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ÂŁ4.30 Issue #1664 | AUGUST 2013 www.yachtsandyachting.co.uk 08 9 770044 000205

Record

Breakers! Francis Joyon 5 days across the Atlantic Ben Ainslie Round the Island souvenir ESSENTIAL GUIDE

Cowes Week How to win, where to meet

IQUE TECHN

20 MOAVVOEIDS TO

CHELSEA ARINE M MAGAZINES

505 WORLDS

Champion dinghy sailors share their secrets

BOAT TEST

The new Nacra 17 Olympic class under the spotlight

TRAVEL: GREECE The joys of dinghy sailing and relaxing in the sun

ANTIGUAN WIN How to put together a winning campaign

CHELSEA ARINE M MAGAZINES


mlindberg 1231 · Patented

Eddie Jordan at the wheel of “Lush” during the Oyster Round the World Race 2013


THIS MONTH

PHOTO: PAUL WYETH

AUGUST 2013

34 OPINION

rom Laser 5000s to International Moths and Volvo 70s, Andy Budgen has enjoyed an incredibly diverse sailing career. But if you ask him what the common thread through the past 25 years has been, it’s a need for speed. ‘I think that I’ve been trying to get my hands on the fastest boat I could ever since I was 17,’ he says. ‘When the Laser 5000 came along, that was one of the fastest things around, and then when the Moth got onto foils, I thought I must have a go at that.’ His fastest toy of the moment is a Volvo Open 70, but more of that later. Andy’s accent is quite a giveaway to his roots, the Scottish burr coming through loud and clear despite having moved to the south coast in his teens. Andy and his older brother Ian learned the ropes sailing keelboats with their father at Royal Gourock YC near Glasgow. When the family moved south to Warsash, the Budgen brothers joined a strong local 420 squad and found themselves sailing against talented sailors such as Ian Walker and John Merricks. But the Olympic classes of the time did not excite the Budgens, who were more taken with the explosion of the new asymmetric classes. After dabbling in the International 14 the brothers were attracted by the launch of the brand new Laser 5000 class. They found themselves a good sponsor that paid enough for them to train and race full-time. With Audi sponsoring the European circuit and television shows going out on Sky Sports, it was an exciting time to be involved. Many good sailors came to compete

11 A few rounds of pure sailing spirit Bob Fisher

Pete Cumming

From skiffs to ocean racing machines, Andy Budgen has always been drawn to boats with an impressive turn of foot, as he revealed to Andy Rice

in the new, short-course format racing, including Paul Brotherton, Tim Hancock, Mark Rushall, Tracey Covell and the Greenhalgh brothers. But the professional approach of the Budgens made them a cut above, and they won most of the regattas they entered. The Laser 5000 was originally developed as the Olympic 5000, specifically to a brief laid down by ISAF for an exciting new doublehanded Olympic class. When ISAF held trials at the end of 1996 for a new doublehander, the Laser 5000 seemed the obvious front-runner. But among the many boats that came to win the coveted spot, it was the 49er that really captured the attention. When it was selected as the new Olympic class, at last the Budgens had a boat that excited them sufficiently to want to get involved in the Olympic circuit. This was also the time when Lottery funding began and British squad sailors could qualify for the kind of money that would enable them to sail fulltime. The Budgens threw themselves into their training and in 1998 finished second at the world championships, behind the then-dominant team of Chris Nicholson and Dan Phillips from Australia. They also acquitted themselves well at the Olympic test regatta in Sydney later in the year. But

I’ve been trying to get my hands on the fastest boat I could ever since I was 17 36

Robertson 14 Andi Could Cup sailors be tempted back to the TP52 fleet?

Yachts & Yachting

August 2013

16 Cover story What a man, and what

34

a record... Louay Habib finds out more about this solo magician

ever Round the Island? 22 Best Cover story From Ben Ainslie’s

42

record to the final finisher, Helen Fretter reveals the tales behind this year’s spectacular race

for a spin in the new Olympic mixed multihull class

boats 65 New Including a new dinghy from Poland

www.yachtsandyachting.co.uk

August 2013

Yachts & Yachting

focus: ‘Esimit Europa’ 68 Design Rebirth of the former ‘Alfa Romeo II’

share their thoughts on negotiating shifty breezes

bag 70 Kit The latest new gear and gadgets from

Cowes Week: from the top

Cover story Rupert Holmes seeks out some essential winning tips, and outlines the latest changes for 2013

Andy Budgen From Moths to Volvo Ocean racers, Andy Rice finds out what it’s like to race the full spectrum of craft

TECHNIQUE

48 Cover story We highlight 20 of the Manoeuvres: what not to do

most common mistakes and how to avoid them!

solo record photo: Jean-Marie Liot/Dppi/iDeC*

Francis Joyon has decimated the transatlantic solo record, crossing in just under five days and three hours. But who is the French master of speed with his magnificent red flying machine? Louay Habib learns more about Joyon and the trimaran ‘Idec’

August 2013

www.yachtsandyachting.co.uk

August 2013

Rob Melotti

Spraytop or drytop? 73 Georgie Corlett looks at the essentials that make for a good buy

TRAVEL chill-out 78 Greek Tom Gruitt and Emma Turner find

Yachts & Yachting

17

ESSENTIALS and Classes 86 Clubs Grassroots and grand-prix events

A winning campaign

on the water 92 Boats Our top picks

why his team did well in this year’s Antigua Race Week

of the month 98 Position The coolest pose ever!

52 Cover story Phillipe Falle assesses

mAgiciAn Yachts & Yachting

and J-Boats’ latest baby

out how to sail and relax

Francis Joyon

16

37

Picking the shifts

30 Cover story 505 worlds winners

ANALYSIS Joyon’s 5-day transatlantic

Nacra 17 58 Test: Cover story Jeremy Evans goes

as the Olympic trials drew closer, the tense relationship between the brothers did not help their cause. They finished fourth in the trials, with Ian Barker and Simon Hiscocks going on to win a silver medal at Sydney 2000.

Separate ways

That was the end of the brothers’ partnership, with Ian going on to become a professional trimmer at GBR Challenge, and then with Paul Cayard on two successive Volvo Ocean Race campaigns. Andy, meanwhile, set himself up as a property developer and started to earn a good living whilst also carrying on sailing for the fun of it. Dinghy sailing took a back seat for a while as he bought a Sigma 38, which he raced successfully at the likes of Cowes Week and Cork Week. But a Sigma 38 hardly fulfilled Andy’s thirst for speed and performance. He convinced a friend, Fred Schwyn, to buy a Volvo Ocean 60 which they ran as a charter vessel for events around the Solent and English Channel, as well as twice in the Rolex Fastnet Race. Andy was still missing the thrill of skiff racing, the part of the sport where he had always excelled thanks to his rock-solid boat handling skills and nofear approach to strong wind sailing. In his Laser 5000 days he had toyed with the idea of doing an 18ft Skiff campaign in Australia when the class was operating as a professional circuit with high levels of television coverage on Sky, and the boats were still going through a rapid pace of development. After the 49er campaign that desire to go 18 sailing on Sydney Harbour was still bubbling away in the background.

photo: howArd wright/iMAgE proFEssionAl photogrAphy

6 News Latest insights into the world of sailing 13 Technology’s role in winning spectators

TESTING

Speed hunter F

August 2013

Yachts & Yachting

3


YACHTS YACHTING

AUGUST 2013 | ISSUE #1664

PHOTO: TOM GRUITT/ONEDITION*

EDITORIAL Editor Gael Pawson +44 (0)7855 849273 gael@creatingwaves.com Deputy Editor/Test Editor Rupert Holmes Deputy Editor/Chief Sub Helen Fretter Art Editor Claire Greeno Picture Editor Tom Gruitt Sub Editor Rob Melotti Clubs & Classes Editor Paula Irish Yachtsandyachting@creatingwaves.com Contributors Georgie Corlett, Pete Cumming, Jeremy Evans, Louay Habib, Bob Fisher, Andy Rice, Andi Robertson

£4.30 Issue #1664 | AUGUST 2013 www.yachtsandyachting.co.uk 08 9 770044 000205

Record

COWES WEEK GUIDE | ROUND THE ISLAND REPORT | FRANCIS JOYON | TEST: NACRA 17

Breakers! Francis Joyon 5 days across the Atlantic Ben Ainslie Round the Island souvenir ESSENTIAL GUIDE

Cowes Week How to win, where to meet

IQUE TECHN

20 VES MOAVOID TO

YACHTS YACHTING

WWW.YACHTSANDYACHTING.CO.UK

CHELSEA ARINE M MAGAZINES

505 WORLDS

Champion dinghy sailors share their secrets

BOAT TEST

The new Nacra 17 Olympic class under the spotlight

TRAVEL: GREECE The joys of dinghy sailing and relaxing in the sun

ANTIGUAN WIN How to put together a winning campaign

CHELSEA ARINE M MAGAZINES

YACHTS YACHTING CHELSEA ARINE M MAGAZINES

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August 2013

O

The best of races

f all the races to miss! I don’t think I have ever been so disappointed to miss a day’s sailing – this year’s JP Morgan Asset Management Round the Island Race was an absolute belter! And I had a great steed to compete on – I’d been invited by Ian Jubb of Sailboat Deliveries to join the crew on the amazing ‘Collective Spirit’, alongside Olympic silver medallist Mark Covell and top coach Mark Rushall. I knew, however, they’d be sailing the boat hard and there wasn’t any space for passengers. I like to be an asset on any boat I race on, and being five months’ pregnant I wasn’t my usual slight, ‘bow girl’ fighting weight. It pained me greatly to explain that I wasn’t the right person. I told myself there was always next year and that helped… until the day of the race! Brilliant sunshine and breeze… race records galore and plenty of boats home for breakfast, never mind lunch! You really couldn’t ask for more. This was the one year you didn’t want to miss – the kind of race that comes around once a decade, if you’re lucky! Ah well, it just reinforces my view that every time you get the chance to sail you should take it, as you definitely regret more the events you miss than those you do, even if they prove to deliver less than champagne conditions! While I’ve consoled myself with planning a bit of cruising over the coming weeks, and some proper See us on Facebook.com/sailingmagazine

racing for next summer, there are still a host of great race weeks and championships to come, including the biggest of them all, Aberdeen Asset Management Cowes Week. There are a number of changes for this year, which sound like they will provide a real boost, especially with SB20s and J/70s having their own special shorter events, with two races per day, as part of the week. I anticipate a pang or two of envy watching their racing as well! Catch up with all the changes in Rupert Holmes’ feature on page 34. Meanwhile, I wasn’t so envious of Francis Joyon’s amazing trip across the Atlantic in just five days (see page 16)! Sailing solo isn’t for me, I’d miss the company of others. It takes a special sort of person to revel in the solitude of singlehanded sailing, which makes him a fascinating character to read about…

Gael Pawson, Editor Follow us on Twitter:

@gaelpawson

Writers this month include... One of the world’s most respected sailing commentators, Bob Fisher has a depth of knowledge that’s second to none.

Pete Cumming is a professional sailor and Sky Sports commentator racing with the SAP Extreme Sailing Team

Midlands-based Paula Irish is a highly experienced dinghy sailor and writer with a finger on the pulse of the UK dinghy scene.

www.yachtsandyachting.co.uk


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NEWS

Left A new course record for this year’s Round the Island race

The Transat returns

Photo: LLoyd Images*

The next edition of The Transat, the pro sailors’ version of the OSTAR singlehanded race across the north Atlantic, will take place in May 2016. The race retains its UK-to-North-America route and pre-Vendée Globe timing.

Ainslie sets sub-3hr RTI record Ben Ainslie and his team on board the wing-sailed AC45 catamaran ‘JP Morgan BAR’ have set a new record time in this year’s JP Morgan Asset Management Round the Island Race of

two hours, 52 minutes and 15 seconds, over 16 minutes faster than Francis Joyon in 2001. A new monohull record was also set, as ‘ICAP Leopard’ broke its own previously held course record

with a line honours win in three hours, 43 minutes and 50 seconds. The Gold Roman Bowl win went to Sir Keith Mills with his TP52 ‘5 West’. Read our full report on page 22.

... And Joyon’s 5-day Atlantic Photo: vIncent curutchet/dPPI/Idec*

Francis Joyon has smashed the North Atlantic record time, sailing singlehandedly from New York to the Lizard in just five days, two hours, 56 minutes and 10 seconds – knocking an impressive 16 hours, 34 minutes and 30 seconds off the previous record west-toeast solo time set by Thomas Coville in 2008. See our special report on page 16.

Sportsboats go Cowes to Miami Aberdeen Asset Management Cowes Week has been selected as a qualifying event for sportsboats interested in participating in the 2014 EFG Pan American Sport Boat Championship, held in Miami in March 2014.

Artemis to compete in AC34

6

Yachts & Yachting

August 2013

I think it will be right for Bart and for the team to be out there.’ The preliminary race schedule has been adjusted to allow Artemis to compete in the team’s second AC72, with racing set to begin for Emirates Team New Zealand and Luna Rossa on July 7.

Photo: sander van der Borch/artemIs*

Following the capsize and tragic death of Andrew Simpson, the Artemis Racing team has announced that it intends to compete in the 34th America’s Cup. Artemis Racing sailing director Iain Percy said: ‘We’re sportsmen and we’re America’s Cup sailors. And we want to compete in the America’s Cup... so

right Artemis is preparing the team’s second AC72

www.yachtsandyachting.co.uk


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“We made it really difficult for ourselves in the medal races so were pretty disappointed with today, but to actually win the regatta is amazing! It’s our first gold of the season, first gold in an FX so ‘boom’!” Charlotte Dobson, on winning gold in the 49erFX at Weymouth “We are working around-the-clock to get our new boat ready, in the water and to prepare our team to race. We still have a mountain to climb.” Paul Cayard, CEO of Artemis Racing, on plans to compete in the 34th America’s Cup

Cruising rally specialist World Cruising Club has announced a new addition to its rally programme, with the first ARC Baltic Rally. Planned for summer 2014, the 1,500 mile trip will include visits to Kiel, Estonian capital Tallin, St. Petersburg, Finnish capital Helsinki, Swedish capital Stockholm, and the Danish capital Copenhagen.

Photo: dIck mander*

Baltic ARC

“The boats are absolutely rock solid. We did 40 knots on the way down here. Of all the classes these are the best racing boats in the world right now. Yes the America’s Cup boats are maybe faster but you would never take them offshore and do 40 knots. So to do that with between two and six people is just awesome.” Damian foxall, racing the MOD70 ‘Oman Air – Musandam’ in the Route de Princes “There are some days in match racing when things don’t seem to go your way, whether it’s powerboat chop as you’re trying to tack, or a wind shift going against you. I think we had one of thse days.” ian Williams, after being knocked out of the Korea Match Cup

Photo: rIchard Langdon/skandIa team gBr*

Thirteen-year-old Abi Oliver is the winner of the RYA Dinghy Show 2013 Start Sailing competition, claiming a ‘winner takes all’ prize package that includes a new Topper Worlds Race 4.2m dinghy with Harken race rig, sailing kit from Rooster, Crewsaver, Gul and

You said… Photo: aLexIs courcoux*

Y&Y readers debate some controversial questions...

Top British ‘bizuth’ in Figaro The 2013 La Solitaire du Figaro - Eric Bompard Cachemire saw the best British performances in years, with Sam Goodchild on ‘ShelterboxDisaster Relief’ finishing in 11th place, the best GBR result in the race since 1975. Meanwhile 22-year-old Jack Bouttell become the first British Figaro sailor ever to win the ‘Bizuth’ prize for the top rookie finisher. The Artemis Offshore Academy sailor finished 21st overall, with a four-hour advantage over other first time Figarists. Overall race win went to Yann Elies (Groupe Queguiner-Leucemie Espoir) giving him remarkable back-to-back race victories in his 14th Figaro competition. Elies won by 26 minutes and 30 seconds ahead of second-placed Xavier Macaire (Skipper Herault) and was 33 minutes and six seconds ahead of Morgan Lagraviere (Vendee) in third. The overall result of the four-stage race was decided in the final 24 hours with Macaire and Lagraviere heading for the finish in contention for victory. On arrival in Dieppe an amazed Elies, 39, said, ‘To win the Solitaire in two consecutive years - it is a dream.’ Ireland’s David Kenefick (‘Full Irish’) was the youngest competitor in the race, also 22, and finished 28th overall, third in the rookie division.

“The future sailing club model probably won’t look the same as it does now. I see a mixture of options from the small and local to large and corporate, but for me, there are too many small clubs out there, all trying to do the same thing...” – hum3, in an online debate on our responsibilities as sailors “Please stop beating the drum and blowing the trumpet for all the British sailors who win international events at the expense of impartial reporting.”– John fitz, by letter “It is a pity the RORC/IRC roadshow started in Poole because all the clubs there have opted out of IRC on cost grounds and devised their own Time Correction Factor called Velocity Prediction Rating System (VPRS).”– robert Veale, by letter For more views go to

www.yachtsandyachting.com/forum/

August 2013

Yachts & Yachting

7


News

In brief ■ London is to host the start and finish of the 2013-14 Clipper Round the World Yacht Race. The fleet will leave on September 1, 2013 and return in July 2014 after visiting 14 ports. ■ Francois Gabart has won the inaugural Mauritius Regatta, held for invited solo sailors and their guests on chartered catamarans.

PHOTO: PAUL WYETH

■ The Yacht Designers and Surveyors Association (YDSA) and Royal Institution of Naval Architects (RINA) have announced an agreement offering reciprocal arrangements for members.

China sails for gold

■ McMurdo has appointed Navicom to distribute its range of distress beacons and marine electronics in France.

China dominated the Laser Radial fleet at Weymouth’s Sail for Gold 2013 regatta, with 2012 Olympic gold medallist Lijia Xu winning with a day to spare from team mate Dongshuang Zhang. Ireland’s Annalise Murphy took bronze. In the men’s Laser it was New Zealand’s Sam Meech turn to take gold, ahead of Nicolas Heiner (NED) with GBR’s Nick

■ Musto is set to continue its support for the 2014-15 Volvo Ocean Race as official clothing and footwear supplier ■ Gazprom International is to sponsor the Dragon World Championship, held in Weymouth from September 5-13.

Thompson third. The 49er fleet was another international battle, with Ireland’s Ryan Seaton and Matthew McGovern getting the better of GBR’s Dylan Fletcher and Alain Sign with Will Phillips and Rhys Mara (AUS) in third. The new Nacra 17 class was an all-British podium, with Ben Saxton and Hannah Diamond first ahead of Lucy Macgregor

and Tom Phipps, with Pippa Wilson and John Gimson third. The Finn, RS:X and Sonar fleets also saw all-GBR medals, with Mark Andrews, Nick Dempsey, Bryony Shaw and John Robertson getting golds. Megan Pascoe took 2.4mR gold from Helena Lucas. And in the new 49erFX Charlotte Dobson and Nicola Groves won from Kate Macgregor and Sophie Ainsworth.

■ Mathieu Richard has won the Korea Match Cup, the second event of the Alpari WMRT.

Great reading

■ Panasonic has joined the 34th America’s Cup as an Official Supplier, with five large LED video boards and 85 flat panel televisions throughout the America’s Cup Park and Village.

The August issue of Classic Boat includes a profile of Charlie Barr, the three-times America’s Cup champion, while Sailing Today features a guide to Cork Habour and tips on turning your cruiser into a Cowes Week winner.

SAILING TODAY

GO FURTHER I SAIL BETTER I BE INSPIRED AUGUST 2013 sailingtoday.co .uk £4.20 AUGUST 2013 – ISSUE No 196

Mr America’s

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LOFOTEN ISLANDS

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INTERVIEW

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CRUISING

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is Morbihan the world’s greatest small boat festival? PAGE 58

Hidden gems A creek-crawler’s guide

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AIS vs radar Which is the best collision avoidance system for you?

ALLURES 39.9 •

CORK •

AIS VS RADAR

August 2013

. BIChe . neLLIe

Yachts & Yachting

schooner in full flow

e BArr . week ChArLI

8

orient press ex Hong Kong

An . SO fOng mOrBIh

■ Apologies, the opening picture in our ‘11 ways to start sailing’ feature in the July 2013 issue, should have been credited to watersports, training and activity holiday specialists Rockley.

PHOTO: UKSA*

UKSA, the country’s leading maritime training provider, has 12 places still available its renowned Yachting Cadetship, a structured three-year apprenticeship which includes a Foundation Degree in Operational Yacht Science with Plymouth University. Training begins in October 2013 and allows students to earn whilst they train for a career on superyachts. Nine places are generously part-funded via bursaries from the maritime charities, Trinity House and Seafarers UK. Trinity House bursary applicants must attend a Cadetship Selection on 9-10 July. Email pybs@uksa.org or contact Lauren on 01983 203038 for more details and an application pack.

. ISSUe no 302

■ The fourth Act of the 2013 Extreme Sailing Series, due to be held in Istanbul in June, has been postponed.

UKSA Cadetship bursaries

0 £4.50 Us$12.5

BoATs UTIFUl osT BeA r l d’ s M The Wo

AUgUST 2013

■ Cobham SATCOM has been named the Volvo Ocean Race’s satellite and radio communications equipment partner for the 2014-15 edition.

Classic Boat

AUGUsT 2013 CLASSIC BOAT

■ Crewsaver has been announced as title sponsor for this year’s West Lancashire YC 24-Hour Race, held on September 7-8.

i

■ The ‘counting’ fireworks are set to return to the final Friday of Cowes Week, on August 9. Online donations to fund the display are still welcomed, find out more at www. aamcowesweek.co.uk

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Opinion

Bob Fisher The world’s foremost racing correspondent delights in a few rounds of pure sailing spirit

D

iscovering new delights in sailing can be surprising. None more so than that of the complete change in attitude towards offshore racing that can be found on the west coast of the United States. There it has a sense of fun that is probably not encountered anywhere else; at least that is how it appeared to a neophyte to the Newport Beach to Ensenada Race. This coastal classic is held annually and is all of 124 miles long and this year had 207 starters. The course is simple – just head south-easterly and hope the breeze holds. It starts at noon on a Friday and sometime in the darkness the wind will die away. One is therefore prepared, but as anyone will tell you good preparation is essential for success and the 50ft Alan Andrews-designed all-carbon flyer that was this sailor’s ride to Mexico was probably the best prepared boat in the fleet. This boat has all the right equipment and is perfectly maintained, but in addition the galley is well supplied with hardware (deep freeze, fridge and microwave) and ample stores. The crew was each given a menu of the tapas that would be served in the evening and a wine list showing the various wines matched to the courses! All went swingingly until almost 12 hours had elapsed and we were just seven miles from the finish – the lights of the committee vessel on the finish line were in sight – when the wind shut off and instead of spinnaker reaching we had to work to windward with big headsails. Two hours later, we finished as the breeze filled in from astern bringing our smaller rivals home on a reach – those ahead of us had all finished before the shut-off, and anyone can calculate

what that does to handicaps. Needless to say, it was only then that the real reason for the race became apparent – we were not to leave Ensenada (on a fast motor cruiser) until early on Tuesday morning. What does a crew of 14 do in a foreign port for three days? The answer was simple – enjoy themselves using the local opportunities and make some that don’t normally exist. Say what

in supporting a wineglass. This friendly sporting pastime went according to tradition with some fairly vicious attacks resulting in the odd coloured ball having to be recovered from the marina. Peace returned on the Tuesday morning on the 60-odd mile motorboat trip to San Diego to clear Customs and Immigration, before the long haul back home. The smile had to be surgically removed from 14 faces. I wondered whether the same was true for the crews of the 120 boats in the RORC’s Myth of Malham Race that went down to the Eddystone Light and back a month later, described by one competitor as: ‘A very tough race, I doubt whether anyone had more than two hours sleep.’ I rest my case. Rigours of a different kind were on the cards for a visit to the Scottish Series on Loch Fyne at Tarbert. Day racing aboard an elderly Scottish lady (the 1898 Fife-designed and built dayboat ‘Mignon’) requires less catering than for the Ensenada Race! We are told that ‘Mignon’ is a scale model to test the shape for the 1899 America’s Cup challenger ‘Shamrock I’, and we have no doubt that Fife was pleased with what he had created as she slips along with very little fuss. Whether her designer would have approved of the SB20 asymmetric is another matter but a Balooner (the forerunner of today’s A-sails) was certainly about when her rig was changed from Gaff to Bermudan in 1907. He would not have turned a hair at the use of a J/24 spinnaker. The Scottish Series was everything it used to be and a complete contrast to offshore racing. Back home in the Tarbert Marina, the craic was as good as ever.

The Newport to Ensenada Race course is simple - just head south-easterly and hope the breeze holds you like about Mexican cuisine (and you will), but there is more than enough to satisfy all tastes. The party spirit culminated on Monday afternoon, following the prizegiving (or awards ceremony in American) when the crew and shore crew of the yacht ‘It’s OK’ took to the croquet lawn for the Inter-Galactic One-Armed Tournament. The other arm was mandatorily engaged

August 2013

Yachts & Yachting

11


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Opinion

Pete Cumming The Extreme 40 sailor and commentator on how new technology can help attract new audiences to sailing

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s an Extreme 40 sailor, sailing analyst, and commentator on Sky Sports sailing I have a vested interest not only in putting on a winning performance on the water, but also in making sure that the events I’m sailing at deliver entertaining viewing to attract new audiences to the sport. As I look back over my sailing career, it’s clear that in recent years we have made a huge leap forward in attracting new audiences through the combination of the increased popularity of ‘stadium’ racing events, and new technology available – as well as the sailing world’s eagerness to embrace new audiences. As trimmer with the SAP Extreme Sailing Team competing in the Extreme Sailing Series, our goal is to sail faster over a shorter distance than our rivals. That sounds simple in its concept, right? In theory yes, but in reality it is not always easy to identify exactly where decisions made during racing didn’t pay off, particularly when you are in the midst of an intense battle on the water. The translation of what happened on the race circuit into a meaningful debrief, based on data which can be analysed post event, is proving key to converting hard lessons into success. With SAP Analytics we can dissect a race to find every bit of information on speed and performance we need, and at the same time look at the other teams to accurately judge their gains and losses. There is no place to hide with this tool! We had to take a hard look at our performance during Act 1 in Oman in March, where our result was not what we had hoped for. We went back to the drawingboard and completely revised our strategy based on the analytics –and

it paid off. Combined with a careful look at our team dynamics and lines of communication, we put a new strategy into play for Act 2 in Singapore, to achieve our first podium place of the Extreme Sailing Series. It was an encouraging result and such a good feeling amongst the team that we were now moving up the leaderboard. We went on to to deliver more hard-hitting

lifeblood. A live television feed paired with the real-time leaderboard and virtual graphics allow new viewers to be brought up to speed in seconds – which is critical these days as there are so many alternative sports to watch. With my broadcasting hat on, I believe that this kind of technology and the speed of data transfer have opened up a whole new world for the viewer and made the commentators’ role more dynamic. We now have access to a combination of GPS tracking and cutting-edge business software to deliver live insights on screen by way of 3D visuals and ‘as it happens’ leaderboards to help decipher exactly what is happening on the water. The combination of action on the water and entertainment is key to ensure events go the distance with fans and viewers as well as sailors. We need to continue to attract new brands into the world of sailing as well as repay the commitment from sponsors who have taken the leap to support sailing teams and circuits globally. As an analyst and commentator for the America’s Cup on Sky Sports, with the tools we now have at our disposal, we focus on bringing more sailing events to a wider audience. Increased viewing figures and a better return on investment for sponsors equals greater investment in the sport and sailors. Everyone wins right? Technology is transforming our sport into one that is entertaining for all. I’m equally as focused on winning on the water with the SAP Extreme Sailing Team, as on driving up our fans and followers through media and technology developments. The next instalment of our story is Act 4 in Istanbul, and we’re ready for it, on all fronts.

