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Pat Steir Cheim & Read

PatPatSteir Steir Cheim & Read


Pat Steir Text by Raphael Rubinstein Cheim & Read New York 2014


RAPHAEL RUBINSTEIN Essay for Two Voices A: Are you able to look exclusively at one half of any of these paintings? B: Wouldn’t that be like ignoring one side of a dialogue? A: You’re not tempted to see each work as two monochrome paintings resting side by side? B: These aren’t “monochromes.” There are multiple colors present that seem to coalesce into one. A: I know. I’ve looked at them, closely enough to see the various colors deposited along the narrow vertical runnels, and to see how the pigments clump together like grains of sand on a tightly packed beach as the tide comes in or out. B: Has Pat Steir ever made monochromes? A: There are some big paintings where a solid color appears to occupy the entire canvas, but even in these works the sense of monochromy disappears after prolonged viewing as multiple colors emerge. I also noticed, in one of the paintings, elements that I want to call “waves.” B: Really? I thought the artist stopped painting waves in the late 1980s. Where are these waves? A: In Blue and Silver and Gold the right half is broken up by a series of ragged-edge frontiers between areas of darker and lighter paint. This effect was achieved by the artist introducing regular intervals between pours of paint, and letting them stop (that is, dry enough so that gravity was no longer pulling them down) before they reached the bottom of the support. She timed them just as a sailor or surfer times waves. One odd thing about these descending curtains of paint, however, is that they simultaneously suggest falling and rising motion. B: They look like ranges of mist-covered mountains and valleys, or stalactites and stalagmites. A: In Empty and Full: the Language of Chinese Painting, François Cheng describes two important conceptual binary pairs in Chinese painting: k’ai-ho (opening-closure) and ch’i-fu (rising-falling). He says “a painting is not alive if the painter has failed to master its k’ai-ho and ch’i-fu.”


B: I can see how “rising-falling” is important in Steir’s paintings, but what about “opening-closure”? A: Possibly in the way your attention shifts back and forth between the two parts of each painting: as you focus on one side, it opens up, and simultaneously the other side closes. And maybe also in the way they oscillate between paint-as-paint surface and abstract space. I think she has mastered k’ai-ho and ch’i-fu. B: After the “Wave” series Steir began painting waterfalls. How exactly does a wave differ from a waterfall? A: In nature a wave moves across a horizontal plane, while a waterfall occurs in a vertical plane, which means that Steir’s Waterfall paintings are literally waterfalls (or, to be precise, paint-turpentine-falls). The Wave paintings are depictions of waves; the Waterfall paintings are at once depictions and the thing itself, a kind of visual onomatopoeia. There ’s a beautiful tautological relationship between process and image. B: Like conceptual art? A: That ’s something she has been involved with, more deeply than many other painters. But the tautology of process and image isn’t crucial to the recent paintings. B: Why? A: Because they don’t present the viewer with an image that refers to something in the world, neither waterfalls nor waves nor rivers. B: Rivers? A: Like her Blue River (2005), a very big 37 foot-long painting that was on view at the National Academy Museum last fall. B: How would you explain Steir’s fascination with water? A: Maybe it has something to do with China. To quote François Cheng again: in Chinese “the expression mountain-water means, by extension, the landscape and so landscape painting is called mountain and water painting.” Although Steir’s work doesn’t involve any calligraphy and doesn’t engage directly with the methods of Chinese ink painting, there are other ways in which her art feels close to those traditions. B: Such as?


