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Chelsea Anderson 180 E 17th Street Brooklyn, NY 11226 518 528 0075 anderchelseam@gmail.com


Selected Works

01

CRAAM : Counter Reformation Art + Architecture Museu

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Re-Interpreting the Baroque: Book + Exhibit

03

Aguila Concert Hall

04

Current House

05

Buenos Aires Zoo

06

D151ortion Pavilion

07

Blue Rain

08

Arctic Flowers

09

GRIND Workspaces

10

Waterfront Penthouse


C.R.A.A.M.

Objective To analyze the underlying geometric framework of Baroque Architecture. The discovered geometry is reinterpreted, using parametric software to manipulate the pure forms from the past. Design The design of the Counter Reformation Art and Architecture Museum is centered around three light wells designating areas of circulation. The light wells are generated though the reinterpretation of the inscribed polygonal geometries found in the dome of Guarino Guarini’s Chapel of the Holy Shroud.


C.R.A.A.M.

Chapel of the Holy Shroud

Objective To analyze the underlying geometric framework of Baroque Architecture. The discovered geometry is reinterpreted, using parametric software to manipulate the pure forms from the past. Design The design of the Counter Reformation Art and Architecture Museum is centered around three light wells designating areas of circulation. The light wells are generated though the reinterpretation of the inscribed polygonal geometries found in the dome of Guarino Guarini’s Chapel of the Holy Shroud.

Governing Geometry


0π/2π

0π/2π

0π/2π

0π/2π

2π/5

s s

r

R

R

R

r

r

R

s

2π/6

2π/7

R

0π/2π

0π/2π

0π/2π

r

2π/8

s

r

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r

s R

r

2π/9

2π/4

2π/3

s s 1π

0π/2π

2π/5

0π/2π

0π/2π

2π/5 2π/5 + 2π/5/2

0π/2π

2π/5

0π/2π

2π/5

0π/2π

2π/5

0π/2π

2π/5 2π/5 + 2π/5/2

2π/5 + 2π/5/2

2π/5 + 2π/5/2

2π/5 + 2π/5/2

2π/5 2π/5 + 2π/5/2

L=1 h=2 s=3

L=1 h=2 s=4

L=1 h=2 s=5

L=1 h=2 s=6

L=1 h=2 s=7

L=1 h=2 s=8

L=1 h=2 s=9

Scripted Geometry

Transverse Section


C.R.A.A.M.

Objective To analyze the underlying geometric framework of Baroque Architecture. The discovered geometry is reinterpreted, using parametric software to manipulate the pure forms from the past. Design The design of the Counter Reformation Art and Architecture Museum is centered around three light wells designating areas of circulation. The light wells are generated though the reinterpretation of the inscribed polygonal geometries found in the dome of Guarino Guarini’s Chapel of the Holy Shroud.


Reinterpreting the Baroque

Objective To examine the governing geometries of S. Andrea al Quirnale by Baroque artist and architect Gian Lorenzo Bernini. The atypical elliptical plan and embedded radial chapels are integrated into the structure and composition. Spatial and visual effects are revealed through solid-void relationships and interior-exterior duality. Design The book documents the analysis of Baroque works conducted during the Fall 2007 Roman Studies Program at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The images provided are from the chapter dedicated to the investigation of S. Andrea al Quirnale.


Reinterpreting the Baroque

Objective To examine the governing geometries of S. Andrea al Quirnale by Baroque artist and architect Gian Lorenzo Bernini. The atypical elliptical plan and embedded radial chapels are integrated into the structure and composition. Spatial and visual effects are revealed through solid-void relationships and interior-exterior duality. Design The book documents the analysis of Baroque works conducted during the Fall 2007 Roman Studies Program at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The images provided are from the chapter dedicated to the investigation of S. Andrea al Quirnale.


x= Cos( X* (t + Sin(t*iCount*2)/iCount )) * dDistance

y= Sin( X* (t + Sin(t*iCount*2)/iCount )) * dDistance *0.7 x= Cos( X* t + Sin(t*iCount*2)/iCount ) * dDistance

y= Sin( X* t + Sin(t*iCount*2)/iCount ) * dDistance *0.7

X=2 X=3 X=4 X=5 X=6 X=7 X=8 X=9

Governing Geometry

Scripted Geometry


1550 1550

S. Andrea al Quirinale

1598 Gian Lorenzo Bernini

1600 1600

Gian Lorenzo Bernini

S. Andrea al Quirinale

General Information

Project: S. Andrea al Qurininale Architect(s): Gianlorenzo Bernini Additional Training: Sculpter, Painter, Playwright, Stage Designer, Actor Work Started: 1658 Work Completed: 1678 Comissioned by: Pope Alexander VII & Cardinal Camillo Pamphilj Comissioned for: Jesuit Seminary Location: Qurinal Hill, Rome, Italy Materials: White Marble, Grey- Blue Bardiglio, White Carrara Marble, Red-White Cottanello Marble, Stucco, Sicilian Jasper , Gold Other Significant Works: 1623-1624 David 1627-1647 Tomb of Urban VII 1633-42 Baldacchin, San Pietro 1642-43 Triton Fountain, Piazza Barberini 1645-52 Cornaro Chapel, with Ecstasy of Santa Theresa, Santa Maria della Victotoria 1648-51 Four Rivers Fountain, Piaza Navona 1654-1670 Constaintine 1658-1678 St. Andrea al Quirinale 1663-66 Scala Regia, Vatican 1666-67 Elephant with Oblisk, Piazza Santa Maria soprea Minerva 1671-1678 Tomb of Alexander VII