Like any sport, ultimately the fans’ appetite for broadcast action and online streaming is its lifeblood sailing in Act 3 in Qingdao and secured a second consecutive podium place, putting us fourth overall in the series. But using analytics tools hasn’t only influenced our performance on the water, it also helps to boost spectators’ engagement and enjoyment. Like any other sport, ultimately the fans’ appetite for broadcast action and online streaming of sailing events is its

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Yachts

Andi Robertson Our big boat correspondent gets the lowdown on the TP52 fleet – might they tempt back the Cup sailors soon?

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arcelona found the TP52 fleet in pretty reasonable shape, all things considered. While there were seven boats racing at the season opener and committed to the 52 Super Series in Europe, there will likely be 10 or 11 in Palma for the Copa del Rey. The class has regrouped and is on the up. The maximum programmes – Rán Racing, Quantum Racing and Azzurra – are still a cut above their rest, but everyone is enjoying the racing again and feeling included. Having gone back to racing largely at existing regattas – save the likes of Miami for the worlds and Ibiza – the circuit is in control of its own destiny. Rob Weiland has worked miracles and deserves great credit for carefully managing expectations and helping bring the new owners on board. Going to the USA early season has been especially successful and that looks certain to be repeated in 2014. It seems the circuit next year will go from Key West to the Caribbean with four European regattas, again likely to include Ibiza and Palma. Ever the realist Weiland says: ‘If you compare with last year we have grown 25 to 30 per cent on the number of boats which do the whole circuit. It now looks like a decent fleet at every event and you can see other sailors are now noticing that as well. There is a real buzz again. ‘We already have owners asking where we will race, how can we modify our existing boat to best effect? That is the main question that I seem to get a lot. It is difficult to say what will happen for next year but I am confident we will hang on to at least seven boats at every event. But you could also see one of two things: perhaps a jump of one or two more boats, or possibly you could see a jump

of four or five boats. That would reflect something happening in the sailing world, a team taking a certain direction to join us and others following. That could be an America’s Cup team, it could be another big sailing team. It is too early to predict an afterlife for America’s Cup teams, but the day the Cup ends, the sailors start looking around and this is one of the few good things there are. If you look at what

step, or a complicated boat.’ He sees new blood coming from the same areas: ‘The feel of the circuit is much more of a travelling club. The growth areas are still the private owners driving themselves, from Anglo Saxon countries where the attitude is very much you only have the boat to drive it yourself. Then there is the Mediterranean approach that you have the boat to enjoy organising the team, and there always has been this divide.’ On the timing of the next generation rule, he explains: ‘It is not going to be 55ft, it is not going to be wider, but the changes might be on draught, sail area or displacement. To make those changes you need to give designers time to design and owners time to build and so typically you need to programme time ahead. You need five to six months for designers and then six months for building, so that is a year. The quickest we can do it is to go through our decision process for the AGM in November. So we could not sail 2014 with that rule. The earliest we could do that is 2015. ‘Because changing rules has an element of turkeys voting for Christmas it is difficult. The owners will very quickly tell you if you are obsoleting their boat. We won’t obsolete boats, but there comes a time at 10 years old when a race boat has been modified twice and it is past all you can do with it, so you don’t update it again. So you won’t see the 2005-06 boats again in 18 months time. The loads will go up and up as the boats get faster and there is a time where older boats won’t take these loads. Logically the 2011-12 boats, of which there are eight, will be fully up to scratch against a new design with a few modifications for 2015.’

It is too early to predict an afterlife for America’s Cup teams, but this is one of the few good things around

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else is around then this still stands out as the best.’ The 52 still has great popularity, the challenge is bringing owners to compete on a regular circuit: ‘The boats still appeal, whether owners are coming from a smaller or a bigger boat. The boats are a nice size to work with. For an organised team it is a very easy boat to step into and for those coming from a smaller boat it is not a huge

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photo: Jean-Marie Liot/Dppi/iDeC*

Francis Joyon

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solo record

mAgiciAn Francis Joyon has decimated the transatlantic solo record, crossing in just under five days and three hours. But who is the French master of speed with his magnificent red flying machine? Louay Habib learns more about Joyon and the trimaran ‘Idec’

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Francis Joyon

rigHt Joyon is renowned for long stretches spent at the wheel hand steering – here aboard the original ‘Idec’

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ive days from New York to the Lizard – that’s faster than many cruise ships cross the Atlantic. Yet one man completed the crossing solo, on a giant trimaran, at an average speed of 26.2 knots. Sailing 2,865 miles in just five days, two hours and 10 seconds, Joyon annihilated the previous time set by Thomas Coville in 2008 by 16 hours, 34 minutes and 30 seconds. The man whose name will now bear that record is Francis Joyon, undoubtedly one of the world’s top solo sailors, but who is he and just how impressive are his achievements?

Legendary status In 1492, it took Christopher Columbus five weeks to sail from Cadiz to San Salvador. Francis Joyon completed the same route in February this year, in less

east, the Atlantic record east to west, and the quickest solo round the world. On June 16, 2013, Joyon completed his historic ‘grand slam’ of solo sailing powering across the Atlantic west to east in just over five days. Joyon has enjoyed an incredible and somewhat controversial sailing career. In 2004, he smashed the solo round the world record by an astonishing 20 days, which was only one day slower than the fully crewed record. He achieved this in a 10-year-old boat with no weather routing. This was typical of Joyon’s fiercely independent streak – he has only the minimum of shore crew (if any) and rarely gives interviews, even to French media. After a previous attempt at breaking the west to east trans-Atlantic record in 2011 ended prematurely, Joyon turned back, picked up a

Francis has always done it on his own, I think he must be allergic to shore crew Brian Thompson

BeLow Single-minded and self-sufficient, 57-year-old Joyon keeps his shore team to an absolute minimum

than nine days. There may be no land left to discover but Joyon’s solo quest for speed is just as much a test of limits as the journeys of Columbus. Francis Joyon, now 57, is without doubt one of the most legendary solo sailors of all time, with the unique accomplishment of holding the four greatest records of singlehanded sailing at the same time: the 24-hour distance record, the Atlantic record west to

mooring under sail – still singlehanded – jumping into the water off the bow of ‘Idec’ with a mooring line to secure the boat to the buoy. He then dived under the boat, repeatedly, to replace the propeller, before motoring back into the confines of Brooklyn Marina, where he moored the giant boat singlehanded. There are few other skippers, especially of his age, that would have the drive and

determination to remain so singlemindedly self-sufficient when help from shore crew could easily be mustered. However, Joyon’s legendary independence has also hit the headlines for the wrong reasons. In 2005, after a record run across the Atlantic, Joyon was sailing the trimaran home to France alone, having refused help to sail across the English Channel. At a critical moment, whilst totally exhausted, Joyon fell asleep and the boat continued on autopilot. ‘Idec’ ran aground on the Breton coast, the €4 million trimaran was wrecked and Joyon was lucky to escape with his life.

Second generation

photo: Mark LLoyD/Dppi

In May 2006, Joyon announced that he was building a new multihull, to be called ‘Idec 2’, designed by Nigel Irens and Benoit Cabaret. His new boat would be designed for solo sailing – unlike the original ‘Idec’, which was originally designed for crewed sailing. ‘Idec 2’ weighed in at 11 tons, compared to his previous boat which weighed 16 tons, and had 10 per cent more sail area. The new boat was anticipated to be capable of taking three days off the existing circumnavigation record. On November 23, 2007 Joyon set off on

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photo: JaCques VapiLLon/Dppi

his solo round the world record bid, returning on the 20 January, 2008, having completed the circumnavigation in 57 days, 13 hours 34 minutes and 6 seconds - nearly two weeks faster than the previous record. The record run is regarded as one of the most impressive sailing feats in modern history and likely to prove very hard to beat. Nigel Irens, designer of ‘Idec 2’ (as well the previous Atlantic record holding ‘Sodebo’) explains: ‘‘Idec 2’ was really made to break the circumnavigation record, and unlike other modern racing trimarans, it is designed for just one man. Other modern racing machines such as ‘Banque Populaire V’ and the MOD 70s are designed to be raced with a crew. ‘The point about ‘Idec 2’ and that generation of boat is that they are built to be sailed with two hulls in the water and not one. The previous generation of ORMA 60s used to suffer when they were not flying both hulls because the main hull was quite rounded in profile to fit into the ORMA 60 box rule. So those hulls had a nasty tendency to be sucked downwards at high speed – causing the bows to get buried, slowing the boat down and potentially pitch-poling. ‘Idec 2’ has a longer main hull than the ORMA,

partly for longitudinal stability and partly so that the rocker produced less drag. In an ideal world, we would have put more forward bow on the boat but structurally it wouldn’t work. As long as the main hull stays on the water you get longitudinal stability from two hulls. If the main hull lifts you don’t have as much forward going stability and you stick the bow in! ‘After the ORMA class was beginning to crash, we had an extension of development by producing three round the world boats: ‘B&Q’, ‘Sodebo’ and then ‘Idec 2’. Francis Joyon started off with no foils at all but he now has a pair of minuscule foils. His budget was so small he had to contend himself with foils that were just 1.2sq m, whereas boats like ‘Sodebo’ have 2sq m of foil. His smaller foils are lighter and perhaps that has had a great effect but I need to know more about it, right now I don’t know. I would be very interested to know why the boat is going so fast because ‘Idec 2’ is going faster than she should do. When we were building the boat, irrespective of who was sailing it, according to our VPP analysis it was not capable of sustaining an average of over 26 knots for five days and that is intriguing for me. Averages are funny things, usually they are never quite as high as you think they are going

Eye on the future Challenges for Joyon on the way to his latest record included gybing twice in rapid succession to avoid the lighter winds in the centre of the low pressure system, and sleeping for less than 10 hours over the duration of the fiveday trip. Despite this he kept his foot to the floor wherever possible, and was sailing 650, then 660 and finally 665 miles within 24 hours over the second half of the Atlantic course – just a fraction slower than his existing 24-hour record of 666.2 miles set in 2012. ‘I have not really been aware of it, as I’ve hardly had time to laze at the chart table,’ Joyon joked, as he surfed at 25-30 knots. ‘I tried to slow the boat to rest, but then I had a guilty conscience, and I put some canvas back up...’ Not only was he sailing against the virtual time set by current record holder Thomas Coville, but Joyon also had one eye on future attempts against the record. ‘I know that others will come with larger and more sophisticated vessels. I try to set the bar as high as possible.’ His weather router Jean Yves Bernot believes that he had achieved just that. ‘We exchanged very little during the race, an email morning and evening, and very little conversation. There was a big gamble to take and since last Tuesday we had to have belief. ‘Francis is probably the only one who you could ask this kind of effort of, you cannot ask it of anyone else. With Francis, it seems he can keep going fast for a long time, he never stops. It was awesome! He has probably set the bar as high as this generation of trimarans can accomplish. It will take larger boats further along the course with bigger sail area to dethrone him.’

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photo: Benoit stitCheLBaut/Dppi

Francis Joyon

ABoVe Exhausted after his 2005 Atlantic record, Joyon fell asleep and was lucky to survive running aground

to be but in this case, Francis has achieved an incredible average speed. Joyon is extraordinary, he just keeps the pressure on.’

Superhuman Speaking after this latest solo record run across the Atlantic, Irens shared his thoughts on Joyon’s talents and mostivation. ‘Francis is very singleminded, he set off in conditions that no one else would have left in. According to every meteorologist apart from his own, Jean-Yves Bernot, the conditions were not right for a record but yet again, he was right and everyone else was wrong. At the end of the run, the little tiny depression that he was surfing on made the record. I kept looking at the map, thinking he will sail out of the front of that and be dropped by it but the depression just moved at the right speed to keep him on the front edge. I imagine he had fairly smooth water because it was the leading edge of the

Fact file: Francis Joyon Born 28 May 1956, Hanches, France. 2004: Record solo around the world in 72 days, 22 hours, 54 minutes and 22 seconds 2005: Record solo W-E Atlantic in 6 days, 4 hours 1 minute and 37 seconds 2007: Record solo 24-hour distance record 613.54 miles in 24 hours. (Av. 25.85 knots) 2008: Record solo around the world in 57 days 13 hours 34 minutes and 6 seconds 2013: Record solo Cadiz to San Salvador in 8 days 16 hours 7 minutes and 5 seconds 2013: Record solo W-E Atlantic in 5 days, 2 hours 56 minutes and 10 seconds

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system rather than one that had wind blowing over it for some while. Francis gave a lot of credit to his weather router, Jean-Yves Bernot. I am sure he did a great job, he would have been right on the money for sure, especially as he has a good relationship with Francis. ‘The truth is that the man seems to be able to stay on the edge for as long as he wants. He hand steers for an

the boat, but the main reason for the success is Francis Joyon. He is just an extraordinary man. Besides his amazing stamina and strength, he has a mystery element, something that nobody else has got. ‘It would be interesting to know the weight difference between ‘Idec 2’ and ‘Sodebo’. Francis is an absolute minimalist, every time he says he doesn’t want to have something, he is saving weight and maybe that is a very big issue in his amazing speed. What he takes with him is almost ridiculous, if you didn’t know how successful he has been you would have thought he was a joke entry. In fact it is the other way around, he is bucking the trend, this was not a big budget campaign and he obviously got it very right!’ Brian Thompson, who has himself set 25 official world sailing records over the last 20 years, (including winning the Jules Verne Trophy as crew on ‘Banque Populaire V’ last year) also admires Joyon’s single-minded approach. ‘Joyon is a hero of mine, I remember him in the 2001 OSTAR competing in an old boat with no shore crew, the night before the race he had hoisted himself up to the top of his rig on his own and was working with

‘I tried to slow the boat to rest, but then I had a guilty conscience’ Francis Joyon awfully long time and he just seems to be bloody superman! I don’t know how he does it, I really don’t. You have just got to throw away the rule book when you think about Francis Joyon. He is physically very strong but his accomplishments take much more than just physical strength. ‘After the solo round the world record, the west to east transatlantic record is the most prestigious and I say that for very good reason. It is a route that can be sailed on a single weather system and that is an art form all of its own. ‘‘Idec’ was behind ‘Sodebo’s’ record for much of the time but he made up a huge amount at the end. The weakest point of the previous record was the finish, when Thomas Colville’s ‘Sodebo’ had to sail upwind as he approached land, which slowed him down. Perhaps it is a combination of the weather routing and the set-up of

power tools and carbon patches and resin, repairing the rig. At the start of the race, he was just blown away by the big budget entries but guess who won in the end? Francis has always done it on his own, I think he must be allergic to shore crew. I remember he didn’t even have someone to buy his food, he literally asked someone on the dock if he would go up to the supermarket the day before the race! ‘Joyon is a truly gifted multihull sailor, physically and mentally very strong with really good seamanship skills and that is why he can push so hard for so long. He is unique in that he doesn’t need or want a big team, he really wants to do it on his own. Legendary French sailors like Tabarly and Desjoyeaux are often thought of as enigmatic, Joyon is superindividualistic and because of that he has total control. For me he is up there with the greats; his records are astonishing.’

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gillmarine.com

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Round the Island

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A rAce

to remember

photo: LLoyd Images*

Spectacular conditions and tumbling records made this year’s JP Morgan Asset Management Round the Island Race one to savour. Helen Fretter has the winners’ tales

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Round the Island

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his year’s JP Morgan Asset Management Round the Island Race was a little bit special. The 76th running of the 50-mile circumnavigation around the Isle of Wight saw one of the earliest starts in memory, with many competitors setting alarm clocks for three-o-something in the morning, and the first gun fired from the Island Sailing Club at an eye-watering 0450hrs. But those who dragged themselves out of their bunks were rewarded handsomely by a sparkling sailing day of bright sunshine and a 15-20 knot northerly on June 1, with just shy of 1,500 boats competing.

rigHt An early start with the first gun fired at 0450hrs

below Alex Thomson was first IMOCA 60 round in ‘Hugo Boss’

For Sir Ben Ainslie and crew on the AC45 ‘JP Morgan BAR’ the 2013 race held a particular poignancy. Having arrived on the island in the small hours of Saturday morning after attending the emotional memorial service for fellow America’s Cup crewman and Olympian Andrew ‘Bart’ Simpson, they set off on a record bid dedicated to their friend. The wing-sailed AC45 was an impressive addition to the jostling waters off Cowes, but with five crew wearing black arm bands and a black ribbon for Bart on their backs the team’s spectacular start in the half light of the dawn was especially emotive. Ainslie, and his crew of Matt

Cornwell, Andrew Mills, Mark Andrews and Andrew McLean honoured Simpson’s memory in style, flying around the island in just two hours, 52 minutes and 15 seconds. They led the fleet from the Needles and were back in Cowes shortly after 0800hrs to claim line honours, having smashed the 12-year course record by 16 minutes and eight seconds from Francis Joyon’s time, set back in 2001. Bowman Matt Cornwell reported that conditions for the wing-sailed catamaran were challenging. ‘It was quite gusty coming down into St Catherine’s Point, and we had some big puffs. It was quite difficult for us with the difficult angles reaching when it’s very windy, so we had to play around that to be safe – we had a few tricky moments but we got through it okay. But as our esteemed navigator – if you can ever have a navigator on a boat like this! – Mark Andrews forgot to put the batteries in the Velociteks we didn’t know how fast we were going or where we were going, we just knew we had to get round the

photo: patrIck eden*

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photo: onedItIon*

records tumble

Yachts & Yachting

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island so that made it simpler!’ Speaking after the race, Ben Ainslie said that the achievement held particular significance, ‘It was a beautiful race, the conditions were perfect for us, the boat performed incredibly well and the team sailed her really well, and so everything fell into place and we ended up breaking the multihull record. For us that was a real bonus because we really wanted to do the race in Andrew’s memory. Yesterday was such a difficult day, so to come out today and have such a wonderful race and to do it in his memory was very special.’ For Trevor Chanter the day was a once in a lifetime opportunity. Offered a ride on the AC45 thanks to his connection with sponsors JP Morgan Asset Management, Chanter – a keen sailor and commodore of Bough Beech SC – leapt at the chance. He describes the unique sensation of a wing-sailed cat: ‘I was surprised by how docile and relatively slow the 45 was whilst heading out for the

line. We sailed up the line and back again a couple of times, and Ben said something along the lines of “powering up” and then the 45 took off! ‘As a crew member was always calling in the gusts Ben never seemed surprised and the 45 seemed to lap it up with extra wind and pick up

very back of the windward hull, and climbing in and out required great care. ‘On the back of the island the leeward hull dug in a couple of times and the back started to rise but the 45 soon recovered and we were speeding away again. The feeling of speed is like nothing else. It was surprisingly noisy, but smooth.’

I was surprised how docile the AC 45 was heading out for the line... then Ben said ‘powering up’ and the 45 took off! more speed with the leeward hull flying a little more. It all seemed very controlled, the crew were at all times focused, although I was a little concerned given the small area of netting I was balanced on! I was amazed that they took turns to sit in the

On crossing the line Chanter says they ‘seemed very pleased in a professional, British sort of way, shook hands, drank some rum and opened the champagne which they shared around. On a personal note I felt very privileged to have shared that time with Ben and the crew.’

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photo: tom gruItt/onedItIon*

The monohull course record also tumbled, with Mike Slade’s ‘ICAP Leopard’ blasting around in three hours, 43 minutes and 50 seconds, clipping nine minutes and 45 seconds off her own previous fastest time, set five years ago. Slade said: ‘When we were rounding St Catherine’s Point we were concerned that the wind would start dying off Shanklin – but it stayed up all the way round the Island. We’re also looking forward to the handicap result – if it drops as forecast we could do well on handicap as well.’ In the event ‘ICAP Leopard’, the largest competitor at 100ft, held on to sixth overall, but there was a tense wait to see who would claim the overall win. With the breeze strongest early in the day, and a reaching course that rewarded powerful designs, this year’s Round the Island initially looked set to be a ‘big boat’ race. But as the winds eased and the smaller boats fought their way home, other class winners began to make their presence felt. In IRC 2 two JPK 1010s topped their class and snuck onto the overall leaderboard, with the French ‘Raging Bee’ holding onto third. IRC 3 went to ‘Woof’, an H-Boat entered by local legend Jo Richards, who ultimately took seventh overall under IRC, followed by ‘Flying Boat’, a 30-yearold 25ft one-off. It was only as the first Folkboat ‘Madelaine’ and Contessa 26 ‘Rooie Rakker’ came home around 1500hrs that it became clear the overall prize would go to an early finisher. This year it was the turn of Sir Keith Mills’ TP52 ‘5 West’ to take the Gold Roman Bowl, the second year in a row a TP has held the prize. Eight minutes behind them another TP52, ‘Pace’, took second overall. Skipper Rob Greenhalgh explained their aims: ‘We knew that TPs have

photo: Ian roman/onedItIon*

big boat triumphs

not generally got a bad handicap, depending on conditions – normally a 50-footer wins or a small boat, so we knew that if we won class, then it would be in the hands of the gods after that. We also knew it wouldn’t be a picnic to win our class, there were three TPs, all pretty well sailed.’ For the ‘5 West’ team, preparation

boat handling so we were able to peel our kite, I think we were a bit better set up as well, we were always one step ahead of the game on sail changes. ‘We’d had quite a big weather meeting on the Friday night and had a fairly pre-determined strategy – we knew what the critical points in the race were going to be and what the sail

above ‘ICAP Leopard’ bettered her own monohull course record

We had a fairly pre-determined strategy – we knew what the critical points in the race were going to be Rob Greenhalgh and sail selection was key: ‘We had a reasonable start. One of the others pushed a bit harder [last year’s winner “Weapon of Choice”] – got OCS, but we didn’t find that out until afterwards. And then we all trucked out towards the Needles, and we got into the lead before we got there. We’ve got pretty good

changes were going to be so we were well set up. We went to a reaching sail halfway to the Needles, then it was a relatively quick peel into the A2, and we were all ready to go on that so we made gains on the fleet with that. ‘Likewise going back to the A3 for round the back of the island, we were ready so we could save a little of our time there. We didn’t have a great leg to St Cats but we held it all together and then it was just a case of getting the reaching sail back up, for a bit of a two-sail reach which we seemed pretty quick at. We had a new A3 reaching sail which was built for Round the Island Race and for Cowes Week, and that worked really well.’ ‘It was obviously going gusty round the back of the island. Everyone from the Needles to St Catherine’s was pressed up reaching with the spinnaker up, it was all difficult sailing along there but nothing too extreme.’

leFt The Firebird ‘Orion’ approaches the Needles on the way to winning the MOCRA class

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Round the Island

tiller steering, which is hard work!’ With many of Mills’ crew from the Olympic and America’s Cup circuits, he added: ‘It was great for the team on board today. It was more special because most of us were at Bart’s [Andrew Simpson] funeral yesterday – we all thought it would be a fitting tribute to him if we had a good race today.’

photo: tom gruItt/onedItIon*

race for all

The JP Morgan Asset Management Round the Island race was a great success for tri-service initiative, Toe in the Water, and provided an exciting racing experience for profoundly injured servicemen currently in rehabilitation. ‘Toe in the Water’, skippered by round the world yachtswoman Dee Caffari, had a consistent race in the near perfect sailing conditions and finished 23rd out of 58 boats in IRC Class 0. However it was ‘Toe in the Water Too’, skippered by racing director Capt Lloyd Hamilton, that managed to beat the six hour barrier, a feat that even its usual professional crews have so far failed to achieve, finishing in 19th place with the best ever finish for that boat. Captain James Morgan, who broke two discs in his back whilst on tour in Afghanistan back in January 2012, joined Toe in the Water for the JP Morgan Asset Management Round the Island race and describes his experience. ‘The start was phenomenal, there were so many boats and it was just a sea of masts and sails behind you. We crossed the line, pulling ahead past some smaller boats and because you’re competing alongside and against able-bodied people it gives guys the opportunity to really experience that buzz, drive and enjoyment of being part of a team. ‘It’s phenomenally important Toe in the Water and other military charities exist. You’re catastrophically injured, lose a leg or more, and the temptation to think “life is over, I may as well give up now” must be overwhelming. Toe in the Water takes guys on referral of their medical trainers and rehab specialists. It allows them to make that mental switch, that yes, I have been injured, life is different but it’s not over.’

