complaints to the Upper West Side’s Council Member Helen Rosenthal, but report that her office has been unresponsive. One irate Upper West Sider wrote on a neighborhood app, “I sent photos to Council Member Rosenthal’s office every day for 3 months and they proceeded to fight me every step of the way.” Recently our paper reported on an Upper East Side turf dispute between two non-profits that employ people to

empty trash cans. (http://www.ourtownny.com/local-news/20181210/ territorial-dispute-over-cleanup-program) So the UES not only has more cans and better cans, it has people fighting to help empty the trash. Certain areas of the UWS are cleaner than others, such as areas with Business Improvement Districts, known as BIDs. The Columbus Avenue BID runs roughly from 67th Street to 82nd Street, between Amsterdam and Columbus. It has just two people assigned to clean-up duty, but that helps to keep the streets swept and the trash picked up. The Lincoln Square staff is larger, and you can see the difference. If you stroll up Amsterdam during or after a weekend, you’ll see the strain of having an enormous amount of foot and food traffic on the sidewalk. At night, it’s time for the vermin to come out and feed, plain and simple. I recall a romantic, early evening hand-in-hand stroll in Central Park, that morphed into a horror scene. As soon as the sun set, rats began gamboling noisily among the leaves, running in droves across the pathway. They seemed annoyed that we dared to be in their area.

Photo: Daniel X. O’Neil, via flickr Daytime parkgoers reported to Assemblywoman Linda Rosenthal (not to be confused with Council Member Helen Rosenthal) that rats were jumping into baby strollers to steal snacks. None of us would leave open trash on our apartment floor, or leave out stale bread thinking we’re feeding pigeons when in fact we’re increasing the vermin population, right? All this open food is a rat magnet and multiplier. Without a sufficient number or types of cans to accommodate the amount of trash generated by all our popular

food venues, we invite rats and mice to an endless bouffet. We will not reduce the rat population until we increase the amount of receptacles and the frequency that the trash is removed from the area. So, what can you do? You can start by contacting your Community Board, or Helen Rosenthal’s office: helen@ helenrosenthal.com. I love my Upper West Side. I want to keep all our “breadbasket of the city” charm. To do this, we need to get rid of a few million of our unwanted visitors.

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Authorities said Wednesday that three homeless men who battled a New York City police officer on a subway platform will face criminal charges after video of the encounter garnered millions of views online. Two of the men will be charged with riot and obstructing governmental administration, police said, while a third man faces those counts in addition to attempted assault, attempted criminal possession of a weapon and menacing. Two of the three men had been taken into custody Wednesday evening. The third remained at large. Two other men in the video, who appeared to be trying to break up the scuffle, arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t facing charges. The charges stem from an incident in which a group of homeless men refused a police officerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s orders to â&#x20AC;&#x153;stand back.â&#x20AC;? Footage of the encounter, viewed more than 4.75 million times on social media, showed Officer Syed Ali using a baton and kicking at the men, who appeared to be drunk, as they come at him one at a time Sunday night. Ali, an Army veteran who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, never pulled his gun. Police cited the men the following day for sleeping on the station ďŹ&#x201A;oor but not for the altercation. The Manhattan District Attorneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dropped that case, citing a policy curbing prosecution of those kinds of low-level violations. But as the video got more and more attention, the decision not to pursue the case drew criticism from Aliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s union, the Patrolmenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Benevolent Association, which said the men â&#x20AC;&#x153;should be held accountable for their actions.â&#x20AC;? The DAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office said prosecutors who declined to move forward on

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Police Officer Syed Ali, praised by Mayor Bill de Blasio for â&#x20AC;&#x153;extraordinary professionalism and bravery.â&#x20AC;? Photo: NYPD Transit, via Twitter the sleeping-related violations were not aware the men also were involved in an altercation with the officer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is no telling how much damage these mopes would have done to that courageous police officer had he not been equipped to handle them,â&#x20AC;? union president Patrick Lynch said in a statement. One of the homeless men tumbled off the platform in the chaos and had to be pulled from the tracks. He and the others were taken to a hospital for treatment. The men werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t arrested until the next morning, when

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JANUARY 3-9,2019

YOU READ IT HERE FIRST 12-14-18

12-17-18

Discover the world around the corner. Find community events, gallery openings, book launches and much more: Go to nycnow.com

SOLD: TWO FABLED UES CHURCHES Jan Hus Presbyterian Church — a storied house of worship on the Upper East Side that once boasted thousands of Czech parishioners — is selling its 1888 building on East 74th Street, Straus News has learned. “We’re relieving ourselves of a burdensome asset so we can live into the future God intends and New Yorkers desperately need,” said Rev. Beverly Dempsey, the senior pastor. “We’re giving ourselves the opportunity to serve the most vulnerable populations of New York City for generations to come.” The Church of the Epiphany — built in 1939 to minister to the nearby hospitals and the only place of prayer on York Avenue — is buying Jan Hus, which sits one block to the

EDITOR’S PICK

Sun 6

west, pastors and lay leaders of both congregations confirmed. “Our building doesn’t work for us, we don’t have enough space, we’re not accessible,” said Rev. Jennifer Reddall. “Now, we’ll be able to significantly expand our ministry to the neighborhood, and at the same time, we’ll get to save a historic building.”

10-19-18

ASSSSCAT 3000 UCB Hell’s Kitchen 555 West 42nd St 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. $12 ucbtheatre.com 212-366-9176

12-8-18

Join UCB for their premier flagship show. The performance consists of UCB improvisers performing scenes with frequent special guests from TV and movies.