A: The idea of making the painting spontaneously, without any adjustments. Steir has worked in different phases, but I think her work can be divided into a before and after with the break happening around 1989 when the first pure Waterfall paintings begin. Earlier in the decade she painted in a more conventionally Western mode; since then she has avoided anything that compromises the initial action. B: Does she sometimes go back into the paintings? Take Blue and Silver and Gold, for instance, the work we were just talking about. Didn’t she use a big rounded brush to rub into the silver side after she ’d applied the paint? A: Yes, though that ’s very rare for her to do. (By the way, she subsequently added a pour of gold paint and a later pour of blue to that area.) These paintings don’t claim to be the result of sheer spontaneity, or a pure unmediated gesture. Nor do they rely on repeating the same formula again and again. She is continually introducing other ways of handling paint, different kinds of relationships, like the splatters of gold paint that mark the right edge of Quantum—there ’s nothing else like that in the exhibition. B: Or the much more assertive physicality in Black, Blue, Silver and Gold. I find a disorienting sense of time and space in the distance between the splattering gold line on the right of edge of this painting and one of the fine blue lines on the left. It could be few feet or a thousand years. A: The haptic presence of Black, Blue, Silver and Gold makes you aware of an ethereal quality in most of the other paintings. There ’s a sense of void, loss, emptiness. Cheng quotes a Buddhist-inspired saying: “Color is emptiness; emptiness is color.” Forgive me for quoting from Empty and Full so often, but it ’s one of the great books about painting written in recent years. Cheng worked closely with Jacques Lacan, and Empty and Full (first published as Vide et Plein in 1979) is a structural analysis of Chinese painting that looks at how philosophical Taoist ideas pervade Chinese painting. What is surprising given its original context (structuralism, Lacan) is how deeply it engages questions of spirituality. B: Doesn’t Pat Steir teach once a year at a Zen Buddhist monastery? A: Yes, at the Zen Mountain Monastery in the Catskills. B: Let ’s return to the binary nature of her compositions. A: I, too, want to understand why the artist presents us with two different color-space elements. How are we to look at them? Why two? And why two on one support, rather than made as a diptych? B: Good question. Are we looking at division, at something split into two, or at a meditation on proximity, on two different things brought into relation to each other? A conversation between two that are alike and not alike.


A: And why always a space between them, a gap or a line along the seam? Very different from what happens with Barnett Newman’s zips that can establish a figure/ground relationship. B: When Newman titled his first such painting Onement he emphasized the singularity of his vertical line and implied a metaphysical rebirth, the “new man” arising from the ashes of the Second World War. A: Steir talks about Newman, especially in a long interview for the Archives of American Art. At one point she says that her November 2007 show at Cheim & Read was a “goodbye” to Newman’s work, and to Rothko’s, because she had completely stopped touching the canvas; all the paint was poured. In early Waterfall paintings the drips often resulted from a loaded brush hitting the canvas. (Interestingly, versions of this dripping brushstroke, at a much smaller scale, can already be seen in Steir’s early 1970s paintings.) B: Why do you think she started the Waterfall paintings circa 1989? Why then, and not earlier or later? A: In 1980, Steir met John Cage. It took her some time to assimilate Cage ’s Zen approach into her painting. Another crucial step was her exchange in 1982 with a former student of Cage ’s, Stephen Addiss. Kay Larson writes about this encounter in her 2012 book Where the Heart Beats: John Cage, Zen Buddhism, and the Inner Life of Artists, describing how Steir’s misinterpretation of a Japanese calligraphic technique opened up new possibilities for her art. As Steir explained to Phong Bui in a 2011 Brooklyn Rail interview, “Stephen Addiss told me that thrown-ink painting began in the third century. I looked everywhere for it, I didn’t understand what it was because I couldn’t find it. That was because thrown ink meant broken line, not traditional painting. The artists didn’t actually throw the ink. I was influenced by the idea of throwing the ink but it was just a misunderstanding. I think a lot of art comes about through misunderstanding.” B: Another aspect worth noting is that the post-wave paintings engage with Abstract Expressionism more directly than anything she had done previously. A: Maybe by the end of the 1980s it seemed more viable even necessary, to reconnect with Abstract Expressionism (albeit with a transgressive specificity of image) whereas in earlier decades many artists felt they had to establish their distance from it. B: In Steir’s paintings there is an emptiness that never quite happens in historic Abstract Expressionist work, where the artist ’s self is always foregrounded. A: “One third fullness, two thirds emptiness” is a traditional precept in Chinese landscape painting.