Gian Lorenzo Bernini

(Right) View of Via XX Setembre and the church before the widening & lowering of the road. (Below) Plan Progression of S. Andrea al Quirinale (01)Original pentagon plan of the church, Bernini (02)Oval plan church on the first chirograph records, Bernini (03) Section of oval church on first chirograph, Bernini (04) Church floor plan as it exists today

01 Tomb of Urban VII 1647 1628 St. Longinus 1629 - 1638 1680

Cornaro Chapel 1645 - 1652 Constantine, San Pietro 1670 1654 S.Andrea al Qurinale 1678 1658 Tomb of Alexander VII 1671 - 1678

1650 1650

In Italy, from the 17th to the early 18th century, the Baroque period emerged transforming the city of Rome through the unity of arts. The Baroque style integrated painting, sculpture and architecture into a collaborative whole providing new spatial relationships, leading to the development of “naturalistic illusionism.” This technique provides the physical and emotional engagement of a person, defining human life and actions through pictorial methods and volumetric detail. (“Baroque) Gianlorenzo Bernini (1598-1680) was the dominating figure of the Italian Baroque period leaving his mark in both sculpture and architecture providing a creation of theatricality, a sense of energy and the movement of forms. His style takes form in Sant’Andrea al Quirinale, a small church in which Bernini creates a stage to present the life of its patron Saint Andrew, from martyrdom to his assent into heaven, becoming Bernini’s culminating work of the Baroque period.

1700 1700

Bernini began his career under his father’s training, Pietro Bernini (1562-1629), a Florentine sculptor who moved his family to Rome. In Rome, Gianlorenzo Bernini gained exclusive patronage from Cardinal Borghese, producing early sculptures such as the David from 1622 to 1625. The works created for the cardinal gained papal attention leading to works commissioned by Papal authority including Urban VII, Innocent X, and Alexander VII; giving Bernini authority over the design of churches, chapels, tombs, monuments, fountains, and other works sponsored by papal patronage. In 1629, Bernini became the official architect of St. Peter’s, contributing works such as the Baldacchino, the cathedra, the elliptical piazza, and the Scala Regia. Over his career Bernini developed a new mode of architecture using white and richly colored marbles, bronze and stucco to create a link between architecture and sculpture. . This synthesis is actualized in Bernini’s design of churches, San Tomaso di Villa Nova at Castelgandolfo and Santa Maria dell’Assunzione at Ariccia. However his methods of merging architecture and sculpture to create a sense of theatricality was not

(Above) S. Andrea as it stands today. (Left) Major monuments to the left and right of the church on Via XX Settembre. (Below) Relationship of the facade to the piazza and the street, today (Bottom) Detail of the porch roof and princely coat of arms

02 fully developed until the designing of Sant’Andrea al Qurinale. (Bernini) The church was first commissioned by Pope Innocent X in 1647. Boromini was to design the plan however the Jesuit’s believed that the church would be too sumptuous for the poverty of the order; the church was later rejected by the Pope because it would have obstructed views to the Qurinale garden from the Papal palace. (Marder) However the plan for Sant’Andrea al Quirinale was later approved under the papacy of Alexander VII. The project was re-commissioned by the Jesuit Order and Pope Alexander VII under the patronage of Prince Pamphili, a former papal nephew. The order was responsible for the shell of the church while the prince was to fund the interior ornamentation. The church was designed to be even more ornate than the plan previously proposed by Boromini, however the order approved of the design, considering the interior decoration to be a gift from a wealthy patron. The order determined the design to be the physical manifestation of the Jesuit order’s motto, for the greater glory of God. (Magnuson) The Pope approved of the church in order to better the image of the Quirnal Hill and to take on the overflow of people from the chapel located inside the adjacent palace.

03

Sant’ Andrea al Qurinale is located on the Qurinale Hill, an area that was scarcely urbanized until the late nineteenth century. The Qurinal hill was the original site of the Baths of Constantine and two temples, one dedicated to Semo Sancus Dius Fidus (446BC) and the other dedicated to Mars, the Roman god of war. (Quirinal) The positioning of these ancient masses was maintained by building the Palazzo del Qurinale and its surrounding buildings creating a large piazza space which serves as its own Belevedere, offering views to the Vatican City and the surrounding areas of Rome. The Palazzo was begun in the late sixteenth century, commissioned by Pope Gregory XIII as a summer home for the papal authority. (Qurinal) The palace remained an apostolic residence until September 20, 1870 during the unification of Italy and the over throw of papal power in Rome. Presently Palazzo del Qurinale is the residence of the President of Italy and houses all the functions of the main government.The Jesuit Noviate acquired property on the Quirinale Hill in 1566, located on the former via Pia (currently Via XX Settembre). The noviate gained the land in order to build a teaching institution as well as a small rectangular church with four apses. The construction of the church began in 1658; however the existing plan was not completed until 1676 with decoration continuing into the early eighteenth century. Bernini’s original proposal was a pentagon plan in order to equally disperse the five chapels requested by the order. The chapels would be located at the points of the polygon with an entrance on the flat side.(Marder) Taking from the beliefs of Renaissance theorists, Bernini’s second proposal was adopted; an oval plan with its long axis parallel to the street. It was domed in order to create a perfect form for a church. The first dome was completed in 1659 with compartments located between high narrow windows. Alterations to the original dome occurred from 1660 to 1672.

