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VISUAL PRODUCTION II Lasalle College

Friday, September 27th

502-AP6-AS

Presented to Kathryn Kelly

by chelsea boodram group 2010

PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECT My Name In Nature

Becoming aware of your surroundings unlocks a new point of view. Allowing the artistic juices to flow. Page A2

Looking Through The Lense

What Ate My Socks?

Who is resposable when your socks go missing? The secret, finally uncovered. Page B1

Barbers Through Time The shops might have changed but the feeling stays the same. Page C1 INDEX Photographic Sign................................A1 Story Telling..........................................B1 Comics.........................................................B2 Personal Experience...................................B3 Contemporary Rendition.....................C1 Then & Now................................................C4 Bibliography..........................................D1


Visual Production II

Photography Project Photographic Sign : My Name In Nature

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Visual Production II

Photography Project Story Telling : What Ate My Socks? The Story Being Told. This story was created for this project is

an imaginative response to the question: “where do our missing socks disappear to when we do our laundry?” That question is answered through a photographic sequence presented in ten frames. Also, the culprit behind this heinous crime is revealed and defeated.

The story began when our main character, a young man wearing a hat, headed to his apartment’s laundry room to complete his chores. Little did he know, he was being watched by something unknown. When the time came to remove his clothes from the dryer he realized that one of his socks had gone missing. Being indifferent, to a certain extent, over the loss of his sock, our protagonist walked out of the laundry room with one less sock than when he arrived. Walking down the hall he sensed an odd presence, as if he was being followed. Without a moment’s notice, he turned around and saw a creature never before witnessed by man and screamed with horror. It was the laundry monster.

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Its black limbless body was composed of black clothing, probably gathered from forgotten garments and its eyes, its eyes radiated a deep hypnotic red. While its tongue hissed, in search of the other side of this young man’s striped sock, it was simultaneously ingesting its twin. Our protagonist, with only moments to recover from his frightful encounter, reacted by throwing an open bottle of bleach hoping it would cripple his opponent. After all, it is common knowledge that black clothes and bleach do not mingle well together, because the chlorine in the bleach dissolves the dye used to colour black clothing. The moment the bleach hit the creature’s body, the laundry monster exploded, leaving its carcass sprawled out over the floor and ceiling of the hall way. Our young man had defeated this alien creature for good. In the midst of the remains laid our young man’s lost sock, still intact and suitable to be worn. Finally, with the odor of bleach in the air he picked up his striped sock and continued on his way home with his sock in hand.


The

laundry

Montster


The End


Visual Production II

Photography Project Story Telling Method Of Presentation. The method of presentation used for this

portion of the project aided in keeping the story simple, humorous and thrilling. The selected format was inspired mainly by the comics section in the newspaper, which is light-hearted and amusing. Also, a second source of inspiration came from a few of, world renowned artist, Roy Lichtenstein’s pieces, such as “Whaam”(1963) and “Sweet Dreams Baby”(1965). A comic strip allows the viewer’s eye to follow the sequence of images; all while allowing one’s imagination to interpret the actions between each image. Furthermore, the photography techniques implemented while shooting for short story really helped bring depth and perspective to the photo sequence as a whole. After gathering the final ten photographs that I would be using. I opened them up into Adobe Illustrator and began to edit. The majority of my editing was done simply to add a comic book feel to each frame. Also, the editing helped make a clear definition between our perspective and the laundry creature’s point of view.

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Personal Experience. This third of the project was the most challeng-

ing, not because of execution but because of the challenge of trying to synthesize a story into ten frames. Initially, my story was going to be about fingers that attacked the world. It sounds slightly absurd, but I had the shots all planned out. I would use perspective and the depth of field to make the fingers look human size. However, what this first idea lacked was a strong and to the point story line. After being tormented by trying to create a concise story for these fingers, I gave up on the idea. Soon after, leterally a couple minutes later, the idea hit me and that same day the photographic portion was completed. Taking the shots was more simple than conceiving the idea. However, I did encounter some difficulties when I realized that wide angle shot would be impossible, because of the narrow hallway that I was working in. None the less, the picture came out just as I had imagined.