For many boats staying high from the Needles to St Catherine’s Point proved tricky, with several spinning out in broaches in the gusty conditions, whilst those that were confident enough to sail deeper without getting carried too far offshore, were rewarded with a lift at the southern tip of the island. ‘Then we had a long two-sail reach out to Bembridge Ledge,’ Rob continued, ‘Which seemed to suit us versus the other two TPs, as we’re probably slightly more powerful. And then it was a beat up to the Forts, which we did quite nicely, and a two-sail run back.’ The other aim of the day was to give owner Sir Keith Mills some time on the tiller. ‘Keith did well, he helmed 95 per cent of the race,’ commented Rob, ‘so good on him.’ ‘It was a great race, although I didn’t expect to win as it’s usually a small boat like a Folkboat or Contessa 26 that gets it in the end,’ commented Mills after the race. ‘We had some really good fast surfing round the back of the island, although my arms feel as though they have stretched today – the boat has

photo: pauL Wyeth*

photo: Jon nash/WIng productIons*

Triumph for Toe in the Water

Elsewhere in the fleet, other boats were making their own memories. Topping the ISCRS fleet overall was Peter Bainbridge’s J/122 cruiser ‘Sky Hunter II’. Meanwhile the multihull fleet turned into a pro-am battle, with Phil Cotton’s Seacart 30 trimaran ‘Buzz’ second multihull home and winning the Grand Prix Multihull class by over half an hour on corrected time from Ainslie and his America’s Cup crew. For the 20 young sailors on the Ellen MacArthur Cancer Trust’s five entries, completing the course was a fantastic acheivement in itself. But for the team on board the Oyster 48, which includes young people recovering from cancer and leukaemia, the race proved truly exceptional as the they finished third in division. Skipper Ross Applebey said proudly, ‘Our team of very brave young people were initially slightly skeptical of the benefits of a 0345hrs wake-up call, but all agreed it was more than worth this as they sailed “Scarlet Oyster” (EMCT2) round the island in sublime conditions to finish before lunch time. We got round in a storming time of six and three quarter hours, to secure a podium finish! This is the best result the boat has achieved in the race, even when crewed by her regular crew, quite an achievement by our intrepid young crew. The 2014 race will be held on Saturday, June 21.

above Rob Greenhalgh and the ‘5West’ team receive the Gold Roman Bowl 28

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Technique

Assume nothing Question everything

F

ollowing a northern European winter, having not sailed for five months, Hamburg surgeon Claas Lehmann was not expecting to win the 505 worlds. Lehmann and his crew Leon Oehme finished 15th at the 2011 Hamilton Island worlds in Australia and had improved to fifth overall at the worlds in La Rochelle in 2012. So for this year’s event they were aiming simply for another top 10 finish, and to match if possible their best previous result. It became clear, however, as the SAP 505 World Championship hosted by Barbados Yacht Club was played out, that they were one of three German pairings in with a serious shot at the title.

Left or right? Sailing off Carlisle Bay, Bridgetown, the fleet found the left almost always favoured, and German team Stefan Boehm and Gerald Roos made the most of this as racing started with a puffy 8-12 knots, to control the field and take the first bullet. But it also paid to not always be completely obsessed with going left. Boehm and Roos took another win in race two, on this occasion after spotting a big black cloud on the right and going for it. Day two, with 10-15 knots for two shifty races, provided a similar scenario with race three providing another reminder, as one commentator put it, to ‘keep a weather eye out for an Act of God’. The turquoise waters were again darkened by a great big cloud.

The tropical paradise of Barbados was the backdrop for the 505 worlds – and the scene of a fascinating tactical battle on a heavily left-favoured course. Paula Irish reports Lehmann and Oehme, who’d kicked off their regatta on day one with a steady 2,4, were chasing Boehm and Roos – then both lost out to the Aussie team of Sandy Higgins and Paul Marsh, scoring a 14th and eighth respectively. As Lehmann explained at the time: ‘Sometimes you can be too fixed in your ways. We stuck to the left and lost 10 boats.’ With the benefit of hindsight after the regatta he added: ‘Maybe we were always too much focused on the lefthand side of the racecourse. In these few moments where “eyes out of the boat” were important skills we failed often.’ Bouncing back with a race four win though, Lehmann and Oehme became overnight leaders, and as Lehmann explains: ‘The race day when we finished first after having the worst result in the race immediately before gave us back confidence in our skills.’

Pressure Ian Pinnell, MD of chandlers Pinnell & Bax, was sailing with Ian Mitchell to finish top British boat at the worlds in seventh overall. He says that after the sunshine and big breezes of Barbados for the Fireball worlds in 2010, the

conditions were a couple of knots less each day than they expected. ‘Quite often it’s very constant over there because it’s pretty much trade winds and when the Fireballs were there it was blue skies, whereas we were actually rained off one day and we had quite a bit of cloud around which generated uneven pressure on various areas of the race course, which made it quite tricky at times. ‘It was pretty much a left-hand track most of the time and the further left you went, the better off you were, but then sometimes you actually ran out of breeze in there, you could get caught out. The strategy of starting early was probably the right thing to do but it didn’t always work all the time.’ Their worst result came after starting in the middle and unable to hold their lane they had to go right: ‘The key was trying to get to the windward mark in the top five and if you did that you were in the medals really... quite often we were at the first mark in the top 15, then you have to pull through, but you’re only going to pull through to somewhere between fifth to ninth basically because the calibre of the fleet is pretty high.’ On the penultimate day Pinnell and Mitchell won the day with a 5,2: ‘We were first out of the gate in both races and we were out to the left.... we changed our tactics slightly and were a bit more extreme, going for the lefthand corner, and it seemed to work.’ In retrospect they would have probably started a little earlier each day but then ‘you had to be careful because

There are big gains to be had in that left-hand corner... it even almost paid to overstand the windward mark Ian Pinnell 30

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phoTo: ChrisTophe Favreau

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Technique

phoTos: aLL ChrisTophe Favreau

right Claas Lehmann and Leon Oehme on their way to winning the 505 worlds

a lot of the good guys are trying to start early as well, and if you can’t quite get a perfect start you’re having to tack off’. Pinnell, himself a former 505 world champion, explains that the water shelves off to become deep really quickly. ‘That means you’re sailing quite close to the shore, so there are big gains to be had in that left-hand

overstanding – which you wouldn’t generally do in a regatta – because it was quite extreme at times, it was working for those guys.’ That said, as the fleet found on a number of occasions: ‘Especially when there’s clouds around you certainly need to get your head out of the boat a bit more and look for the pressure’. Many of the sailors in the 69-boat

Two young Americans identified a speed deficiency of 0.8 knot on just one leg as the factor that made the difference corner, big big gains .... which only really happen when you are in the left corner or close to it, and it even almost paid to overstand the windward mark, which normally you wouldn’t do because you’re sailing further. You’ve got a bend up the shore and convergent breeze coming down the shore so you’re going to get more breeze on the left, on the port layline, so even

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fleet found getting the balance right difficult: The USA’s Howie Hamlin, a past 505 world champion who won the pre-worlds, finished 13th.

Tracking Sponsored by SAP, which supports the German Olympic sailing team, the championship benefitted from live state-of-the-art GPS tracking integrated

with wind measurements from sensors out on the course – enabling spectators worldwide to follow the action while SAP Analytics provided sailors with daily debriefs. When day three was canned as torrential rain killed the wind, it allowed time for replaying the first four races with an in-depth look at speed and tactics. Young Americans, Ted Conrads and Brian Haines, for example, identified a speed deficiency of 0.8 of a knot on one leg – and only one leg – as the factor that made the difference. For Lehmann, the SAP analytics led them to focus more on their upwind speed.

Reckoning In 12-14 knots with a swell off the Atlantic, Boehm and Roos returned to the top of the leaderboard after taking a 5,2 to carry a four-point advantage over five-time world champion Wolfgang Hunger and crewman Holger Jess, while the USA’s Mike Holt and Carl Smit held onto third overall, denting Germany’s hold on the podium positions. Lehmann/Oehme took a third but followed it up with a 15th, which would become a discard, regaining their form the next day with a second behind Hunger.

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Showdown

Aussie team Higgins and Marsh then took their second win in race eight but with three finishes of 10th or worse were out of the reckoning for the world title. On the sixth leg, upwind, Boehm again took a flyer and overtook five boats to finish third, while Lehmann and Hunger, favouring the left, were sixth and eighth. In the debrief, SAP Analytic’s Boris Herrmann noted Boehm had been a fraction of a knot slower than his opponents, on average, on the downwind legs – and that it sometimes pays to boldly go where nobody else is going. Boehm had never won a national sailing championship in his native Germany or a world title. After eight races he was now leading with 16 points and one race remaining, ahead of Lehmann in second on 18 points and Hunger in third with 21. Lehmann commented: ‘We recognised there was a little chance of winning the worlds not until coming ashore after race eight, therefore we did a big mistake in not covering Stefan Boehm in race eight, so he managed to overtake us on the last beat and had a two points lead then... but shortly after the start of the last race we really felt that it was possible.’

The final day showdown was between three veteran German teams. Ahead of the final race, Herrmann summed up: Lehmann/Oehme had great consistency; Boehm/Roos’s weakness was downwind, 0.25 knots slower on average; Hunger/Jess were on average 0.5 knots slower on the first leg. Lehmann said: ‘On the final race day mentally we tried to keep calm and said to each other don’t change the routine now. Concentrating on the start was also a key element. We changed the starting tactic a little bit, coming very late from the left side of the starting line on port tack, really close to the starting mark on the left side and avoiding getting in trouble with the two opponents. This tactic pays off perfectly. But to be honest of course I missed a few hours of sleep at night thinking again and again about exactly these things.’ Lehmann and Oehme had a great start and led to the favoured left to be in the top three by the windward mark. Both their rivals had poor starts: Cologne attorney Boehm and Hunger, a physician from Kiel, were fighting their way through the pack. Lehmann touched a mark and had to take a 360 penalty but had time on his side and Oehme told his skipper, ‘just settle down and sail’. On the last beat Boehm/Roos again rolled the dice, heading right. Lehmann recalls: ‘We had to finish fourth to become world champions so there was no realistic chance to cover Stefan Boehm on the right course side because the risk of losing two boats on the favourite left course side was too big, so we only did a short leg to the right in the middle of the beat, then back to the still favoured left.’ It was enough to finish the job. Lehmann and Oehme finished third behind USA’s Holt in first and Australia’s Higgins in second – securing the title by two points. Boehm was second overall and Hunger third.

leading up to the 2013 worlds, was a major factor in their success. ‘Because of the hard German winter we stopped sailing in the middle of November but we had a strong programme in the gym, which is very important when you start the sailing season with the most important regatta of the year.’ Having sailed with Leon since 2008, Lehmann says another strength was ‘understanding each other without words and always keeping calm when a mistake occurs’. They also have a short debrief after racing to work out the tactical finesse of what has happened on the course, different speed potentials, and identify weak points. For this event they also looked at the tide, which got stronger as the event went on, because of its influence the steady north-west current: ‘Being a North Sea sailor I recognised this from the beginning, but understood it better and better until the final race.’ Ultimately the result could have been very different were it not for one other aspect to their preparation. Checking the boat over before the final race, they spotted a missing split ring on the mainsheet block. ‘Losing the bolt during the last race would have been the consequence for absolute sure...’ says Lehmann. ‘This could have destroyed the title for us.’ Instead it was a moment of vigilance that enabled Lehmann – who has been in the top 10 at the 505 worlds four times in the last decade – to secure his first ever world championship win.

below Ian Pinnell and Ian Mitchell were top Brits in seventh

Preparation Lehmann started sailing with his father aged five and at 11 started racing an Optimist, subsequently switching to a Europe and then the Olympic 470 class, becoming a member of the national team. In 1999, after a three year break, he started sailing 505s. He believes fitness, in the absence of on-the-water training in the months

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CONQUER AT COWES rupert holmes talks to two of the most successful sailors at Cowes last year to get their key go-faster tips for victory

MEET THE Y&Y TEAM

Come and join the Yachts & Yachting team for drinks and share your Cowes Week tales in the Pier View, Cowes High Street on Tuesday the 6th of August from 5:30pm to 8:30pm

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photo: pAUl WYEth

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Cowes Week preview

Dayboats: White Group winners right Matthew Alexander helmed a Redwing to class and overall White Group victory last year

M

atthew Alexander helmed John Raymond’s ‘Harlequin’ to a class win in the 25-strong Redwing fleet, also becoming overall winner of White Group after winning all but one race. ‘Cowes is our biggest event of the season, so preparation in general is absolutely key,’ says Alexander, ‘particularly in terms of avoiding the major mistakes that can ruin a series.’ He identifies several key aspects to this: understanding the racing area, boat preparation, managing the overall approach to the series, and pre-race preparation.

1 Understand the racing area Even though as a crew they had raced from Cowes for many years, the ‘Harlequin’ team still took time out to refresh their knowledge. ‘Firstly, we walked the Green (immediately to the west of the Royal Yacht Squadron line) at low tide, marking the rocks against landmarks. We also took the buoy chart out on a RIB to make sure all the marks were where we thought we would find them.’

3 An overall approach ‘At Cowes it is particularly important to sail conservatively – while there are lots of gains to be made, there are also lots of possible losses. You need to be aware of the opportunities that are high-risk, that you should ignore and wait for a less risky one. A single high-stake move can ruin your series score. ‘For me this takes the luck out of the equation. There are many people that say you have to be lucky to win at Cowes Week, but the more you can manage and defend against risks and the more you can identify low-risk advantages, the less luck plays a part. That’s why in some classes the same people tend to be ‘lucky’ every year.’ 4 Pre-race ‘You have to understand exactly where you are in the tidal flow sequence and how the situation will evolve over the next two or three hours. A copy of Winning Tides is essential – anyone who sails without one is not taking their racing seriously. ‘For Cowes it’s also really important

to triple check the course – we all look at it to check we have noted it correctly and write it down in several places. You can’t depend on a single piece of paper that could get blown away. ‘We are always out 45 minutes early, watching for wind changes and trying to identify patterns. We also try practice starts, providing we are able to keep clear of others, by following other starts. ‘It’s really important to get good transits for your chosen spot on the line and to make timed runs, especially for downwind starts. It’s very interesting how late some boats are when you watch other fleets on a downwind start – it’s understandable because you can’t burn time, but if you time it right you can get a really good flyer on the fleet. ‘Once on the course you must think one leg ahead – we have to keep reminding ourselves of this. For example, you need to know how you will get up the next beat well before you get to the leeward mark. The first consideration is always tidal strategy – do I want to be on a bank or not? – followed by wind strategy, i.e. playing the shifts. ‘You also need to consider your position within the fleet – the are times that you might want to be the righthand-most or left-hand-most boat, or to protect the left, or protect the right.’

Other factors Alexander also identifies a number of other areas that are invariably associated with achieving a great result. Many of us sail more than one type of boat, so being able to transfer

photo: Rick tomlinson*

2 Boat prep ‘We spend more time than most people on this – I am a big believer in replacing things before they break, whereas many people just wait for the breakage. We spend a lot of time pre-season, checking everything down to the last block. Even then we still

re-learn this the hard way – I noticed a hairline crack in the rudder when the boat was being craned into the water last year, but didn’t think anything of it at the time. But on the penultimate race at Cowes, when we were leading the event, the rudder split in two halves. ‘We also spend quite a lot of time in advance of the regatta checking rig tension and refreshing the marks, making sure we are still happy with them.’

right Tidal strategy is a huge part of racing at Cowes – do your research!

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photo: Rick tomlinson*

lessons learned in one environment to a different one can be a great advantage. ‘The Illusion is the main other class I sail,’ says Alexander. ‘That fleet helps you to see how some of the top sailors in the Solent – Graham Bailey, Graham Sunderland, Mark Downer and so on – consistently manage their racing. They always start well, sail in clean air, and cover the fleet. It’s interesting how simple they make a potentially very

– I am extremely lucky to have John Raymond as skipper and tactician. He’s an excellent helmsman in his own right, but he knows Cowes extremely well and is an even better strategist – we’ve found the fastest combination is for him to do that from the middle of the boat, while I helm, so that he’s not trying to do two jobs. ‘We’ve had the same team (with Xander Shaw at the front) for five

A single high-stake move can ruin your series score complex situation appear to be – so I try to take those lessons to the Redwing. ‘I was also lucky to have had someone of the stature of Vernon Stratton (former British Olympic sailing team manager and ‘Admiral’ of the Illusion class) mentoring me and passing on his knowledge – it was a great privilege. ‘Team work is also absolutely crucial

years, our boat handing is spot on and communications on board are accurate and concise. That’s also hugely important – you need to condense all the available information into bite-size pieces from which you can quickly make strategic decisions. It all gets run through John who is best placed to make decisions as he isn’t trying to juggle two jobs on the boat.’

Official charity – Toe in the Water The event’s official charity partner is Toe in the Water, a tri-service initiative that uses competitive sailing to re-inspire injured service personnel to see beyond their injuries, and perform to their limits regardless of their physical condition. Since entering its first crew at Cowes Week in 2008, Toe in the Water now re-inspires 50-60 profoundly and traumatically injured servicemen and women each year through competitive sailing, including numerous top 10 finishes across a string of regattas and national competitions. Competitive sailing provides a unique opportunity for injured men and women to re-engage and re-integrate while racing on equal terms with their able bodied contemporaries. Participation in Aberdeen Asset Management Cowes Week is a crucial part of the rehabilitation programme, although many of the crew have never been on a yacht before, let alone raced competitively. ‘Competitiveness and team spirit are things you forget when you get injured, but before you know it when the other boats are all around you at the start line, fighting for the best position, it all comes flooding back and all you want to do is win,’ says Sargent Chris Pacey. The charity relies entirely on donations. You can help by buying Toe in the Water merchandise via www.toeinthewater. org or make a donation at www.justgiving.com/toeinthewater And don’t forget to kick off your Cowes Week with the Toe in the Water Crew Party on Saturday, August 3. Tickets £5 each and can be bought on the door or in advance via Cowes Yacht Haven.

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All sales are “as-is, where-is, with no guarantees or warranties” and subject to United States Bankruptcy Court Approval.

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photo: pAUl WYEth

Big boat success: Black Group

C

owes-based navigator and tactician Graham Sunderland sailed David Frank’s JPK10.10 ‘Strait Dealer’ last year, winning IRC Class 4 convincingly, counting only podium places, and finishing in the overall top 10 of

all Black Group boats They also won every race in the RORC Red Funnel Easter regatta for the second consecutive year. 1 Know where the line is ‘Although shorter than in the past, the Black Group start line is still a very long one – so you need to know exactly

where it is. In the past we could do this visually, by looking at transits, but that is no longer sufficiently accurate. I recommend buying the Velocitek ProStart. It’s a really simple and easy to use device that allows you to ping each end of the line and then gives the exact distance to the line in metres. ‘Knowing that you are in exactly

above In handicap fleets it’s important to know who you’re racing against

beLoW LeFt Plan ahead when choosing which spinnakers to carry for the week

photo: Rick tomlinson*

New this year With 2013 being a Rolex Fastnet Race year, the big boat class will be back in town, with racing likely to include a race around the island, a passage race of about 40 miles and a race around Solent marks. As we went to press entries included the 100ft maxi ‘Esimit Europa 2’ (ex-‘Alfa Romeo II’), two 72ft Mini Maxis and a Volvo 70. The J/70 will have racing following a similar format to the SB20’s Grand Slam ‘regatta within a regatta’, with two races a day over the first four days of the event, followed by traditional Cowes Week racing for the remainder of the event. There will also be a stand-alone class for J/111 onedesign for the first time. In partnership with the Island SC there’s a single day of fun and relaxed racing on the final Saturday (August 10) for cruisers and other boats rated under the Island Sailing Club Rating System (ISCRS). The day’s racing will cost just £30 and will take place over a relatively short and straightforward two to three hour course.

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Cowes Week preview

make sure everyone knows what the sounder reads when the keel touches the bottom – it’s best to tweak the offset so that this is set to zero.’

photo: Rick tomlinson*

4 Know your opposition ‘In an IRC fleet it’s not always clear which boats are your biggest competitors in terms of the overall title – often it’s not the boats immediately around you. The WinningIRC app empowers you to change your strategy during a race depending on whether you’re ahead or behind your closest competitors on corrected time.’

Knowing that you are in exactly the right spot at the start is a game-changer above The Black Group startlines are long, so make sure you know exactly where it is

the right spot at the start is a gamechanger that gets you ahead of the fleet in every race. A low budget alternative is the iRegatta mobile app.’

right Make sure you have an up-to-date chart for the 2013 Solent marks

2 Choose the right kites ‘Cowes Week is a long event that typically includes both light and windy days. Given that many courses will include some reaching legs, that amounts to a lot of spinnakers. A standard IRC rating allows you to only carry three spinnakers for an event – for us we must have the A1.5 and S4 on board, so that leaves us choosing whether to leave the A5 or A0 behind. ‘It’s worth putting in a trial certificate for carrying four kites – it’s the easiest and cheapest way of figuring out

whether doing so is likely to be worth the rating penalty.’ 3 Depth calibration ‘You will spend a lot of time rock- and sand-hopping, so this is a must. And

5 Get the basics right ‘Everyone talks about the importance of this, but don’t be complacent – few crews are as thorough as they should be in this respect. Read the Sailing Instructions, check exclusion zones, make sure you all understand the penalty system, and the procedure for general recalls, sign off after racing, know where all the shallow bits are, and keep a constant look out for ships. The sooner you see them the better the chance of avoiding them without losing ground.’ 6 Understand the weather ‘Ten years ago all we had to go on was the shipping forecast and the synoptic chart. But now there are more forecasts available, from more models, so there are more points of comparison. If the models agree, you can have high confidence in the forecast, but if they differ you know to keep more of an open mind and plan your strategy accordingly.’

Key info

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photo: Rick tomlinson*

Where: Cowes, Isle of Wight When: August 3-10, 2013 What: The world’s oldest and largest sailing regatta with up to 1,000 boats, 8,000 sailors and 50,000 spectators Standard price entries close: July 28 www.aamcowesweek.co.uk

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We invite you to visit our stand number J104 - MAYFLOWER HALL, during Southampton Boat Show held on 13-22.09.2013 where we will present the offer of the Poland’s yacht-building industry. We will be also present in the edition of the boat show in 2014. www.polishyachts.eu, e-mail: 6.5@polskiejachty.eu

The yachts built in Poland triumph in European marketsy The history of the Polish boating industry goes back centuries, when the great work of boat builders was a pure necessity, in the country with a dense network of rivers, the varied landscape of thousands of lakes and the open sea. Hundreds of years of craftsmanship and tradition contributed to a very dynamic development of the industry over the last two decades, when Poland became an important supplier and partner for the European and international markets. In the record year of 2008, the Polish shipyards exported approximately 22 000 units to the entire world. The recent decades in the development of the yachting industry reflect a very fast integration of new technologies in the field of electronics, communications and material technology. The offered structures apply the latest solutions for propulsion, navigation systems and electronic control systems as well as wireless technologies, automatism and remote control. The modern materials, such as carbon fibers, and the new techniques of lamination, improve strength and technical parameters. The implemented innovations constantly improve the performance and aesthetic and functional characteristics of new models of boats and yachts. Advanced machining processes and hand-made details ensure the high quality of the final product.

The flagship products of the Polish boating industry are: ” Luxury yachts manufactured on behalf of other shipyards with personalized interiors. ” Medium and small pleasure boats. Designed for coastal cruising in channels, rivers and lakes. Their comfort and facilities compete with much larger units. The boats manufactured in Poland are renowned in the industry for their excellent quality and workmanship. The attention to details and continuous introduction of new models is undoubtedly the key to success. All the factors listed above contributed to the success of the Polish boating industry on the international stage. The Polish yachts have won many awards at international fairs for innovation and design and were nominated in the categories for the best yacht, sailing boat and motor boat of the year. The Polish shipyards are rewarded in the international market by numerous prestigious awards such as: ‘Brand of the Future’, ‘European Company 2003’ contest ‘MPS’, ‘European Medal’ and many others. The quality of the Polish boats is acknowledged in the ranking of the „International Boat Industry” magazine and by being nominated for the ‘European Yacht of The Year Award’. The tests of the Polish boats and yachts are published in major nautical magazines across Europe. We are pleased to invite you to visit our stand with the offer of the Polish boating industry during the Southampton Boat Show.

Project co-financed by the European Union from the European Regional Development Fund

The manufacturers who participate in the program: CP YACHTS Sailing boats Giżycko +48 87 5230033, office@comarpoland.eu, www.comarpoland.eu LA MARE Sp. z o.o. House boats Bydgoszcz +48516005993, biuro@lamare.pl, www.lamare.pl NAUTINER YACHTS Sp. z o.o. Sailing boats Giżycko +48 87 428 18 79, biuro@nautiner-yachts.pl, www.nautiner-yachts.pl NUMO YACHTS Sp. z o.o. Motor boats Warsaw +393347722366, info@numoyachts.com, www.numoyachts.com PARKER POLAND Sp. z o.o. Czosnów +4822 785 00 90, parker@parker.com.pl, www.parker.com.pl SKIPPI YACHTS S.A. Motor and sailing boats Warsaw +48 606 327 557, kris@skippi-yachts.pl, www.skippi-yachts.pl VENDURI TYMON BUTKIEWICZ Sailing boats Łubianka +48781572436, info@huzar-boats.com, www.huzar-boats.com WAVE CATAMARANS Sailing boats Warsaw +48501100492, info@wavecatamarans.com, www.wavecatamarans.com


Speed hunter F rom Laser 5000s to International Moths and Volvo 70s, Andy Budgen has enjoyed an incredibly diverse sailing career. But if you ask him what the common thread through the past 25 years has been, it’s a need for speed. ‘I think that I’ve been trying to get my hands on the fastest boat I could ever since I was 17,’ he says. ‘When the Laser 5000 came along, that was one of the fastest things around, and then when the Moth got onto foils, I thought I must have a go at that.’ His fastest toy of the moment is a Volvo Open 70, but more of that later. Andy’s accent is quite a giveaway to his roots, the Scottish burr coming through loud and clear despite having moved to the south coast in his teens. Andy and his older brother Ian learned the ropes sailing keelboats with their father at Royal Gourock YC near Glasgow. When the family moved south to Warsash, the Budgen brothers joined a strong local 420 squad and found themselves sailing against talented sailors such as Ian Walker and John Merricks. But the Olympic classes of the time did not excite the Budgens, who were more taken with the explosion of the new asymmetric classes. After dabbling in the International 14 the brothers were attracted by the launch of the brand new Laser 5000 class. They found themselves a good sponsor that paid enough for them to train and race full-time. With Audi sponsoring the European circuit and television shows going out on Sky Sports, it was an exciting time to be involved. Many good sailors came to compete

From skiffs to ocean racing machines, Andy Budgen has always been drawn to boats with an impressive turn of foot, as he revealed to Andy Rice

in the new, short-course format racing, including Paul Brotherton, Tim Hancock, Mark Rushall, Tracey Covell and the Greenhalgh brothers. But the professional approach of the Budgens made them a cut above, and they won most of the regattas they entered. The Laser 5000 was originally developed as the Olympic 5000, specifically to a brief laid down by ISAF for an exciting new doublehanded Olympic class. When ISAF held trials at the end of 1996 for a new doublehander, the Laser 5000 seemed the obvious front-runner. But among the many boats that came to win the coveted spot, it was the 49er that really captured the attention. When it was selected as the new Olympic class, at last the Budgens had a boat that excited them sufficiently to want to get involved in the Olympic circuit. This was also the time when Lottery funding began and British squad sailors could qualify for the kind of money that would enable them to sail fulltime. The Budgens threw themselves into their training and in 1998 finished second at the world championships, behind the then-dominant team of Chris Nicholson and Dan Phillips from Australia. They also acquitted themselves well at the Olympic test regatta in Sydney later in the year. But

as the Olympic trials drew closer, the tense relationship between the brothers did not help their cause. They finished fourth in the trials, with Ian Barker and Simon Hiscocks going on to win a silver medal at Sydney 2000.