SCANDAL? WHAT SCANDAL? IOWA BECKONS

LEADERSHIP Even before he’s sworn in for a second term, Mayor Bill de Blasio will hit the Hawkeye State to rev up his national profile — despite intense blowback from bogus leadpaint inspections at public housing BY DOUGLAS FEIDEN

When the going gets tough, Mayor Bill de Blasio gets going — as far away from City Hall as politically, geograph-

ically and logistically possible. It’s been a four-year pattern. And now, even as his administration reels from a mushrooming scandal at the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA), it is about to repeat itself: The mayor next month packs his bags for Iowa, home of the first-in-thenation caucuses — and graveyard-inthe-cornfields for outsized dreams and overreaching politicians. Fresh from his reelection triumph and two weeks before his swearing-in for a second term, he’ll headline the fifth annual holiday party for the lib-

10-19-18

11-20-18

‘GRAMMAR ZEN’ IN VERDI SQUARE COMMUNITY New Yorkers talk tricky tenses, punctuation passions and more at Ellen Jovin’s UWS pop-up table BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

Are you prepositionally challenged? Hesitant around hyphens? Undergoing a comma crisis? Simply enraptured by the beauty of a well-placed ellipsis? Ellen Jovin wants to talk grammar with you. Jovin has become familiar to Upper West Side word lovers in recent weeks as the face and founder of Grammar Table — a public forum for open-ended discussion of all things language. Armed with a folding

table and an array of reference books and style guides, Jovin sets up shop near the northern entrance to the 72nd Street subway station on Broadway to dole out complimentary (with an “i”) pointers, guidance and emotional support to all comers, from devoted syntacticians to the downright grammar-averse. “Hi, this looks lit,” a young woman said on a recent after-

FIRST IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD (212) 868 - 0190

Thu 3

Fri 4

Sat 5

▲ COMEDY: ON THIS DAY

ALTAI KAI THROAT SINGING VIRTUOSOS

Caveat 21 A Clinton Street 6:30 p.m $10 Based on Facebook memories and the Timehop app, this show does a deep dive about everything that happened on the day of the show. On This Day is about how each day is special to each and every one of us. caveat.nyc 212-228-2100

Rubin Museum 150 West 17th St 7:00 p.m. $30 Hear the otherworldly music of the group Altai Kai. Throat singing and the ringing melodies of the khomus, topshur, and accordion all come together to form the sound of this acclaimed band. rubinmuseum.org 212-620-5000

STORYTIME AND ACTIVITIES FEATURING CLIFFORD THE BIG RED DOG Barnes and Noble 150 East 86th St 11:00 a.m. Free Clifford is an adorable dog whose well-intentioned bumblings have great kid appeal, especially for his owner, Emily Elizabeth. Stop by for a reading about everyone’s favorite big red dog. Plus, get a coupon from the Café for a grilled cheese sandwich with milk or juice for $4. barnesandnoble.com 212-369-2180


JANUARY 3-9,2019

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

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MARBLE COLLEGIATE CHURCH’S

Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Concert:

Celebrating the Legacy of

Aretha Franklin

The Marble Community Gospel Choir directed by Stacy Penson

Sun 6

Mon 7

Tue 8

▼ PLUTO IS MISSING! A NOT-SO-PLANETARY MUSICAL

▲ ASTRONOMY CLUB LET’S TALK ABOUT RACE BABY

GRABIGOUJI: LIFE OF DISAPPEARANCE

The PIT 123 East 24th St 3:00 p.m. $20 When news of its demotion reaches the small planetoid, Pluto leaves the Solar System. This musical is a family-friendly space comedy that blends music, puppets and fantasy with real science and space exploration history. You’ll leave the theater with your head full of catchy songs and astronomical knowledge! thepit-nyc.com 212-563-7488

UCB East Village 153 East 3rd St. 9:00 p.m. $9 This acclaimed all POC improv/sketch comedy group presents their monthly show. Based on interviews with audience members, the group will perform a hilarious show based around the topic of race. ucbtheatre.com 212-366-9231

Anthology Film Archives 32 Second Ave 7:30 p.m. Free Filmmaker and producer, Brigitte Cornand first met renowned artist Louise Bourgeois in 1994, when she made Chere Louise. This final film in their three part series represents a haunting depiction of a great artist contemplating her legacy and her own mortality. anthologyfilmarchives.org 212-505-5181

Wed 9 CONVERSATION: THE SPEED OF DARK The Strand 828 Broadway 7 p.m. Free Author Joram Piatigorsky reads from his memoir about how he broke the chain of his lineage of art, music and banking to establish an important career in science. His nephew, cellist Evan Drachman, head of The Piatigorsky Foundation in Manhattan, will perform. strandbooks.com 212-473-1452

Sunday, January 20 at 3:00pm Admission: $20 at door | $15, seniors Save $5 by ordering in advance online at MarbleChurch.org SAVE THE DATE

Tri-Faith Sunday Worship Sunday, February 3 at 11:00am Marble has been a pioneer in interfaith cooperation in New York City. One of the ways we lift up the importance of interfaith relationships is through our annual “Trialogue.” This year during our service Dr. Michael Bos will have a conversation with dynamic Jewish and Muslim leaders about the future of faith and how we can work for the common good. This is being done as part of the United Nations’ World Interfaith Harmony Week. Invite friends to join you for this special experience.

Event listings brought to you by Marble Collegiate Church. 1 West 29th Street / New York, New York 10001 212 686 2770 / MarbleChurch.org Download the Marble Church App on iPhone or Android


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JANUARY 3-9,2019

Chelsea News|Chelsea Clinton News chelseanewsny.com

AILEY TROUPE CELEBRATES 60 YEARS One of the world’s bestknown dance companies marks a milestone anniversary by looking back at its founder BY JOCELYN NOVECK

It was March 1958 when an African-American dancer named Alvin Ailey, then making his living on the Broadway stage, gathered up a group of fellow dancers and presented a one-night show of his own works. In the audience at the 92nd Street Y in Manhattan was 18-year-old Sylvia Waters, who was studying dance across town at Juilliard. She had never seen anything like it. “It was

absolutely riveting,” she says now. “I had never seen men dance like that.” Most exciting to Waters was seeing people dance “who I could relate to,” she says. “There was something so visceral about the experience. We didn’t know at the time that it was history, but it was definitely special.” It was indeed history: The company born that night, which Waters would join a decade later, is now 60 years old and credited with helping popularize modern dance, as well as bringing the AfricanAmerican experience to a global stage. The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater is one of the best-known companies in the world, touring constant-