B: Chez Steir, it ’s more like “three thirds fullness, three thirds emptiness.” One moment you are looking at layers of poured paint on a large stretched canvas, the next moment you are projected into a limitless space of atmospheric color. I'm also struck by how the paintings are like the pages of an open book. A: That ’s an interesting comparison, given that the artist worked for over 10 years as a book designer. B: And if these were pages of a book, what kind of writing would you expect to find in them? A: Perhaps some lines from Stéphane Mallarmé ’s poem “Un Coup de dés jamais n’abolira le hasard” (A Throw of the Dice Will Never Abolish Chance), where the poet evokes a shipwreck and an “abyss.” These are paintings in which a fragile vessel might flounder and vanish, and they can feel as vast and vertiginous as an abyss. The poem also includes a line that seems as if was written expressly for one of Steir’s paintings: “the shadow enclosed in the depths by this alternative veil” (l’ombre enfouie dans la profoundeur par cette voile alternative). B: Another reason that Mallarmé ’s poem seems very apt for Steir’s paintings is because of how it spreads across two pages at a time, something no poet had ever done before. The reader of “Un Coup de dés” is encouraged to shift attention in ways that are closer to looking at a painting than to conventional reading protocols. Like the French poet, Steir wants our attention to break free and cross back and forth between the facing rectangles, describing a potentially infinite number of lateral or diagonal trajectories. A: The new painting that seems closest to Mallarmé is Silver and White. By the way, this is another of the paintings where Steir intervened in the seemingly autonomous process of the drips: near the top of the left side the silver paint was clumping so she sprayed it with some water and then used a brush to activate the flow. You can see traces of where the sprayed water hit the canvas. This contributes to the sense of something dissolving in the left half of the painting, while the right half is so much smoother and stable. B: What about Small Blue One, a painting which isn’t so small, except in relation to Steir’s usual scale? It features two intense blues, combed through with densely packed silvery drips, and riven by a sharp red-orange line insulated by a current of silver paint. Wasn’t “l’Azur,” the blue sky, one of Mallarmé ’s central images, his symbol of the ideal? A: Yes, and he said it “haunted” him, always there, but unattainable. B: The idea of pairing Steir’s work with poetry isn’t as unusual as it sounds. In 2011 she and poet Anne Waldman collaborated on Cry Stall Gaze, an innovative double-scroll artist ’s book where Waldman’s poems are actually superimposed over drawings by Steir.


A: In Chinese art, of course, poetry and painting are often indistinguishable. B: As Su Shih (1037-1101) said: “When one savors Wang Wei’s poems, there are paintings in them;/When one looks at Wang Wei’s pictures, there are poems.” (I’m quoting from Early Chinese Texts on Painting, edited by Susan Bush and Hsio-yen Shih.) A: Here ’s another ancient quote (from Hsieh Ho in the fifth century): “Generate and give life to the rhythmic breath.” B: There are silent rhythms in Steir’s new paintings. How many breaths does it take, I wonder, to make a painting? Or to look at one? A: When your attention shifts from one side of a painting to the other you hold the breath of the first color. B: Then, as you encounter the second color(s), you exhale. A: I see therefore I breathe. B: Too Cartesian. A: I see and breathe? B: I see-breathe.