Separate ways

That was the end of the brothers’ partnership, with Ian going on to become a professional trimmer at GBR Challenge, and then with Paul Cayard on two successive Volvo Ocean Race campaigns. Andy, meanwhile, set himself up as a property developer and started to earn a good living whilst also carrying on sailing for the fun of it. Dinghy sailing took a back seat for a while as he bought a Sigma 38, which he raced successfully at the likes of Cowes Week and Cork Week. But a Sigma 38 hardly fulfilled Andy’s thirst for speed and performance. He convinced a friend, Fred Schwyn, to buy a Volvo Ocean 60 which they ran as a charter vessel for events around the Solent and English Channel, as well as twice in the Rolex Fastnet Race. Andy was still missing the thrill of skiff racing, the part of the sport where he had always excelled thanks to his rock-solid boat handling skills and nofear approach to strong wind sailing. In his Laser 5000 days he had toyed with the idea of doing an 18ft Skiff campaign in Australia when the class was operating as a professional circuit with high levels of television coverage on Sky, and the boats were still going through a rapid pace of development. After the 49er campaign that desire to go 18 sailing on Sydney Harbour was still bubbling away in the background.

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photo: howArd wright/iMAgE proFEssionAl photogrAphy


below Having moved into the foiling Moth, Andy topped the silver fleet at the 2012 worlds

‘I had spent a couple of three month periods in Australia coaching 49er teams, I was keen to do the 18-footer circuit, and it was really initially planned as a one or a two year 18 campaign out there for the winter. And – just because it was a nice place to go for the winter – it turned into a bit more than that. I think I must have done four winters in Australia, maybe five.’ Fortunately with the property empire ticking over nicely in the UK, Andy was in a good situation to be able to spend more than half the year, the British winter, in sunny Australia. ‘Sydney Harbour itself is certainly a nice place to go sailing, and places like Lake Macquarie which aren’t too far away. I didn’t really get the opportunity to do a lot of travelling because the 18 circuit was based pretty much in Sydney, so we were a little bit restricted on where we could go, but obviously there are other venues in Australia which are pretty impressive. A nice temperature of water, good attitude from the sailors out there – it’s a bit of a sailing paradise, and people are racing on a Monday night, Wednesday afternoon, Saturday afternoon round the Harbour. It’s a pretty special place, really.’ What’s surprising, considering what a sailing paradise Australia is, is how small the sailing scene is there, and how seasonal. ‘I think unfortunately for them maybe, they’re a bit spoilt with their conditions. I think they get used to them, or maybe a lot of

them have actually grown up in those conditions, and don’t really understand what a number of people in the UK go through to go sailing. I mean it always astonished me that around Christmas time the sailing clubs are absolutely deserted. I think people are just doing their Christmas stuff, cooking their barbecues. The Harbour is normally reasonably quiet. I normally went sailing on the Harbour on Christmas Day, and you’d have the whole place to yourself, in beautiful sailing conditions! The whole place would be just completely deserted, and it’s 25 degrees, sunny, and a nice strong north-easter blowing in. If you had a day like that in the UK, the Harbour would be packed.’ Sailing in such amazing conditions has, Andy admits, spoiled his outlook on sailing in the UK. ‘It does astonish me – having spent time out in somewhere like Australia – just how

photo: thiErry MArtinEz/sEA&Co

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photo: FrAnk QuEAlEy*

Andy Budgen

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keen people are to go sailing in this country, a lot of the time in fairly cold, unpleasant conditions. They want to get out there, they want to go sailing. I think that obviously our Olympic success has come down partly to that British attitude of “we’re getting out there and we’re going to give it a go”. And I think there’s also a certain amount of the fact that we just don’t know any better. That’s just the way it is. If you waited for a warm day you might never go sailing!’

An Irishman, an Englishman... For the 18-footer campaign, Andy teamed up with two of his coaching protegés from the 49er fleet, Englishman James Barker, and Irishman Matt McGovern. And so the Englishman, the Irishman and the Scotsman started learning how to sail and race an 18ft Skiff on Sydney Harbour. ‘They were good guys who

I knew quite well, and we had a great time. I mean to be quite honest it was a real pleasure just to go sailing an 18 on Sydney Harbour without the racing.’ As to the racing itself? ‘Pretty difficult,’ Andy admits, ‘I mean we’d obviously sailed the 49er back in the Sydney days,

or you’ve got to do at least a season or a couple of seasons down there to work out what’s what. ‘It’s a very, very difficult place to get right. It’s a great place to sail, it’s so unpredictable and it changes from one wind direction to the next. We

Above Andy’s 18ft Skiff campaign included a third at the JJ Giltinan ‘worlds’

Australians don’t understand what people in the UK go through to go sailing! but having sailed a couple of seasons down there, I soon realised how little we actually knew of the Harbour. We really didn’t have a clue. So I think to do well down there, either you’ve got to have a boat which is significantly faster than everybody else, to make up for the fact you don’t know the Harbour that well,

would notice that a five-degree change in the north-east direction would have an effect on how you go round the standard 18-footer course. There are so many wind bends everywhere.’ The Aussie 18-footers welcomed Andy and his crew. ‘Certainly to begin with, yes, they were very friendly, very

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photo: ppl*

Andy Budgen

Above Andy dominated the Laser 5000 class in 1995-96, winning both the UK and European circuits

helpful. I think we were seen as an outside group coming in who weren’t necessarily going to offer any real resistance to the locals. They supplied us with a boat when ours hadn’t turned up, and allowed us to join in with their racing. And I knew a few of them from 49er days, and generally the club was extremely helpful.’

restrictions on what we could use, sails, masts, stuff like that. The last season I did there, I started to feel singled out. I don’t think it affected us much because I wasn’t actually going to put that much money into it, but I think had I wanted to spend the money to be fully competitive there, it would have been a real problem.’

When you mix a hobby and a career it starts losing some of its appeal. You certainly lose some of that enjoyment But as the Budgen crew started showing some potential for hitting the front of the fleet, attitudes shifted. ‘There was sort of a politics down there, and I think unfortunately there had been other people that had come over from the UK and maybe not abided 100 per cent by the rules and left a bit of a bitter taste in some people’s mouths. I think that we got slightly tarnished by that brush. The club generally was fine, but we did find that they did start trying to put up some barriers to slow us down,

Sailing a monster Find out more about how you can get onboard Andy’s Volvo Open 70 ‘Monster Project’ at Volvo70charter.co.uk

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In their penultimate season, the Budgen team came third in the JJ Giltinan, the unofficial 18-footer world championship, and had run the winners close for overall victory. No wonder the locals’ attitude had shifted, although by this point Andy was increasingly distracted by the International Moths that were running rings around the 18-footers in the Harbour.

Flying hulls and canting keels Having bought a Mach II he started training hard for a few months and by the World Championships in Lake Macquarie in early 2011, he was good enough to come 11th out of 109. Not bad for a bloke in his early 40s. Meanwhile during the British summer had had been busy running his Sigma

38 and the VO60, but in the neverending quest for the next big thrill he convinced his business partner to sell the VO60 and trade up to a Volvo Open 70, the Rob Humphreys-designed boat built for Team Russia in the 2008-09 Volvo Ocean Race. The boat was widely acknowledged to be too overbuilt to be competitive for the Volvo Race, although this meant it was a good deal more bulletproof than most of its faster but more fragile cousins. With all its moving parts, not least the canting keel and lifting daggerboards, the idea of taking on a VO70 for charter purposes seems a little crazy. Andy is certainly not testing its limits, taking it a good deal easier than he did on the VO60, which by the fifth season he was pushing to 100 per cent even in strong winds. But the VO70 doesn’t need to be pushed hard to achieve some impressive average speeds, and he is discovering there is indeed a charter market out there for such a big and powerful beast. ‘We could have sold our charter package for the Rolex Fastnet Race three times over,’ he says, ‘but we’ve got lots of other opportunities throughout the season, Channel races, the Rolex Middle Sea Race in the Mediterranean, the ARC Race across the Atlantic and the Caribbean season next winter.’ It’s no accident that former 49er sailors have been the most fertile recruiting ground for VO70 helmsmen in recent years, and it is perhaps the closest skiff experience you could find on a keelboat. But if you ask Andy to pick out a favourite experience thus far in his sailing career, he returns to his time sailing with his mates on Sydney Harbour. ‘It’s hard to beat the 18ft scene. A lot of the Olympic and Laser 5000 scene was quite pressured sailing. Of course it’s got its enjoyable moments, but it’s pressure sailing at the end of the day, because you’re doing it for a sponsor or you’re doing it for a governing body. ‘Whereas when we started doing the 18 stuff in Australia, really it was just for ourselves. We didn’t really have any pressure, we funded it ourselves. I think that when you mix a hobby and a career it starts losing some of its appeal. You certainly lose some of that enjoyment from the hobby perspective. But sailing on Sydney Harbour with a couple of guys that just really get along, that’s got to be the must fun I’ve had of all the sailing I’ve done.’

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Technique

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hings will go wrong when racing, no matter how much time and money and organisation goes into the boat and team. However, the mark of a real championship-winning crew is how they go about avoiding the known issues, embracing change that will reduce the likelihood of error, and focussing on the things they can control.

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Pre-start 1 Don’t be late... Make sure you’re properly prepared with plenty of time in hand. Always. The more time you have to get accustomed to conditions, sail part of the windward leg, then bear away, pop the spinnaker up and gybe it, the fewer boat handling mistakes you will make on the race track.

2 ...But don’t over-do it If you turn up too early it’s possible to become tired before you’ve even started racing. In a dinghy race you may not need more than 20 minutes on the water after arriving at the starting area, although for a yacht race 45 minutes is likely to be a better timing. This allows you to get some vital practice in, followed by a quick break to relax, rehydrate and

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BOAT HANDLING BLOOPERS (and how to avoid them) rupert holmes looks at ways to iron out bad habits and eliminate boat handling mistakes to improve your racing results

replenish energy before the start sequence begins. 3 Don’t procrastinate! Being ready in enough time to practise key manoeuvres is closely connected with your attitude at the end of your previous day’s sailing. If the jobs list is not attended to immediately after racing there is too much risk that tasks will be forgotten until a last-

minute rush on the morning of your next race.

Upwind legs 4 Don’t overstand the top mark Too many boats give away ground unnecessarily here. Granted, in a big fleet if you approach the top mark at the end of the first beat on the port layline you’ll end up in

a mess. On the other hand, if you approach a little outside the three-boat length zone, you have a good chance of being able to find a spot in which you can tack underneath the boats that are overstanding on starboard tack, while giving away very little ground. 5 Don’t push your luck If you see a lot of starboard tack boats

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Technique

photo: Jean-Marie Liot/Dppi

right In big fleets be careful not to overstand the windward mark

struggling to get round the top mark – maybe because of a windshift, or because the tidal stream is setting them onto the buoy – then tacking below their line is unlikely to get you round. Instead you’ll just get drawn into a parking lot of boats that are attempting, but usually failing, to pinch around the mark. It’s usually faster to accept that you’ll have to duck a few transoms so that you can tack a couple of lengths beyond the starboard layline. This will then give you a little breathing space to sail fast around the outside of the slow-moving melee at the top mark. below Have a plan to recover quickly from broaches

6 Hike hard bearing away When bearing away at the windward

mark it’s all too easy to pile into the middle of the boat, focussing on hoisting the spinnaker and getting set up for the next leg. However, moving weight to the centre, increases heel, which makes the boat tend to luff up. As a result, more helm must be applied, which kills speed. It’s therefore worth setting the boat up so that as many tasks as possible can be done from as close to the windward side as possible, and on a big boat for any crew not directly involved in the manoeuvre to hike hard until the boat is settled on her downwind course.

Downwind legs Whatever the wind strength, gybing is the manoeuvre in which boat handling deficiencies are most noticeable. Again it’s worth highlighting the basic errors, as these are repeated all too often.

photo: toM Gruitt/oneDition*

7 Square the pole first A boat that’s gybed prematurely is an all-too common sight, resulting in the sail collapsing, wrapped kites, confusion as to who should be doing what and recriminations. Before gybing it’s vital to give the crew time to rotate the kite to windward by winding the pole aft, before bringing the main boom over. It’s then important to get the boat settled with the wind dead aft, until the pole is set on the new windward side. A skilled crew makes it look like one smooth seamless manoeuvre – but none of these elements can be rushed or skipped.

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8 Watch the A-sail clew Similarly, it’s a mistake to gybe an asymmetric boat before the clew is ahead of the forestay – on a big boat if you do so before the clew of the sail

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has been pulled around the forestay with the lazy sheet, the sail will be blown into the foretriangle. Again good communication between the helm and crew is vital to ensure perfect timing. 9 Pick your moment to gybe The perfect timing will vary depending on conditions. In a howling wind it’s clearly best to choose a patch of relatively calm water. However, in light airs it may be better to gybe on a gust, so that you don’t lose too much speed as the apparent wind strength drops when you turn dead downwind.

Spinnaker drops 10 Time to mark All too often it’s tempting to judge the moment to drop the spinnaker based on visual distance to the mark, maybe making a small mental allowance for the speed and direction of the tide. While in dinghies and keelboats this may well be the only option, the same is not true for any boat that is allowed to use a GPS while racing. Here the ‘time to waypoint’ function will tell you exactly how long you have to reach the mark. 11 Know how long drop takes If you know how long it takes your crew to get the headsail up and the kite down you can achieve a perfectly timed slick manoeuvre every time. Well, almost. You still need to carve out some space to turn downwind to drop the spinnaker if approaching the mark on a reach, and watch for gusts that will accelerate you past the mark at the very last moment. 12 Avoiding a broach Downwind in a big breeze broaching

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will lose you lots of time and can be dangerous. It’s all too easy to blame the helm for bad driving when there are many things the crew can do to make it easier. None of this is rocket science, but it bears repeating as it seems to be easily forgotten, even on boats that race at a very high level.

big boats the pit is the link between the foredeck and the afterguard at the back – and it’s vital to get it right. If the back end of the boat doesn’t know what is going on at the front, or vice versa, the blame lies with the pit, for failing to alert the tactician that the foredeck needs a decision, for example.

13 Don’t forget the vang This is a critical control – it needs to be in someone’s hand all the time so that it can be eased to dump power out of the upper part of the mainsail if the rudder is in danger of stalling. Once the danger has passed the vang must be retightened – if it’s slack enough for the head of the sail to twist forward of the shrouds, the boat will be much more difficult to steer.

18 Keep noise levels down Using the pit as a conduit for communications can also reduce the overall noise level on the boat – the more noise there is the less focus there tends to be, and important messages can get drowned out. It’s also worth considering using wireless headsets for this reason on a big boat for communications between the back of the boat, the pit and the foredeck.

14 Get weight in the right place Similarly, think about the position of crew weight – it’s amazing how frequently the rest of the crew do nothing when someone else has to move forward, or move in from the rail to do a job, yet his is just the moment at which you need to hike extra hard, or shuffle aft.

19 It works two ways When we think about communication we often think solely of the action taken by the person delivering the message, but careful listening by the person receiving the message is of equal importance. One of the best training exercises I’ve ever done was when regularly sailing as navigator on Tony Langley’s Farr 45 ‘Atomic’. Concerned that there was too much noise on the boat, and not enough listening, we sailed a couple of laps of a windward-leeward course without any verbal communication.

15 Look at the wind It’s also important have someone looking behind to call gusts, so that the helm and trimmers can react early, rather than after the gust has already hit. Good communication is clearly a big part of this…

It was an educational experience: instead of many people talking over each other, making it hard to get the attention of the person you needed to talk to, everyone was tuned into looking for cues, which made it easy to pass on key messages in an instant and get confirmation they had been received. It was an excellent illustration of the extent to which only a small part of effective communication is verbal and helped considerably with refining boat handling. 20 Talk about it afterwards A chat after every day’s sailing is one of the most efficient ways of all to sharpen up crew manoeuvres and boat handling. An effective platform for this is to give everyone in turn an opportunity to make one positive point. To avoid creating bad feeling it’s important that there is never any blame attached here – but that doesn’t prevent exploring better ways to carry out manoeuvres. It also doesn’t replace post-race analysis in the bar – but it is an additional tool in the armoury.

below Make sure the pole is squared before gybing a symmetric

Your tips There must be some common boat handling mistakes that you and your crew have learned to avoid. Email them to editorial@creatingwaves.com and we will publish the pick of the bunch in a future issue.

Communication Never underestimate the extent to which eliminating any kind of boat handling mistake centres around communication – not only do things go wrong when communication is lacking, but poor communication also impedes the learning process. This is doubly important on a big boat if you frequently sail with different people in the crew – the better the team communication, the easier it is for new people to drop seamlessly into their respective roles.

photo: toM Gruitt/oneDition*

16 Does everyone know? However loud you shout never assume everyone has heard an instruction, unless they give a clear indication they have done so... 17 Look to the pit The vital importance of communication in this role is often underestimated. On

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PHOTO: Paul WyeTH

Antigua Sailing Week

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to win

Think a charter boat can’t cut it against practised racing crews? Think again, as Louay Habib finds out how ‘Quokka’ came out on top at Antigua Sailing Week August 2013

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Antigua Sailing Week

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kippered by Philippe Falle, the Grand Soleil 43 ‘Quokka’ had an outstanding Antigua Sailing Week, winning their highly competitive class on the last race of the regatta. ‘Quokka’s’ win was made all the remarkable by the fact that as a race charter boat, the crew only came together just before Antigua Sailing Week. Unusually, seven of the crew were also women. Philippe revealed some of criteria for their success.

that a winch is not working. I spent two weeks before Antigua Sailing Week making sure that ‘Quokka’ was completely ready, right down to the small details; taping up every split pin and tightening every shackle key. Having a clean bottom is very important, since ‘Quokka’ arrived in the Caribbean, the hull has been cleaned at least twice a week, otherwise the limpets grow and cleaning becomes a nightmare, regular scrubbing makes the job easier. Just before the regatta,

top to toe

BELOW Skipper Philippe Falle has many years of experience bringing new race crews together

Preparation plays a massive part in the success of any campaign, maybe as much as 80 per cent of the reason for getting the right result. I try to look at every single mechanical aspect of the boat. For example, servicing winches is vital, there is nothing worse than finding out, just before a regatta,

‘Quokka’ was hauled out and, with 400-grit wet sandpaper, we made sure she was absolutely magnificent; smooth as a baby’s bottom! It is also very important to look after the sails, they are the engine of the boat and the better they are looked after the faster ‘Quokka’ will be. Storing the sails correctly after each regatta is part of that, we always leech-flake the sails, which avoids damaging them. Every boat has a budget for sails and the longer you can keep them in good condition, the more competitive you are going to be. And the further you can make the budget go, the more sails you can add to the sail inventory, which gives you plenty of horse-power in a variety of conditions. When the race crew arrive, everybody becomes responsible for his or her own area on the boat and the same checking and preparation ethos applies. For example, the mainsheet trimmer is tasked with everything to do with the position including the boom, the blocks and the mainsail control lines, the main track etc. If everybody checks his or her area every morning, it can save a huge amount of hassle, such as ripping a kite on a split pin during a race.

Know your strengths

PHOTO: Paul WyeTH

Training is key to success. We spent two days on the water just acclimatising to the heat of the Caribbean and having a bit of a blow out ashore. Sailing is for fun and you have to find the balance

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PHOTO: Paul WyeTH

Having been called OCS with only one discard, we had to change our starting philosophy!

between socialising and concentrating on performance. Having a few beers before getting down to racing hard allows the crew to bond, having the big party nights when you don’t have to go racing the next day is all part of having an amazing regatta. We then set about three days of proper race training, gradually increasing the amount of time on the water and the intensity of the exercises. By the last day of training, we had seven hours on the water and by the first race, everybody was completely used to the boat and the conditions and ready to nail that first start. As the ‘Quokka’ crew changes, often for each regatta, we identify the team’s different strengths and weaknesses and vary the techniques that we use to develop that team around those. For example, we have a very powerful

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mainsail and for Antigua Sailing Week, we decided to put two crew on the mainsail. It might not look normal but with the physical strength available amongst the crew it was definitely the right thing to do. I always start by allowing the crew to work out the mechanics of their tasks and then suggest how that can be improved. As far as allocating roles to crew, I ask each person what their top three preferences are and everybody gets one of their choices. You can’t have two bowmen but you can have a bow and a mid-bow and you can also rotate that a little bit. On ‘Quokka’, nobody is just there to sit on the rail, everybody has to be involved in the team’s performance.

Nailing the start As the highest rated boat in our class, it was vital to focus on a good start and

getting away into clear air. We needed to be ahead of other competitors by several minutes if we were going to beat them on corrected time. Each day, we would get out to the race area early, maybe leaving the dock an hour and a half before the start. For me, the start procedure begins when we leave the dock. On the way to the starting area, we would sail upwind to monitor all of the settings and also put the spinnaker up to get everybody warmed up. I like to sail along the start line, this allows us to get an accurate measure of time over a known distance, which is a really useful tool. We then ’ping’ both ends of the line and enter the data into our software. This gives us the ‘time to burn’ and gives details on line bias. If there is a lot of pin-end bias, it is worth fighting for but if it is less bias then the correct third of the line is fine.

After the five minute gun sounds, I will do a timed, close-hauled run to the preferred end and pick out a transit to aim for. After a last look at changes in wind direction, we would begin our approach to the start. For the last three boat lengths, I tend to concentrate on the bowman, because I believe he can be more accurate than the software. I aim for the transit previously taken but obviously now there are other boats around us. If I am close-hauled heading for the line, then this often creates space to leeward, which can be used to use to slow down if we are too early. If we were close-hauled on starboard, any boat reaching in above us would be barging in.

ABOVE Pre-regatta training was key to slick boat-handling throughout the event

Changing the plan Having been called OCS in Race 5 and with only one discard, we had to change our starting philosophy! We were

August 2013

Yachts & Yachting

55


PHOTO: Paul WyeTH

Antigua Sailing Week

ABOVE The winning crew celebrate their multiple wins, including class victory and top charter yacht

winning the class but for the last three races, if we had another OCS or had some gear failure we would be lucky to even make the middle of the fleet, it would be regatta over! So we changed our starting policy, to just try and go for clear air. We would start halfway down the line even if there was a big bias, we just didn’t want any issues with the traffic at the favoured end. The policy was to keep our nose clean, get the bow into clear air and use our extra boat speed as our weapon. However, in a very competitive class this was not easy. In the penultimate race of the regatta, we had a conservative start and we were rolled by boats over the top of us and got spat out of the back of the fleet. We went around the first windward mark in last

Glossary of terms ‘time to burn’ = the number of seconds that the boat will be early to the line if the same course and speed are maintained. ‘Ping the line’ = plot the position of both ends of the line electronically using GPS. ‘Leech flake’ = gathering a sail starting from the clew by making wider folds towards the clew and narrower folds towards the tack. ‘Line bias’ = the degree to which a start line is not perpendicular to the sailing wind. This decides which end of the line is closer to the first mark of the course. ‘take the height’ = sailing as close to the wind as possible efficiently. Sailing high may be used to gain a strategic advantage over an opponent. ‘Polar data’ = data showing the relationship between True Wind Speed, True Wind Direction and Target Speed.

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August 2013

place but everyone kept their cool and we kept up our boat speed and fought back to second place.

Visualisation One technique that I like to use is to sit calmly before a race and visualise the start. I encourage the team do the same about something they think will be important during the race for them or perhaps something that they need to improve on. By focusing on that it builds confidence to get it right. This technique can also be used in the heat of the moment when a problem arrives, which will stop the crew falling into mayhem. My personal way of dealing with this is, when I am calm before a race, I visualise putting all of my problems into a blue balloon and I watch it float up into the sky and disappear. When the problem occurs and you feel angry and the emotional trauma building inside, I just think of the colour blue and all of the anger and frustration is replaced with calmness by its association.

Boat speed We use the polar data from the boat to decide target upwind speed. The trimmers work to those polars and the helmsman decides whether to go high for position or low for speed. Upwind, the mainsheet and headsail trimmers are responsible for boat speed and work really hard to communicate that. The helmsman calls one of three modes: accelerate, VMG or height. For example, if we are below our target

speed, we might go into accelerate mode by coming off the wind a few degrees and easing the sheets slightly. If we were over target, we might take the height.

roll tacking The majority of racing at Antigua Sailing Week was in unusually light airs so roll tacking the boat was very important, to keep boat speed up during the tacks. In light air, it is important to keep some heel on the boat, so there is a flow of water over the rudder. As soon as you start to move the rudder, it acts like a brake, so as little rudder movement as possible is ideal. Using the crew weight to heel the boat to leeward before the tack, then having the crew weight – all up as one – after the tack will mean less movement required on the rudder. The important thing to remember is that all of these techniques should be learnt in training not during the regatta. Right from the start of Antigua Sailing Week, we had excellent boat speed and good boat handling and we did not have any gear failure during the event. I am sure all that was down to training and preparation of the boat and the crew before the event. The end result was that the ‘Quokka’ crew had a memorable night in Nelson’s Dockyard at the prizegiving. Not only did we win our class but we were also awarded Best British Yacht, Best Charter Yacht and the biggest surprise of all; second overall for the regatta. It was an emotional night to say the least and all the hard work had been worth it!