Jacqueline Green in Alvin Ailey’s “Revelations.” Photo: Paul Kolnik

ly and still earning rapturous ovations for its signature work, “Revelations,” which tells the African-American story through spirituals and blues. To mark the milestone, the company has been devoting its current New York season to remembering Ailey himself, who died at age 58 in 1989, with a major new work, “Lazarus,” as well as “Timeless Ailey,” a compilation that includes a piece of “Blues Suite,” performed that night in 1958. It’s a time for the company to reflect on how it made it this far, says Judith Jamison, the former Ailey artistic director. “It’s amazing,” says Jamison, 75, who in her dancing years became known for the searing “Cry,” another Ailey signature piece. “I find it remarkable that we still exist today, lo these 60 years. And I think Mr. Ailey would be absolutely besidehimself happy, that something he started 60 years ago could blossom into everything he imagined.” In a recent interview on the sidelines of company rehearsal, Jamison recalled being present as Ailey died, along with Waters and Ailey’s mother. “We were in his room as he passed, and usually you see in movies, that people have their last breath and they breathe out. But Mr. Ailey breathed IN. We expected him to breathe out, and he didn’t. So I think what we’re living on now, is his breath OUT ... that air, that vision, that dream.” A key challenge for the company is keeping Ailey’s memory alive and present — not just for audiences, but for the dancers who never met him. Yannick Lebrun, who grew up in French Guiana and joined the company 10 years ago, says he learned about Ailey from people like Jamison. “She always talked about Alvin and how generous he was, how human he was,” says

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in Rennie Harris’s “Lazarus.” Photo: Paul Kolnik Lebrun, one of the company’s current stars, “and how dedicated he was to sharing his love for modern dance, but also his memories from growing up in the South, and African-American heritage and history.” Ailey grew up in poverty in small-town Texas, to a 17-yearold mother. It’s both the story of his early life and the broader African-American experience that the company is telling with the two-act “Lazarus,” so named for the theme of resurrection. It was choreographed by hip-hop artist Rennie Harris and commissioned by Robert Battle, Jamison’s successor as artistic director. “There came this thing of wanting to hear Mr. Ailey’s voice, because so many of us didn’t have the opportunity to know him,” says Battle. He means “voice” both figuratively and literally; there’s a section of “Lazarus” where the choreographer inserts his own voice into old audio of Ailey, as if interviewing him today. The piece begins with a historical look at the AfricanAmerican struggle, including a depiction of lynchings, and then moves into full-on, highenergy hip-hop. “Hip-hop is a celebration of life,” Battle says. The genre also connects with younger audiences, of course, and the company’s challenge — like that of any arts organization — is to bring younger people into the fold. “Our biggest challenge is the competition for people’s leisure time,”

Battle says. “The phones, the technology.” The cost of touring, too, is rising. “We have to continue to find ways to reach new audiences,” he says. However successful the new piece, or others in the company’s broad repertoire, nothing will ever take the place of “Revelations,” which more than a signature work is the very core of the company’s identity. It’s on the schedule most evenings the company performs. Indeed, the work is so much in demand that none other than Ailey himself tried to cut back on it years ago, to showcase other things. But ticket sales dropped, Battle says, “And so Alvin said, ‘Put it back on!’” Performed everywhere from

Alvin Ailey in performance, c. 1950s. Photo: Zoe Dominic

the Olympics to the White House, the work has often been called the most-seen piece of modern dance, but it’s hard to imagine anything to compare it with. “It’s a phenomenon,” Battle says simply, “a once-in-alifetime work. It’s universal in such a palpable way that no matter if we’re across the street or across the ocean, people have a visceral response.” He describes a trip to Russia where he felt very far from home — until he saw the audience cheering “Revelations.” Suddenly, he says, “it became a church somewhere in the South.” The popularity of “Revelations” is hardly a challenge, Battle says — he sees it as a blessing. “It’s like Aretha singing, ‘Respect,’” he notes. “People don’t get tired of it. It’s, `C’mon, sing it!’” Jamison adds that on evenings when “Revelations” isn’t on the bill, audiences still appreciate seeing the new works — and then, she quips, “they’ll buy another ticket, to get their fix.” Nor do the dancers, for whom “Revelations” is a rite of passage, seem to tire of the work, Lebrun says. “There’s always something new to say,” says Lebrun. “Revelations” is why we are here right now, 60 years later. So if we don’t take care of it ... this most important modern dance piece in the world, then why are we here? Why are we doing what we’re doing?’’


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HALF KING CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Author Dan Kaufman and Glenn Raucher, curator and host of the Half King reading series (at microphones), listening to a question from the audience. Photo courtesy of Glenn Raucher

RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS

years were the toughest. Having to figure out the logistics of running a restaurant and bar on a day to day basis was challenging, he said. But once they got the hang of it, journalists, writers and other customers began to flock to the eatery. It became known for its Monday night author readings and bi-monthly photography exhibits. Though the space could only accommodate 60 or 70 people, The Half King offered an intimate setting for an author to read his or her book and for writers to connect. “I think journalists liked the idea that there was a place for them,” Junger said. “In New York City a place like this doesn’t exist.” Glenn Raucher, who curated and hosted the weekly readings in 2018, is sad that the watering hole is closing. Raucher feels the series had a profound impact on the authors and attendees. Some authors who spoke there include David Johnston, an investigative journalist and author, C.J. Chivers of the New

I’m very sad it’s closing and I’m also sad for New York that businesses keep closing.” Sebastian Junger, author, journalist and co-founder of The Half King