The oculus was opened and capped with an oval shaped lantern. The windows were reduced in scale after determining the amount of natural light that entered the church through the lantern. The initial compartments of the dome were neutralized and replaced by embellishment. The plan of the church is unusual for the Baroque period. The oval plan was easily manipulated to adhere to the requests of the order and the pope. The church provided a new entrance to the novitiate and a small piazza created by a setback initiated by the order and the pope. The pope further set back the church; compressing the plan in order to maintain views to the Qurinal Gardens. The oval was primarily seen as the synthesis between the longitudinal and central plan typologies, providing a centralized space with a major axis. Bernini completely undermines the advantage of the ovular plan by flipping its axis and and terminating the longitudinal, major axis with heavy pilasters. This discontinuation of the axis gives a heightened sense of enclosure, giving less emphasis on the major axis. The pilasters are flanked on both sides by two large chapels, each dedicated to a Jesuit saint of the sixteenth century, St. Francis Xavier, St. Ignatius, St. Francis Borgia, and St. Aloysius. (Hager) The chapels are connected diagonally creating the geometry of St. Andrew’s cross, symbolizing Andrew’s crucifixion taking place in the center high altar painting of the church. The orientation of the plan gave Bernini two advantages; it fit in correctly with the constraints of the site while creating a central vantage point. This is the point at which the room reveals itself, causing an initial preparation and pause before being pushed into the performance of St. Andrew’s martyrdom and assent into heaven, the drama created through the combination of painting, sculpture and architecture into a unified whole.

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Chelsea Anderson & Mike Visovsky

Chelsea Anderson & Mike Visovsky

S. Andrea al Quirinale

Gian Lorenzo Bernini

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Chelsea Anderson & Mike Visovsky

S. Andrea al Quirinale

Governing Geometry

Gian Lorenzo Bernini

Elevation The double facade is composed of two distinct orders. The colossal order flanking the outer edges of the facade is embedded with a semi-circular portico proportionally at a one to two ratio. The facade is flattened onto the drum of the cylindrical exterior. This conceals the drum and the dome contained within it. Scrolls are extended from the upper drum to the mid level of the facade in order to provide a buttressing system for the dome. Wing walls extend from the exterior to provide a direct connection with the surrounding city. The raised entrance creates the feeling of a stage as you enter the church.

01 Sub AddPolarSinePolyline() ‘Script for Rhino v4 to add a polar sine graph ‘created by Jess Maertterer 21.09.2007 ‘modified by Chelsea Anderson 13.10.2007 05 Dim intWaveCount ’variable intWaveCount = 1 ’determines number of waves in the sin curve

10

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Dim i ‘counter for loop Dim t ‘angle

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The section was devised through the halving of the existing floor plan, placing it vertical in order to create the section of the dome. The height of the lower cornice level and the entire height of the building is related in a one to two ratio. The church is broken up into two specific zones, the dome and the lower realm, the heavenly and earthly zones respectively. The pilasters of the lower level continue into the upper area in order to create ribs which diminish in size as they approach the oculus. The ribs break at the cornice level, giving them the symbolic appearance of radiating light.

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Chelsea Anderson & Mike Visovsky

Dim dDistance ‘Distance of our line Dim x, y, z ‘coordinates

20

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Section

Dim intPointCount ‘zerobased number of points intPointCount = 360 ‘determines number of control points created in array Dim arrPoints ‘array of points for the polyline ReDim arrPoints(intPointCount) ’redimention array as interpoint count

Plan The oval plan is usually a compromise between the longitudinal and central church plan typologies. Bernini undermines the advantage of the oval church by terminating the longitudinal axis. The axis is stopped strongly with large pilasters. Each of these pilasters is flanked on either side with a chapel dedicated to a patron saint of the Jesuit order. The axes connecting these side chapels create the cross of St. Andrew, the patron saint of the church.

The enclosure of the church is created by the carving of inner chapels into the thick exterior walls of the church. These thick walls serves to support the dome and to conceal the dome from the exterior facade, The plan is created using simple platonic shapes, the circle and the triangle. The circle determines the outer bounds of the ellipse located on the inner wall of the exterior , and also determines the shape of the main apse space and the four smaller apses flanking the main apse and the entrance. The placement of the chapels is determined by creating thirty, sixty, and ninety degree connections between the foci of the ellipse. The longitudinal axis of the church is terminated by two colossal pilasters, causing the transverse axis to be the main axis of the church. Entry on the transverse produces less emphasis on the longitudinal axis and creates a central vantage point within the church. The small church allows the spectator into the scene described by the ornate decoration of the interior.