Visual Production II

Photography Project The Frame By Frame

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Visual Production II

Photography Project Contemporary rendition Of A Classic : Barbers Through Time The Inspiration.The Artist. The History. The piece that was se-

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lected for this part of the project was inspired by a Barbershop. Having the opportunity to spend a lot of time in a sleek and modern local barbershop, the inspiration hit me like a rock to the face when I stumbled upon one of Robert Frank’s photographs entitled the “Barber Shop Through Screen Door, McClellanville, South Carolina” (1924). This photograph led me search for more barbershop photography. Soon enough, I was led to the United States’ Library of Congress website, where I found the photograph that would be used for my contemporary rendition. The photograph, entitled “Senate Office Bldg. Barber Shop”, can only be traced back to the studio from which it came, the Harris & Ewing Photographic Studio based in Washington, DC. The Harris & Ewing studio was founded in 1905 by George Harris, a successful photojournalist, and by Martha Ewing, a woman who spearheaded the expansion of the Bushnell Studio’s West Coast expansion. George Harris was the talent behind the studios success, his career began in the 1880’s and from then was a pioneer in his field. He covered everything from volcanic eruptions in Hawaii to political demonstrations in Canada. Whereas, Martha Ewing was the Mastermind, she was gifted with being able to access the inaccessible which made her a key asset the studio. Together, Harris & Ewing quickly became “Washington’s preeminent photo studio” . Their client base quickly grew as of 1906 when Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th president of the United States, requested Harris & Ewing “to photograph the Cabinet, which would be the first time this had ever been done.” This collaboration led this fairly new studio to become the White House’s official photographers for decades. George Harris’ photography style

was simple; he started with traditional portrait photography and then developed a more candid approach. With such huge success, this start up studio quickly grew to a staff of 120, who documented all the events in Washington until 1955. The Harris & Ewing studio is a substantial part of the United States photographical and political history. Accordingly, when the studio closed its doors in 1977, millions of undocumented and undated negatives were left behind and sent to be preserved at the Smithsonian, at the Library of Congress, at many of Washington’s local museum and some were even purchased by photography companies.

Barber Shop through Screen Door—McClellanville, South Carolina (1924) by Frank Robert


Visual Production II

Photography Project Contemporary rendition Of A Classic : Barbers Through Time The Photograph. The chosen photograph is a digital print

that was produced based on an archived negative kept in the Library of Congress. Due to the lack of documentation on the part of the Harris & Ewing studio and despite the Library of Congress’ best effort to name and research this photograph, it is highly unlikely to ever be able to identify these men. Were they simple citizens of the Washington area or were they political leaders and members of senate? Regardless of the answer, barbershops are places where all men can come together as equals, to discuss, fraternize and upkeep their appearances. This piece captures that candid moment between two barbers and their clients. The position and body language suggests that the men sitting in the chairs have been to this shop before, because they seem very comfortable and at home. The barbers while, perhaps, chiming into the conversation every so often seem to be relaxed and focused on their task. The environment in which this shot was taken proposes that the barbershop is doing very well financially, since all the amenities look new and clean.

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Personal Experience. This portion of the project really in-

volved a lot of planing, because of the scale and setting required. I can honestly say that I am very fortunate to know someone who owns a barbershop and that was willing to spare his day off to help me out. I had the setting, a sleek and modern barbershop newly furnished. All i was missing was my models, to play the role of barbers and clients. I was rather successful, because most of the barbers at the shop wanted to participate. Also, I was able to evolve my family, my father and older brother, who are in the final shot. Also my mother and younger sister were there to lend a helping hand, during the photo shoot which eased the challenge of trying to figure out the exact positioning of my models bodies. My main focuses during the shoot was to capture the right body positioning and camera angle. It took between 70 to 100 shots before I got “The One”. Lastly, I was really inspired thoughout this project to be like George Harris and capture the candid moments. This project was a great opportunity to fully experience what it is like to be a photographer. It consist of a lot more than just taking pictures, it is a thought process that really requires vision an creativity


Visual Production II

Photography Project Contemporary rendition Of A Classic : Then & Now

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Visual Production II

Photography Project Contemporary rendition Of A Classic : Then & Now

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Visual Production II

Photography Project Bibliography : IMAGES: • (Whaam!) http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/lichtenstein-whaam-t00897/text-catalogue-entry • (Sweet Dreams Baby) http://www.christies.com/lotfinder/prints-multiples/roy-lichtenstein-sweet-dreams-baby-from-11-5615398-details. aspx • (Barber Shop through Screen Door—McClellanville, South Carolina) http://www2.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/2863 95?rpp=20&pg=1&rndkey=20130716&ft=*&what=Photographs&who=Robert+Frank&pos=5 • (Senate Office Bldg. Barber Shop) http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/hec.23162/ • (About the item, the glass negative) http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/hec2009009860/ HARRIS &EWING: • (credibility of the website) http://broadway.cas.sc.edu/content/about-site • (About Harris & Ewing) http://broadway.cas.sc.edu/content/harris-and-ewing (About George Harris) http://www.iphf.org/hall-of-fame/george-harris/

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Visual Production II  

Divided into three parts this project explores the world of photography. Enjoy!

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