York Times, Marie Brenner of Vanity Fair, author Carmen Gentile and Vegas Tenold, a reporter and author. Raucher noted that while many of these writers were excellent wordsmiths, it was often difficult for some to speak in public. The Half King provided a supportive setting. “It meant a lot to them to have somebody really pay attention to their book,” he said. “People would come in and hear a story that they had never heard.” Raucher said he is looking for a new space for the series. Gentile, who has been a writer for 20 years, kicked off his book tour for “Blindsided by the Taliban,” in April 2018 at The Half

JANUARY 3-9,2019 King. He had been there a few times as a patron, but this was his first as an author. During the event, he met a few people in the foreign news world who have since approached him for work. “It really set the tone for what was to come afterwards,” Gentile said. “It’s one of those places in New York and frankly the world where you can have a unique and meaningful experience that covers conflict and foreign affairs that you can’t find much elsewhere. It’s a shame that it’s closing.” In February 2018, Tenold read his “Everything You Love Will Burn,” a book about the resurgence of white supremacist and nationalist groups and their path to political power. He had been to readings there before, but this was his first time in the spotlight. Tenold, who lives in Norway, has been a journalist for eight years and didn’t know The Half King was closing. “As an aspiring writer you kind of always wanted to be the guy doing the reading,” he said. Being invited to The Half King was a big deal. It created a community that many New York writers will miss.

DEC 19 - 25, 2018 The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml. Ajisen Ramen

136 West 28 Street

Grade Pending (43) Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Live roaches present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service.

Fresh & Co

444 10th Ave

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Smithfield Hall

138 W 25th St

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Starbucks

525 W 26th St

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Just Salad

291 7th Ave

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Sliced

264 35th St

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Chimney Cone Factory

167 W 32nd St

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Norwood

241 West 14 Street

A

Soho 99 Cents Cheese Pizza

204 W 14th St

A

Ample Hills Creamery

141 8th Ave

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Empire Cake

112 8 Avenue

A

Just Salad

140 8th Ave

A

Popeye’s Louisiana Kitchen 252 8th Ave

A

Artlovers

180 9th Ave

Grade Pending (27) Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Food Protection Certificate not held by supervisor of food operations. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas.

Cafeteria

119 7 Avenue

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L’arte Del Gelato

75 9th Ave

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Author Bryan Mealer (left) with author and editor Roger Hodge at the Half King. Photo courtesy of Glenn Raucher


JANUARY 3-9,2019

KOSHER RESTAURANTS CLOSE ON THE UPPER WEST SIDE SMALL BUSINESS

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City regulations and religious oversight add to the difficulties of doing business

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BY JASON COHEN

December was a bad month for kosher restaurants on the Upper West Side. Coffeeberry, Chocolate Works, Seasons and Big Bang Burger all shuttered their doors. Big Bang Burger opened a year ago at 426 Amsterdam Ave., between 80th and 81st Streets, and closed Dec. 24. The burger joint was started by Dr. Gabriel Feldman and Jane Potter, who wanted to combine their love for science with food, spawning the name of the restaurant from the television show “The Big Bang Theory.” Feldman told the West Side Spirit that they tried to keep the place afloat, but nothing ever worked. Whether it was the loopholes they had to jump through with the Department of Buildings, kosher oversight, an unprofessional restaurant consultant or rent of $13,500, it was simply too much. “I think our restaurant consultant mislead us,” Feldman said. “We didn’t have any success. The difficulties of having a place on the UWS is insurmountable.” Prior to Big Bang Burger, Feldman had a small frozen yogurt place in the Bronx, but it didn’t pan out. However, knowing there is a large Jewish population on the UWS, he thought a kosher place would work. At first, the place was just dairy and called Bazinga Café. However, Feldman saw that wasn’t working, so he and Potter quickly changed to burgers. The goal was to make a fun place with good food for the community, but they soon discovered owning a kosher restaurant in the Upper West Side was almost impossible. “[The city] absolutely could

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Cultural Events Out with a Big Bang: Photo courtesy of Jane Potter care less, whether it’s architecture or a grease trap,” he said. “It’s all [so] complex that you need a navigator just to hold on.” They learned that even though Mayor Bill de Blasio claims to be pro-small business, it’s the landlords that really run the city. “The landlords are charging twice what [rent] should be,” Feldman said. “We’ve become a society of landlords on the Upper West Side. The rents are so high that all you can do is serve liquor or high-end desserts.” Feldman feels opening a restaurant in the Upper West Side is not place for beginners. Furthermore, owning a kosher place requires constant oversight from mashgiachs, or kosher food supervisors, which can be a costly hassle. “There’s really no future for Glatt kosher places on the UWS,” Feldman said. “It’s really a place for super-experi-

enced, super-wealthy people that want to open up.” Coffeeberry, which opened in 2015, was located at 618 Amsterdam Avenue, on the corner of 90th and Amsterdam. It originally closed in mid-November for renovations, but in early December officially shut its doors. Seasons, the kosher grocery store chain, which filed for bankruptcy in September, closed its Upper West Side location at 661 Amsterdam Ave. on Dec. 28. Seasons began in 2010 in Flushing and eventually expanded to seven locations; two on Long Island, two in New Jersey, one in Baltimore, one in Scarsdale and their UWS store. After seven years on the UWS at 641 Amsterdam Avenue, between 91st and 92nd Streets, Chocolate Works closed on New Year’s Eve. Manager Natalie Serussi said their rent doubled and it was not affordable to remain open.

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640 NEW SCHOOL SEATS PLANNED FOR UES EXCLUSIVE City capital plan proposes $93 million project to expand East Side public school capacity

I saw a lot of children being turned away, which is why I’ve been pushing for these additional seats.”