For i=0 To intPointCount ‘Loop to calc point positions t= (2*Rhino.Pi/intPointCount)*i ‘angle for each point dDistance = ( Sin(t*intWaveCount) + 2.345 ) ’definition of the variable x= 1.4* Cos(t) * dDistance ’defines line in the x direction y= Sin(t) * dDistance ’defines line in the y direction z= 0 ’defines line in the z direction arrPoints(i)= Array(x,y,z) ’command arrays points around the ellipse Next ’completes the “for” statement loop Dim strPolyline ‘identifier of the line strPolyline = Rhino.AddPolyline (arrPoints) ’creates the polyline Rhino.SelectObject strPolyline ’selects object created by rhino (not mandatory)

End Sub ’end of script 35 AddPolarSinePolyline()

The raised entry way on the transverse axis further creates a stage like atmosphere. Lighting Lighting within the church causes a feeling of infinite space through a contrast in shadow. The main space is blanketed in bright light from the lantern and the windows above the ring of the dome. The chapels are shrouded in shadow , giving them the appearance of boundless spaces embedded into the thick walls of the exterior. There is also a contrast in light between the zones of the church. The heavenly zone or the dome is filled with direct light while natural light slowly filters down to the early realm below the cornices. The five large chapels are lit with a hidden clerestory giving off a highly radiant or divine light while openings leading to the sacristy and the noviate are absorbed in a much more intense lighting condition.

Chelsea Anderson & Mike Visovsky

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Chelsea Anderson & Mike Visovsky


S. Andrea al Quirinale

General Information

Gian Lorenzo Bernini

General Information (Top left) Entrance Canopy, Sea shell symbolic of St Andrew (Fisherman) (Bottom left) Two of the four chapels in the main space (Right) Facade today

Map of context before the construction of the church. The Quirinale Hill at the time was largely undeveloped and the main buildings in the area were the beginnings of the palace and the novitiate. The other spaces were occupied by walled gardens and farm land, some of the gardens survive today. Even earlier than this map there were the Baths of Constantine and two Roman temples in the general area.

Map of context during the construction of the church. The church went through many phases of design but the surrounding area remained the same as before. Some land had been turned into urban fabric with the widening of roads.

The sacred opera begins at the apse chapel with a painting of Andrew’s crucifixion. The altar painting executed by Guillaume Courtois (1668) showing the apostle nailed to an X shaped cross or the cross of St. Andrew. In the foreground women gather to grieve as cupid waits on a cloud above. The scene is continued beyond the frame with sculpture of radiating light, bronze relief sculpture by Giovanni Renaldi. (Hager) The relief also depicts angels and cherubim ready to guide the saint’s soul to heaven. Diffuse light radiates through a concealed lantern in order to give the appearance of a heavenly glow. This occurs in all five of the radiating chapels. Altar pieces and paintings disguise the small fan openings in the massive exterior walls in order to create an internal radiation of ambient light, creating a mysterious glow over frescoed walls and stucco angels. The use of light blurs the boundaries of each chapel, widening the space along the minor axis. The lantern over the dome emits the most light causing the eye to wander upward into the dome. The contrast of light between the dome, main space, apse and side chapels causes the space to feel limitless. (Fokker)

Map of context at the present day. Today Rome is a dense urban fabric even on the Quirinale Hill. The spaces all around the church were built up. The only surviving green space is in the two walled gardens to either side of the complex and in the Quirinale Palace.

The scene of Andrew is pushed vertically into the dome through a series of rhythmical succession, two arcades and a flat entablature which lead up to the expanding high altar aedicule. On top of the high altar a statue of St. Andrew’s soul by Antonio Raggi appears on the broken pediment, floating on a cloud into the golden dome. A ring of angels and fishermen surround the upper windows, serving as a chorus to the main protagonist. (Hager) The scene concludes in the lantern with the image of the dove, depicting the Holy Spirit and light which encompasses the entire space.

(Above) Interior, statue of S. Andrea and the dome above (Right) View of high altar from the entrance

Chelsea Anderson & Mike Visovsky

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However the disjointed facade takes on the leading role of masking the dome, causing a rhythmic build up of spaces as the interior is approached. The larger of the two is characterized by the colossal Corinthian order. The smaller is embedded within the embrace of the colossal order. Both are placed proportionally within each other. The elevated stair creates a stage leading to the story of St. Andrew. The giant pilasters create a transition between the façade and the cylindrical curved wall behind it. The contrasting curvature of the exterior further emphasizes the feeling of the stage. Wing walls embrace the road while the remaining mass is separated from its audience. (The wing walls were later reduced when Via Pia was widened.)

The interior elevation is early Baroque in style, high archways open into dim chapels while narrower doorways provide entry into secondary rooms. The interior is pierces with rectangular openings while side chapels are carved into the thick mass of the exterior wall. (Fokker)

The church of Sant’Andrea al Qurinale sets the stage for the Baroque works which were created in the remaining years of the period. Bernini creates a sense of theatricality through the creation of a stage, depicting the story of a saint as his soul ascends into the heavenly realm. He is able to push a person into the story, becoming a character as the classical interior is transformed into a sacred opera. Bernini creates his own mixture of sculpture, painting and architecture which envelops a person physically and emotionally. “Bernini explained to his son Domenico, “This is the only piece of architecture for which I feel special satisfaction from the depth of my heart; often when I need to rest my troubles I come here to find consolation in my work.” (Scribner, 204)

The exterior of the church is simple compared to the ornate interior. The simplicity of the façade is essential to creating monumentality at a modest scale. (Magnuson) Bernini’s simplistic form is influenced by church facades of of the earlier Renaissance period. The elevation is composed of two facades. The facades are built to the round wall of the church, causing the facade to feel detached from the remaining mass.