Sweet Suite #II: One 2012‒13 oil on canvas 60 x 50 in 152.4 x 127 cm


Sweet Suite #II: Two 2012‒13 oil on canvas 60 x 50 in 152.4 x 127 cm


Sweet Suite #II: Three 2012‒13 oil on canvas 60 x 50 in 152.4 x 127 cm


Sweet Suite #II: Four 2012‒13 oil on canvas 60 x 50 in 152.4 x 127 cm


Yellow 2013 oil on canvas 132 x 50 in 335.3 x 127 cm


Orange 2013 oil on canvas 132 x 50 in 335.3 x 127 cm


Green 2013 oil on canvas 132 x 50 in 335.3 x 127 cm


Birthday Painting 2013 oil on canvas 84 x 84 in 213.4 x 213.4 cm


Two Reds 2013 oil on canvas 84 x 84 in 213.4 x 213.4 cm


Silver and Silver 2013 oil on canvas 84 x 84 in 213.4 x 213.4 cm


Black, Blue, Silver and Gold 2013 oil on canvas 132 x 132 in 335.3 x 335.3 cm


Colors Without Names 2013 oil on canvas 132 x 132 in 335.3 x 335.3 cm


Blue and Silver and Gold 2013 oil on canvas 132 x 132 in 335.3 x 335.3 cm


Green, Orange and Mica 2013 oil on canvas 132 x 132 in 335.3 x 335.3 cm


Naples Yellow and Mica 2013 oil on canvas 132 x 132 in 335.3 x 335.3 cm


Quantum 2013 oil on canvas 132 x 132 in 335.3 x 335.3 cm


Two Whites Over Antique Red Over Cadmium Red 2013 oil on canvas 132 x 132 in 335.3 x 335.3 cm


Silver and White 2013 oil on canvas 132 x 132 in 335.3 x 335.3 cm


List of Works

Sweet Suite#II: One 2012‒13

Yellow 2013

oil on canvas

oil on canvas

60 x 50 in 152.4 x 127 cm

132 x 50 in 335.3 x 127 cm

Sweet Suite #II: Two 2012‒13 oil on canvas 60 x 50 in 152.4 x 127 cm

Orange 2013 oil on canvas 132 x 50 in 335.3 x 127 cm

Sweet Suite #II: Three 2012‒13 oil on canvas 60 x 50 in 152.4 x 127 cm

Green 2013 oil on canvas 132 x 50 in 335.3 x 127 cm

Sweet Suite #II: Four 2012‒13 oil on canvas 60 x 50 in 152.4 x 127 cm


Birthday Painting 2013

Black, Blue, Silver and Gold 2013

oil on canvas

oil on canvas

84 x 84 in 213.4 x 213.4 cm

132 x 132 in 335.3 x 335.3 cm

Two Reds 2013

Colors Without Names 2013

oil on canvas

oil on canvas

84 x 84 in 213.4 x 213.4 cm

132 x 132 in 335.3 x 335.3 cm

Silver and Silver 2013

Blue and Silver and Gold 2013

oil on canvas

oil on canvas

84 x 84 in 213.4 x 213.4 cm

132 x 132 in 335.3 x 335.3 cm


Green, Orange and Mica 2013

Two Whites Over Antique Red Over Cadmium Red

oil on canvas

2013 oil on canvas

132 x 132 in 335.3 x 335.3 cm

132 x 132 in 335.3 x 335.3 cm

Naples Yellow and Mica 2013

Silver and White 2013

oil on canvas

oil on canvas

132 x 132 in 335.3 x 335.3 cm

132 x 132 in 335.3 x 335.3 cm

Quantum 2013 oil on canvas 132 x 132 in 335.3 x 335.3 cm


Pat Steir 1940 1966‒69 1970‒73 1973‒75 1975‒78

Born Iris Patricia Sukoneck in Newark, New Jersey Art Director, Harper & Row Publishing Company, New York Taught at Parsons School of Design; Princeton University; and Hunter College Lived in Los Angeles and taught at California Institute of Arts Traveled in United States and Europe Founding board member of PRINTED MATTER bookshop and HERESIES magazine. Editorial Board of SEMIOTEXT magazine. Lives and works in New York and Amsterdam

EDUCATION 1956‒58 1958‒60 1960‒62 1961 1991

Studied graphic art at Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York Studied at Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts Studied at Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York Received BFA from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York Received Honorary Doctorate of Fine Art from Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York

SOLO EXHIBITIONS 2014 Cheim & Read, New York 2013

Baldwin Gallery, Aspen, Colorado Self-Portrait and The Nearly Endless Line, Newcomb Art Gallery, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana Self-Portrait and Heartline, Museo Nacional de San Carlos, Mexico City, Mexico Hand Painted Monoprints, Pace Prints, New York Blue River, National Academy Museum, New York