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Boat test

Nacra 17

Hull length Beam Mast length Upwind sail area Spinnaker Weight (ex-sails) Crew weight Price

58

Yachts & Yachting

5.25m 2.59m 9.00m 20.1sq m 19.0sq m 148kg c.135kg €19,750 ex VAT ex works ready-to-race with Performance Sails

August 2013

Concept

1

★★★★★★★★★ Constant curve daggerboards, known as C-foils, were initially developed for 60ft trimaran racing before being adopted by A-Class cats – the 18ft superlight, singlehanded, development class. C-foils play three important roles on the Nacra 17. Firstly, they provide lift, helping to keep the bows up and prevent pitchpoles, which used to be the bane of catsailing downwind in a breeze with the bearaway a major danger zone. Secondly the extra lift reduces wetted area of the hull and reduces drag, providing a big potential increase in speed. And lastly, C-foils look amazing. Pete Melvin designed the Nacra 17 hulls specifically for use with C-foils. Apart from being a lot smaller with considerably less relative volume, Nacra 17 hulls and bows are a very different shape from the Infusion. Slim ‘wave-piercing’ bows, which allow water to flow cleanly over the hulls when driving hard upwind, lead into a virtually flat underwater shape for most of the hull. Pete claims the result is 40 per cent greater longitudinal stability than conventional hulls with straight daggerboard foils, but without additional drag and with the benefit of allowing crews to push the boat much harder downwind. Over 140 boats were delivered in the first six months of production, but with some teething problems along the way. Nacra’s attempt at a carbon mast proved unreliable, so boats were supplied with aluminium masts until the first World Championship in Holland during July, after which existing 17s will be retro-fitted with the new carbon mast made by Hall Spars, which will save 5kg. An Olympic squad sailor informed me that at least two Nacra 17 hulls split after slamming at speed across waves, presumably due to a production glitch with the foam sandwich epoxy glass and carbon construction, while another glitch involved rudder brackets crushing foam inside the transoms.

phOTO: JeRemy evANs

SPECIFICATIONS

highest level Pete Melvin also leads the design team for the ETNZ and Prada America’s Cup catamarans. Further down the scale, his work for Nacra includes the Infusion, the most successful Formula 18 design since the venerable Hobie Tiger, and the Nacra 20C, rated as the world’s fastest standard production beach cat and the first to be fitted with curved daggerboard foils.

phOTO: pAul WyeTh/RyA*

M

aurice van Paardenkooper, coach to the GBR Nacra Team, has requested that the RYA buy him a new RIB. There’s nothing wrong with the old one, but with a 70hp outboard he can’t currently keep up with his sailors when they hit 25 knots as they rocket across waves downwind. Without doubt, cats are back as the fastest Olympic class. Last autumn ISAF took a big risk when they selected a totally new design, which had not yet gone into production, as a mandatory mixed crew replacement for the Tornado – the Olympic cat class from 1976-2008. Nacra had the expertise and dynamism to deliver the goods. Since being taken over by Gunnar Larsen and Peter Vink, this Dutch-based cat manufacturer has developed a superb range of racing cats. Gunnar works in partnership with Peter Vink, who runs Performance Sails in Holland, and Pete Melvin of the Morrelli & Melvin design group in California. All three are top catamaran racers in their own right with a huge amount of experience in this specialist sector of the sport, while at the

phOTO: lAuReNs mORel*

A new mixed-crew Olympic cat class will be raced at Rio in 2016. Jeremy Evans joins the GBR Nacra Team to see what this exciting new design has to offer

2

3

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phOTO: JeRemy evANs

So far, results have been fairly evenly split with boys or girls at either end of the boat

phOTO: Jesus ReNedO/sOfiA mApfRe*

4

1 Pippa Wilson and John Gimson – the raised C-foil is quite an obstacle 2 Bows designed to cut through waves without stopping the boat 3 Lucy Macgregor and Tom Phipps at Sail for Gold 4 Nikki Boniface – note raised kickbar and parallel strap 5 Ben Saxton and Hannah Diamond at Princess Sofia Trophy 6 Flying windward hull in Rio-style light winds

phOTO: JeRemy evANs

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August 2013

Yachts & Yachting

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It’s worth noting that the Nacra 17 looks like a super-sophisticated racing machine principally due to its novel hull shape and C-foils, aided by a handsome high aspect rig. But it is still basically a beach cat with aluminium beams, rudder stocks and other standard fittings from the Nacra performance range and an all-up weight that is surprisingly not a lot lighter than Formula 18. These new cats are hopefully built to last, but only time will tell if they stay competitive for anything like as long as the sophisticated Swedish Marstrom Tornado, which earned a reputation for remarkable longevity.

Deck and rig

★★★★★★★★★ With top cat racers designing the Nacra 17 sailing systems, it’s a surprise to hear that crews initially struggled with too much spaghetti on the trampoline. The one-design rules forbade extra blocks, so crews resorted to leading ropes and elastics round stainless steel rings in an effort to clear up the mess, until the class association agreed to change the rule. As Olympic aspirants learn to sail the boat and push limits, it seems inevitable that other rule changes may be required to provide the most satisfactory one-design. Layout and fittings are similar to Formula 16 or 18, with a large spinnaker chute, selftacking jib, control lines led to the ends of the front beam and hulls for tweaking on the wire, combined mainsheet and traveller on the rear beam and trampoline left as clear as possible. A raised foot bar runs along each side, which is great for bracing or pushing out, but the strap alongside appears pointless. The helm also has a Y-shaped strap between rear beam and centreline, which provides useful security when sitting in downwind. Peter Vink’s Performance Sails surely come close to ‘as good as it gets’ for soft sail power

phOTO: Jesus ReNedO/sOfiA mApfRe*

above Spinnaker sheet loads can get very heavy in a breeze right Gemma Jones and Jason Saunders twin-wiring downwind for best VMG at this year’s Trofeo Princesa Sofia regatta

on a small racing cat, providing a slightly scaled-down version of his rig on the triple F18 world championship Infusion.

Under sail

★★★★★★★★★ The Nacra 17 lacks the ultimate refinement of a Marstrom Tornado in several areas. For instance, the rudder stocks are comparatively heavy with spring-loaded locks that don’t provide the totally rigid blades of the Tornado or Viper solid pin system. Getting a perfect fit with daggerboards is never easy and the GBR Nacra team spent a lot of time ensuring their C-foils don’t move until you want to pull them. In light winds they slide up quite easily, but squad sailor Nikki Boniface assured me it can be a lot trickier when a foil is loaded. The curved boards also take a lot of space

inboard on the trampoline, which has been standard cat technique for many years. The downside is increased load in the kite, which is part of the reason why crewing a Nacra 17 at top level will be very physical, combined with the vogue for short, dynamic, actionpacked races with endless hoists, drops, tacks and gybes. In addition Hannah’s fingers suffered from hauling the spinnaker up and down, with the crew also required to tweak the single jib sheet, mainsail downhaul and mast rotation, play the mainsheet upwind, pull up or push down the C-foils, get weight on the wire to hold the cat at the perfect angle and stand in the right place for perfect trim. Meanwhile, the helm ensures the boat is sailing in the right direction and should enjoy a less physically demanding role, although coach Maurice van Paardenkooper thinks it’s

Sailors are discovering it’s faster to twin-wire downwind than go lower and slower when raised (with a sharp trailing edge you would not want to fall against), which may be a good reason why some Dutch crews have been leaving both boards down between tacks. Nikki also told me that while the spinnaker does not look huge, sheet loads get very heavy twin-wiring downwind. It’s tough at the front, as demonstrated by GBR crew Hannah Diamond stripping a gruesome amount of skin off her fingers during the previous regatta. Nacra 17 sailors are discovering that it’s faster to twin-wire downwind, sailing higher but faster to increase VMG instead of going lower and slower with the helm sitting

worth testing whether the helm could take over spinnaker hoists and drops to share more of the physical load, which is standard practice on many dinghies. The big question is whether having the girl or boy on the front will prove to be faster? In the first season, the fleet and results have been fairly evenly split with girls or boys at either end of the boat. The Dutch have done a lot of winning with male crews and girl helms, but the French have been close behind with girl crews and boy helms. The four-boat Nacra team I joined at Weymouth had a 50/50 split, with different opinions as to the best route to success. Despite having always raced cats as

August 2013

Yachts & Yachting

61


phOTO: Jesus ReNedO/sOfiA mApfRe*

helm, Tom Phipps is convinced that the Nacra 17 will ultimately be fastest with a boy at the front, simply because the Nacra 17 makes exceptional physical demands on the crew. By contrast, Maurice van Paardenkooper thinks girl crews will benefit from the lighter carbon masts and as techniques improve will find the physical loads easier to handle, making them just as effective as men. The bottom line is that the 2016 Olympic sailing events at Rio are predicted to have winds below 10 knots, giving the lightest crews a real advantage downwind. C-foils provide the most interesting challenge to mastering the Nacra 17. The first problem is sideslip waiting behind the start line, when the curved foils cannot prevent leeway as effectively as straight, deep foils on a modern Formula 18. The second problem is that while C-foils really are successful at holding the bows up and preventing pitchpoles, which is a great boon to enjoying blasting downwind, they are prone to ‘wheelie’ – the cat rides up on its foils, bows point skyward, transoms flop down, wind gets under the tramp and you can backflip off a wave! The solution is to keep weight much further forward than a conventional cat and forget your worries about the bows diving underwater. You would definitely not want to hit the bottom with those beautiful curved tips, and they do need pulling up part-way to prevent the boat flying up and crashing down in stronger winds. Most crews sail upwind with the windward foil lifted to prevent that hull flying too high, which of course means you have to push down and pull up on every tack, though as Tom Phipps explains they are still at a very early stage of discovering how C-foils work best. We experienced the Nacra 17 in true Rio conditions at Weymouth when it was seldom necessary to go out on the wire. Like most cats, the boat would be a lot livelier with just a

above Tomas Zajac and Tanja Chiara Frank at Trofeo Princesa Sofia – crew weight is typically further forward than on a normal small cat little more wind. Top F18 helm Grant Piggott told me that sailing the Nacra 17 makes his Infusion ‘feel like a keelboat’. Clearly that’s an exaggeration, but when you can steer by shifting bodyweight (forward to bear away, back to head up) the Nacra 17 feels more like a skiff than a conventional small catamaran.

Verdict

★★★★★★★★★ In a short time it’s become clear that the Nacra 17 is not only the fastest Olympic class, but also quicker than Formula 18 with exceptional speed downwind, thanks to those fabulous C-foils. Olympic racers will sail whatever they are given in their quest for medals, but the GBR team do appear to quite enjoy this boat. But what about normal people? Having

COMPARISONS

ANSWER BACK

Formula 18 The world’s most popular high performance racing cat class, suitable for heavier crews than the Nacra 17.

Length Beam Draft Displacement Mainsail Jib Spinnaker

62

Yachts & Yachting

satisfied initial demand from Olympic teams, Nacra has been busy selling the new cat to enthusiasts who want to race the latest, quickest, most exciting thing on twin hulls. It provides a great challenge for experienced Formula 18 or skiff sailors, with an ideal crew weight either side of 135kg. You don’t get cheap thrills when all the bits push the price towards £22,000 including VAT, which sounds a lot for a relatively heavy cat that is not particularly hi-tech compared to a 75kg A-Class. It’s also considerably more expensive than an F16 Viper, which was ISAF’s second choice for a new Olympic cat. But it does buy a great-looking racing machine designed around C-foils with the potential to sail at 25 knots downwind, which could be the start of a new era in cat sailing.

5.5m 2.6m 0.6m 180kg 17sq m 4.15sq m 21sq m

August 2013

Formula 16 Viper Top Formula 16 racing cat which was narrowly beaten to Olympic selection by the Nacra 17. Great value second-hand. LOA Beam Hull weight Mainsail Jib Spinnaker

5.0m 2.5m 129kg 15sq m 3.7sq m 17.5sq m

From: Gunnar Larsen, Commercial Director, Nacra Sailing International (Netherlands) We love it that the Nacra 17 is so well received. Since 1975 Nacra has been about empowering sailors and to make the best but also affordable equipment available for them. The Nacra 17 being chosen for Olympic usage was not only a decision by ISAF. At the trials (held and facilitated by ISAF in Santander) the sailors choice was the Nacra 17 clearly over all other boats presented. The multihull being back in the highest level of competitive sailing is great for cat sailing, as a sport all over the world. See you hopefully on the water. Nacra Europe (Holland): www.nacrasailing.com Class: www.nacra17class.com UK sales: www.nacra.co.uk

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A bevy of high-performance new boats

Portuguese C-Class

Tony Castro yacht design joined forces with high-tech Structural Analysis company Optimal last year to create a Portuguese challenge for the C-Class trophy (formerly known as the Little Americas’ Cup) to compete in Falmouth, UK in September 2013. ‘This is indeed a big challenge for us, entering into a new racing class and allowing us to flex our muscles with new design technologies like CFD and FEA and also an interesting collaboration with the guys from the British challenge – Invictus Team,’ says Castro. ‘Despite the high technologies nowadays current in cruising yacht design that keep

us busy, this C-Class, by virtue of having literally no rules, allows us a lot of freedom and opportunity to delve into materials and solutions not allowed in other racing classes, not even the America’s Cup.’ The Castro team report that their design focus has been on finding novel solutions in areas such as hydrodynamics, aerodynamics, composite materials, lightweight structures and controls. Sponsorship, from the Port of Cascais, was announced in May and lamination of the 100 per cent pre-preg carbon hulls started almost immediately, with the boat scheduled to be sailing in July. www.PortugueseCclassChallenge.pt

J/88

The latest lightweight high-performance design from the J-Boats stable fits between the J/70 sportsboat and J/111 one-design racer/cruiser-racer. Highlights include a high-aspect, non-overlapping sail plan with a carbon double-spreader mast. This is deck stepped for easy rigging and tuning and to help keep the main cabin dry. The 88 is large enough to provide the creature comforts of a sit-in cockpit, inboard diesel, simple overnighting interior with sitting headroom and heads; and small enough to be single-point lifted, owner-trailered and stored. As this issue of Yachts and Yachting went to press the first hull had just been popped out of the mould, with the launch and initial sea trials scheduled for late June. It is anticipated that some 16-18 boats will be built this year, with an autumn launch in the UK. www.keyyachting.com LOA LWL Beam Draught Displacement Diesel engine Sail area (100%) SA/Displacement ratio Dspl/Length ratio

8.90m 8.18m 2.90m 1.98m 2,200kg 12hp 40.80sq m 24 112

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photos: nAutiCA BoAts*

HH42

Nautica 450

New to the UK is this 14ft 9ins two- orthree-person hiking dinghy from Poland. It’s designed to bring the excitement of sailing a planing dinghy to a wider audience of less experienced sailors – the high stability hull form ensures high speeds can be obtained without expending considerable effort and without complex controls. The fibreglass hull is built in a sandwich construction of vinylester resin and biaxial E-glass fabric with a Divinycell core, while deck and cockpit mouldings are contoured to maximise comfort when hiking. The boat is available in both Fun and Racing specifications, the latter having a bigger rig and larger sail area. www.nauticaboats.pl

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with a variety of winch options. The hull and deck are carbon pre-preg cured at high temperature, with thermoformed damagetolerant foam cores. The open plan interior is optimised around the requirements for efficient sail handling, however a total of eight berths, six of them in retractable pipe cots, ensures the boat complies with the requirements for classic offshore races including the Rolex Fastnet and Sydney Hobart. LOA Beam Draught Displacement

12.60m 4.35m 2.80m 4,950kg

4.50m 1.92m 1.2m 95kg 120kg 9.8sq m 4.7sq m 21.8sq m

August 2013

photo: Judel VroliJk yACht design*

Hull length Beam Draught Hull weight Sailing weight Mainsail Jib Asymmetric

This design from Judel Vrolijk is intended to be the fastest of its size around the racetrack, yet carry an IRC (or ORC) rating that will enable it to win the big prizes in handicap fleets. The boat’s lines are of a pure inshore racer, with flush deck, beam carried well aft and a marked chine, plumb bow with fixed bowsprit, deep T-bulb keel and a single rudder. Option packages are designed such that the boat can be easily tailored to suit different racing areas around the world. These include a lifting keel, retracting propeller, wheel steering, carbon rigging, and deck gear packs

www.yachtsandyachting.co.uk


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photos: all heinrick hecht/esmit europa*

Design focus

SPECIFICATIONS Builder Designer Year LOA Beam Draught Website

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McConaghy Boats Reichel-Pugh 2005 30.48m (100ft) 5.20m (17.0ft) 5.01m (16.5ft) www.esimit.com

August 2013

www.yachtsandyachting.co.uk


Design profile

Esimit Europa 2 the distinctive blue and yellow-starred ‘esimit europa 2’ will be gracing British shores this summer, Helen Fretter takes a closer look at this record-beating super maxi

T

he ‘Esimit Europa 2’ project was launched in 2010, with the ambitious aim of combining a political message, multinational sponsorship and ultracompetitive sailing aboard one of the largest Maxis on the circuit. The 30m yacht currently flies the flag for Gazprom, the Russian energy giant which has recently invested in sailing, backing the Swan 60 class among others. ‘Esimit Europa 2’ also carries EU-style branding to promote the slightly more nebulous notion of European co-operation, for which it also has official backing by the European Commission and Parliament.

Technical innovations Purchased by Slovenian Igor Simcic, ‘Esimit Europa 2’ was formerly Neville Crichton’s famous ‘Alfa Romeo II’. The Reichel-Pugh design was built by McConaghy’s in Australia, and on her launch in 2005 was the first ‘CBTF’ (canting ballast twin foil) Super Maxi. Originally a 98-footer, she was later lengthened to make use of a 100ft LOA upper limit in the Maxi class, and features a fearsome bowsprit. ‘Esimit Europa 2’ carries a 44m carbon mast by Southern Spars and flies 820sq m of sail area downwind, counterbalanced by a hydraulically controlled canting keel with forward canard, and water ballast, for a top speed of around 38 knots. Other innovations include the use of Process Logic

Controllers (PLCs) to ‘intelligently’ manage the keel, which has 40 degrees of movement either side, together with the lift and steering of both the canard and conventional rudder. The boat is powered by hydraulics, so there are no grinding pedestals in the cockpit. Just forward of the twin wheels, however, is a large mainsheet ‘pod’ supporting a single giant Harken winch along with hydraulic controls and instruments. Besides this season’s all-new graphics, other changes made as ‘Esimit Europa 2’ include a complete new set of North Sails 3Di sails. As skipper Jochen Schümann explained, the sheer size – particularly of the headsails – means avoiding changes is key. Hence the new wardrobe was deliberately optimised for the maximum range of conditions. ‘On a boat like this you are already fully loaded in 8-10 knots, and from then on you are working to depower. It’s quite difficult to change sails, so you are trying to find sails to cover a wide wind range, but they also need to be strong enough from, say 6-16 knots, where another boat might have gone through three sail changes.’ Otherwise the new team’s focus has been on optimising the boat’s complex systems in pursuit of maximum reliability. ‘We have a team of five people working all year long on the maintenance,’ Schümann explains. ‘The key is to work with the right skilled technical people, and to make the boat more and more reliable. She is at the peak of her performance at the minute, which is why I think we’re setting more records. The boat is a real racehorse now.’ The 18-strong crew represents 10 different nations, including British resident Andrew Cape – although Schümann is keen to emphasise that all are there because of talent, not nationality, with many having sailed together through Alinghi, Movistar and Telefonica campaigns.

First home

above The yacht is operated by hydaulics but still requires an 18-strong crew to race

Since her 2005 launch, ‘Alfa Romeo 2’ has taken more than 150 major line honours titles, including a Transpac record and the 2009 Sydney Hobart, when she beat ‘Wild Oats XI’ by just two hours. She has twice won division at the Maxi worlds as ‘Esimit Europa 2’, as well as earning three back to back victories in both the Middle Sea Race and Giraglia. This year, following appearances at Kiel Week, Germany and Sweden, ‘Esimit Europa 2’ will race at Aberdeen Asset Management Cowes Week before competing in the Rolex Fastnet Race in August, in which the team will be aiming for another line honours victory.

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Tyred soles

New from Goodyear (yes, the car tyre company!) comes a range of deck shoes called Hanley, available from Debenhams. RRP: £60 www.debenhams.com

Baltic Zigzag

The new Baltic 50-Newton buoyancy aid has segmented buoyant panels to give a good fit for both male and female sailors. RRP: £52 www.baltic.se

Kitbag Latest launches to help you sail in comfort and at speed

Ronstan Shocks

Sheaveless compact blocks (Shocks for short) weigh only 2.5g, yet can carry up to 350kg of break-load force – 1.4 to 5mm line diameters – and should work well even if the load alignment is not straight. Available in four colour choices. RRP: £10 www.ronstan.com

Henri Lloyd Osprey jacket

Part of the Henri Lloyd coastal/ inshore range for 2013 is the versatile waterproof Osprey Jacket with a highvis foldaway hood, internal Dartex storm cuff, external hoop and loop wrist adjusters and a fleece lined internal collar. RRP: £135 www.henrilloyd.com

Nabu to you too...

Marmot has teamed up with performance fabric expert Polartec to launch the Nabu jacket, offering the weather protection of a hardshell with the moistureregulating ability of a softshell. RRP: £250 www.marmot.com

Sleep under the stars

The spacious Blue Performance deck hammock ties between the mast and forestay using the durable Velcro saddle and soft shackle provided. Measures 210cm x 110cm. RRP: £133 www.blue-performance.co.uk

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www.yachtsandyachting.co.uk


new products

Gul grow-suits

Gul’s G-Force junior 3mm flatlock summer steamer wetsuits are great value entry-level suits – or ideal for children that just won’t stop growing! They feature titanium-lined Neoprene for warmth and Powertex knees for durability. RRP: £30 www.ldcsailing.com

Hassle free battens

The innovative Rutgerson 1585 batten receptacle enables batten tensioning without the use of tools. The integrated lid on the 1585 has no loose parts and a clear tensioning scale and indicator makes for hassle-free tensioning. Compatible with flat battens up to 25mm x 10mm and round battens up to 10mm. RRP: £41 www.contender.co.uk

Tried & tested: Musto Dinghy Drysuit

The Offshore Race Crew Manual, Stuart Quarrie

Faultless manoeuvres help win races, hence the need for a manual explaining the evolution and exact execution (step-bystep for each crew member) of just about every situation that is likely to be encountered during a race at sea. Photographs and illustrations will ease comprehension. Other chapters cover watch-keeping systems, heavy weather, sail trim and set-up for racing. RRP: £19.99 www.bloomsbury.com

Magic hoody

Magic Marine’s Polyurethane (PU) waterproof hooded top is lined with microfleece offering an extra windproof insulation layer, for extra warmth. A hoody to protect from the rain! RRP: £80.75 www.ldcsailing.com

Musto’s breathable dinghy drysuit has been around in one guise or another since 2001, writes Steffan Meyric-Hughes, but we tested its latest incarnation from the 2013 spring/summer collection. They have come on quite a bit in recent years, both in terms of comfort and weight, and this one feels very light to wear. It’s not the top of the range MPX suit that retails for £600, but has certain advantages over it, not least in the 2mm Neoprene ‘glideskin’ cuffs and neck, which I personally find infinitely more comfortable (if less watertight) than the Latex cuffs of the MPX and other suits. The look – all black with a singly chunky zip – is a perfect cross between diver and assassin. It is comparatively easy to don and remove singlehanded thanks to the front diagonal zip, and the internal braces (as well as that light weight) mean that it does not sag down while wearing. I tested it out with a full immersion on the Upper Thames on a chilly day in April, floating for about five minutes in water of 2 degrees Centigrade. There was no cold-water shock and I was completely dry underneath. In fact, with just one layer of modestly priced fleece on underneath, I was warm! I will be using the suit this July when sailing from Land’s End to the Scilly Isles in a 15ft dinghy and will no doubt put it to a very thorough test. Sizes: S-XXL RRP: £370 www.musto.com

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ŠPaul Wyeth Marine Photography


photo: tom Gruitt*

High and dry

W

hen deciding on which spray top to buy, your first consideration should be towards the sort of sailing you’re most likely to do. Ask yourself ‘how wet will I get?’ A spray top is typically the choice of the active dinghy or sportsboat sailor. These sailors are not fair-weather potterers, nor those sat at the back of large keelboats for whom a sailing jacket would be the preferred option; rather they are sailors who set afloat with the firm expectation of getting wet at some stage! To the uneducated eye, spray tops may appear not to have changed much in the last few years. But developments in fabrics and features have in fact led to more choices than ever, meaning you can fine tune your decision-making to

Whether your sailing season calls for lightweight and breathable or heavy-duty and hard-wearing, there is a spray or smock top on the market for you, says Georgie Corlett best meet your needs based on your sailing preferences. According to spray top manufacturers, the fundamental question is whether this anticipated dousing extends to the occasional bit of wind-driven spray, or to regular or prolonged drenchings. Matt Clark, product development manager for Gill, sums this up: ‘For those hiking hard out of the boat the priority is to keep warm, dry, and seal out cold water from the

cuff and neck. For others perhaps sitting further inside or in warmer weather, a lightweight spray top is enough to keep the breeze and spray at bay.’ Working from this fundamental basis, manufacturers have further refined their designs, resulting in a multitude of options for consumers; all the manufacturers we spoke to work closely with sailors at the top of their game in different types of class to design for optimum comfort and fit across the board. Catherine Smith, Henri Lloyd’s technical product developer, says: ‘Function and fit are key considerations throughout the design and testing process. We think about what boats people are sailing, and that determines the choice and quality of material and its construction relevant to fit and comfort in use. We engineer whatever is needed into each different product to suit different sorts of sailor.’

It’s important to try things on, ideally as part of your clothing system to gauge the true fit August 2013

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photo: Neil pryde*

photo: Gill*

Above right Water resistant flush zips are a relatively recent innovation

Entry level spray tops For dinghy sailors sailing traditional classes, you won’t go wrong with a traditional style spray top made from lightweight nylon shell with a waterproof coating; it’s not so heavy that it will expel all the warm air out from the inside, but of sufficient weight to act as a barrier to the wind. New soft-

all help to ensure a good fit and keep out the spray. Neck openings can offer handy ventilation – useful when the action gets intense. Pockets are always a useful addition for stowing that spare shackle or your car key; water resistant zips are a clever move. Placed on the front, sleeve or even the back, the aim is for pockets to be non-instrusive;

The best sailing garments are those that you don’t even notice – they simply work

below Opening necks can be useful if you are working hard

touch fabrics are becoming increasingly common; the use of thin membranes means that waterproof fabrics no longer have to be stiff and crinkly. Taped seams, a good level of breathability and a durable waterproof coating should all come as standard; look out for Velcro tabs, Neoprene closures and elastic adjusters, which

think about any preference for positioning that you may have. About features, Matt Clark at Gill, says; ‘The seemingly insignificant can quickly become irritating and frustrating when you’re stuck out on the water, so attention to detail is key. The best sailing garments are those that you don’t even notice – they simply work.’

photo: Gill*

High performance When it comes to getting wet, high performance dinghy sailors have different priorities; they aren’t worried about the odd bit of spray as chances are they are already going to be soaked! Comfort, not staying dry, becomes the top concern. Fabrics are lighter weight, and incorporating stretch panels, designed for a tighter, more ergonomic fit. Matt Clark says: ‘It’s important to try things on, ideally as part of your clothing system so over the top of a wetsuit for example. This allows you to gauge the true fit and assess the degree of movement they allow.’ Embellishments such as pockets and Velcro tabs disappear, removing the potential for snagging as you move around the boat, and closures are elasticated rather than adjustable.

Sportsboats Sportsboat sailors, particularly those sailing at the pointy end, can also find themselves very exposed to the elements. They are typically seeking a step up from dinghy kit when it comes to protection. Laminated fabrics are the solution here, giving complete water and wind protection whilst offering excellent levels of breathability – a top consideration for active sailors. They tend to feel slightly weightier than materials used for dinghy garments, but have greater durability. To enable a high level of movement and comfort, you may find a greater degree of ergonomics designed into these sorts of garments. Catherine Smith of Henri Lloyd, explains how this can be achieved: ‘We use a 3D bodyshape mapping system to build precise shape and structure into our garments, replacing old flat pattern construction methods. The enables us to determine the positioning of panels and seams for maximum comfort without clinging unnecessarily to the skin. Men’s, women’s and junior fits will all vary.’