Chelsea Anderson & Mike Visovsky

S. Andrea al Quirinale

Gian Lorenzo Bernini

Script on next page:

r1 r

F1

Parametric Variations

x= Cos(X*(t + Sin(t*iCount*2)/iCount )) * dDistance

r2 F2

C 2c 2a major axis (1.4)

2b

minor axis (1)

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The following is derived from varying two lines of script: 34 & 35 respectively.

0π/2π

Here the interior and exterior meet and are pushed onto each other creating a positive and negative relationship. However the interior and exterior form a homogenous entity, the façade subtly reveals the character of the space behind it. (Wittkower)

Chelsea Anderson & Mike Visovsky

Scripted Geometry The first step in making an ellipse is to take a Cartesian line and array it around a central point. This leads to a Cartesian circle. The circle is an integral part of the geometry of S. Andrea because it forms the ratio the ellipse that governs the main space of the church. The ellipse in S. Andrea is formed by stretching the horizontal axis by 1.4 times the vertical axis.

The story is further emphasized through the use of material. The church is segmented into two zones. The lower zone is characterized by rich heavy marbles linking the lower portion below the cornice to the ground or an earthbound realm. Classical unity and proportions are created through the use of textures and colors (marbles, bronze and gold) and controlled through repetition, form and the distribution of light. The dome is ornamented with gold and stucco, reflects light becoming Bernini’s interpretation of the heavenly realm. The dome matches the interior ground plan perimeter of the ellipse. Ten ribs correspond with the pilasters bellowing, springing from the entablature which separate the lower and upper zones of the church. The ribbing becomes another interpretation of light rays. Compartments between the ribs are filled with hexagonal coffers which diminish in size toward the oculus. Each coffer is decorated with a different flower as cherubim look on to the scene developing below. The coffered ornamentation of the dome is representative of ancient Rome while the ribbing is characteristic of the medieval period. ( Rizzoli)

y= Sin(X*(t + Sin(t*iCount*2)/iCount )) * dDistance *0.7

x= Cos(X*t + Sin(t*iCount*2)/iCount ) * dDistance

y= Sin(X*t + Sin(t*iCount*2)/iCount ) * dDistance *0.7

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Script to the left:

From there the ellipse can be modified by changing the line (07) of script: intWaveCount from 2 to 10, in incriments of 1. This begins to hint towards the ten chapel spaces that surround the main space of the church. In the script in the right column (the original script on next page before the parametric variations), the apses are more clearly defined and become more like the actual church. This is basically the same variation as the first ellipse except for the script asks for the amount of “apse” spaces. In this script the same numbers are entered from 2 to 10 in increments of one, when the script prompts: EnterCount:. This variation is shown in the “radius” of the short side of each increment.

4

01 Sub GuariniShapes_A() ’begins script ‘Script for Rhino v4 to add a polar (circular) polyline ‘created by Jess Maertterer 21.09.2007 ‘modified by Chelsea Anderson 05 Dim intPointCount ‘zerobased number of points intPointCount =360 ‘determines number of control points created in array

2 5

X=2

X=3

Dim iCount ‘variable 10 ‘the following allows the desired number of “knobs” ‘to be entered after the script has run

3 6

15 4

20

iCount = Rhino.GetInteger(“Enter Count”,6,2) ’definition of variable If IsNull (iCount) Then Exit Sub ‘conditional statemnt ‘if i count is null/doesn’t exist then exit the entire script ‘ then exit the entire script

X=4

Dim arrPoints ‘array of points for the polyline ReDim arrPoints(intPointCount) ’redimention array as inter point count

7

Dim dDistance ‘Distance of our line/variable Dim x, y, z ‘coordinates

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6

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X=5

Dim i ‘counter for loop Dim t ‘angle For i=0 To intPointCount ‘Loop to calc point positions t= (2*Rhino.Pi/intPointCount)*i ‘angle for each point dDistance = Cos(t*iCount) + iCount ‘definition of the variable

X=6

‘the following creates points which are arrayed around an ellipse ‘modified equation of an ellipse 35

7

x= Cos(t + Sin(t*iCount*2)/iCount ) * dDistance ’defines line in the x direction y= Sin(t + Sin(t*iCount*2)/iCount ) * dDistance *0.7 ‘defines line in the y direction

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X=7

40 z= 0 ’defines line in the z direction

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arrPoints(i)= Array(x,y,z) ’command arrays points around the ellipse Next ‘completes the “for” statement loop X=8

45 ‘the following connects the points created by the array 9

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Dim strPolyline ‘identifier of the line strPolyline = Rhino.AddPolyline (arrPoints) ’creates the polyline Rhino.SelectObject strPolyline ‘selects object created by rhino (not mandatory) End Sub ‘end script GuariniShapes_A()

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Chelsea Anderson & Mike Visovsky

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Chelsea Anderson & Mike Visovsky

X=9

Chelsea Anderson & Mike Visovsky

072


Aguila Concert Hall

Objective To explore the process of design development, taking a pre-existing professional schematic design from a past competition submission and developing the design both conceptually and technically through drawings, renderings and models. Design The initial design scheme for the Congress and Concert Hall in Aguila, Spain was conceived by Estudio Barozzi Veiga. Through a process of subtraction, the design was modiďŹ ed to enhance the schematic design, creating spaces that vary in volume and scale.