2012 Pat Steir: A View, Academy Art Museum, Easton, Maryland Pat Steir: Editions and Monoprints, Pace Prints, New York Crown Point Press, San Francisco, California 2011

Winter Paintings, Cheim & Read, New York Another Nearly Endless Line, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York Water and Sand, Locks Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania A Nearly Endless Line #3, Galerie Thomas Schulte, Berlin, Germany A Special Print Edition: Pat Steir, to benefit Henry Street Settlement, ADAA The Art Show, New York

2010 Pat Steir: The Nearly Endless Line, Sue Scott Gallery, New York


Paint, Galerie Jaeger Bucher, Paris, France Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, New York Pat Steir: Water & Stone, Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati, Ohio Pat Steir: Drawing Out of Line, Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence; traveled to the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, New York BCIE Annual Exhibition 2010–2011, the Brodsky Center for Innovative Editions, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey Self-Portrait: An Installation, Purchase College, Purchase, New York

2009 Paintings on Painting, Locks Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Pat Steir Self-Portrait: Reprise 1987-2009, New York Studio School, New York 2008

Pat Steir: Recent Work; Paintings & Monotypes, Elizabeth Leach Gallery, Portland, Oregon Pat Steir: New Monoprints, Pace Prints, New York Bentley Gallery, Scottsdale, Arizona Pat Steir: Prints and Paintings, Carl Solway Gallery, Cincinnati, Ohio

2007 Cheim & Read, New York Reykjavik Art Museum, Reykjavik, Iceland Rosenbaum Contemporary, Boca Raton, Florida 2006

Pat Steir: Gravity and Levity, Baldwin Gallery, Aspen, Colorado Pat Steir: Moons and Mirages, Locks Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Small Paintings from the Studio of Pat Steir, Kiang Gallery, Atlanta, Georgia Bentley Gallery, Scottsdale, Arizona

2005

Pat Steir: New Paintings, Texas Gallery, Houston, Texas Pat Steir, Blue Moon, Paintings, Drawings, and Prints, Galleria Alessandro Bonomo, Rome, Italy Moons and a River, Cheim & Read, New York Pat Steir: Drawings, Cook Fine Art, New York Pace Prints, New York

2004 Ochi Fine Art, Ketchum, Idaho Mixed Marks: Seven New Color Etchings, Crown Point Press, San Francisco, California 2003

Galleria Nationale Moderne Borghese, Rome, Italy Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines, Iowa Handpainted Monotypes, Pace Prints Gallery, New York Pat Steir: The Rhythm of Silence, Locks Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Pat Steir: Waterfall Paintings, Boise Art Museum, Boise, Idaho New Releases by Pat Steir, Crown Point Press, San Francisco, California

2002 Baldwin Gallery, Aspen, Colorado Sky River Group, Kiang Gallery, Atlanta, Georgia Crown Point Press, San Francisco, California