BY MICHAEL GAROFALO

The city aims to add 640 new public school seats on the Upper East Side as part of its upcoming $17 billion fiveyear school capital plan. Plans for expanding the neighborhood’s school capacity appear in the School Construction Authority and Department of Education’s proposed capital plan for fiscal years 2020-2024. The 640 Upper East Side seats are among the 2,794 new seats the plan calls for in School District 2, which includes the Upper East Side, Midtown, Chelsea and much of Lower Manhattan. An SCA and DOE spokesperson did not comment on whether the city has identified potential sites for the 640 new seats. But Council Member Ben Kallos, who advocated for the agencies to expand school capacity in his Upper East Side district, said that the added seats will most likely be located in a new school. “My preference is for one large school,” Kallos said, adding, “Based on the work I’ve been doing with the SCA to find a location for this school, I believe that there will be a site large enough to accommodate all 640 seats, if not more.” The 640-seat Upper East Side project will cost an estimated $92.85 million, with an expected completion date of March 2025, according to the proposed capital plan. The city hopes to start design work by Sept. 2020 and begin construction by Dec. 2021. District 2 as a whole is slightly below its full enrollment capacity, but

Council Member Ben Kallos

grade over the next decade — a result of DOE’s formula for projecting future enrollment, which assigns District 2 the city’s lowest expected pupil contribution rate for new housing units. Overall pre-kindergarten to eighth grade enrollment in Manhattan is expected to drop nearly 14 percent over the same period.

VYING FOR AVAILABLE SEATS

P.S. 198, at 96th Street and Third Avenue, received 243 applications for 50 available kindergarten seats in 2018. Local leaders are hopeful that the city’s plan to add additional elementary school seats on the Upper East Side will reduce overcrowding and result in more students attending their school of choice. Photo: Jim.henderson, via Wikimedia Commons elementary schools in the portions of the district represented by Kallos and his Council colleague Keith Powers — encompassing the East Side from roughly 14th to 96th Streets — are overcrowded, operating slightly over combined capacity as of the 2016-2017 school year. Kallos is hopeful that the new seats will reduce overcrowding, allow more students to attend their school of choice and offset future capacity needs resulting from new residential projects in the neighborhood. “I see cranes wherever I look,” Kal-

los said. “We literally have multiple buildings on 86th Street going up on the same block. The Second Avenue subway has brought with it a new construction boom and our neighborhood is already at 102 percent capacity. This is about building for the future.” According to DOE estimates, work will have begun on over 24,000 new residential units in District 2 by 2024, the highest total of any school district in the city. But despite the projected housing growth, DOE expects a slight enrollment drop of 1.4 percent in District 2 for pre-kindergarten to eighth

A DOE report mandated under legislation sponsored by Kallos shows that kindergarten applications at many East Side schools substantially exceed the number of available seats. P.S. 151 the Yorkville Community School, on East 88th Street, for example, offered admission to 120 kindergarteners in 2018 after receiving 316 applications for 75 available seats. During the same admissions cycle, 243 prospective kindergarteners applied to P.S. 198 the Straus School, vying for 50 available seats (the school offered admission to 122 students). “I saw a lot of children being turned away, which is why I’ve been pushing for these additional seats,” Kallos said, adding that parents often turn to private schools when their children don’t receive offers from their preferred public schools. “I want to have such amazing public schools and such amazing facilities that parents are choosing our public education system

over the best private schools in the world,” he said. A DOE and SCA spokesperson did respond to inquiries regarding whether the agencies tracks the number of students who opt to attend private schools after not receiving offers to their public schools of choice, or whether enrollment projections account for localized housing trends within school districts. “The SCA takes extensive measures to create accurate projections about future seat needs for districts, including a demographer who provides projections,” the spokesperson wrote in an emailed statement. The proposed school capital plan for 2020-2024, which will be submitted to the mayor and City Council for adoption later this year, allocates $7.88 billion toward creating nearly 57,000 new seats citywide. Roughly 23,000 of the seats were originally funded in the previous five-year capital plan. The plan includes 88 new school facilities, five of which will be located in Manhattan. According to City Council analysis, the majority of the seats, including the new Upper East Side school, are projected to be completed between 2025 and 2028, after the last fiscal year of the proposed capital plan. Under the current capital plan, the city opened two new pre-kindergarten facilities on the East Side in 2018, with another on East 76th Street scheduled to open in fall 2019, for a total of more than 400 new pre-kindergarten seats. “The SCA is dedicated to providing all children with access to high quality school facilities and will continue to innovatively design and construct much needed seats throughout the City,” Lorraine Grillo, the president and CEO of the SCA, said in a statement.

Neighborhood Scrapbook

HOLIDAY MASS AT BELLEVUE On Christmas Eve, Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan went to NYC Health + Hospitals/Bellevue to celebrate Mass for patients and staff in the Catholic Chapel. The Cardinal attended a reception after Mass with participants, toured the adult and pediatric emergency rooms and greeted patients and staff. In his homily, Cardinal Dolan said that if Joseph and Mary had come to Bellevue, they would not have been turned away because Bellevue turns no one away.

The Cardinal (center) with all the celebrants, including Bellevue priests and brothers. Photo courtesy of NYC Health + Hospitals/Bellevue


JANUARY 3-9,2019

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LEGAL WEED? NOT SO FAST The founder of Phoenix House adds his voice to the marijuana debate BY DAVID NOONAN

Dr. Mitchell S. Rosenthal has dedicated his life to helping people overcome addiction, providing them with the treatments and social services they need to live healthy, productive lives. In 1967, Rosenthal, a psychiatrist, founded Phoenix House, which today operates scores of alcohol and drug abuse programs in nine states. In 2007, he created the Rosenthal Center, which offers information and guidance about addiction and related issues to individuals, families, health care providers and policymakers. Rosenthal, an Upper East Sider, spoke with Straus News about marijuana and Governor Andrew Cuomo’s recently announced plan to legalize recreational use by adults in New York state, which was endorsed by Mayor Bill de Blasio.

Ten states have legalized recreational use of marijuana and New York state could join them. What are your chief concerns about a trend that seems to be accelerating?