Aguila Concert Hall

Objective To explore the process of design development, taking a pre-existing professional schematic design from a past competition submission and developing the design both conceptually and technically through drawings, renderings and models. Design The initial design scheme for the Congress and Concert Hall in Aguila, Spain was conceived by Estudio Barozzi Veiga. Through a process of subtraction, the design was modiďŹ ed to enhance the schematic design, creating spaces that vary in volume and scale.


Transverse Section


Aguila Concert Hall

Transverse Section

Objective To explore the process of design development, taking a pre-existing professional schematic design from a past competition submission and developing the design both conceptually and technically through drawings, renderings and models. Design The initial design scheme for the Congress and Concert Hall in Aguila, Spain was conceived by Estudio Barozzi Veiga. Through a process of subtraction, the design was modiďŹ ed to enhance the schematic design, creating spaces that vary in volume and scale.

Longitudinal Section


Current House

Objective To create a residence that provides opportunities for sustainable living practices. The house’s location on the Arkansas River is ideal for passive ventilation while providing the residents with scenic views. Design The current house was developed using a unique set of design criteria and site constraints. The client provided a distinct list of programmatic requirements along with a request for a smooth elevation. The site, directly adjacent to the Arkansas River, is located within a deďŹ ned ood zone that elevates the build-able ground plane approximately ten feet, allowing substantial views of the surrounding area. The house takes on the traditional dog trot typology with a contemporary twist. It mediates between the interior and exterior through its folded form, creating unique public and private juxtapositions.


Current House

West Elevation

Objective To create a residence that provides opportunities for sustainable living practices. The house’s location on the Arkansas River is ideal for passive ventilation while providing the residents with scenic views. Design The current house was developed using a unique set of design criteria and site constraints. The client provided a distinct list of programmatic requirements along with a request for a smooth elevation. The site, directly adjacent to the Arkansas River, is located within a deďŹ ned ood zone that elevates the build-able ground plane approximately ten feet, allowing substantial views of the surrounding area. The house takes on the traditional dog trot typology with a contemporary twist. It mediates between the interior and exterior through its folded form, creating unique public and private juxtapositions.

East Elevation

North Elevation

South Elevation


Level 00

Level 01

Level 02

Level 03


Buenos Aires Zoo

Objective All that is horizontally moving in a typical zoo has been translated vertically into tubes. This shift in the normative provides an opportunity to push the boundary between the exhibitor and the exhibited, creating a voyeuristic environment in which workers’, visitors’ and animals’ activities are put on display. Their actions are not only exposed to each other but also to the surrounding city, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Design The proposed urban zoo has been redefined placing all back of house staging and prep areas into vertical tube structures. Exhibits and habitats are manipulated and arranged according to the animal’s movements and land use. The open plan concept enables unique visual experiences.


+23: roof 1176 m2 @ +108m

+22: mechanical 786 m2 @ +104m

+21: restaurant 786 m2 @ +96m

+20: aviary 835 m2 @ +92m

+19: armadillo 285 m2 @ +88m

+18: lion 415 m2 @ +84m

+17: meerkat 350 m2 @ +80m

+16: hyena 678 m2 @ +76m

+15: panda 406 m2 @ +72m

+14: lemur 553 m2 @ +68m

+13: vizcacha 407 m2 @ +64m

+12: koala 574 m2 @ +60m

+11: crocodile 370 m2 @ +56m

+10: anteater 561 m2 @ +52m

+09: orangutan 414 m2 @ +48m

+08: bengal tiger 369 m2 @ +44m

+07: leopard 675 m2 @ +40m

+06: tapir 441 m2 @ +36m

+05: squirrel monkey 948 m2 @ +32m

+04: education 948 m2 @ +24m

+03: administration 948 m2 @ +20m

+02: veterinary 948 m2 @ +16m

+01: ticketing 884 m2 @ +8m

00: boardwalk 858 m2 @ 0m

Transverse Section


Buenos Aires Zoo

Objective All that is horizontally moving in a typical zoo has been translated vertically into tubes. This shift in the normative provides an opportunity to push the boundary between the exhibitor and the exhibited, creating a voyeuristic environment in which workers’, visitors’ and animals’ activities are put on display. Their actions are not only exposed to each other but also to the surrounding city, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Design The proposed urban zoo has been redefined placing all back of house staging and prep areas into vertical tube structures. Exhibits and habitats are manipulated and arranged according to the animal’s movements and land use. The open plan concept enables unique visual experiences.