Alessandro Bonomo Gallery, Rome, Italy Cheim & Read, New York University Art Museum, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan Looking East, Contemporary Painters Engagement with Chinese Art, exhibition with Brice Marden and Michael Mazur, Boston University Art Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts 2001 Contemporary Arts Museum, Honolulu, Hawaii Red Yellow Blue I Love You, Madison Art Center, Madison, Wisconsin Waterfall Des Reves, Piece Unique, Paris, France Sweet Suite, Galerie Simonne Stern, New Orleans, Louisiana Distant Horizon, Galleria Bonomo, Bari, Italy Pat Steir: Recent Prints, Sherman Gallery, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts University Art Museum, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 2000 Leigh and Mary Block Art Museum, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois Lyman Allyn Museum of Art at Connecticut College, New London, Connecticut Des Moines Cultural Center, Des Moines, Iowa Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio Watershed, Selby Gallery, Ringling School, Sarasota, Florida Chase Bank Installation, Massachusetts College of Art, Boston, Massachusetts Waterfall Paintings, Rhona Hoffman Gallery, Chicago, Illinois The Norton Museum of Art, Sarasota, Florida Permanent installation of five panels in the Grand Entrance, United States Chancery, Moscow, Russia Permanent installation of two large-scale wall drawings for the Public Art Fund, Embassy Suites Hotel, Battery Park City, New York 1999 Baldwin Gallery, Aspen, Colorado Moon Mountain Ghost Water, Marlborough Gallery, New York My Garden Ghosts, Albright – Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York Piece Unique, Paris, France Double-Sided Painting, Piece Unique, Paris, France 5 Easy Pieces, Weatherspoon Art Gallery, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, North Carolina Nina Freudenheim Gallery, Buffalo, New York New Editions by Pat Steir, Crown Point Press, San Francisco, California 1998 Ghost Moon Mountain Water, wall painting installation curated by Klaus Biesenbach, PS1 Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City, New York New Work, Baumgartner Galleries, Washington, DC Recent Paintings, Rhona Hoffman Gallery, Chicago, Illinois Likity Split, installation, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York Ghost Moon, Mountain Water, PS1 Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City, New York Bentley Gallery, Scottsdale, Arizona 1997 Wind Water Stone, Robert Miller Gallery, New York Waterfalls, Galerie Deux Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan Pat Steir: Waves and Waterfalls 1982 – 1992, Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, New York


1996 Pat Steir, Dorothy Blau Gallery, Bay Harbor Islands, Florida Franck & Schulte, Berlin, Germany Wind and Water: Paintings 1985 – 1995, the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, Ireland 1995 Pat Steir, Quartier Art Centre, Centre d'art contemporain de Quimper, Quimper, France Pat Steir: New Paintings, Robert Miller Gallery, New York New Work: Paintings and Works on Paper, Baldwin Gallery, Aspen, Colorado Franck & Schulte, Berlin, Germany Kunstwerke Berlin, Germany Black & White, exhibition with Donald Judd, Print Cabinet, Museum d'art Moderne, Geneva, Switzerland 1994 From Beyond the Pale: Pat Steir: A Painting Project, the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, Ireland Jaffe Baker Blau, Boca Raton, Florida Pat Steir: Paintings and Etchings, Anders Tornberg Gallery, Lund, Sweden Dennis Ochi Gallery, Sun Valley and Boise, Idaho 1993 Guild Hall Museum, East Hampton, New York Galleria Alessandra Bonomo, Rome, Italy Pat Steir: Wall Drawings, Galerie Franck & Schulte, Berlin, Germany 1992 Centre National d'art Contemporain de Grenoble, France Elective Affinities, Robert Miller Gallery, New York 1991 Pat Steir Paintings, Galerie Albert Baronian, Brussels, Belgium Galerie Franck & Schulte, Berlin, Germany Linda Cathcart Gallery, Santa Monica, California Self – Portrait Installation, Mackenzie Art Gallery, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada 1990 Waterfalls, Victoria Miro Gallery, London, England Paintings, University of South Florida Contemporary Art Museum, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida Pat Steir: Waterfall Paintings, Robert Miller Gallery, New York Galerie Montenay, Paris, France Conversations with Artists, Pat Steir with Kathan Brown, National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC Musee d'art Contemporain, Lyon, France Pat Steir: Ways of Seeing, Paintings Drawings Prints of the 1980s, New Jersey Center for the Visual Arts, Summit, New Jersey Pat Steir: Drawings, Dennis Ochi Gallery, Sun Valley and Boise, Idaho 1989 Pat Steir: New Waterfall Paintings, Galerie Eric Franck, Geneva, Switzerland Pat Steir: Neue Wasserfallbilder, TransArt Exhibitions, Cologne, Germany Galeria Marilena Bonomo, Bari, Italy Waterfall Paintings, Massimo Audiello Gallery, New York Waterfall Paintings, Fuller Gross Gallery, San Francisco, California Pat Steir: New Works, Harcus Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts


1988 1987

New Monoprints, Crown Point Press, New York New Monoprints, Crown Point Press, San Francisco, California