One major concern is the increased use and increased availability of the new marijuana, which is so much more powerful than the marijuana of 20 years ago. It’s a different beast, and that’s why I suggested, in the November report from the Rosenthal Center, that we pause and do a two-year moratorium to look at what has happened, and what is happening, in the states where there has been legalization.

How would you use that two years? I would use it to ask questions, such as “What has happened to eighth graders? And to twelfth graders? What are the patterns?” There has been a big increase, a doubling of use, between 2002 and 2016, where there has been legalization.

Young people are a special concern of yours, aren’t they? Marijuana is not a benign drug for adolescents ... Kids who use marijuana regularly, it’s bad for their brains, bad for cognitive function. It’s a gateway drug for adolescents who are regular users. I started to get concerned about this 40 years ago, at Phoenix House, where I was seeing adolescents whose drug of abuse was marijuana, have

Photo courtesy of Dr. Mitchell S. Rosenthal their lives so undone, and become so socially disordered, that they needed to go into full time residential treatment. And that was marijuana that was relatively weak. Developing brains are vulnerable. There is already evidence from some of the research being done that there is actually structural change in the brains of regular users. I’m very troubled by that. And it’s not just 12- to 17-year-olds. You’ve got to look at 18to 25-year-olds. If they are regularly

using the kind of potent marijuana that is now available, they will get in serious drug trouble, too.

How do you view the increasing pace of the legalization movement? There has been a kind of chain reaction of acceptance, and an insufficient amount of critical thinking. It’s ironic that more than 60 percent of Americans feel that marijuana is benign. We did a study at the Rosenthal Center in 2017 and found that parents would be happier if their kids were using marijuana than alcohol or cigarettes.

What do you think is driving the change in attitude about marijuana? This is a new, promising big business, so big business is driving this. And you have lobbying by companies, in the states, to bring about legalization. And there has not been a lot written yet about adolescent brains and gateway phenomena and so forth. So marijuana is still enjoying a reputation of being safe.

where there is a component of marijuana in the medicine. Right now there are some seizure disorders where it seems promising. But the incidence of those seizure disorders is very small.

If you could speak directly to Governor Cuomo, what would you say? I’d say “Listen, you have been very careful about mental health issues, and issues involving children, and homelessness. Let’s pause here and take more of a look. I don’t think we need to rush into legalization. We have some [marijuana] medicalization going on in the state, it’s one of the more careful programs anywhere in the country. Let’s stay with that.”

Finally, the thing that is missing from the current marijuana debate in New York state is ______________ . Caution. Because the train is moving so fast towards legalization, and commercialization, which is the turbocharger, I’m afraid that we will look back and see a lot of harm that nobody is thinking about right now.

Do you believe marijuana has legitimate medical applications?

us to

you You’d look Marijuana for sale. Photo: Dank Depot, via flickr

?

into

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have

Do

Know somebody who deserves their 15 Minutes of fame? Go to chelseanewsNY.com and click on submit a press release or announcement.

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I think that the evidence so far — the number of carefully done studies where you say “Hey, here is a condition and marijuana, or a derivative of marijuana, will be good for that condition” — is scant. In the future, however, I think there will be legitimate uses ...

Email us at news@strausnews.com


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WORD SEARCH by Myles Mellor

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JANUARY 3-9,2019

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to hav e is the sixthin the city. past thre been hit by a person car in the to The ee days alone. least 20New York Tim According cyclists pedestrians es, at have bee and thr accidents ee n kill more tha so far this ed in traffic VOL. 2, yea n ISSUE been inju 900 pedest r, and 08 rians hav It’s demred. e of victim oralizing. If fam s, ilies heighten a devoted mayor and a dent in ed awarenes the proble s can’t ma Amid the ke m, wh at can? New Yor carnage, Immedia kers once agathough, hit, bys tely after Da in rallied. A CASI group tanders ran to uplaise was MANH NO IN managof them, workin try to help. in hopesed to flip the carg together, A < BUSI ATTAN? of NESS, on res its cuing Unfor sid P.16 She wa tunately, it didDauplaise. e, Bellevues pronounced n’t work. The a short wh dead at citizensefforts of our ile later. fell to hearten save a str ow us, despit anger sho recklessn uld e who con ess of a danthe continued a place tinue to makegerous few THE SE of traged our street y. OFsOU COND DISG

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First, obvious: let’s start wit condition h the city’s hom s inside thi disgrace. eless shelte rs are as A ser one mo ies of terrible (includinre horrible tha crimes, month g the killing n the last of ear lier this daugh a woman has higters in Statenand her two hlighted Island), living con the the ma ditions for shameful cities inrgins of one ofpeople at Blasio, the world. Ma the richest wh yor o has bee Bill de his app from theroach to homn halting in has final beginning elessness proble ly begun to of his term, from thim, but years ofaddress the others, s administra neglect, tion and will take But years to correct. recent none of that exc office grandstanding uses the appareof Gov. Andrew by the Cuomo, he can’tntly sees no iss who In the try to belittl ue on which attempt governor’s late the mayor. officials at a hit job, est sta compla then pro ined te Post, abomptly to the to the city, homele ut a gang New York alleged ss shelter, purape at a city VOL. 77 had tim event before blicizing the , ISSUE pol e 04 As it turto investigate ice even ned out, it. never hap the officials pened, infuriaincident media hitwho called it ting city a ” “po aim the mayor ed at em litical . More cha barrassin counter-c rges and g THfolElow the me harges Dicken antimeA , of cou ed. In Tditrse men, wosian livingR OionF, the con in New men D kidsIM s for Yor andEN Here’s k goe s on. in shelters CITY ARTS, leadershi hoping tha t som P.2any eday our as intere p in Alb 0 as it is in sted in helpinwill become back fro agains scoring pol g them t sit itical poi 17 fee m FDR Drour ive byting mayor. nts t 16 to out of and raise