Extreme exposure At the more extreme end of the spray top market are high performance keelboat sailors, who may be afloat for prolonged periods, perhaps even days at a time. ‘Depending on where you are on the boat, a spray top or ‘smock’ can be a great option,’ says Musto product manager, John Clementson. ‘These garments are very similar in design to dinghy spray tops, but fabrics take a big step up. Usually the fabric is the same as that used in race jackets, which offers greater comfort and protection over an extended period of time, but the features that get added are more suited to high performance racing; these can include hoods, collars and stretch panels. ‘Cruising sailors will also enjoy the benefits of increased comfort

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photo: tom Gruitt*

Buyers’ Guide

and durability that these materials give, but the real gains come when you start to get active. Performance sailors will need moisture to escape as quickly as possible during periods of high activity, placing a premium on breathability, and they may want to trade into Gore Tex.’ Double closures help to keep as much water at bay as possible, whilst the possibility of having to wear the same garment for an extended amount of time means quick drying is must for any fleece-lined collars or pockets.

photo: musto*

below Slim-fit lowwindage styles are ideal for dinghy sailing

Dry tops Of course, the ultimate solution to keeping the water out entirely comes in the form of a dry top; whether with

Neoprene or Latex seals. These are a popular option for sailors facing real extremes – professional round the world and trans-ocean race teams will often wear them. That’s not to exclude dinghy and sportsboat sailors who are determined to remain dry for whom this is also a viable option. Chris Hammond of Hammond Drysuits says: ‘Assuming you choose correctly fitting neck and wrist seals, not a drop will get in – no matter whether you choose Neoprene or Latex; and that’s largely down to personal preference. Whilst Neoprene seals are longer lasting and won’t need to be replaced as often as Latex, Neoprene is not as stretchy and so can be more difficult to get on and off; this is particularly true for women and

photo: heNri lloyd*

Yachts & Yachting

Future fabrics It goes without saying that manufacturers are constantly seeking ways to improve these products. With fit and features mastered, it’s likely that future developments in spray top technology will come in terms of fabrics. There could be some interesting developments ahead, as Matt Clark, of Gill, hints at heated

Neoprene seals are longer lasting, but not as stretchy

below Smock tops also suit sportsboat sailors and foredeck crew

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children’s suits which typically have a small neck seal opening to fit slender necks. Developments in Neoprene manufacture are seeing stretchier options coming onto the market, although at a higher price point.’ If you do opt for Latex, a dry top that features cuff covers will give you the extra advantage of preventing snagging and of sheltering the Latex from harmful UV rays, which play a large part in causing this material to wear. When it comes to waistbands, Neoprene is the standard option, as it grips well and sits comfortably. Materials will feel on the heavier side compared to a standard dinghy spray top; typically three-layer laminates are chosen to ensure breathability and durability. Chris says: ‘For the ultimate in longevity, non-breathable fabrics are recommended, which can last up to 15 years or more with the right care.’

August 2013

garments and self-cleaning fabrics! But exciting as that sounds, he points out: ‘Where appropriate we will develop samples for wearer trials. But ultimately, if it’s not suited for sailing use or doesn’t enhance the customer’s sailing experience then we won’t use it.’ On the aesthetic side of things, there are plenty of options to mix and match. Catherine Smith of Henri Lloyd, says: ‘When it comes to spray tops for offshore use, safety still rules over aesthetics, resulting in traditional reds and yellows with high vis hoods and reflective strips. For inshore sailors and race teams, blacks and carbons are popular; whilst for individuals bright colours are leading the way. We’re seeing more and more colour blocking for 2013 and this will continue in 2014.’

www.yachtsandyachting.co.uk


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August 2013

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CHILL OUT and sail

photos: All tom Gruitt*

Seafarer’s Nikiana Beach Club offers sun and relaxation with plenty of sailing thrown in too. Tom Gruitt and Emma Turner enjoy a holiday in the Greek islands that combines chill out time with time on the water‌.

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B

ooking an activity-based holiday can often be difficult. While one person may prefer a quieter setting with just the beach and sea for their amusement, another may want a range of activities to do, and a vibrant atmosphere in which to do them. Such was the dilemma my partner Emma and I faced this year so we chose a bit of both by selecting a beach club holiday.

Ionian idyll Sheltering on the eastern side of Lefkas in the Ionian Sea, Nikiana is a small, beautiful village. In complete contrast to the towns of Nidri and Vassiliki, the island’s other watersports hot spots, Nikiana has a much more local, community feel, which is reflected in the facilities it has to offer. There is a small selection of restaurants, based along the main

the day. Most of these places, like the Nikiana Beach Hotel, are owned and managed by families and they treat you as one of their own. If you fancy visiting a larger, more tourist-orientated town, Nidri is a 10-minute taxi ride away, and Vassiliki approximately half an hour. Both taxis and car hire can be organised through the beach manager at the club, and are very reasonably priced.

abovE Tom and Emma sailing the Laser 4000 – a range of beginner and more challenging dinghies are available

bElow The windsurfing taster session was a highlight for Tom

A windsurfing taster session taught us the basics, then let us loose on the sea – I’m totally hooked! Beach club holidays come in many different shapes and sizes. Some offer a whole range of both land and sea-based activities with a variety of restaurants in a large resort, bustling with people. Others, like Seafarer’s Nikiana Beach Club on the island of Lefkas in Greece, offer a similar range of activities to the larger resorts, but in a smaller, more relaxed environment. For us this was a nice compromise.

road through the village, or by the harbour itself. These tend to be open mainly during the high season (so unfortunately we were unable to sample all of their delights) and are all within a comfortable walking distance of the club. There are also a few supermarkets where you can purchase the essentials, and small cafes to relax in the shade during the hottest part of

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A warm welcome From the airport we were taken by coach to the beach club. The main briefing was to be held in the evening so after a quick visit to the shops – one minute away – we spent a relaxed afternoon on the balcony drinking iced tea and enjoying spectacular views of the Acarnanian Mountains. The briefing was everyone’s chance to meet the whole beach club team for the first time, as each told us a little bit about themselves and what they like to teach. Bevan, the beach club manager, was the go-to man, he was the first point of contact for just about everything, be that booking a lesson, using a boat or just getting a taxi for an evening out.

Club and accommodation The club itself is situated on a small sand and pebble beach in a relatively sheltered bay. This means the club is able to open their beach facilities when other centres with more open water sites cannot. With only 25 rooms, the hotel and club has a very friendly, family feel that is accentuated by the owners, who are incredibly hospitable and cannot do more to help. Although not luxurious, the accommodation is practical and has everything that you need: shower, kettle, fridge, air conditioning and a balcony. There is an extra £10 per night supplement if you would like a sea view. The bathrooms were refurbished over the winter of 2012. The food at the taverna was reasonably priced with a choice of both local and English food. On some evenings entertainment was provided, kicking off with a quiz from Chris, one of the instructors. ‘Greek Night’ included local entertainment and a wonderful buffet at the taverna,

showcasing local food and amazing moussaka. I can definitely recommend the tiropita (cheese pies).

On the water Seafarer’s Nikiana Beach Club, like many of its competitors, offers a range of water and land-based activities, with kids’ clubs for children between the ages of 7-18 during high season. Sailing and windsurfing are the main sports on offer, complemented by stand-up paddleboarding and sea kayaking. There is a range of boats to choose from, depending on your own preference and ability. It is Seafarer policy to rig and de-rig the equipment for you, which ensures you get to spend every last moment enjoying the sun – but you may want to check that things are set up as you are used to before heading out. Experienced sailors are able to try out the full selection of boats from Lasers to Dart 16s, Laser 4000 and Laser Bahias. Unfortunately, as we did not visit in high season, not all of the boats were rigged and we missed out on the opportunity

to sail the RS800, but the sailing that we did do was very enjoyable as we rarely get to sail together. We also took part in a windsurfing taster session, where our instructor Mandy taught us the basics of the sport, then let us loose on the sea for an hour to practice under supervision.

bElow lEfT The beach club

‘Stay and sail’ pre-flotilla course Seafarer also offers a pre-flotilla course at the beach club, which accounted for many of our fellow guests while we were there. This is a great idea for anyone considering their first flotilla, as you spend the first week of holiday at the beach club learning all you need to get your ICC certificate, and the second on a flotilla which departs from Lefkas Town. The courses are suitable for complete beginners, or as a refresher. As many of our new-found friends were enrolled on this course, Emma and I took the opportunity to go along for a day and experience the tuition they received from Ed, their skipper for the week. This was hugely enjoyable as we sailed to Little Vathi on Meganissi for lunch, after the students had practiced their mooring and picking up of lazy lines. In the afternoon there were a few knot tying exercises before we headed to a sheltered bay off the infamous Island of Skorpios, (formally owned by Aristotle Onassis) to practise anchoring and partake in a little swim in the warm water. The wind had picked up nicely for our sail back to Nikiana for dinner so everyone got the chance to helm and practise rescuing ‘Bob’, the man overboard fender.

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Travel

RIGHT Emma and Tom explore the coast in the club’s two-man kayaks bElow RIGHT The club offers RYA instruction

A smaller beach club promotes an almost personalised holiday, where you can do as much – or as little – as you like Useful info ■ Seafarer Cruising and Sailing Holidays mainly run flotilla and beach clubs but also offer bareboat charter, ‘sail and stay’, and sailing adventures from over 20 bases worldwide. The two beach clubs are based at Nikiana and Porto Heli, both in Greece. ■ Although not all the boats were brand new the sails were in great condition, as were ropes and hardware. Boats included RS800, Laser 4000, Laser 2000, Laser (standard and Radial), Laser Funboats, Topaz Taz, Lasar Bahias, Dart 16s and Laser picos. The club also has a variety of windsurf boards for beginners and intermediates, one and two-person kayaks, and four new stand-up paddleboards for the 2013 season. ■ All hotel rooms are on a bed and breakfast basis with air conditioning, fridge, ensuite shower and WC. All rooms have a television and tea and coffee making facilities. The hotel capacity is 56 guests with everyone being able to be on the water in dinghies, kayaks, windsurfing or paddleboarding at once if they so wish. There are six dinghy and windsurf instructors, and one yacht instructor throughout the high season. ■ You don’t need to take much sailing kit with you, a pair of dinghy boots, gloves and a rash vest will all come in useful.

The wind was offshore so we paddled out of the wind shadow from the hills behind the club and pulled our sails up for the first time. After a bit of wobbling about we were off. It seemed easier to sail downwind or on a reach, which in the end meant we were flying along in a pretty gusty 15 knots of wind, maybe not the best conditions for learning! After we all got towed back upwind we decided to retire to the bar for a few beers to try and soothe our aching shoulders. Whatever your experience level I would thoroughly recommend giving it a go... I’m totally hooked. The next morning the wind was light so we decided to try stand-up paddleboarding – one of the most simple watersports to learn the basics and get moving. Bevan adjusted our paddles to the correct length and

told us how to paddle. We pushed our boards out and away we went, on our knees to start with soon on our feet and paddling along quite happily. Again I would recommend giving this a try if there is not enough wind to go sailing. After a few hours back on shore lying in the sun and swimming in the pool the wind had picked up enough to go for a sail, so we hopped onto a Dart 16 and cruised around the bay for an hour or so. This was my first time sailing a catamaran and it took a little while to get used to tacking slowly but by the end of the afternoon Emma was out on the trapeze and we were flying a hull nicely upwind. Throughout the rest of the week we spent leisurely mornings on the beach or by the pool, before heading out in the afternoon for a kayak or sail to cool off in the nice breeze further out to sea. The luxury of having all the boats on hand meant we never felt pressured to stick to a schedule. In terms of tuition, Seafarer offers a range of RYA sailing, windsurfing and powerboating courses at various levels, for an additional fee. Pre-booking these courses is recommended, especially in high season. This is a beautiful place to learn, the boats are very forgiving and in the event of a capsize, it is no hardship to take a dip in the warm sea.

Conclusion Visiting a smaller beach club brought lots of benefits for us: we got to know the other guests staying at the same time, as well as the beach crew. It also promotes an individual, almost personalised holiday where you can do as many of the activities or as few as you would like. During the week we were there, this was certainly the case. But as it’s a smaller capacity centre, I advise having a think about the activities that you would like to do, and book onto them early in the holiday. And don’t be afraid to ask the staff if you can join in with any sports, they are more than willing to help.

Price point In 2013 a one week stay costs £599 per person for the week we visited (June 9), rising to £899 per person in high season (end July to August). All prices include flights and transfers, flights are from either Gatwick or Manchester. ■ For the latest details: www.seafarersailing.co.uk ■ See www.vimeo.com/tomgruitt for a video overview of the week

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Clubs & Classes

submit your event reports to club@YachtsandYachting.com

Clubs & Classes Sailors have been revelling in racing from the Wilson Trophy on the Wirral to the OK worlds in Thailand, as Paula Irish reports

phOTO: paScal MaheO/Magic phOTO*

The Posh Regatta

Champagne racing for RS classes Four days of sun and varying wind speeds, including champagne sailing conditions, set up some close racing for 180 competitors in the Crewsaver RS Europeans and Eurocup at Yacht Club de Carnac in southern Brittany. With a 10-race series over four days for each of the fleets, the RS100, RS700 and RS800s fought it out for their

European Championships, while the RS200, RS400 and RS500 fleets battled for their own National Eurocup titles. In the 15-strong RS100 fleet the European title was taken by GBR’s Huw Powell, and the RS200s with 18 entries saw victory for Ian Martin and Chloe Martin. A good turnout of 24 RS400s made

the biannual trip to Carnac for their Eurocup, Howard Farbrother and Tiny Anderton taking the title. The RS500s, with six entries, were won by Nicolas Honor and Florence Le Brun and the 22-strong RS700 fleet by Jerry Wales. The RS800 fleet of 15 entries was won by James Date and Toby Wincer.

Germany’s Roland and Nahid Gaebler became the new Tornado European champions at Lake Constance in Austria, knocking the Greek Red Bull sailors Paschalidis Iordanis and Konstantinos Trigonis off the podium they have held since 2008. Roland’s last European championship victory came in the 1990s.

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phOTO: MarTina BarneTOva/fOTOBOaT

New Tornado champions Topper Inlands The Crewsaver Topper inlands at Grafham Water SC saw the overall results coming down to the final race; Rutland sailor Ben Jennings took the title ahead of Parkstone’s Oliver Aldridge in second, with Ben Whaley of Swanage SC in third overall in the 178-boat fleet. Two brothers from Paignton SC meanwhile shared the podium at the Topper 4.2 inlands at Grafham. Overall winner was Ewan Gribbin with brother Luke taking third in the 31-boat fleet, and Hamish Beaumont from Bartley SC in second.

Paignton SC’s POSH Regatta saw some fast and furious competition between the singlehanded dinghy classes, as 54 sailors signed on for what proved to be a challenging first race, which proved to be the only race of the day as the wind gusted up to 30 knots. More moderate conditions on day two allowed a further five races. The fleet winners were: Blaze, Martin Saveker (Chase); Phantom, Andrew Wilde (Carsington); Handicap, Carys Roberts, Laser 4.7 (Paignton); RS100, Huw Powell (Red Wharf Bay); RS600, Matthew Holden (Locks); D-One, Charlie Chandler (Tewkesbury).

Southport Town Cup Sailed under the burgee of West Lancashire YC, the Southport Town Cup, in its new pursuit race format, saw testing light winds and victory for South Staffs SC Solo sailor Jonathan Woodward. Ed Thomas’ Phantom from Pilkington SC took second ahead of local Streaker sailor Tony Halliwell.

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Clubs & Classes

25th Sigma 38 Nationals Kevin Sussmilch’s ‘Mefisto’ won the 25th anniversary Sigma 38 national championship – a second hard-fought nationals win for Kevin and his crew to celebrate. ‘Mefisto’ previously won the title 10 years ago in 2003. Despite two days of light wind all races of the three day regatta were completed and ‘Mefisto’, in impressive style, took bullets in four of the seven races. The young team of mainly under-25s on ‘Gambit’ skippered by Tim Goodhew, 23, finished

A course with no gybes tempted many more teams onto the water than would otherwise have been the case for the breezy last race at Bala SC. Steve Cockerill and Harry Kennedy, of Hayling Island SC, took the bullet despite their poor start, giving them a clean sweep of six race wins and the overall title. In second overall were Andrew and Sue Flitcroft of Bolton SC, ahead of Bob and Maggie Murrell of Chipstead SC in third, with Bob also taking the over-55 trophy.

Bala Cat Open The 36th Bala catamaran open saw 21 boats and was dominated by the strong wind experts. Local heroes of Simon Flack and Lewis Bissell won the event from F18 national champion Will Sunnocks sailing with various crews in second, and the Unicorn of Owen Cox in third. The youth Dart 16 and Dart 15 fleet was won by Oli Cornforth and Mat Tute.

The Etchells European championship at Cowes Corinthian YC had the Razmilovic brothers split by James Howells in the top three spots; Ante Razmilovic sailing with Stuart Flynn and Chris Larson became the European champions, with James Howells second and Nils Razmilovic third. The proposed eight-race event was reduced to five races due to the extremes in the weather.

Oppie Inlands

Brits win Moth Europeans in Sicily

The Volvo Gill Optimist Inland Championship at Grafham Water saw more than 260 entries, split across Main and Regatta fleets. Benno Marstaller, aged 13 (Restronguet SC/Mylor YC) claimed the title winning all but one of his races. West Mersea’s David LaBrouche, aged 15, and Max Clapp, 14, of Royal Southern YC took second and third. First girl was Jenny Cropley, 15, of Royal Lymington, fifth overall. The Regatta fleet was won by Bowmoor’s Zachary Lyttle, aged 10, followed by Nicklas Host-Verbraak, 9, of Royal Lymington, and Spinnaker’s Kieran Young, aged 10. Sophie Johnson, 11, took the top girls spot in seventh. Hayden Sewell was top Junior overall.

UK Moth sailors headed out to Sicily for the Europeans in a region of the Sirocco wind. With winds up to 40 knots on the first two days, the event finally got started with a moderate southerly. Chris Rashley started strongly with two firsts. The next day brought one race in a light to moderate breeze with Chris’s dominance being broken by Mike Lennon on the last run followed by Jason Belben. There followed another day on shore, waiting for wind, then the final day allowed two more races, which brought in a discard. Rashley took a fourth then a final bullet to take the title for the third time in successive years, with Lennon

2000 Inlands phOTO: clare TurnBull/fOTOBOaT

Etchells Europeans

second overall with one first, two seconds and no finish below fourth – a major triumph for Tim, who has raced the family Sigma 38 since he was a teenager, as it was his first campaign running the boat. Hannah Diamond, 23, another Sigma 38 ‘baby’, gave tactical insight having just finished fourth at the Hyeres World Cup in the Nacra catamaran with Ben Saxton. Although Chris Choules’ ‘With Alacrity’ didn’t actually win a race this popular team took third overall.

phOTO: paul WyeTh

Graduate Nationals

Rob and Katy Burridge took the 2000 Noble Marine inlands title at their home club, Weir Wood SC. The 28-boat fleet saw varied conditions – from 32-knot gusts to light and fickle – with the added challenge of holes and massive shifts. By the final race the local team had to

second and Belben third. The top five boats were British using Exocet designs and a variation in rigs. Moth inlands International Moths went to Bala for their inlands and race one’s marginal foiling conditions saw Ricky Tagg making the most of the puffs to win. Day two’s racing opened with a light breeze. Richard Westbury took the first win, and Tom Offer the second. A cracking breeze later on saw Offer consolidate with two further wins to take the title, ahead of Tagg in second overall, Mike Cooke in third, and Westbury fourth.

ensure closest rivals Graham and Kristina Sexton, of Thorpe Bay, didn’t beat them by more than one place and after a match racing duel were successful. The two previous national champions had raced hard over the weekend to finish first and second overall, ahead of Simon Horsfield and Tom Bernal of the Army Sailing Association in third.

Wind shift decides GP14 Inlands at Burton A breezy first day at the Harken GP14 inlands at Burton SC belonged to Mike and Lizzie Senior in their Boon/HD package, with all three races won by the South Staffs SC pairing. A lighter day two saw a fourth bullet for the Seniors but then race five turned the event on its head after a 45-degree change in wind direction made a pin

end start a must, with 30 boats all vying for that prime location on a black flag start. Many were over, four more so than the rest; they were binned from the restart, and protested. Race six started with three possible winners of the event, all dependent upon the protest; the Seniors, Goacher pair Andy Tunnicliffe and Chris

Robinson, and Shane McCarthy and Andy Thompson. Only McCarthy in his Winder/HD had five good results. The Seniors were again caught OCS, Tunnicliffe/Robinson were some way down the fleet and McCarthy was on his way to shore, content he’d won, subject to that protest. The BFDs stood, handing victory to McCarthy.

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Clubs & Classes

phOTO: gareTh fudge*

B14 Flying Circus

National 12 Burton Week

while Stewart/Ralph sailed to victory. With Camm/Ballantyne leading overall but only one point ahead of Stewart/Ralph, all was to play for on the final day. With light northerly winds Stewart/Ralph took the first bullet of the day ahead of their rivals in second, making it level pegging before the final race, but with Camm/Ballantyne ahead on count back. In the final race Camm/Ballantyne match raced Stewart/Ralph, pushing them over the line, and then just needed a third or better to win, but could only manage a fourth. Steve and Joanne Sallis took third overall.

RS Feva Nationals The Sekonda RS Feva UK Nationals at Thorpe Bay YC saw Hayling Island sailors take the top three spots overall. A variety of wind strengths, directions and tidal conditions challenged the 93 entries. After racing in flights on day one the fleet split into gold and silver for day two, with the sun out and 12 knots providing great conditions for

a master class from Hayling Island’s Elliott Wells, aged 12, and Jake Todd, 15, who took three bullets. Light easterly winds and torrential rain arrived on the final day for a very different game, which saw race wins for Ogston’s Harvey Martin and Will Ward and Weir Wood’s Emma Baker and Izzy Black, who were the

Forthcoming events n August 2-4 comet combined national championships, exe Sc n August 3 Topper, national Summer championship, Weymouth & portland Sailing academy n August 3-5 Squib, irish national championship, ireland n August 3-9 albacore national championship, South caernarvonshire yc

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Yachts & Yachting

2000 nationals, pwllheli Sc n August 3-10 cowes Week, cowes, isle of Wight north West norfolk Week, norfolk clubs regatta Week, royal yorkshire yc n August 3-17 Menai Strait regatta n August 2-11 Bass Week, Bassenthwaite Sc n August 4-8 rS400, national championship,

August 2013

first all-girl team overall. Wells/Todd took the Feva national title ahead of fellow Hayling Island SC members Jamie Smith and Piers Nicholls in second and Tom Darling and Will Dolin third, making it a clean sweep of podium finishes for HISC. Smith, aged 13, and Nicholls, 12, were crowned junior champions.

east lothian yc n August 4-9 albacore, national championship, South caernarvonshire yc n August 4-10 pyefleet Week, Brightlingsea Sc n August 5-9 Monohull dinghies, dinghy Week, chichester yc cadet Week, Waldringfield Sc n August 5-11 Whitstable Week Mudeford Week n August 7-10

British Moth, nationals, Staunton harold Sc n August 8-11 rS700 and rS800 national championships, eastbourne Sovereign Sc n August 9-11 challenger, Multiclass regatta, rutland Sc n August 10-13 420 uK nationals, pwllheli Sc Mirror, national championship, pembrokeshire yc n August 11-16 gp14 national championship,

phOTO: STuarT france*

Brixham YC hosted the National 12 Championships with Tom Stewart and Andrea Ralph taking the title in the 38-strong fleet. Light breeze on day one saw two bullets for Graham Camm and Zoe Ballantyne, well known for their speed in these conditions. With a stronger south-westerly on day two it was Steve and Joanne Sallis’ turn at the top in race three, with Camm/Ballantyne back on form for the second race. Day three then saw the annual 13-mile Sir William Burton Cup race in south-westerly winds of over 25 knots, with many sailors having an opportunity to inspect their hulls

The B14 Flying Circus, consisting of 27 teams, 25 from the UK and two from France, headed to Whitstable for what promised and proved to be a windy nationals. Day one of the Ullman Sails B14 nationals, the first casualty was local boat Seavolution 1 (Mark Barnes, Jeremy Williamson), taking them out of contention. The rest of the fleet saw some very close racing, with at least one photo finish. Blue Badge (Mike Bees, Martin Worth) came out on top with a 1,2,2, hounded by Ullman Sails 1 (Mark Watts, Chris Bishop) with 3,4,1 and The Anthill Mob (Tim Harrison, Jonny Ratcliffe) with 2,1,8 - the latter found a capsize in race three coming back to haunt them in the final scores. Day two saw no racing due to high winds so on day three a real jousting match was to be had. Over the first three races Blue Badge (1,1,2) and Seavolution 1 (2,2,1) had a battle royal. Having won the nationals, Blue Badge opted for the bar and celebrations, leaving Seavolution 1, Ullman Sails 1 and Neil Pryde (Mark Emmett, Allan Stuart) to do battle in the last race. Seavolution 1 got the better with them finishing in that order. Second overall were Ullman Sails 1 with Anthill Mob third and Neil Pryde fourth.

largs Sc Miracle, national championship, Weymouth & portland Sailing academy Merlin rocket, national championship, Tenby Sc Salcombe yc regatta n August 11-17 falmouth Week n August 12-16 Bala race Week ullswater holiday Week abersoch Mirror Week, South caernarvonshire yc Brancaster Staithe Sailing Week

n August 12-17 ramsgate Week n August 12-18 camel Week, rock Sc n August 14-18 Weymouth Keelboat regatta n August 14-22 470, Jr european championship, pwllheli Sc n August 17-18 Junior cat championships, Marconi Sc elan cup at dartmouth n August 18 cock of the harbour pursuit,

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Clubs & Classes

Thames Valley Trophy The Thames Valley Inter-Match Shield - open to sailing clubs racing on or around the River Thames - was won by this year’s host club Henley SC with a 9-12 point advantage over their competitors. The N12 of Stephen Gent, crewed by Viv Roberts, mastered the blustery conditions to take first place for Henley SC ahead of Tim and Sue Hunt in one of the three Abbey SC Wayfarers, with Tim Saunders and Carol Stitson third for Henley SC in a vintage N12.