1986

Concentrations 14: Pat Steir, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, Texas Pat Steir: New Paintings, Kuhlenschmidt/Simon Gallery, Los Angeles, California The Harcus Gallery, Boston, Masschusetts Fuller Goldeen Gallery, San Francisco, California John C. Stoller & Co., Minneapolis, Minnesota Castelli Uptown, New York Pat Steir: New Monoprints and Etchings, Crown Point Press, New York

Pat Steir: Waterfall Monoprints, Crown Point Press, San Francisco, California; Crown Point Press, New York Pat Steir Prints 1976 – 1988, Cabinet des estampes, Musée d'art et d'Historie, Geneva, Switzerland; traveled to the Tate Gallery, London, England; Victoria Miro Gallery, London, England; Galeria Marilena Bonomo, Bari, Italy Pat Steir: Waterfall Series, M. Knoedler & Co., Inc., New York Pat Steir: Paintings and Drawings, Kunstmuseum, Bern, Switzerland Self-Portrait: An Installation, Galerie Adelina Von Furstenberg, Geneva, Switzerland Drawing Now: Pat Steir, the Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, Maryland Pat Steir Autorittrato/Pat Steir Self-Portrait, installation, Galleria Alessandra Bonomo, Rome, Italy Pat Steir: Schilderijn 1981 – 84/Pat Steir: Paintings, 1981 – 1984, Rijkmuseum Vincent Van Gogh, Amsterdam, Netherlands Galerie Eric Franck, Geneva, Switzerland Pat Steir: The Moon and the Wave, M. Knoedler & Co. Inc., New York Self-Portrait: An Installation, Adelina Von Furstenberg, Geneva, Switzerland Self-Portrait: An Installation, New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York Pat Steir, Galerie Eric Franck, Geneva, Switzerland

1985 Pat Steir Peintures 1981 – 1985, Galerie Eric Franck, Geneva, Switzerland Pat Steir: Major Prints and Drawings, Dolan/Maxwell Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania New Drawings, Cincinnati Art Museum, Cincinnati, Ohio Fuller Goldeen Gallery, San Francisco, California Pat Steir: Prints/Printmaking, Philadelphia College of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1984

Pat Steir, The Breughel Series (A Vanitas Of Style), the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, New York; traveled to Minneapolis College of Art and Design, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, Nebraska; University Art Museum, Berkeley, California; The Ohio State University Gallery of Fine Art, Columbus, Ohio; Honolulu Academy of Arts, Honolulu, Hawaii; Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, Dallas, Texas; Centre d'art Contemporain Palais Wilson, Geneva, Switzerland; Los Angeles County Museum, Los Angeles, California; Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines, Iowa; Haags Gemeentemuseum, The Hague, The Netherlands Pat Steir New Work, Nina Freudenheim Gallery, Buffalo, New York Pat Steir: New Paintings, Galleriet, Lund, Sweden Pat Steir, New Paintings and Works on Paper, Van Straaten Gallery, Chicago, Illinois


Pat Steir: New Paintings, Galerie Barbara Farber, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Real Art Ways, Hartford, Connecticut Signet Art Gallery, St Louis, Missouri Paintings and Etchings, Anders Tornberg Gallery, Lund, Sweden 1983 Arbitrary Order: Paintings by Pat Steir, Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, Texas; traveled to Lowe Art Museum, Coral Gables, Florida; the Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati, Ohio Form Illusion Myth: The Prints and Drawings of Pat Steir, Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas; traveled to University Art Museum, California State University, Long Beach, California; Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, Texas; The Wellesley College Museum, Wellesley, Massachusetts; Brooks Memorial Art Gallery, Memphis, Tennessee Pat Steir, Fuller Goldeen Gallery, San Francisco, California McIntosh/Drysdale Gallery, Houston, Texas At Sea, 1982, Crown Point Press, New York Pat Steir: Studies for the Breughel Series, Galeria Marilena Bonomo, Bari, Italy Gloria Luria Gallery, Bay Harbour Islands, Florida The Harcus Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts 1982