+23: roof 1176 m2 @ +108m

+22: mechanical 786 m2 @ +104m

+21: restaurant 786 m2 @ +96m

+20: aviary 835 m2 @ +92m

+19: armadillo 285 m2 @ +88m

+18: lion 415 m2 @ +84m

+17: meerkat 350 m2 @ +80m

+16: hyena 678 m2 @ +76m

+15: panda 406 m2 @ +72m

+14: lemur 553 m2 @ +68m

+13: vizcacha 407 m2 @ +64m

+12: koala 574 m2 @ +60m

+11: crocodile 370 m2 @ +56m

+10: anteater 561 m2 @ +52m

+09: orangutan 414 m2 @ +48m

+08: bengal tiger 369 m2 @ +44m

+07: leopard 675 m2 @ +40m

+06: tapir 441 m2 @ +36m

+05: squirrel monkey 948 m2 @ +32m

Tubular Variations +04: education 948 m2 @ +24m

+03: administration

grassland

horizontal range of motion max travel height

948 m2 @ +20m

dry, hot

seasonal forest moderate, temperate

vertical range of motion

+02: veterinary 948 m2 @ +16m

individual animal height max travel depth

tropical forest humid, cool

+01: ticketing 884 m2 @ +8m

00: boardwalk 858 m2 @ 0m

giant anteater squirrel monkey

leopard orangutan

bengal tiger crocodile

koala tapir

lemur vizcacha

spotted hyena panda

lion meerkat

Animal Distribution Logic

armadillo

Transverse Section


D151ortion Pavilion

Objective The D151ortion Pavilion is an architectural device to transform our experience of sound and light. It explores the potentials of parametric design, is informed by material logic, and is inspired by the urban experience. Design The pavilion is the result of a transatlantic collaboration between architecture students from the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture in Copenhagen, Denmark and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute School of Architecture in Troy, New York. The group produced an innovative sound installation for the most progressive international music festival: The Copenhagen Distortion Music Festival.


D151ortion Pavilion

Objective The D151ortion Pavilion is an architectural device to transform our experience of sound and light. It explores the potentials of parametric design, is informed by material logic, and is inspired by the urban experience. Design The pavilion is the result of a transatlantic collaboration between architecture students from the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture in Copenhagen, Denmark and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute School of Architecture in Troy, New York. The group produced an innovative sound installation for the most progressive international music festival: The Copenhagen Distortion Music Festival.

Chuck Geometry


D151ortion Pavilion

Objective The D151ortion Pavilion is an architectural device to transform our experience of sound and light. It explores the potentials of parametric design, is informed by material logic, and is inspired by the urban experience. Design The pavilion is the result of a transatlantic collaboration between architecture students from the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture in Copenhagen, Denmark and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute School of Architecture in Troy, New York. The group produced an innovative sound installation for the most progressive international music festival: The Copenhagen Distortion Music Festival.


Hexagon Cone Configuration

Structural Diagram

Cone Configuration Diagram


D151ortion Pavilion

Objective The D151ortion Pavilion is an architectural device to transform our experience of sound and light. It explores the potentials of parametric design, is informed by material logic, and is inspired by the urban experience. Design The pavilion is the result of a transatlantic collaboration between architecture students from the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture in Copenhagen, Denmark and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute School of Architecture in Troy, New York. The group produced an innovative sound installation for the most progressive international music festival: The Copenhagen Distortion Music Festival.


D151ortion Pavilion

Objective The D151ortion Pavilion is an architectural device to transform our experience of sound and light. It explores the potentials of parametric design, is informed by material logic, and is inspired by the urban experience. Design The pavilion is the result of a transatlantic collaboration between architecture students from the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture in Copenhagen, Denmark and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute School of Architecture in Troy, New York. The group produced an innovative sound installation for the most progressive international music festival: The Copenhagen Distortion Music Festival.


Blue Rain

Objective The installation called for a series of hand-blown colored glass vessels to be suspended within a public stair tower as a major design attraction. Custom designed for a world-renowned corporate client in Abu Dhabi, this unique architectural installation took advantage of the natural light from skylight above to produce spectacular luminous effects. Design Designed to function as an art piece in this context, the glass and stainless steel cable assembly unit was produced in three different shades of blue. In addition a mirrored finish was applied to half of the pieces in order to introduce highly reflective surface effects alongside the transparent vessels.


Blue Rain

Objective The installation called for a series of hand-blown colored glass vessels to be suspended within a public stair tower as a major design attraction. Custom designed for a world-renowned corporate client in Abu Dhabi, this unique architectural installation took advantage of the natural light from skylight above to produce spectacular luminous effects. Design Designed to function as an art piece in this context, the glass and stainless steel cable assembly unit was produced in three different shades of blue. In addition a mirrored finish was applied to half of the pieces in order to introduce highly reflective surface effects alongside the transparent vessels.


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Blue Rain

Objective The installation called for a series of hand-blown colored glass vessels to be suspended within a public stair tower as a major design attraction. Custom designed for a world-renowned corporate client in Abu Dhabi, this unique architectural installation took advantage of the natural light from skylight above to produce spectacular luminous effects. Design Designed to function as an art piece in this context, the glass and stainless steel cable assembly unit was produced in three different shades of blue. In addition a mirrored finish was applied to half of the pieces in order to introduce highly reflective surface effects alongside the transparent vessels.