The Musto Vice Admiral’s Cup at Royal Corinthian YC saw 58 competing teams taking on the final two races to decide the hugely competitive series. With big shifts and winds from sub-five to around 10 knots the tacticians and trimmers got a strenuous workout. The three-day event featured seven classes, and Tony Langley’s ‘Weapon of Choice’ - with Olympic silver medallist and Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing Volvo Race skipper Ian Walker as guest tactician - dominated the TP52s of Class 0, scoring two further wins to take the series by a five-point margin ahead of Sir Keith Mills’ ‘5 West’. In Class 1 for the Farr 45s, ‘Kolga’,

owned by James French, won the final race of the series and the regatta, while the final result of the J/111s in Class 2 went down to a protest with Duncan McDonald and Phil Thomas’s

‘Shmokin’ Joe’ delighted to claim overall victory. In Class 3 for the J/109s, David Richard’s ‘Jumping Jellyfish’ took overall victory by a confident 12-point margin. The Quarter Tonners in Class 4 saw Peter Morton aboard ‘Bullit’ win overall. The Llewellyn/Wakefield/Virgus partnership ‘Henri-Lloyd/Forelle Estates’ meanwhile had put in such a consistently good performance in the SB20s Class 5 that they did not need to sail in the final race, winning the regatta overall by eight points. Andrew Pearce’s Ker 40 ‘Magnum III’ won Class 6 for 39-43 footers.

Myth of Malham

sprint 15 sport

After last year’s extremely windy race, this year’s edition provided a far more tactical race for the 120 yachts competing in the 230-mile race around the Eddystone Lighthouse. Staying in the breeze and calculating the best route for tides made all the difference, with conditions ranging from zephyrs to 25 knot gusts. Edward Broadway’s Ker 40 ‘Hooligan VII’ was declared overall winner after time correction under IRC and also the winner of IRC 1. With 31 yachts IRC 2 was the largest class and after time correction was won by Patrick Ponchelet’s French X-40 ‘Exception’.

Sean McKenna won the Sprint 15 Sport nationals at Yaverland Sailing and Boating Club on the Isle of Wight. With a total of 28 boats taking part the three-day event, sponsored by Wightlink Ferries and Windsport International, proved tricky, featuring winds changeable enough to drain the colour from the race officers’ cheeks. The overall results were determined by the final race, race seven. If Robin Leather

was to win the race with Sean McKenna fourth, Leather would win the series. And so McKenna went into attack mode right from the start, ultimately sailing both himself and Leather into the last positions, from where they both retired. And so Shanklin SC’s McKenna took the title, with Leather left in fourth overall. The final race was won by Stuart Snell, who finished second overall ahead of Paul Grattage in third.

pentewan Sands Sc n August 26 last Blast pursuit, hayling island Sc n August 26-31 cadet, national championship, South caernarvonshire yc n August 27-30 farr 40, World championship, new york yc, newport august 29-September 1 dartmouth Week, yachts east coast Sailing Week, Scotland n August 30-31 flying fifteen, irish nationals, Waterford harbour Sc

n August 30-September 2 contender, national championship, llandudno Sc n August 31-September 1 channel islands hobie cat championships, royal channel islands yc enterprise, under-21 national championship, Barnt green Sc n August 31-September 6 Musto Skiff, european championship, union yc attersee, austria n August 31-September 2 rS100, national championship, hayling island Sc

hayling island Sc Singlehander Open, Shotwick lake Sailing n August 18-23 Oulton Week, Waveney & Oulton Broad yc aldeburgh regatta, aldeburgh yc n August 18-24 Mersea Week 40th anniversary fowey royal regatta n August 19-23 abersoch Keelboat Week, South caernarvonshire yc Monohull dinghies, Junior race Week, royal harwich yc

Benoit D’Halluin’s A35 ‘Dunkerque Plaisance’ took line honours in IRC 3 and the class win. The Class 40 division produced a photo-finish: Yvon Berrehar and Stephan Theissing racing ‘Al Bucq’ were just 32 seconds ahead of Emma Creighton and Dan Dytch’s ‘Momentum Ocean Racing’. IRC 4 was won by the French crew of Jean Yves Chateau’s Nicholson 33, ‘Iromiguy’. Richard Palmer’s J/109, ‘Jangada Too’, was second in IRC 2 and won the 22-strong two-handed fleet with Jeremy Waitt as co-skipper.

fed Week, hayling island Sc n August 20-22 Junior Summer camp, Bala Sc n August 21-24 J-cup, royal Western yc n August 22-30 J/24, World championship, howth yc n August 23 Topper Six hour race, Bala Sc n August 23-28 Torbay Week n August 24-25 rS200 and rS400, irish northern championship, Ballyholme yc Solution national championship, Bala Sc

n August 24-26 Monohull dinghies, august regatta, Bala Sc ullswater regatta 49er and 49er fX, national championships, Weston Sc Sailfest 2013, Weymouth & portland national Sailing academy n August 24-27 poole Week dartmouth Week, dinghies n August 24-31 Burnham Week, royal corinthian yc n August 25-27 Sprint 15, national championship,

phOTO: Mary hOWie-WOOd*

A breezy Kielder Water SC Open saw a clean sweep of firsts in the A-Class cat fleet for Phil Neal of Rutland. In the fast handicap fleet, honours were taken by locals Viola and Mike Scott in their Osprey, while in the slow handicap fleet victory was taken by Sunderland Laser sailor Richard Purdy. KWSC’s legendary Dam to Dam race took place on day three and was won by the Scotts in their Osprey.

Hot competition for Vice Admiral’s Cup

phOTO: fiOna BrOWn*

Kielder Water Open

August 2013

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21/06/2013 09:22


Clubs & Classes

phOTO: MiKe rice/fOTOBOaT

eric Twiname

Goacher wins Flying 15 inlands A building wind on day one of the Flying 15 inlands at Chew Valley Lake, saw race wins for Steve Goacher and Phil Evans, and Richard Lovering/Matt Alvarado. Gusts up to 40mph forced a third of the fleet to retire from race two. Conditions on day two

allowed three more races with wins for Alan Bax and James Grant, Goacher/Evans and Jeremy Davy/Paul Busby. Inland champions were Royal Windermere’s Goacher and Evans. Lovering/Alvarado took second from Ian Cadwallader and Nick Stone.

Fifteens in France The French national Flying 15 championship at Dinard YC had 24 boats competing, including five British teams and four from Belgium. Chris and Tom Waples took the championship, with David Tabb and Pete Allam second.

GBR Skud team wins Europeans GBR Paralympic bronze medallists Alexandra Rickham and Niki Birrell were crowned Skud European champions at Arbon, Switzerland, with a clean sweep of six race wins. The Italian duo of Marco Gualandris and Marta Zanetti

provided the toughest competition for the four-time world champions, and finished the regatta in second. The regatta was part of the Access European Championships and in the Access 2.3 class victory was

taken by GBR’s Lindsay Burns of Frensham Pond SC. Two GBR boats also made it into the top 10 in the Access 303 Single class: Margaret Foreman also of Frensham in ninth with fellow club member Paul Phillips in 10th.

Seven British medals at EUROSAF Mark Andrews claimed gold at the Dutch leg of the EUROSAF Champions Sailing Cup, as the British sailing team finished the Delta Lloyd Regatta in Medemblik with seven medals from five classes. The 27-year-old Scotsman is

the fourth British sailor in four World Cup and EUROSAF events to top the podium in the Finn class, along with Ed Wright, Giles Scott and Andrew Mills, the latter claiming bronze this time. Megan Pascoe also celebrated gold in the 2.4mR

class with team mate Helena Lucas taking silver. Dave Evans and Ed Powys claimed a silver in the 49er class, with bronze for Alison Young in the Laser Radial, and Paralympic Sonar trio John Robertson, Hannah Stodel and Steve Thomas.

The RYA South West Zone took victory in the RYA Eric Twiname Championships at Rutland Water, which attracted 268 competitors. Day one brought fickle winds, strong gusts and driving rain while day two saw more favourable spells of sunshine and an average 12-14 knots. RYA South Zone won the Eric Twiname Dinghy Trophy, while the South East Zone clinched the Eric Twiname Windsurfing Trophy. In the RS Feva XL class South Zone sailors Edward Norbury and Charlie Hutchings took event honours, while in the Topper fleet North Zone sailor James Tulley, who was eighth at the halfway stage, had a fantastic second day to take victory. East Zone’s Hannah Tucker won the Optimist fleet. Windsurfing winners were: South East’s Benjamin Temme, Bic Techno 4.5m rig; South’s Ben Tweedle, 5.8m; Scotland’s Andrew Brown, 6.8m rig; and East’s Alexi Murphy, 7.8m. Jamie Calder from Loch Tummel SC won the Laser 4.7 indicator.

North sea Race Piet Vroon’s Ker 46, ‘Tonnerre de Breskens 3’, won the RORC North Sea Race, part of the Delta Lloyd North Sea Regatta. Gusting over 25 knots with rainsqualls at the start, the weather settled by the end. Harm Prins’ Dutch Volvo 60 ‘Pleomax’ took line honours and IRC 0 but corrected out to third overall. The biggest threat to ‘Tonnerre de Breskens’ came from Géry Trentesaux’s MC34 Patton ‘Courrier Vintage’, which was the victor in IRC 2. Iain Kirkpatrick’s team on X-37 ‘Fatjax’, corrected out to win IRC 3. Vincent Willemart’s well-campaigned Belgian JPK 10.10 ‘Wasabi’ won IRC 4, whilst Chris Revelman and Pascal Bakker retained the two-handed class on J/122 ‘Junique’.

IRC East Coast Championship and Sail East Regatta David Pinner’s X-35 ‘Kiss’ took the overall trophy for winning IRC East Coast Championship on the River Blackwater estuary. The season’s first Sail East Regatta was jointly hosted by West Mersea YC and Dabchicks SC and saw five races in light to

moderate breezes. Yachts ranged from the top rated and newly launched 42ft carbon grand prix machine ‘Oystercatcher XXX’ of Richard Matthews at 1.235 to Tim Wood’s classic long keeled wooden 25ft Stella OD ‘L’Etoile’, rated at

0.766 – a difference of about 28 minutes an hour on handicap. Class One was won by X-35 ‘Kiss’ of David Pinner from Haven Ports YC finishing equal on points with the Humphreys 36 ‘Inn Spirit’ of Alan Bartlett from Crouch YC.

Class Two saw J/80 sportsboats making up half the entry. WMYC’s Rob Leggett with his Contessa 33 ‘Arctic Monkey’ who came out on top. Class Three saw victory for 2010 Sail East champion Julian Lord with the Impala ‘Scallywag’ from WMYC.

August 2013

Yachts & Yachting

91


Boats for sale

Race boats

ON THE WATER Our monthly guide to the best boats available from private sellers and brokerages

J/111 i £193,000 ex VAT

Six Metre i £24,950

2013 looks set to be the year in which this class reaches the size at which there are sufficient numbers for excellent class racing and there’s a great programme of championship events in the UK and Europe, including a one-design class start in Aberdeen Asset Management Cowes Week. The J/111 offers a step-change in performance compared to the popular J/109, with carbon rig and deep bulbed two-part keel. Overall weight is reduced by around 25 per cent, without compromising the amount of power available and the boat still offers the same appealing one-design racing format. This example is one of the first to appear on the second-hand market, offering an opportunity to compete at the highest level in this class this summer. She is still owned by the factory, having been used for only a couple of regattas, is in fully race-ready condition, and is offered at an attractive discount on the new price, allowing for extras and the sail wardrobe. Why wait for next year? Granted it’s already too late to enter the European Championships that took place just across the English Channel in Le Havre in June, but there is plenty of other

Here’s an affordable entry to the exalted world of Metre yacht racing. A modern Six Metre, designed by Peter Norlin, with a Howlett wing keel, she was built in 1989. ‘New Sweden’ has many race successes to her name, including the Royal Southern YC Six Metre Regatta and the Royal Yacht Squadron Household Division Regatta. As you would expect, there’s an extensive sail wardrobe and decks and hull were refurbished three years ago. There are also Tacktick instruments and a carbon spinnaker pole from 2006. Regular events for the International

Six Metre class include Panerai British Classic Week, a UK national championship and the Cowes Metre and Keelboat Regatta. This year the world championships are in Germany, and the European Championship, which often attracts a fleet of around 30 boats, is proposed for Falmouth next summer. ‘New Sweden’ is lying near Southampton, ready for viewing. Contact: sales@aspireboatsales.com LOA 11m (approx)

photo: Kurt Arrigo/rolex*

Beam 2m (approx) Displacement 4,000kg (approx)

LOA 11.1m LWL 9.97m

Beam Draught Displacement Ballast Mainsail Headsail Asymmetric

3.29m 2.19m 4,216kg 1,595kg 30sq m 32.85sq m 130sq m

photo: eddie mAys

great racing planned for this season. Contact: Key Yachting info@ keyyachting.com 02380 455669 www.keyyachting.com

MerLin rOcket i £1,750 Here’s a classic Merlin in a ready-to-go condition that promises lots of fun – and pride of ownership – for a modest price. This long-running class is one of the most family-friendly in the UK, with a programme of open meetings, championships and the renowned Salcombe Week, which all frequently see three generations of the same family on the water in one form or another. This example, sail number 3305,

92

Yachts & Yachting

August 2013

is an NSM II design from 1983 with a wooden hull that’s in excellent condition. She was only sailed three times last season and has been barn stored for three years following a professional revarnish. At the same time, Brett Dingwall fitted a new centreboard case. She has never been exposed to frost, the gunwales are in perfect condition and there are under/over covers, plus a trailer in

good condition and fitted with new wheel bearings in 2012. She’s currently located in Salcombe. Contact: 07971 240379 LOA Beam Hull weight Mainsail Jib Spinnaker

4.27m 2.2m 98kg 7.16sq m 2.8sq m 10sq m

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Bluewater Cruising yachts Oyster 62

£880,000 Lying: Cruising, Greece

Immaculate Rob Humphreys Oyster that is maintained in total apple pie order - she is the biz. Proven world girdler that manages all this in the utmost style and with enormous panache.

najad 490

£335,000 Lying: Plymouth

Bluewater equipped 490 in her first ownership sensibly specced for serious sailors enroute Lymington.

discovery 67

£1,750,000+VAT Lying: Newport, RI, USA

An exceptional Ron Holland design built in blighty to the very highest standards and perfect for bluewater. She has a great layout with 3 doubles and crew

swan 66

£1,950,000 Lying: Newport, RI, USA

Incredible German Frers from the masters in Pietasaari, she was hatched 2008. The ultimate cruising Swan with carbon this and kevlar that - as the name implies - she flies


CLA

CLASSIFI CLASSIF

Water but not Galvanised sailed thisFantastic year. Fully Complete Trax Rutland Launching Trolley, Road Trailer with and open to inspection or sail. price to sell. open to inspection sail. Fantastic to sell. £1500 Tel 07850 755876 / Portsmouth (RUTLAND WATER) largeand box available, Lyingor /price Stokes Bay £1500 Tel 07850 755876 / (RUTLAND WATER) David . £5750 Tel 02392 754000 Office hours / 07958 FORMULA 18 HOBIE TIGER Well sorted former 418145 (PORTSMOUTH) FORMULA 18 HOBIE sorted former Championship winning TIGER boat Well with Excellent sails, Championship winning Excellent sails, Measurement Certifi cate, boat Carbonwith Boards and Tornado DART 18 A 1998 Applause in good condition. Hulls Measurement Certifi cate, Carbon Boards and Tornado Marstrom Rudders, Stern Supports, New Cover, Cat refurbished, new ropes and halyards. Trolley included Marstrom Rudders, Stern Supports, New Cover, Cat Trax Launching Trolley, Galvanised Road Trailer with Trax Launching Trolley, Galvanised Road/ Trailer £2995. £2995 01795 880116 / (KENT) large box Tel available, Lying Portsmouth Stokes with Bay large available, Lying Portsmouth / Stokes Bay David box . £5750 Tel 02392 754000 Office hours / 07958 David . £5750 Tel 02392 754000 Offi ce hours / 07958 418145 (PORTSMOUTH) UNICORN A CLASS CATAMARAN 2009 National 418145 (PORTSMOUTH) Championship winning boat Sail No.1074. 1988 Condor DART 18 A 1998foam Applause in good condition. Hulls professionally sandwich hulls, DART 18 Abuilt 1998 Applause goodconstruction condition. Hulls refurbished, new ropes and in halyards. Trolley included dagger boards & rudders. Low refurbished, new ropes and halyards. Trolley included £2995. £2995 Tel 01795 880116 / (KENT) maintainance competitive boatTelin01795 good condition. £2995. £2995 880116 / (KENT)Ideal for single handed adrenalin seeking man or woman. UNICORN A CLASS CATAMARAN 2009 £1499 NationalTel UNICORN A CLASS CATAMARAN 2009 winning boat(MALDON) Sail No.1074. 1988National Condor 01621Championship 779119 / 07714425460 Championship winning boat Sail No.1074. 1988 Condor professionally built foam sandwich construction hulls, professionally built & foam sandwichLow construction hulls, dagger boards rudders. maintainance dagger boards & good rudders. Low Ideal maintainance competitive boat in condition. for single competitive boat in good man condition. Ideal for single handed adrenalin seeking or woman. £1499 Tel handed adrenalin seeking man or woman. £1499 Tel 01621 779119 / 07714425460 (MALDON) 01621 779119 / 07714425460 (MALDON)

Insurance

(SOUTHEND) £2700 Tel 02920 752167 / (CARDIFF) Complete and(MUDEFORD) ready to sail. £1850 Tel 07742 219109 / 01590 681061 01590 681061 (MUDEFORD) DART 16, 2973 WITH GENNAKER Dart 2006 (2973). TORNADO CATAMARAN White Marstrom hulls, Carbon MASTROM TORNADO SPORT CATAMARAN Year16, 2000 White Marstrom Carbon MASTROM TORNADO SPORT Year 2000and TORNADO mast and CATAMARAN pole. Excellent main, good hulls, jib, new GP BuiltWhite Marstrom Sport, Carbon Mast +sails Shoot, hull,Tornado with blueCATAMARAN and white yellow mast and and pole. good and jib, big new GP Built Marstrom Tornado Sport, Carbon Mast + Shoot, spinnaker oldExcellent spinnaker.main, Full cover wheel Big Gennaker. wheeled launching trolley Gp sails Marlow Lines & Secondtrolley boatGp so sails occasional use only. Has big and spinnaker old spinnaker. Full cover and big wheel Big wheeled launching Marlow Lines & trolley. Harken Blocks Good condition, well maintained & ready wheel launch trolley, road trailer and full cover. It has theNo. 412. £6500 Tel 07894 280190 / (STOKES trolley. Harken Good well maintained ready BAY) No. 412. £6500 Tel 07894 280190 / (STOKES to race.Blocks £6500 Tel condition, 07843 063265 / 01702 &588553 new £6500 style DartX Gennaker, new style Traveller Main BAY) to race. Tel 07843 063265 / 01702 588553 and (SOUTHEND) (SOUTHEND) Sheet. Very clean boat excellent condition. £3100 Tel 07766 831613 / GENNAKER (OXFORD)Dart 16, 2006 (2973). DART 16, 2973 WITH DART 2973 WITH GENNAKER Dartsails 16, 2006 White 16, hull, with blue and white and (2973). yellow White hull,Second with boat blue so and white sails and Has Gennaker. occasional use only. big 15 with a DART STING Thisso is the classicuse Dart 15Has /yellow Sprint Gennaker. Second boat occasional only. wheel launch trolley, road trailer and full cover. It has big the more powerful rig.trailer The hulls &cover. equipment are in good wheel launch trolley, road and full It has the new style DartX Gennaker, new style Traveller and Main condition. There is NEW tri-radial sail only used about new style DartX Gennaker, new style Traveller and Main Sheet. Very clean boat excellent condition. £3100 Tel 10 times in pristine condition and original Sheet. Very boat excellent condition. £31001990 Tel main. Jib 07766 831613clean / (OXFORD) 07766 (OXFORD) Road trailer, trolley, cover. Photos in 831613 good /condition. available. £1700 07531 653574 / (HALIFAX) DART STING This is theTel classic Dart 15 / Sprint 15 with a DART STING This is The the classic 15 / Sprint a more powerful rig. hulls &Dart equipment are15inwith good more powerful rig. & equipment in about good condition. There is The NEWhulls tri-radial sail only are used condition. There is NEW tri-radial sail only used about 10 times in pristine condition and original 1990 main. Jib 10 pristine condition and original main. Jib in times good incondition. Road trailer, trolley, 1990 cover. Photos in good condition. Road 653574 trailer, trolley, cover. Photos available. £1700 Tel 07531 / (HALIFAX) available. £1700 Tel 07531 653574 / (HALIFAX)

£19 £19

Insurance

Sails

Sails Sails

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DINGHIES

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LASER 2000, SAIL NO 21025. 2003 model in excellent overall condition with very little use since new. It comes with launching trolley and road base, mainsail, two jibs and spinnaker (hardly used). Will accept very near offer for quick sale. £3450 Tel 0208 940 8830 / 07816 164334 (STAINES) RONDAR 420, GOOD SOUND HULL. Great condition for price. Comes with two suits of sails, stainless steel launching trolley, nearly new cover. Ready to sail. TRADE. £500 Tel 01425 620541 / (LYMINGTON) LASER 176348 XD, EXCELLENT RACING BOAT. Comes with radial and 4.7 rig, trolley and cover. At Stone Sailing Club Essex.Good racing boat. Grey/ White. Nearly new 4.7 sail. £1900 Tel 01621 868011 / 07840 29618 (ST LAWRENCE BAY, ) LASER VAGO XD NO 822. Good condition, one owner (fresh water use only) Not sailed last 2 years.. Gennaker, XD mainsail.(capable of reefing) Jib slightly worn, rudder small ding – hence the excellent price Includes Extending tiller. trapeze, rigging manual, road trailer, launching trolley, top and bottom covers. £2050 Tel 01524 388283 / 07826 721420 (LANCASTER) CLASSIC INTERNATIONAL 14 K871. Classic Souter Casson designed with varnished hull. Re-fitted recently. Main Sail, jib and spinnaker. Cover and trolley. Good condition, complete and ready to race. Or near offer. £350 ‘11 Tel 01494 483360 / (HIGH | FEBRUARY 096 | YACHTS & YACHTING WYCOMBE) 096 | YACHTS & YACHTING | FEBRUARY ‘11 RS200 1458. Very little used boat with grey hull, pink spi, combi trailer/trolley etc. £5250 Tel 07515 154368 / 07781 120375 (PERRY) 1634 Classifieds FEB (7).indd 96 RS VISION. used, 1634 Classifieds FEBHardly (7).indd 96very good condition, stored inside, trailer and cover included. £2900 Tel 07970 282544 / (ANGLESEY) YACHTS & YACHTING ‘11 As new. Used only once RS500 XL| FEBRUARY MAIN & JIB. for less than a hour’s leisurely sail. £750 Tel 0151 3554940 / (CHESTER)

DIRECTORY

RS400 SAIL 1004. Grey hull, fair condition (watertight / some cosmetic wear & tear), hardly used last 2 years, Black Spars, carbon tiller extension, 1x main sail, new jib, (still unwrapped), asymmetric, 2 x rudders, top and undercover, combi-trolley / road trailer, kept indoors in winter, race ready. Excellent entry level boat. £2500 Tel 02089 487447 / 07771 756575 (ALDEBURGH) CATALINA EXPO 14.2 SAILING CRUISER/DINGHY. The Expo 14.2 is a simple approach to sailing with a furling main, one piece mast without stays and two line control. The boat is 4.2m long with a high one piece Hoytt boom. Combi Trailor and cover included. Rare in the UK, Sailed only a handful of times. £3500 Tel 07772 742016 / (DUMFRIES) WANDERER MD VERSION 1025. Anglo Marine MD version, blue hull ivory deck, Slab reefing main roller furling genoa, Spinnaker, Self bailers, Oars, Outboard bracket, Overboom cover, Floatation pad, Combi road/launching trailer, Original Wanderer Handbook and builders certificate... (OUTBOARD also available 2.5 Yamaha, barely run-in, serviced end 2012, test run by “Oakleys” April 2013: £400). £2250 Tel 07703 350246 / (CHICHESTER) KEYHAVEN SCOW. Very clean and complete 2000 model GRP Keyhaven Scow. Complete with new Dolphin road trailer & launching trolley. £3850 Tel 02085 026644 / (ROMFORD) PHANTOM 1318. Bought from Nick Craig this year, no time to use it, has CST Rig, JJ Foils, Speed Sail like new, under/over covers, combi with brand new trailer, 2 x Nats Winner, must sell soon so open to offers. £6500 Tel 07888 704586 / (PLYMOUTH) COMET TRIO. Sail No 470, Registered 2006 Excellent condition, launching trolley and travel covers. £3750 Tel 01395 224645 / 07805 035133 (EXMOUTH) RS800 976. Very lightly used since new, covers, combi, very good condition, inland waters use only. £3900 Tel 07770 631346 / (CHEPSTOW)

GP14 13040. Rigged for racing. Full sized racing sails are in good condition but won’t win a Nationals. Recently re-roped. Over cover (good). Combi (good). Spars/rigging (good). 2 jibs - full size (good) and small. 2 mainsails – full sized Goacher (good) and small reefable. 2 spinnakers (average). £700 Tel 07815 710726 / 01325 247008 (DARLINGTON) LASER 2000 SAIL NO 21763. Built 2006. One owner from new. Includes new top cover, new toestraps, trailer, trolley, rudder bag. 2 suits sails. Clean boat well maintained and in good condition. Good boat for cruising, club racing or more. View Chichester or Woking area by arrangement. £3750 Tel 01483 488557 / 07786 111923 (CHICHESTER) PENULTIMATE I14 SAILS/FOILS/BOOM. Brand new Batt main, useable genoa, foils that need a bit of work to finish them off, and an aluminium boom. All from an OD14 (grand prix rig) Penultimate I14. Photos and more details here: http://www.facebook.com/ groups/dinghies/permalink/550786818294101/ and here: http://www.facebook.com/groups/dinghies/ permalink/550794951626621. Tel 01637 872684 / 07732 300627 (NEWQUAY) EUROPE SAIL NO USA112. Winner hull, Marstrom yellow band carbon mast, Marstrom carbon rudder stock, 2 North sails, trolley, cover. USA Olympic trials winner 2004. White hull, blue decks, minimum weight. Or Near Offer. £1500 Tel 01937 833386 / 07503 189980 (YORK) TRADITIONAL DAY BOAT - MANX YOLE. Black, GRP ‘clinker hull’ with Teak trim, red bottom, LOA 19 ft. Aluminium mast, tan sails and furling jib. Recent refit and road trailer service. Good inventory of warps, fenders, anchor. This is a lovely sailing family picnic / fishing boat. £3800 Tel 07793 528341 / (PORTSMOUTH) LASER FULL RIG SAIL (ROLLED) - BRAND NEW. Brand new laser full rig sail never been used. £350 Tel 07783 416048 / (CHICHESTER)