Eason Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico Galerie Annemarie Verna, Zurich, Switzerland Galerie Farideh Cadot, Paris, France Pat Steir: Watercolors, Nina Freudenheim Gallery, Buffalo, New York

1981 Pat Steir Etchings and Lithos and Drawings, Galleriet, Lund, Sweden Pat Steir: Etchings and Paintings, Crown Point Press Gallery, Oakland, California Pat Steir, Bell Art Gallery, List Art Center, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island Galeria Marilena Bonomo, Bari, Italy Galerie Farideh Cadot, Paris, France Marianne Deson Gallery, Chicago, Illinois Max Protech Gallery, New York 1980 Droll/Kolbert Gallery, New York Galerie Farideh Cadot, Paris, France Galerie d'art Contemporain, Geneva, Switzerland Max Protech Gallery, New York 1979 Galerie Farideh Cadot, Paris, France 1978

Art School for Children, Birmingham, Alabama Droll/Kolbert Gallery, New York Galerie Farideh Cadot, Paris, France Galeria Marilena Bonomo, Bari, Italy

1977 Carl Solway Gallery, Cincinnati, Ohio Fine Art Gallery, California State University, Long Beach, California


1976

The Art Gallery, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland Galerie Farideh Cadot, Paris, France Morgan Thomas Gallery, Santa Monica, California Otis Art Institute, Los Angeles, California White Gallery, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon Xavier Fourcade, Inc, New York

1975 Fourcade, Droll, Inc, New York John Doyle Gallery, Paris, France State University of New York, Oneonta, New York 1973 Ball State University Art Gallery, Muncie, Indiana The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC Max Protech Gallery, Washington, DC 1972 Douglass College, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey Paley & Lowe, Inc, New York 1971 Graham Gallery, New York 1969 Bienville Gallery, New Orleans, Louisiana 1964 Terry Dintenfass Gallery, New York


SELECTED PUBLIC COLLECTIONS Albright – Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York The Art Museum, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey The Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, Maryland BankAmerica Corporation Art Collection, New York The Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, New York Chase Manhattan Bank, New York Cincinnati Museum of Art, Cincinnati, Ohio Dallas Museum of Fine Art, Dallas, Texas Denver Art Museum, Denver, Colorado Honolulu Academy of Arts, Honolulu, Hawaii The Wadsworth Athenaeum, Hartford, Connecticut The Hirshhorn Museum, Washington DC The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, Ireland Jacksonville Art Museum, Jacksonville, Florida Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, Nebraska Lyon Museum d'Art Moderne, Lyon, France Kunstmuseum Bern, Bern, Switzerland La Domaine Kergheinnec, Brittany, France Malmo Museum, Malmo, Sweden Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, Florida Museum of Modern Art, New York Musée d'art et d'Archaeologie, Toulon, France Musée d'art Contemporain, Lyon, France Musée des Beaux – Arts, Tourcoing, France National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC National Museum of American Art, Washington, DC The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC The Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania The San Francisco Museum of Fine Arts, San Francisco, California Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York Tate Gallery, London, England Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts Whitney Museum of American Art, New York Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut


Pat Steir Febr uar y 2 0 ‒ March 29, 2 014

This cata log ue has been pr inted in a n edit ion of 2 ,0 0 0 on t he occasion of t he 2 014 ex hi bit ion

Text R aphael Ru binstein Desig n Joh n Cheim Editor Ellen Robinson

Photog raphy Br ia n Buck ley Editor ia l Assista nce Dulce Shult z

Pr inted in Ita ly by Tr ifolio ISBN 9 7 8 - 0 - 9 914681- 0 -2 Cover det a i l: Silver and Silver 2013

CH E IM & R E A D 547 West 25 Street New York


Pat Steir Cheim & Read

PatPatSteir Steir Cheim & Read

Steir 2014 catalogue  

Pat Steir exhibition catalogue for her 2014 exhibition at Cheim & Read

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