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it on the floo as red d plain, e foot uc building e the heigh as well three. from four t of the storie HAPP s to The ref urbishe would SNOWY LITTLE d sit FLAKES pier pil atop newl bu ild ing y food ma ings and restored Reme board co Transpa officia sio’s fi mber Mayo Jean-G rket overseenntain a expre ls, but rst r Bil eorge linger ov rency concer by sse me W ch Th s Vong hat a winter in his l de Blaef mbers e pr ns develop d concern dif fer redeveloper Howard Hu new years the de oposal also erichten. er ’s vis s that the ence Se ma molit ca lls a coup job? Seaport ment plans ghes’ pieapor t is be ion for th Ho ion for Hit wi kes. le of for the ing e tw use and Lin of the He ceme after th a snow ad o dil k Bu compre al instead relea sed sto tak new ma ing off ice rm shortly of in on adjacen apidated str ild ing, hensive Howa BY DAN t e in pro uc The new would yor fumble in 2014, th IEL FIT front ofto the Tin Bu tures CB1’s rd Hughes posal. d in a wa ZSIMM e co Jan. 19 ly restored me Pie ild joi ONS Re half of ing r 17. to The joi cen Tin presen South nt La nd mamet with his ter define th y that nt La nd tation Building, as by the tly announ Stree un So rk e m. to Comm fi ut fir s lle envisio ced Ho h ma Ce Po an t Seap st d. Stree nter d Ce plans poration ward Hu ned unity Bo storm Official wa tholes we t Seap rks and nter gh pla ns on Jan. 19 or t/Civic nt ’s ard 1. in Howard Hu at the for the Tin es Corfor th to unve Residen severity wernings on the a resolucomm ittee or t/Civic ghes a fou e s passe re mu ts in ne re ce iveSouth Stree Building r-s tory Tin Build il the pr tion in did dd igh d n’t led t supp structur ing bo op prov al d preli mi Seaport plaine vote for de rhoods tha . e at thelandm arke , of Howa osal, but req or t of na co d from being that their strBlasio com-t comm ry ap - Hording to the Seaport. Acd pla n for rd Hughes uested plo un ity a was lat wed -- a eets weren - ing wa rd Hu gh presentation - the Seap redevelopmmaster su ’t es ort , wo to mo tion-trucer proven spicion tha ve the is propos uld inc as a whole ent at ou t Tin Bu , wh lude the This k GPS data. t by sanitailding compa ich new detime aroun ny’s CONTINU d, ED ON ch arge Blasio seem an entirely PAGE 5 was for . Before th ed to be Sanitati e storm in ceful, Ins on bu tea , t no he d architect Dept. build closin of jumpin t panicke d. g g storm ure, is press ing, praised waited subways or the gun an ed into for d service its then ac for the storm schools, he during detectedted decisive to develop the , We do a sense of huly. We even n’t wa mor in The bu cre nt it all dit tha to give BY DEE to life ilding looks him mo . someth n is due, PTI HAJ , all re bu ELA ing can loo angles an like a mode t there about seeme rn d wa thi d nation k bluish or gra edges, with art painting New Yo to bring ou s storm tha s t rkers. t the be in any of the three. yish or wh concrete wa come On Su itish, or settin lls st of functi g, but It would be some that alpine nday, the cit an no on pounds it was cre ne more tha unusual str combiskiers vil lage. Cr y felt like an ate uc of the n rock sal d for --- sto the fairly pro ture snow plied the pa oss-cou nt ry rin t bo sai tha rks g CONTINU c tho t the cit hot ch ots and pa , people y’s De usands of ED ON ololat rkas ord in partm PAGE 29 wi es, th su ered kid ent of of sledd nburned fac s came home es after ding. There a day tent. Qu were pock ets the plo eens reside of disco nand elew trucks by nts felt th at the sch cted offici passed them, als closed ools should there sa id for ha But ov another da ve stayed %TGCVKX just en erall, consid y. G9TKVK PIr &CPEG snows dured the secering we ha r/QVK torm in d QP2KE lovely our his ond-biggest VWTG# litt TVUr and his le chapter tory, it was /WUKE a for the subjects r6JG mayor CVTGr . 8KUWC

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FOR PARK REDESIGN

Bu On Sa 13 10 15 siness BY EM ILY TOW parishioturday mo Minutes 16 NER rn and low ners, comm ing, archit 19 ered in er Manhatt unity me ects, mb vision St. Paul’s Ch an residents ers for Tr ap gat el hto discu inity Ch building ss urch’s The ex . new pa the rish Place acr isting bu ild been cle oss from Tr ing, on Tr inity inity Ch ared for 1923, urc de it the chu no longer sermolition. Buh, has tower rch and the ves the ne ilt in wi com ed The we ll be built in munity. A s of new in a ser ekend me its place. eti — collabies of commu ng was the needs orative for nity “charr fifth an um ett the low d wants of s to addre es” a whole er Manhatt the church ss the and an com . “In ou munit of r y initial as about charr buildinghow we wa ettes we talked for the to be a homented th is pa hood,” homeless an for the spi rish rit fer, Tr said the Re d for the neigh ual, v. Dr. Wi ini bor“We tal ty Wall Street lliam Lu ked ’s prector What ab . they wo out minis try act look,” uld be ivi Lu marke pfer said. , how they ties. wo t underst study in ord“We condu uld cte desires and neighbo er to objec d a dream as well as rhood needtively s.” parish s and He sai hopes and sion em d the churc tality braces a ph h communit The can tha ilo ride in coming t is “open sophy for y’s viCe carouseldidate’s owne ho , flexibl .” On the ntral Park. “We wa e and spifamilia puts New Yo rship of the wela white wall next to nt it street r bind rkers in , access to be visiblP.9 > that rea placard wi the entrance a Gemm ible to e from the com and Re ds, “Trum th red letter is well, a Whitema the CONTINU p Ca munit gulat ing who we n and ind It’s y, BY DAN Engla ED ON Joel Ha re on lat icatio ions” -- rousel Ru PAGE 6 weekd e afternoon IEL FITZSIMM presid ns that Do one of the les day, nd and rode vacation uxONS ay, an on only sai the en fro nald a mi tial d lining opera bearing d they notic carousel Mo m up to pakids and tou ld winter tes the candidate, J. Trump, ed the Trum ntially ow car ris y Tr $3 for “It p’s ns an placar New Yo a qu ts are see um p’s po ousel. d ma was in my name. OurTown d rk mo lit ics ping int n, he ment: intesenDowntow wh ad o the car have be 20gav a carou weigh 16 e he en asked ,” said Wh n gu sel an aft a deep ernoo ousel, as rid n in En r pause. “H if the realiz iteOTDOW O n esc ly divisiv gla ati ers e’s NTOW like, ‘Do nd, so in my not very lik on e candid ape again N.COM st he ed I want ate. Newsche to give ad I was a bit ck money @OTD CO Cri me Wa NTINU to this owntown 2 Cit tch ED ON y