RS400 971 FAST AND READY TO RACE! Road base, Top and bottom covers, 4 jibs, 2 mains, 2 spinnakers, Spare rudder blade, New sheets and halyards, New slot gasket, (Add £225 to include a new Tacktick digital compass.) Raced competatively nationally. 30/12/2010 11:08 More info & pics http://apolloduck.net/307848. £3000 Tel 07794 871264 / (ELY) TOPPER 44999. Topper 44999 well looked after and very competitive. aluminium collapsible trolley, 2top covers 1undercover, 2x6:1 downhauls,3:1kicker with new rope, 4:1outhaul, new boom,other spars good condition. Foils good condition carbon tiller extension/spare. New toestrap and mainsheet ratchet block for the 2012 nationals. 3 sails 1 virtually new only used for nationals . £1300 Tel 07974665331 / 01915 369935 (SOUTH SHIELDS) 49ER GBR940 NEW RIG. New Style Rig 2 Mains, 2 Jibs, one training, one race set. 2 Kites. 1 old style jib. Carbon tillers. Professionally re-gripped and re-roped September 2012 for Nationals. Air tight hull. Trolley, trailer, top and bottom covers, mast bag, foil bag. Fully sorted boat. Sale due to crew moving away. . £6750 Tel 07824 338669 / (SOUTHAMPTON) TOPPER 43765. Turqoise hull.orange/purple/white sail (stored rolled). Spars and foils stored in bags. One owner. No trolley. £500 Tel 01732 359345 / (TONBRIDGE) MIRRIR DINGHY SPINNAKERS AND CHUTE. 2 off spinnakers , unbranded and unused one white yellow ,one green white , £50.00 plus £5 pp ea, unused trident type grp chute mouth £25.00 plus £7.50 pp . £50 Tel 07976 229665 / (GLASGOW) ENTERPRISE SAILING DINGHY 10493. Built 1965,Owned since 1967.Always dry stored. Varnished topsides & inner hull. Enamel exterior, original wooden mast. In almost original condition. Sails Jack Holt(C) Rockall(R). Transom & Elvestrom balers. Modern trailer-Snipe Combi, jockey & electrics in excellent condition. Ready to trail and sail. £550 Tel 01248 810170 / (BEAUMARIS) RS200 872. Light grey hull, the boat has comes with combi trailer, top and bottom cover, 2 spinnakers, 2 jibs and one main. Sad sale to to crew moving away. . £3500 Tel 07515 373087 / (FALMOUTH ) LASER 1 DINGHY COMPLETE READY TO RACE. In great condition for age 1980’s. Blue hull. Solid mast foot and water tight. Fast boat competitive with new ones. Ready to race, Launching trolley, 2 full rig sails, cover could do with replacing. . £500 Tel 07796 386125 / (KENDAL ) RS FEVA XL. Sail No 1468 XL main, jib, gennaker, foils with padded covers, trolley & top cover. . £1750 Tel 07813 799584 / (RINGWOOD) LASER FULL RIG SAIL - BRAND NEW. Brand new laser sail (rolled) with sail bag. Never been used. £350 Tel 07783 416048 / (CHICHESTER) LASER CARBON TILLER EXTENSION NEVER BEEN USED. Brand new 1.3 25mm diameter MB yachting Christchurch laser carbon tiller extension . £60 Tel 07783 416048 / (CHICHESTER) LASER CARBON TILLER NEVER BEEN USED. MB Yachting Christchurch laser carbon tiller, low profile with roller. £130 Tel 07783 416048 / (CHICHESTER) LASER 2000. Built 2002. New cover with extra long sides. New spinnaker. All the usual bits in good order. Launching trolley and trailer both with new wheels. . £2850 Tel 07415 486717 / (BRIXHAM) BOSS 777. Old and well used mast head kite New ish Jib tatty cover with launching trolley and road base. Sail or spares. £500 Tel 07879 235849 / (RUTLAND WATER) OPEN BIC SAILING DINGHY - GREAT CONDITION. Sail in great condition. The fast, planing hull of the O’pen BIC gives a dynamic sailing experience. See manacturers OpenBic website for more info. Search Open Bic on youtube Great internediate boat, step up from an optimist, will accept an opy rig. Similar to RS Tera. Rigs in 5 mins, yes 5 mins. Car toppable. Pictures available. £650 Tel 07714 672423 / (PRESTON) LASER II REGATTA. Sail No 8039. Very good condition. Turquoise/white. Launching trolley, 2 spinnakers, trapeze harness and new cover. £850 Tel 01208 880969 / (TRURO) MUSTO SKIFF GBR230. In good overall condition 30/12/2010 11:08 and well cared for. Sails in good crisp shape (blue 30/12/2010 11:08 spi)2 carbon tiller extensions, new top cover, bottom cover, tapered spi halyard and sheets. Rig and foil bags, trolley and new trailer Little used and kept tidy. Will deliver to Poole/sth coast. £5750 Tel 01534 851111 / 01534 448826 (POOLE)

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CLA

CLASSIFI CLASSIF

Water but not Galvanised sailed thisFantastic year. Fully Complete Trax Rutland Launching Trolley, Road Trailer with and open to inspection or sail. price to sell. open to inspection sail. Fantastic to sell. £1500 Tel 07850 755876 / Portsmouth (RUTLAND WATER) largeand box available, Lyingor /price Stokes Bay £1500 Tel 07850 755876 / (RUTLAND WATER) David . £5750 Tel 02392 754000 Office hours / 07958 FORMULA 18 HOBIE TIGER Well sorted former 418145 (PORTSMOUTH) FORMULA 18 HOBIE sorted former Championship winning TIGER boat Well with Excellent sails, Championship winning Excellent sails, Measurement Certifi cate, boat Carbonwith Boards and Tornado DART 18 A 1998 Applause in good condition. Hulls Measurement Certifi cate, Carbon Boards and Tornado Marstrom Rudders, Stern Supports, New Cover, Cat refurbished, new ropes and halyards. Trolley included Marstrom Rudders, Stern Supports, New Cover, Cat Trax Launching Trolley, Galvanised Road Trailer with Trax Launching Trolley, Galvanised Road/ Trailer £2995. £2995 01795 880116 / (KENT) large box Tel available, Lying Portsmouth Stokes with Bay large available, Lying Portsmouth / Stokes Bay David box . £5750 Tel 02392 754000 Office hours / 07958 David . £5750 Tel 02392 754000 Offi ce hours / 07958 418145 (PORTSMOUTH) UNICORN A CLASS CATAMARAN 2009 National 418145 (PORTSMOUTH) Championship winning boat Sail No.1074. 1988 Condor DART 18 A 1998foam Applause in good condition. Hulls professionally sandwich hulls, DART 18 Abuilt 1998 Applause goodconstruction condition. Hulls refurbished, new ropes and in halyards. Trolley included dagger boards & rudders. Low refurbished, new ropes and halyards. Trolley included £2995. £2995 Tel 01795 880116 / (KENT) maintainance competitive boatTelin01795 good condition. £2995. £2995 880116 / (KENT)Ideal for single handed adrenalin seeking man or woman. UNICORN A CLASS CATAMARAN 2009 £1499 NationalTel UNICORN A CLASS CATAMARAN 2009 winning boat(MALDON) Sail No.1074. 1988National Condor 01621Championship 779119 / 07714425460 Championship winning boat Sail No.1074. 1988 Condor professionally built foam sandwich construction hulls, professionally built & foam sandwichLow construction hulls, dagger boards rudders. maintainance dagger boards & good rudders. Low Ideal maintainance competitive boat in condition. for single competitive boat in good man condition. Ideal for single handed adrenalin seeking or woman. £1499 Tel handed adrenalin seeking man or woman. £1499 Tel 01621 779119 / 07714425460 (MALDON) 01621 779119 / 07714425460 (MALDON)

Insurance

(SOUTHEND) £2700 Tel 02920 752167 / (CARDIFF) Complete and(MUDEFORD) ready to sail. £1850 Tel 07742 219109 / 01590 681061 01590 681061 (MUDEFORD) DART 16, 2973 WITH GENNAKER Dart 2006 (2973). TORNADO CATAMARAN White Marstrom hulls, Carbon MASTROM TORNADO SPORT CATAMARAN Year16, 2000 White Marstrom Carbon MASTROM TORNADO SPORT Year 2000and TORNADO mast and CATAMARAN pole. Excellent main, good hulls, jib, new GP BuiltWhite Marstrom Sport, Carbon Mast +sails Shoot, hull,Tornado with blueCATAMARAN and white yellow mast and and pole. good and jib, big new GP Built Marstrom Tornado Sport, Carbon Mast + Shoot, spinnaker oldExcellent spinnaker.main, Full cover wheel Big Gennaker. wheeled launching trolley Gp sails Marlow Lines & Secondtrolley boatGp so sails occasional use only. Has big and spinnaker old spinnaker. Full cover and big wheel Big wheeled launching Marlow Lines & trolley. Harken Blocks Good condition, well maintained & ready wheel launch trolley, road trailer and full cover. It has theNo. 412. £6500 Tel 07894 280190 / (STOKES trolley. Harken Good well maintained ready BAY) No. 412. £6500 Tel 07894 280190 / (STOKES to race.Blocks £6500 Tel condition, 07843 063265 / 01702 &588553 new £6500 style DartX Gennaker, new style Traveller Main BAY) to race. Tel 07843 063265 / 01702 588553 and (SOUTHEND) (SOUTHEND) Sheet. Very clean boat excellent condition. £3100 Tel 07766 831613 / GENNAKER (OXFORD)Dart 16, 2006 (2973). DART 16, 2973 WITH DART 2973 WITH GENNAKER Dartsails 16, 2006 White 16, hull, with blue and white and (2973). yellow White hull,Second with boat blue so and white sails and Has Gennaker. occasional use only. big 15 with a DART STING Thisso is the classicuse Dart 15Has /yellow Sprint Gennaker. Second boat occasional only. wheel launch trolley, road trailer and full cover. It has big the more powerful rig.trailer The hulls &cover. equipment are in good wheel launch trolley, road and full It has the new style DartX Gennaker, new style Traveller and Main condition. There is NEW tri-radial sail only used about new style DartX Gennaker, new style Traveller and Main Sheet. Very clean boat excellent condition. £3100 Tel 10 times in pristine condition and original Sheet. Very boat excellent condition. £31001990 Tel main. Jib 07766 831613clean / (OXFORD) 07766 (OXFORD) Road trailer, trolley, cover. Photos in 831613 good /condition. available. £1700 07531 653574 / (HALIFAX) DART STING This is theTel classic Dart 15 / Sprint 15 with a DART STING This is The the classic 15 / Sprint a more powerful rig. hulls &Dart equipment are15inwith good more powerful rig. & equipment in about good condition. There is The NEWhulls tri-radial sail only are used condition. There is NEW tri-radial sail only used about 10 times in pristine condition and original 1990 main. Jib 10 pristine condition and original main. Jib in times good incondition. Road trailer, trolley, 1990 cover. Photos in good condition. Road 653574 trailer, trolley, cover. Photos available. £1700 Tel 07531 / (HALIFAX) available. £1700 Tel 07531 653574 / (HALIFAX)

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LASER 2000, SAIL NO 21025. 2003 model in excellent overall condition with very little use since new. It comes with launching trolley and road base, mainsail, two jibs and spinnaker (hardly used). Will accept very near offer for quick sale. £3450 Tel 0208 940 8830 / 07816 164334 (STAINES) RONDAR 420, GOOD SOUND HULL. Great condition for price. Comes with two suits of sails, stainless steel launching trolley, nearly new cover. Ready to sail. TRADE. £500 Tel 01425 620541 / (LYMINGTON) LASER 176348 XD, EXCELLENT RACING BOAT. Comes with radial and 4.7 rig, trolley and cover. At Stone Sailing Club Essex.Good racing boat. Grey/ White. Nearly new 4.7 sail. £1900 Tel 01621 868011 / 07840 29618 (ST LAWRENCE BAY, ) LASER VAGO XD NO 822. Good condition, one owner (fresh water use only) Not sailed last 2 years.. Gennaker, XD mainsail.(capable of reefing) Jib slightly worn, rudder small ding – hence the excellent price Includes Extending tiller. trapeze, rigging manual, road trailer, launching trolley, top and bottom covers. £2050 Tel 01524 388283 / 07826 721420 (LANCASTER) CLASSIC INTERNATIONAL 14 K871. Classic Souter Casson designed with varnished hull. Re-fitted recently. Main Sail, jib and spinnaker. Cover and trolley. Good condition, complete and ready to race. Or near offer. £350 ‘11 Tel 01494 483360 / (HIGH | FEBRUARY 096 | YACHTS & YACHTING WYCOMBE) 096 | YACHTS & YACHTING | FEBRUARY ‘11 RS200 1458. Very little used boat with grey hull, pink spi, combi trailer/trolley etc. £5250 Tel 07515 154368 / 07781 120375 (PERRY) 1634 Classifieds FEB (7).indd 96 RS VISION. used, 1634 Classifieds FEBHardly (7).indd 96very good condition, stored inside, trailer and cover included. £2900 Tel 07970 282544 / (ANGLESEY) YACHTS & YACHTING ‘11 As new. Used only once RS500 XL| FEBRUARY MAIN & JIB. for less than a hour’s leisurely sail. £750 Tel 0151 3554940 / (CHESTER)

DIRECTORY

RS400 SAIL 1004. Grey hull, fair condition (watertight / some cosmetic wear & tear), hardly used last 2 years, Black Spars, carbon tiller extension, 1x main sail, new jib, (still unwrapped), asymmetric, 2 x rudders, top and undercover, combi-trolley / road trailer, kept indoors in winter, race ready. Excellent entry level boat. £2500 Tel 02089 487447 / 07771 756575 (ALDEBURGH) CATALINA EXPO 14.2 SAILING CRUISER/DINGHY. The Expo 14.2 is a simple approach to sailing with a furling main, one piece mast without stays and two line control. The boat is 4.2m long with a high one piece Hoytt boom. Combi Trailor and cover included. Rare in the UK, Sailed only a handful of times. £3500 Tel 07772 742016 / (DUMFRIES) WANDERER MD VERSION 1025. Anglo Marine MD version, blue hull ivory deck, Slab reefing main roller furling genoa, Spinnaker, Self bailers, Oars, Outboard bracket, Overboom cover, Floatation pad, Combi road/launching trailer, Original Wanderer Handbook and builders certificate... (OUTBOARD also available 2.5 Yamaha, barely run-in, serviced end 2012, test run by “Oakleys” April 2013: £400). £2250 Tel 07703 350246 / (CHICHESTER) KEYHAVEN SCOW. Very clean and complete 2000 model GRP Keyhaven Scow. Complete with new Dolphin road trailer & launching trolley. £3850 Tel 02085 026644 / (ROMFORD) PHANTOM 1318. Bought from Nick Craig this year, no time to use it, has CST Rig, JJ Foils, Speed Sail like new, under/over covers, combi with brand new trailer, 2 x Nats Winner, must sell soon so open to offers. £6500 Tel 07888 704586 / (PLYMOUTH) COMET TRIO. Sail No 470, Registered 2006 Excellent condition, launching trolley and travel covers. £3750 Tel 01395 224645 / 07805 035133 (EXMOUTH) RS800 976. Very lightly used since new, covers, combi, very good condition, inland waters use only. £3900 Tel 07770 631346 / (CHEPSTOW)

GP14 13040. Rigged for racing. Full sized racing sails are in good condition but won’t win a Nationals. Recently re-roped. Over cover (good). Combi (good). Spars/rigging (good). 2 jibs - full size (good) and small. 2 mainsails – full sized Goacher (good) and small reefable. 2 spinnakers (average). £700 Tel 07815 710726 / 01325 247008 (DARLINGTON) LASER 2000 SAIL NO 21763. Built 2006. One owner from new. Includes new top cover, new toestraps, trailer, trolley, rudder bag. 2 suits sails. Clean boat well maintained and in good condition. Good boat for cruising, club racing or more. View Chichester or Woking area by arrangement. £3750 Tel 01483 488557 / 07786 111923 (CHICHESTER) PENULTIMATE I14 SAILS/FOILS/BOOM. Brand new Batt main, useable genoa, foils that need a bit of work to finish them off, and an aluminium boom. All from an OD14 (grand prix rig) Penultimate I14. Photos and more details here: http://www.facebook.com/ groups/dinghies/permalink/550786818294101/ and here: http://www.facebook.com/groups/dinghies/ permalink/550794951626621. Tel 01637 872684 / 07732 300627 (NEWQUAY) EUROPE SAIL NO USA112. Winner hull, Marstrom yellow band carbon mast, Marstrom carbon rudder stock, 2 North sails, trolley, cover. USA Olympic trials winner 2004. White hull, blue decks, minimum weight. Or Near Offer. £1500 Tel 01937 833386 / 07503 189980 (YORK) TRADITIONAL DAY BOAT - MANX YOLE. Black, GRP ‘clinker hull’ with Teak trim, red bottom, LOA 19 ft. Aluminium mast, tan sails and furling jib. Recent refit and road trailer service. Good inventory of warps, fenders, anchor. This is a lovely sailing family picnic / fishing boat. £3800 Tel 07793 528341 / (PORTSMOUTH) LASER FULL RIG SAIL (ROLLED) - BRAND NEW. Brand new laser full rig sail never been used. £350 Tel 07783 416048 / (CHICHESTER)

RS400 971 FAST AND READY TO RACE! Road base, Top and bottom covers, 4 jibs, 2 mains, 2 spinnakers, Spare rudder blade, New sheets and halyards, New slot gasket, (Add £225 to include a new Tacktick digital compass.) Raced competatively nationally. 30/12/2010 11:08 More info & pics http://apolloduck.net/307848. £3000 Tel 07794 871264 / (ELY) TOPPER 44999. Topper 44999 well looked after and very competitive. aluminium collapsible trolley, 2top covers 1undercover, 2x6:1 downhauls,3:1kicker with new rope, 4:1outhaul, new boom,other spars good condition. Foils good condition carbon tiller extension/spare. New toestrap and mainsheet ratchet block for the 2012 nationals. 3 sails 1 virtually new only used for nationals . £1300 Tel 07974665331 / 01915 369935 (SOUTH SHIELDS) 49ER GBR940 NEW RIG. New Style Rig 2 Mains, 2 Jibs, one training, one race set. 2 Kites. 1 old style jib. Carbon tillers. Professionally re-gripped and re-roped September 2012 for Nationals. Air tight hull. Trolley, trailer, top and bottom covers, mast bag, foil bag. Fully sorted boat. Sale due to crew moving away. . £6750 Tel 07824 338669 / (SOUTHAMPTON) TOPPER 43765. Turqoise hull.orange/purple/white sail (stored rolled). Spars and foils stored in bags. One owner. No trolley. £500 Tel 01732 359345 / (TONBRIDGE) MIRRIR DINGHY SPINNAKERS AND CHUTE. 2 off spinnakers , unbranded and unused one white yellow ,one green white , £50.00 plus £5 pp ea, unused trident type grp chute mouth £25.00 plus £7.50 pp . £50 Tel 07976 229665 / (GLASGOW) ENTERPRISE SAILING DINGHY 10493. Built 1965,Owned since 1967.Always dry stored. Varnished topsides & inner hull. Enamel exterior, original wooden mast. In almost original condition. Sails Jack Holt(C) Rockall(R). Transom & Elvestrom balers. Modern trailer-Snipe Combi, jockey & electrics in excellent condition. Ready to trail and sail. £550 Tel 01248 810170 / (BEAUMARIS) RS200 872. Light grey hull, the boat has comes with combi trailer, top and bottom cover, 2 spinnakers, 2 jibs and one main. Sad sale to to crew moving away. . £3500 Tel 07515 373087 / (FALMOUTH ) LASER 1 DINGHY COMPLETE READY TO RACE. In great condition for age 1980’s. Blue hull. Solid mast foot and water tight. Fast boat competitive with new ones. Ready to race, Launching trolley, 2 full rig sails, cover could do with replacing. . £500 Tel 07796 386125 / (KENDAL ) RS FEVA XL. Sail No 1468 XL main, jib, gennaker, foils with padded covers, trolley & top cover. . £1750 Tel 07813 799584 / (RINGWOOD) LASER FULL RIG SAIL - BRAND NEW. Brand new laser sail (rolled) with sail bag. Never been used. £350 Tel 07783 416048 / (CHICHESTER) LASER CARBON TILLER EXTENSION NEVER BEEN USED. Brand new 1.3 25mm diameter MB yachting Christchurch laser carbon tiller extension . £60 Tel 07783 416048 / (CHICHESTER) LASER CARBON TILLER NEVER BEEN USED. MB Yachting Christchurch laser carbon tiller, low profile with roller. £130 Tel 07783 416048 / (CHICHESTER) LASER 2000. Built 2002. New cover with extra long sides. New spinnaker. All the usual bits in good order. Launching trolley and trailer both with new wheels. . £2850 Tel 07415 486717 / (BRIXHAM) BOSS 777. Old and well used mast head kite New ish Jib tatty cover with launching trolley and road base. Sail or spares. £500 Tel 07879 235849 / (RUTLAND WATER) OPEN BIC SAILING DINGHY - GREAT CONDITION. Sail in great condition. The fast, planing hull of the O’pen BIC gives a dynamic sailing experience. See manacturers OpenBic website for more info. Search Open Bic on youtube Great internediate boat, step up from an optimist, will accept an opy rig. Similar to RS Tera. Rigs in 5 mins, yes 5 mins. Car toppable. Pictures available. £650 Tel 07714 672423 / (PRESTON) LASER II REGATTA. Sail No 8039. Very good condition. Turquoise/white. Launching trolley, 2 spinnakers, trapeze harness and new cover. £850 Tel 01208 880969 / (TRURO) MUSTO SKIFF GBR230. In good overall condition 30/12/2010 11:08 and well cared for. Sails in good crisp shape (blue 30/12/2010 11:08 spi)2 carbon tiller extensions, new top cover, bottom cover, tapered spi halyard and sheets. Rig and foil bags, trolley and new trailer Little used and kept tidy. Will deliver to Poole/sth coast. £5750 Tel 01534 851111 / 01534 448826 (POOLE)

Classifieds FEB (7).indd 96

August 2013

Yachts & Yachting

95


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38FT BRUCE ROBERTS (STEEL) YACHT. Extensive inventory, professionally built and fitted out teak interior, dry stored. used for single handed and family sailing, perfect for a live aboard. Will sell to the highest bidder over the asking price. £20000 Tel 07714 179531 / (NORThWICh) VERTUE 216 CRUISING YACHT. 26ft long keel sailing yacht built in 1994. strip-planked wood and epoxy resin hull, 10hp Yanmar Engine, 2 sets of sails, roller furling genoa and storm jib. Rigging spec means that solo sailing is possible. In good condition however cosmetically requires some general maintenance, please contact for more information. £8950 Tel 07861 240171 / (hARTlEPOOl) 3 MAN DINGHY (HONDA). 2.4 metre Air V-Floor (model T24-1E) 2012 Never used (RRP £775). light,fast and stable inflatable. £450 Tel 07775 598031 / 01189 745138 (lYmINGTON) YACHTSHARE - SAILORS WANTED. Opportunity to join new 2 or 3 person yachtshare for sailboat up to 40ft at circa £20K per share. Call Bob to discuss. £20000 Tel 07976 775059 / (lYmINGTON) BARIENT 24-45 2 SPEED CHROME WINCH. Chrome on bronze 2 speed sheet winch. 2 available, never fitted. height = 170mm, base = 160mm, drum = 90mm weight = 15Ibs. £300 Tel 01489 575847 / (WARsAsh) BARIENT 27C 2 SPEED WINCH. Barient 27c 2 speed chrome sheet winch, 2 available, as new, never fitted!, height = 175mm, base = 180mm, drum = 95mm, weight = 24Ibs. . £400 Tel 01489 575847 / (WARsAsh) BARIENT 22-39 CHROME 2 SPEED WINCH. New, never fitted to yacht, height = 163mm base = 150mm drum dia = 86mm weight = 13lbs. £250 Tel 01489 575847 / (WARsAsh) JIB 632 - CHERISHED CAR NUMBER PLATE. JIB 632 cherished car number plate for sale. Priced to sell. usual retail price of this type of number £1300£1400. On transfer document ready for immediate sale. Private seller. £799 Tel 07968 939373 / (ANYWhERE) £122.50 GIFT VOUCHER FOR SCOTSAIL TRAINING (RYA SAILING & POWER COURSES) FOR £80. A gift voucher for the value of £122.50 which can be used towards all yachting and power boating courses / experiences from scotsail Training in largs, Ayrshire. Valid until the end of 2013. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to get in touch. £80 Tel 01828 670389 / (BuRRElTON, PERThshIRE) AH07 BOY NUMBER PLATE. Available immediately. £1500 Tel 07785 575100 / (ANYWhERE) BARIENT 24-45 2 SPEED CHROME SELF TAILING WINCH. New, never fitted!! height = 190mm Base dia = 165mm Drum dia = 87mm Weight = 18lbs line entry 80mm line 8mm - 14mm . £480 Tel 01489 575847 / (WARsAsh) TOP 541L CAR REGISTRATION. Rare sailing related plate. 1973. Never allocated. might suit Olympic sailor or victorious Admiral of the Fleet. £20000 Tel 07931 773378 / (BOuRNEmOuTh) POWERED HEADSAIL FURLER. For sale due to cancelled project Powered headsail Furler. Custom made by Bamar for below deck fitting. Everything required for push button reefing and furling, 24volt system. Designed for max 100m2 sail. New, never installed and still in original packing cases. Retail value over £16,000. £12000 Tel 07966 098312 / (lYmINGTON)

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easy to assemble with tools and instructions supplied

ALSO NOTE

our roadbases/trolleys are usually compatible with most other units, call for details.

SAILS ?

CLOTHING ?

TRIDENT UK

TRIDENT UK

TRIDENT UK

.com

CHANDLERY ? .com

BOATCOVERS ? .com

TRIDENT UK

.com

.com

TRIDENT UK

DELIVERED FLAT PACKED


9.52pm

time for us to take you home after a great day out Time is the most precious thing you have – especially when it’s completely your own. A Suzuki outboard helps you make the most of every moment, thanks to the hours and passion our engineers put into developing our world-leading technology. Because we get the same satisfaction from creating our outboards as you do from using them.

suzuki-marine.co.uk

Yachts and Yachting August 2013  

Yachts and Yachting August 2013

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