Stair Tower Elevations


Blue Rain

Objective The installation called for a series of hand-blown colored glass vessels to be suspended within a public stair tower as a major design attraction. Custom designed for a world-renowned corporate client in Abu Dhabi, this unique architectural installation took advantage of the natural light from skylight above to produce spectacular luminous effects. Design Designed to function as an art piece in this context, the glass and stainless steel cable assembly unit was produced in three different shades of blue. In addition a mirrored finish was applied to half of the pieces in order to introduce highly reflective surface effects alongside the transparent vessels.

Cable Locations

Assembly Diagram

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DP


Blue Rain

Objective The installation called for a series of hand-blown colored glass vessels to be suspended within a public stair tower as a major design attraction. Custom designed for a world-renowned corporate client in Abu Dhabi, this unique architectural installation took advantage of the natural light from skylight above to produce spectacular luminous effects. Design Designed to function as an art piece in this context, the glass and stainless steel cable assembly unit was produced in three different shades of blue. In addition a mirrored finish was applied to half of the pieces in order to introduce highly reflective surface effects alongside the transparent vessels.


Arctic Flowers

Objective The competition submission for the Nashville Music City Center called for a spectacular architectural installation to suspend below a ceiling within a major public entry lobby .The installation was designed to reect light from all directions, to make it easy to assemble and offer a memorable experience for countless visitors to this major performing arts center building. Design Roto-cast plastic modular packing units are fastened together with mechanical fasteners and industrial epoxies to create the suspended ceiling system.


Arctic Flowers

Objective The competition submission for the Nashville Music City Center called for a spectacular architectural installation to suspend below a ceiling within a major public entry lobby .The installation was designed to reect light from all directions, to make it easy to assemble and offer a memorable experience for countless visitors to this major performing arts center building. Design Roto-cast plastic modular packing units are fastened together with mechanical fasteners and industrial epoxies to create the suspended ceiling system.


Polygon B Polygon A

Polygon A

10 3/4”

11 1/2”

6 1/2”


Arctic Flowers

Branch Accessories Outline of Ceiling Membrane

Typical Cross Bracing

1 2 3

4 5 6 7

Center Line of Spirals

Existing Concrete Column

Underlying Line Work - Plan

Spiral Unit

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Objective The competition submission for the Nashville Music City Center called for a spectacular architectural installation to suspend below a ceiling within a major public entry lobby .The installation was designed to reect light from all directions, to make it easy to assemble and offer a memorable experience for countless visitors to this major performing arts center building. Design Roto-cast plastic modular packing units are fastened together with mechanical fasteners and industrial epoxies to create the suspended ceiling system.

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([LVWLQJ&RQFUHWH&ROXPQ

Underlying Line Work - Section


Spiral / Branch Unit

Polygon Packing Unit

Spiral Layout


GRIND Workspaces

Objective Grind is a 22nd century platform that helps talented persons collaborate in a new way: outside the system. The Grind workspace is a high tech, low stress atmosphere that is fl exible so that an individual can work where they want, when they want. Design Both designs strip the space to its shell, exposing beams, mechanical systems and the existing concrete fl oors. The raw surrounding space is in high contrast to the plush, comfortable furniture that is the place of human interaction. This offi ce of the future focuses on superior sustainability. Custom Pipe light fixtures use LED bulbs and blend in appropriately with the exposed mechanical systems. All appliances and plumbing fi xtures are energy and environmentally efficient. The furniture was selected keeping the manufacturer’s cradle to cradle fabrication process in mind.


GRIND Workspaces

Objective Grind is a 22nd century platform that helps talented persons collaborate in a new way: outside the system. The Grind workspace is a high tech, low stress atmosphere that is fl exible so that an individual can work where they want, when they want. Design Both designs strip the space to its shell, exposing beams, mechanical systems and the existing concrete fl oors. The raw surrounding space is in high contrast to the plush, comfortable furniture that is the place of human interaction. This offi ce of the future focuses on superior sustainability. Custom Pipe light fixtures use LED bulbs and blend in appropriately with the exposed mechanical systems. All appliances and plumbing fi xtures are energy and environmentally efficient. The furniture was selected keeping the manufacturer’s cradle to cradle fabrication process in mind.

Times Square, NYC


GRIND Workspaces

Objective Grind is a 22nd century platform that helps talented persons collaborate in a new way: outside the system. The Grind workspace is a high tech, low stress atmosphere that is fl exible so that an individual can work where they want, when they want. Design Both designs strip the space to its shell, exposing beams, mechanical systems and the existing concrete fl oors. The raw surrounding space is in high contrast to the plush, comfortable furniture that is the place of human interaction. This offi ce of the future focuses on superior sustainability. Custom Pipe light fixtures use LED bulbs and blend in appropriately with the exposed mechanical systems. All appliances and plumbing fi xtures are energy and environmentally efficient. The furniture was selected keeping the manufacturer’s cradle to cradle fabrication process in mind.

Downtown Chicago


Portfolio  

Selected Works

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