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Accor DOB, Coding to sta STREETORY OF OU tis R agency nEd report tics provid S ed by over 20 in 2015, a ed 343 shutoff the The 40 Ruby BY DAN trend 14’s 67 shu 0 percent s to the New Yorworst and the IEL FIT ey on Mak has been ap toffs. increa ZSIMM takeo An So far pears to be Monday k were both best of ONS ut tha spending mid-d in 2016 increa d the upwa se on displa mo mo issert n acc mid a the sin re rd docto ording y town. rning on 36th mong eve re ha ation is worki Street in ng at lea , and her ne rate stude “Since to the DO ve been 157 n more: Ca rol “A lot nt B. Da shu w rice st as uplaise, toffs, noticing the spring owner cooker to eat of it is just ou hard. the a no gas, a lot of pe of last year crossingof a jewelry com 77-year-o cook at lot more,” t of pocket, op we sta going rted water either cookin le coming Street Madison Av pany, was ld steam home it’s jus said Mak. “W ,” out in ing an said Donna g gas or he that had when a during the mo enue at 36th cally.” things with t a rice cooker hen we at livery-cab rning rus it, or ma Ameri d commun Chiu, direct and hot cor . You can ner h dri ity or can La st Se and hit ke rice, her. ver turned the Chiu cal s For Equa ser vices forof housptemb The basihundred er Asian said AA led the inc lity. arresteddriver of the car no natur s of others her bu ild ing ing an FE is worki rease “freak pedest for failing to was joi ned an ins al gas, cut across the d pe off town almost a dong with Ma ish,” and been citrian, and cop yield to a Building ction blitz by Con Ed city with an ser vic d the Lowe zen others k’s buildtraffic vioed for at leasts say he had a month s that bega by the city’sison after es. 10 oth lations advocat And Ch r East Side in ChinaIt sin wa East Vil after a fat n last April, Dept. of iu, lik ce 2015. er es, ha al ga e ma to restor exp les litany ofs but the latest lage tha s t claim s explosion s than lon loitation by witnessed ny housinge that hav traffic deaths in a sad ed two bu g servic in the a lives. e interr ilding owne pattern of Mayor e lingered on, and injuries rs wh uptions curb traBill de Blasio’s despite CONTINU in an eff o proffic crashe efforts ort to ED ON Da to uplais s PA

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accuse capita d of overleve l. very James Beninati anraging invest lions aftCabrera, we d his partn or re BY DAN Antar er the firm sued for mier, The Ba IEL FIT es ZSIMM condo uhouse Gr assets was stripp ’s collapse, lONS and ou ed of mo in p’s 90 the lat project on A rep the late-a st of its 0-foo Sutto n Place t the Ba resentative ughts. velopmeest lux ur y res for uhouse fundin nt to suffer idential is a req Group Beninati an ue de g, fro did st for d - tim as inv ingly comm not return estors m a lack of e. wary ent by are inc of fin at the Sto press rea ler an top a surpl end of the cing projec s- Deal ne also spok outlookus in inven market du ts a notic wspaper las e to the Re tor e will ma on whether y and a tep to ap ar tmeable decre t month ab al ase out affluent terialize id lig en News buyer hted ma t sa les, whin high-end down of s the roa the 80 rke ich hig squa re avera d. -st ge nu t data tha hmb April, foot propo or y, 260,0 t apart ments er of days said the an 00 squat d sent the sa l broke las spent in new for-sa neigh and sleepy comparative t perce on the marke developme le VOL. 42 bo nt munit rhood int Sutton Pla ly and the between t increased nts , ISSUE o the y 47 en 09 tions, Board 6 vo a panic. Co ce “E very d of last yea end of 20 man ice 14 on d r. d Council e’s a its ob Kallos Stoler lit jec the bu came out str member Be - $2,50 told TRD. “W tle worri ed ilding 0 ’s heigh ongly again n lende [per square ith anything ,” plicat ions. rs are t and soc st at foo t] ver or But it Stoler ial imtold thi y cautious.” more, opposit wa sn’t jus s ne wspape house ion workingt commun CONTINU r that ED ON Mi aelprincipal Jo against Baity PAGE 5 seph u20ch Sto ne r16 at the ler, a mana Beninati. Jewish invest ging pa son Re wome me n and the wo backg alty Capital, nt firm Ma rtgirl rld by rou lighting s light up candle tares Inv nd also plasaid Beninatidis every the Sha yed bbat Friday 18 min a role. ’s Benin estment Pa eve utes bef < NEW An ati co Friday ore sun ning -foundertners, the fi schoo S, Ma set. l rm P.4 For mo rch 11 – 5:4 boast classmate thad with a pre 1 pm. re info ed $6 rm www.c billion t at one po p habadu ation visit int in ass pperea ets, wa stside.co s m.

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Chelsea News - January 3, 2019  
Chelsea News - January 3, 2019  
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